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Olive Fruit For Diabetes

I Am A Diabetic. Can I Eat Olives?

I Am A Diabetic. Can I Eat Olives?

When looking after our health, especially when we are diagnosed with a serious illness, like diabetes, heart disease or a stroke, we need to take everything under consideration. The article we found takes under consideration whether olive oil, olives as well as the Mediterranean diet in general, have a good or a bad effect to our fight against diabetes. Often thought of as a vegetable, but actually a fruit, the olive is one of the worlds oldest cultivated foods. They are thought to have originated in Asia Minor around 6,000 years ago, and were enjoyed by early civilizations even before the advent of writing. As such, this delectable fruit has long been cherished, and rightfully so, for its incredible versatility, health benefits and potent flavor. Read the entire article here: Join Grains, our urban newsletter and get news and hacks about health, kitchen tips and tricks and more info about the Mediterranean liifestyle. We hate spam. Your email address will not be sold or shared with anyone else. Continue reading >>

Olive Oil Blunts Glucose Response In Type 1 Diabetes

Olive Oil Blunts Glucose Response In Type 1 Diabetes

Olive Oil Blunts Glucose Response in Type 1 Diabetes Encouraging results for fending off type 2 diabetes, too With commentary by lead study author Angela Rivellese, M.D., professor of applied dietetic sciences at Federico II University in Naples. Adding olive oil to a meal improves glucose response in those with type 1 diabetes, researchers in Italy have found. Olive oil may slow blood sugar rise following a high-glycemic meal in those with type 1 diabetes. Our study shows for the first time that the type of fat significantly influences post-prandial glycemic response in patients with type 1 diabetes, said lead author Angela Rivellese, M.D., professor of applied dietetic sciences at Federico II University in Naples. In short, extra virgin olive oil (EVOO) is better than butter. Study subjects who consumed meals with 37 grams of EVOO (2.5 tablespoons) showed an approximate 50% reduction in early, after-meal blood glucose response compared with those who consumed meals with either 43 grams of butter (2.9 tablespoons) or meals deemed low-fat (half-a-tablespoon of EVOO). The EVOO meals were also associated with a significant delay in the time it took for blood glucose to peak compared with the butter and low-fat meals. The EVOO benefit was seen only in meals with a high glycemic index (HGI); it did not apply to meals with a low glycemic index (LGI). HGI foods cause a rapid rise in after-meal blood glucose levels, while LGI foods result in a slower and steadier release of glucose, which leads to healthier blood glucose readings. The study, which suggests that carbohydrate-counting alone may not result in optimal glucose control, has important clinical implications for those with type 1 diabetes, the authors wrote, because it demonstrates that the combination of carbohydrate Continue reading >>

7 Health Benefits Of Olives

7 Health Benefits Of Olives

The small oval-shaped olives can be found in either green or black depending on the ripeness of the fruit. Olives have been one of the worlds most popular fruit because of its versatility for foods, beverage, and oils. The small fruits, also called drupes or stone fruits, grow on olive trees (Olea europaea). The small oval-shaped olives can be found in either green or black depending on the ripeness of the fruit. Olives are too bitter to be eaten immediately picked from the tree and must be processed to reduce their intrinsic bitterness. Here are the seven health benefits of olives. 1. Olives are loaded with healthy fats. In Mediterranean countries, 90% of olives are processed to make olive oil. Why? Olives contain 11-15 percent of fat with 74 percent of the fat being oleic acid. Oleic acid is a monosaturated fatty acid linked with health benefits against diseases when consumed including the following: 2. Olives could reverse some symptoms caused by type 2 diabetes. Type 2 diabetes is a long-term metabolic disorder affects how the body responds to sugar in the body. The pancreas is an organ in your body that produces a hormone called insulin. Insulin allows cells in the body to convert the sugar you eat into energy. Even though people with type 2 diabetes still make insulin, the cells in their bodies do not respond to insulin, causing high blood sugar. This condition is called insulin resistance. Most individuals with insulin resistance are obese and have high abdominal fat. Vassiliou et al. 2009 suggested that consuming oleic acid could help reduce the inhibitory effect of insulin production of the inflammatory cytokine TNF-, reversing how the body makes and reacts to insulin. 3. Olives could reduce the risk of atherosclerosis. Atherosclerosis is a disease where plaqu Continue reading >>

Prevent Type 2 Diabetes: This Fruit Could Help You Lose Weight

Prevent Type 2 Diabetes: This Fruit Could Help You Lose Weight

A Mediterranean diet has well known health benefits and includes healthy fats such as vegetables oils, fish and nuts. Now a team of research have dug deeper into the health benefits of one of the key components of the Mediterranean diet - olives and olive oil - to really understand the benefits. Scientists have not previously known which specific compounds in the fruit contribute to its nutritional benefits. Type 2 diabetes occurs when the body does not produce enough insulin or the insulin produced does not work properly and can be linked to lifestyle factors such as being overweight. A team of researchers by Virginia Tech discard that the olive-derived compound oleuropein helps the body produce more insulin. Insulin is a hormone made in the pancreas - just under the stomach. It helps the body use glucose for energy and is released into the blood stream. "Our work provides new mechanistic insights into the long-standing question of why olive products can beanti-diabetic," said Bin Xu, lead author, assistant professor of biochemistry in the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences. Oleuropein also helps detoxify molecules called amylin which can cause type 2 diabetes. Experts hope the discovery will help people understand why olive oil and olives are so beneficial, They said it could lead to new, low-cost ways of combatting type 2 diabetes and obesity. The benefits of eating olives and olive oil include helping people lose weight and preventing the onset of type 2 diabetes. "We believe it will not only contribute to the biochemistry of the functions of the olive component oleuropein, but also have an impact on the general public to pay more attention to olive products in light of the current diabetes epidemic." Experts said they now plan to test the oleuropein in animal Continue reading >>

Diabetes Diet: Tips For Buying Genuine Extra Virgin Olive Oil

Diabetes Diet: Tips For Buying Genuine Extra Virgin Olive Oil

Diabetes Diet: Tips For Buying Genuine Extra Virgin Olive Oil Cooking with healthy oils, such as pure Extra Virgin Olive Oil (EVOO), may be one of the best things we can do for our familys well being. Olive oil contains monounsaturated fatty acids, a healthy dietary fat that lowers our risk for heart disease. Also, unlike many processed vegetable oils, EVOO is low in omega-6 fatty acids. Omega-6 is an inflammatory substance that our typical Western diet provides too much of. High intake of omega-6 is associated with chronic illnesses, including cardiovascular disease and type 2 diabetes. Unfortunately, much of the olive oil sold in our grocery stores is not genuine EVOO. Many bottles actually contain blends of different olive oil grades, or are a mix of EVOO and vegetable oils (e.g., canola, soybean), and are often chemically refined. So, for those wanting the healthiest EVOO available, here are nine olive oil tips to keep in mind when shopping: Since olives are stone fruits, as are plums and cherries, genuine EVOO is comparable to fresh-squeezed fruit juice that is seasonal, and perishable. Olive oil begins to deteriorate within a few months of milling, and this process speeds up after its container is opened. Light, heat, and oxygen cause EVOO to spoil so its best to choose bottles that protect against light, buy a quantity of oil that will be used quickly, and keep it well sealed in a cool, dark place. Genuine EVOO has a fresh grassy aroma, and a fruity olive taste with a bit of bitterness and pepperinessin great oils these flavors are well balanced. The bitterness and pungency usually indicate the presence of beneficial antioxidants, anti-inflammatories, and other healthy compounds. Since there are many types of olives, EVOOs come in a variety of shades, from green Continue reading >>

Olives Nutrition Facts: Fights Cancer, Heart Disease & Diabetes

Olives Nutrition Facts: Fights Cancer, Heart Disease & Diabetes

Current: Olives Nutrition Facts: Fights Cancer, Heart Disease & Diabetes Olives Nutrition Facts: Fights Cancer, Heart Disease & Diabetes Dr. Axe on Facebook175 Dr. Axe on Twitter8 Dr. Axe on Instagram Dr. Axe on Google Plus Dr. Axe on Youtube Dr. Axe on Pintrest62 Share on Email Print Article They might be small, but did you know that olives nutrition packs quite a healthy punch? Its true. Known mostly for making versatile, beneficial olive oil , olives are bursting with rich phytonutrients and are known for their high vitamin E content, cancer-fighting antioxidants and cardiovascular benefits. But thats not all. What else does olives nutrition provide? Lets take a look. Oxidation within the body is proven to be connected to the progression and growth of many diseases like heart disease and cancer. Olives are a high-antioxidant food that mainly provide polyphenols , which are antioxidants that have proven anticancer, antidiabetic, anti-aging and neuro-protective effects ( 1 , 2 ). Olives even help boost blood levels of glutathione , which is one of the bodys most important antioxidant nutrients because of its ability to recycle antioxidants. ( 3 ) Although each form of olive has varying levels of antioxidants, theyre present in all of them. The benefits from antioxidants like those found in olives transcend almost all body systems and can be a major factor in disease prevention and treatment. 2. Lower Cholesterol and High Blood Pressure Because olives are a good source of good fats, they dont damage arteries the way other fats do. Studies have proven olives ability to lower blood pressure and help control and lower cholesterol as well. The hypotensive (lowering blood pressure) effects of olives are due to the oleic acid they contain. ( 4 ) Studies have shown significan Continue reading >>

Can Diabetics Eat Olives

Can Diabetics Eat Olives

Lisa Rivera | November 10, 2017 | Fruits for Diabetes | No Comments Olive is often mistaken as a vegetable. Precisely, Olive is a fruit that was initially cultivated in Asia. This fruit is one of the ancient fruits and has been on the market for over 6000 votes. And it should be no surprise that this fruit has gained a lot of ground and is being cultivated in virtually every continent. This is highly fueled by the fact that olive has numerous health benefits and can fit in almost every meal. Studies have indicated that people who eat a Mediterranean diet are less likely to develop type 2 diabetes. To back up these claims were statistics on the number of people who suffer from heart diseases and diabetes in countries where Mediterranean diet is a staple food such as Italy and Spain. The number is significantly low compared to people in the US and India. People in Spain and Italy consume more of whole grains and vegetables accompanied by a small amount of meat, fish and dairy products. These countries use olive oil as a substitute for margarine and butter when it comes to cooking. In general, olives are fruits that are either black or green. Famously known due to its natural fats, this particular food is useful in lowering the blood pressure and preventing chronic heart diseases. Also, olives are rich anti-oxidants and this makes them particularly useful in preventing cancer by giving the body with essential body nutrients. The two varieties of olives that is the green and black olives are similar in the nutrients composition with only one major distinction. Green olives have about twice as much sodium as that contained on black olives. This is very important if you wish to add your daily intake of sodium. Olive has the health benefits mentioned above but this can vary d Continue reading >>

The 15 Best Superfoods For Diabetics

The 15 Best Superfoods For Diabetics

beats1/Shutterstock Chocolate is rich in flavonoids, and research shows that these nutrients reduce insulin resistance, improve insulin sensitivity, drop insulin levels and fasting blood glucose, and blunt cravings. But not all chocolate is created equal. In a 2008 study from the University of Copenhagen, people who ate dark chocolate reported that they felt less like eating sweet, salty, or fatty foods compared to volunteers given milk chocolate, with its lower levels of beneficial flavonoids (and, often, more sugar and fat, too). Dark chocolate also cut the amount of pizza that volunteers consumed later in the same day, by 15 percent. The flavonoids in chocolate have also been shown to lower stroke risk, calm blood pressure, and reduce your risk for a heart attack by 2 percent over five years. (Want more delicious, healthy, seasonal foods? Click here.) Jiri Vaclavek/Shutterstock Broccoli is an anti-diabetes superhero. As with other cruciferous veggies, like kale and cauliflower, it contains a compound called sulforaphane, which triggers several anti-inflammatory processes that improve blood sugar control and protect blood vessels from the cardiovascular damage that’s often a consequence of diabetes. (Heart disease is the leading cause of death for people with diabetes, so this protection could be a lifesaver.) Sulforaphane also helps flip on the body’s natural detox mechanisms, coaxing enzymes to turn dangerous cancer-causing chemicals into more innocent forms that the body can easily release. Blueberries funnyangel/Shutterstock Blueberries really stand out: They contain both insoluble fiber (which “flushes” fat out of your system) and soluble fiber (which slows down the emptying of your stomach, and improves blood sugar control). In a study by the USDA, peopl Continue reading >>

Olives For A Snack | Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community

Olives For A Snack | Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community

Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community Find support, ask questions and share your experiences. Join the community What's the maximum amount of olives you're allowed per meal? The pitted ones are carb free (according to Collins GemCarb Counter) I eat them until I've had enough, lol. Can't help you with the stuffed ones, sorry You could Google and find out for yourself douglas99 I reversed my Type 2 Well-Known Member I count calories, so my limit depends on how many calories I have from them. Green Olives are lower carb than black olives... I think it's something like 4g of carb per 100g for green, and 6g per 100g for black. I've tried several times to find out why (as I love black olives). I'm guessing that it's something to do with the processing of black olives - they aren't black naturally, but are processed with iron which turns them black. Green Olives are lower carb than black olives... I think it's something like 4g of carb per 100g for green, and 6g per 100g for black. I've tried several times to find out why (as I love black olives). I'm guessing that it's something to do with the processing of black olives - they aren't black naturally, but are processed with iron which turns them black. Green Olives are lower carb than black olives... I think it's something like 4g of carb per 100g for green, and 6g per 100g for black. I've tried several times to find out why (as I love black olives). I'm guessing that it's something to do with the processing of black olives - they aren't black naturally, but are processed with iron which turns them black. No difference between green and black olives, green ones are usually picked before they ripen and black /purple ones are the riper fruit no proccessing to turn them black . On some trees they go black almost straight Continue reading >>

Benefits Of Olive Oil Consumption In Type 2 Diabetes Treatment

Benefits Of Olive Oil Consumption In Type 2 Diabetes Treatment

Worldwide, type 2 diabetes is at epidemic proportions, with over 300 million already having the condition with an estimated rise to 600 million diagnosed cases by the year 2030. Information regarding reduced risk of type 2 diabetes is fairly common. However, finding information regarding treatment and management for an individual who already has type 2 diabetes can be somewhat more difficult. Therefore, this article is designed as a mini literature review of sorts, pointing to some of the recent research around olive oil and its potential benefits for use as a dietary intervention in type 2 diabetes treatment. Endoplasmic reticulum stress (ER) is a central mediator for pancreatic beta-cell dysfunction in type 2 diabetes. An in vitro study published in Biochemical and Biophysical Research Communications, 2016, investigated if tyrosol, an antioxidant polyphenolic compound found in olive oil, could protect against beta-cell dysfunction. Researchers found that tyrosol did in fact protect against beta-cell ER stress-induced cell death, suggesting that it should be explored as a therapeutic agent for improving insulin resistance and diabetes. Insulin resistance (IR) is one of the major contributors to difficulties in maintaining blood glucose control. A study published in Diabetologia, 2015, randomized 642 patients to either an olive oil enriched Mediterranean diet (MedDiet) (35 percent fat; 22 percent from monounsaturated fat) or a low-fat diet (less than 28 percent fat) to determine whether dietary intervention effects tissue-specific IR and beta-cell function. The study found that both diets improved IR, however, liver IR is improved more through a low-fat diet, while muscle IR and muscle+liver IR could benefit more from the olive oil enriched MedDiet. At this point there Continue reading >>

Extra Virgin Olive Oil Linked To Lower Cholesterol, Blood Sugar After Meals

Extra Virgin Olive Oil Linked To Lower Cholesterol, Blood Sugar After Meals

Extra Virgin Olive Oil Linked to Lower Cholesterol, Blood Sugar After Meals The Mediterranean diet is known to have many beneficial effects on health, from lowering peripheral arterial disease risk to reducing sleep apnea to increasing life expectancy . Now, according to a small new study from Sapienza University in Rome, extra virgin olive oil as part of a Mediterranean diet appears to have healthier effects on cholesterol and blood sugar after meals than other types of fat. The Mediterranean diet is an eating style typical of countries such as Greece, Italy, Morocco and Spain, that emphasizes whole grains, vegetables, fish, fruits, low-fat dairy, nuts, legumes, and extra virgin olive oil (oil that has been produced by simply pressing the olives ). Previous research has indicated that extra virgin olive oil may help protect against cardiovascular disease, but it has not been clear what accounts for this effect. To determine how the oil benefits heart and blood vessel health, researchers evaluated the effects of adding either no oil, 10 grams (approximately 2 tablespoons) of extra virgin olive oil, or 10 grams of corn oil to a standard Mediterranean lunch in 25 subjects without diabetes. In the first phase of the study, the participants were randomly assigned to eat the meal either with or without the additional extra virgin olive oil. A month later, the participants were randomly assigned to eat the meal either with the addition of extra virgin olive oil or the addition of corn oil. Blood tests taken two hours before and two hours after the meals indicated that blood sugar levels rose much less after the meal with extra virgin olive oil (26.2 mg/dl, on average ) compared to the meal with corn oil (40.7 mg/dl, on average) or the meal with no additional oil (53.6 mg/dl, Continue reading >>

Are Black Olives Healthy?

Are Black Olives Healthy?

Written by Jill Corleone, RDN, LD; Updated March 15, 2018 Ten large olives contain about 5 grams of fat. Whether youre eating them whole as a snack or chopping them to top a salad or pizza, black olives add a bit of extra nutrition to your diet. The tiny fruit -- yes, olives are considered a fruit because they contain a seed and develop from a flower -- is rich in monounsaturated fat, fiber, beta carotene and vitamin E. However, as a high-fat fruit, black olives are a concentrated source of calories, and they're also high in sodium, so enjoy them in moderation. Black olives are olives that have been allowed to ripen while still on the tree, unlike green olives, which are picked before theyre ripe. But you cant simply eat an olive right off the tree -- its too bitter. An olive must be cured, in brine, salt or water, before you can eat it. The brining process adds salt, so is one of the reasons to eat olives in moderation. Twenty large black olives have 100 calories, 9 grams of fat, 6 grams of carbs and 2 grams of fiber. While the savory fruit is rich in a number of health-promoting nutrients, those same 20 olives could have more than 600 milligrams of sodium, providing about 25 percent of the daily recommended amount. To cut back on sodium, look for low-sodium cans of black olives. Olives are high in fat, but have heart-healthy monounsaturated fat. This type of fat may help lower LDL cholesterol levels, which is the "bad" cholesterol that clogs arteries and increases risk of heart disease. If you have diabetes, replacing saturated fats with monounsaturated fats, like those found in black olives, may help improve blood sugar. However, while the fat in black olives is healthy for you, it adds a lot of calories. Eating too many calories, no matter their source, may lead to Continue reading >>

Olives And Type 2 Diabetes

Olives And Type 2 Diabetes

Kalamata: 20 calories, 1.5 g fat, 230 g sodium, 2 g carbs Green (plain or stuffed with pimentos): 25 calories, 2.5 g fat, 350 g sodium, 1 g carbs Black: 25 calories, 2.5 g fat, 115 g sodium, 1 g carbs On the whole, most types of olives stack up fairly equally when it comes to calories and nutritional value. Green olives are often slightly higher in sodium than their black cousins, but again, olives nutritional properties depend strongly on how they are prepared. Many people think that olive oil that you might find on the grocery store shelves is fresh. This is often not the case, however. Its best to check for a harvest date in order to make sure your oil is adequately fresh. You may also be wondering what the deal is with virgin or extra-virgin olive oil. Extra-virgin olive oil is of a higher quality, and it also contains higher levels of oleic acid. It often has a more true olive taste, too. Beware of olive oils marketed as light' it may sound healthier, but it actually just means that the oil has a lighter flavor. And sometimes they have undergone more processing and refining. When it comes to olives themselves, there isn't a great deal of specific research. Let's face it, researchers aren't really going to feed people a ton of olives each day to see what results could be determined. But, other byproducts of olives such as olive oil, olive fruit extract and olive leaf extract show loads of promising benefits. one study with elderly patients, consumption of olive fruit extract was associated with a significant reduction in body weight and body mass index. Taking olive leaf extract (500 mg once per day in tablet form) has been shown to improve glucose homeostasis and may be an effective blood glucose-lowering agent for adults with type 2 diabetes. Studies in diabetic Continue reading >>

Olive Oil And Diabetes

Olive Oil And Diabetes

WHAT IS DIABETES? Diabetes mellitus is one of the leading health problems in the developed countries, and the sixth cause of death. It is one of the major metabolic diseases and it is potentially very serious because it can cause many complications that seriously damage health, such as cardiovascular diseases, kidney failure, blindness, peripheral circulation disorders, etc. There are two types of diabetes mellitus: type-I or insulin-dependent diabetes, found in children and teenagers, and type-II or non-insulin-dependent diabetes, which appears in adulthood, generally from the age of 40 onwards. Insulin is required to control the first type while the second, more frequent type is generally associated with obesity and does not call for insulin treatment. Nowadays a person is considered to be a diabetic when, two hours after an oral overdose of glucose, he or she has a fasting blood sugar level of more than 126 mg/dl, or of more than 200 mg/dl in non-fasting conditions. Glucose intolerance is a situation where a person has high blood sugar levels (between 110 and 125 mg/dl) without any clear signs of disease, but with a major risk of suffering from diabetes in the future. OLIVE OIL AND DIABETES An olive-oil-rich diet is not only a good alternative in the treatment of diabetes; it may also help to prevent or delay the onset of the disease. How it does so is by preventing insulin resistance and its possible pernicious implications by raising HDL-cholesterol, lowering triglycerides, and ensuring better blood sugar level control and lower blood pressure. It has been demonstrated that a diet that is rich in olive oil, low in saturated fats, moderately rich in carbohydrates and soluble fibre from fruit, vegetables, pulses and grains is the most effective approach for diabetics Continue reading >>

Could An Obscure Compound In Olives Prevent Diabetes?

Could An Obscure Compound In Olives Prevent Diabetes?

Even since the Mediterranean diet came on the scene in the 80s, theres been a fascination with olive oil. Its long been suspected that something in olives may be one of the reasons that the diet works to reduce heart attacks. Now new research suggests that an obscure compound may be one of the key factors. The Power Compound Found in Olives: Oleuropein Oleuropein is the olives most potent polyphenol (powerful antioxidants that fight cell stress and are believed to have many health benefits) and can be found in the leaves, oil, and the olive itself. Polyphenolsalso found in other food sources, such green and black teas, red wines, dark chocolate, cloves, blueberries, and nutsare believed to prevent risk factors that cause certain chronic diseases , such as cardiovascular diseases and cancer. Polyphenols have also been credited with helping to control blood-sugar spikes that can cause diabetes, and a new study now supports this as it suggests that the oleuropein in olives may increase insulin secretion, potentially useful in diabetes prevention. Oleuropein has been shown in research to have many health benefits, such as antioxidant effects that may prevent heart disease, anti-inflammatory properties that decrease inflammatory agents in the blood and may protect against bone loss, and antitumor effects that may protect against some cancers (e.g., colon and breast) particularly when included in a Mediterranean diet (which includes olives and olive oils). Additional connections to the health benefits of oleuropein include protection against certain bacteria and viruses as well as protective benefits to our neurons, or nerve cells and so much more. Ill review the new study on oleuropein in a moment, but, first, lets look at insulin and its role in the human body. We may be m Continue reading >>

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