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Objectives Of Diabetes Prevention Program

Perceived Benefits And Barriers To The Diabetes Prevention Program

Perceived Benefits And Barriers To The Diabetes Prevention Program

Perceived Benefits and Barriers to the Diabetes Prevention Program Perceived Benefits and Barriers to the Diabetes Prevention Program Nicole Johnson, DrPH, MPH, MA - University of South Florida, Stephanie T. Melton, PhD, MPH, MA - University of South Florida, Diabetes prevention interventions have a proven positive effect on health outcomes. The goal of this project is to understand the factors that motivate and deter people with prediabetes from utilizing evidence-based education programs, such as the Diabetes Prevention Program (DPP). Formative research was conducted among program facilitators, health providers who care for diabetes patients, and patients living with prediabetes to generate an in-depth understanding of perceptions of the program. The methodology included a mixed methods approach. A total of 97 interviews and 5 focus groups were conducted with health providers, program facilitators, and patients. An online survey was administered to 50 patients with prediabetes. All three populations agreed the DPP aided in implementing lifestyle changes and preventing the onset of type 2 diabetes, and the classes provided a positive experience for support, in-depth discussion, and opportunities for learning how to make lifestyle changes. However, while the overall benefits of the program were expressed, there were barriers noted by all populations that affect program utilization and physician referrals. General lack of knowledge, cost of the program, and the significant time commitment necessary to complete the program were barriers discussed. The Diabetes Prevention Program is successful in helping individuals with prediabetes make positive lifestyle changes. The lack of knowledge about the program, however, is a deterrent for utilization. Creation of a social marke Continue reading >>

My Aade Network : Building Your Diabetes Prevention Program - December 15, 2017; Tampa, Fl : Learning Objectives & Outcomes

My Aade Network : Building Your Diabetes Prevention Program - December 15, 2017; Tampa, Fl : Learning Objectives & Outcomes

Details Agenda Location and Hotel Information CE Information Learning Objectives & Outcomes Faculty Cancellation Policy Registration This activity is designed for both healthcare professionals and non-healthcare professionals who are looking to implement the National Diabetes Prevention Program. Participants who complete this workshop will have a better understanding of the National DPP Landscape, CDC recognition Standards and the reimbursement landscape including the Medicare Diabetes Prevention Program (MDPP) benefit. With this increased knowledge, you will be able to implement the NationalDiabetes Prevention Program within or outside of your diabetes self-management education and support program. At the completion of this activity, the participant will be able to: Explain the evidence base for the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)'s National Diabetes Prevention Program (National DPP) List the Lifestyle Change Program participant eligibility, goals, curriculum delivery, and required documentation and data collection Review and explain CDCs DPRP standards and how programs can ensure success Explain AADE's role in the National DPP and opportunities for DSMES programs and diabetes educators to house their own DPP program Develop a business plan to implement a prevention program into an already existing DSMES Program Considerations in the sustainability of a prevention program Discuss opportunities for multiple payersand the scaling of your diabetes prevention programs Discuss CPT codes for billing, coverage criteria for Medicare employer based reimbursement Learn about additional support and resources nationally and in your specific state and community MY AADE NETWORK is designed to help members learn more about what's going on at the state and local leve Continue reading >>

Strategic Priorities And Objectives-diabetes

Strategic Priorities And Objectives-diabetes

Strategic Priorities and Objectives-Diabetes The Georgia DPCP seeks to utilize diabetes surveillance data, coupled with multi-sector partnerships and collaborative efforts to advance policies and support the adoption of evidence-based guidelines in an effort to sustain quality-oriented healthcare services as well as expand access to evidence-based Diabetes Self-Management Education (DSME) Programs and Diabetes Prevention Programs (DPP) statewide. Cornerstone of the Georgia Diabetes Prevention and Control Program: Access to Diabetes Self-Management Education (DSME) and Preventive Care Resources Diabetes Data Surveillance and Evaluation Health Communication: Diabetes Prevention and Diabetes Management The Georgia DPCP is part of a national effort by the CDC Division of Diabetes Translation and is focused on the following statewide efforts to improve the health of Georgians. Access Related to Primary and Secondary Prevention To reduce the onset and severity of diabetes-related complications among Georgians statewide (including medically underserved regions) by collaborating with organizations to expand access to nationally recognized and evidence-based Diabetes Self-Management Education (DSME) Programs including: American Association of Diabetes Educators (AADE) Accredited DSME Programs American Diabetes Association (ADA) Recognized Diabetes Education Programs To reduce risks among Georgia adults at "high risk" for developing Diabetes including adults diagnosed with Prediabetes (also known as Borderline Diabetes) by collaborating with organizations to increase the availability of evidence-based Diabetes Prevention Programs (DPP) in various settings. To reduce the onset and severity of diabetes-related complications among vulnerable population groups including: women with Continue reading >>

Ong Sant Diabte / Ngo Health Diabetes - Program Mali

Ong Sant Diabte / Ngo Health Diabetes - Program Mali

The NGO Sant Diabte started its Action Program in Mali in 2003. Between 2003 and 2009, Sant Diabte has gradually developed over 5 types of action through 3 complementary projects: 2003 - 2005: "Improvement of the management of patients suffering of diabetes mellitus in Mali" 2005 - 2007: Improvement of the training for health professionals in the fight against diabetes in Mali, and Information of the Malian public on diabetes' 2008 - 2009: " Improvement of the prevention, management of diabetes and of one of its major complications: amputation linked to diabetic foot" At the end of the project 2008 - 2009, an external evaluation was commissioned by the European Commission, which was a financial partner for this project (Presentation of the main results) . This evaluation showed the strong impact of this project but also recommendations to continue actions after this last 2-years phase of action ( External evaluation report (Fr)). From these recommendations, a new project was launched in partnership with the Ministry of Health of Mali and the team of Professor Sidibe (Endocrinologist - Head of Department of Endocrinology at the National Hospital of Mali) under the national Program of prevention and fight against diabetes. The project "Improvement of the prevention and management of diabetes (in adult, child and pregnant woman) and its complications (retinopathy and diabetic foot) in Mali, for a period of 36 months (2010-2012), financed by different partners, participates in the general objective of national policy to fight against diabetes in Mali. This policy aims at improving health and quality of life of the population through prevention and the fight against diabetes. It affects 9 intervention areas included in 7 regions of Mali: the District of Bamako, the regions Continue reading >>

National Diabetes Prevention Program Symposium

National Diabetes Prevention Program Symposium

Physicians: The American Diabetes Association is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education to provide continuing medical education for physicians. The American Diabetes Association designates this live activity for a maximum of 4.5 AMA PRA Category 1 credit(s). Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity. Physician Assistants: AAPA accepts certificates of participation for educational activities certified for AMA PRA Category 1 Credit from organizations accredited by ACCME or a recognized state medical society. Physician assistants may receive a maximum of 4.5 hours of Category I credit for completing this program. Nurses: The American Diabetes Association is accredited as a provider of continuing nursing education by the American Nurses Credentialing Centers COA. California Board of Registered Nursing: The American Diabetes Association is also a provider approved by the California Board of Registered Nursing, Provider No. CEP-12196. This activity is approved for 4.5 contact hours. Dietitians: The American Diabetes Association is a Continuing Professional Education (CPE) Accredited Provider with the Commission on Dietetic Registration (CDR). Registered dietitians (RDs) and dietetic technicians, registered (DTRs) will receive 4.5 continuing professional education units (CPEUs) for completion of this program/material. Pharmacists: The American Diabetes Association is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Pharmacy Education as a provider of continuing pharmacy education. The American Diabetes Association designates these sessions as knowledge-based per ACPE guidelines. See the final program for the list of UANs and learning objectives.* *Attention Pharmacists: Upon closing Continue reading >>

Program Objectives

Program Objectives

Diabetes & Hypertension Self-Management Program PROGRAM OBJECTIVES Diabetes is a serious chronic disease and affects 390,000 adults in West Virginia. In adults, type 2 diabetes mellitus [T2DM] accounts for about 90 to 95% of all cases of diabetes. The prevalence of T2DM in West Virginia is 11.8%, significantly higher than the national average of 8.3%. This ranks West Virginia fourth in prevalence among the 52 states and territories. In addition, 466,000 adult West Virginians have pre-diabetes. In order to advance the translation of knowledge into effective practice, preventing or delaying the early onset of diabetes and its complications is critical. Healthy lifestyle is antecedent to effective prevention of the disease for those in the pre-diabetes stage. However, a statewide diabetes prevention program in this medically underserved state is currently lacking and therefore proposed in the current study. Assessing the feasibility and effectiveness of a national Diabetes Prevention Program can guide clinicians and public health professionals in prevention and management of diabetes.The projected increase in the incidence and prevalence of diabetes and the high economic burden associated with its treatment makes this study timely and significant. Our long-term goal is to disseminate an evidence-based Diabetes Prevention and Management Program (DPM), a modified Diabetes Prevention Programs national clinical trial that showed participation in a healthy lifestyle program can lower the risk of developing T2DM. The objective of this project is to pilot test the effectiveness and fidelity of the DPM in two communities of West Virginia: Objective 1:To determine the effectiveness of the community lifestyle educational intervention program to promote behavior change related to di Continue reading >>

Stop Diabetes Swasthya India

Stop Diabetes Swasthya India

STOP DIABETES-A MOVEMENT FOR DIABETES FREE INDIA: The project aims to implement a diabetes prevention program targeting the population of Gujarat. To create awareness about diabetes and its consequences among the various stakeholders and to sensitize them to take appropriate action for the care and prevention of Diabetes. (Among the general public, school going children, health care professionals and health workers). Early detection of diabetes by screening people at high risk for diabetes Early detection of diabetic complications by screening people with diabetes. To train Community doctors/Nurses/other Paramedical Staff/Interns in screening high risk individuals, carrying out blood tests to diagnose diabetes, IFG and IGT, provide education and counseling on reducing risk factors and changing life styles. Awareness campaign will reach > 20 million people. Around 2,00,000 pamphlets will be distributed. Over 10,000 booklets will be distributed. 30,000 will be tested for diabetes in camps and counselled for LSM. 6000 diabetics will be screened for complications. Under stop diabetes movement, we organize diabetes screening camps in different districts in the state of Gujarat on regular basis. We identify high risk persons for developing diabetes and screen them for free. We also give them free counseling for life style modification. Persons detected to have diabetes, goes for screening for diabetes related complications at institute. Continue reading >>

World Diabetes Day 2017: Women And Diabetes

World Diabetes Day 2017: Women And Diabetes

Diabetes is a chronic, metabolic disease characterized by elevated levels of blood glucose (or blood sugar), which leads over time to serious damage to the heart, blood vessels, eyes, kidneys, and nerves. The most common is type 2 diabetes, usually in adults, which occurs when the body becomes resistant to insulin or doesn't make enough insulin. In the past three decades the prevalence of type 2 diabetes has risen dramatically in countries of all income levels. Type 1 diabetes, once known as juvenile diabetes or insulin-dependent diabetes, is a chronic condition in which the pancreas produces little or no insulin by itself. For people living with diabetes, access to affordable treatment, including insulin, is critical to their survival. There is a globally agreed target to halt the rise in diabetes and obesity by 2025. Continue reading >>

Culturally-grounded Diabetes Prevention Program For Obese Latino Youth: Rationale, Design, And Methods

Culturally-grounded Diabetes Prevention Program For Obese Latino Youth: Rationale, Design, And Methods

N2 - Background Type 2 diabetes (T2D) disproportionately impacts Latino youth yet few diabetes prevention programs address this important source of health disparities. Objectives To address this knowledge gap, we describe the rationale, design, and methodology underpinning a culturally-grounded T2D prevention program for obese Latino youth. The study aims to: 1) to test the efficacy of the intervention for reducing T2D risk, 2) explore potential mediators and moderators of changes in health behaviors and health outcomes and, 3) examine the incremental cost-effectiveness for reducing T2D risk. Latino adolescents (N=160, age 1416) will be randomized to either a 3-month intensive lifestyle intervention or a control condition. The intervention consists of weekly health education delivered by bilingual/bicultural promotores and 3 moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (PA) sessions/week. Control youth receive health information and results from their laboratory testing. Insulin sensitivity, glucose tolerance, and weight-specific quality of life are assessed at baseline, 3-months, 6-months, and 12-months. We will explore whether enhanced self-efficacy and/or social support mediate improvements in nutrition/PA behaviors and T2D outcomes. We will also explore whether effects are moderated by sex and/or acculturation. Cost-effectiveness from the health system perspective will be estimated by the incremental cost-effectiveness ratio using changes in insulin sensitivity at 12-months. Conclusions The results of this study will provide much needed information on how T2D prevention interventions for obese Latino youth are developed, implemented and evaluated. This innovative approach is an essential step in the development of scalable, cost-effective, solution oriented programs to p Continue reading >>

Objectives | Gifts

Objectives | Gifts

GIFTS has been established to improve diabetes prevention through an enhanced understanding of early life programming. Three key objectives of the program, which will enable this ambition to be achieved, are outlined here: Use of results generated by GIFTS to inform public health policy via guideline development in Europe and South Asia. Dissemination of key outputs to stake holders in diabetes prevention, including healthcare professionals and South Asian communities. Use of the results and expertise gained from GIFTS to design a large-scale pragmatic intervention for diabetes prevention in people of South Asian origin. Specific objectives, which will allow the key objectives to be achieved, are as follows: To enhance understanding of the early life determinants of diabetes, obesity and metabolic syndrome in people of South Asian origin which give rise to variation in disease prevalence. Establish an international consortium based on understanding the early life determinants of diabetes, obesity and metabolic syndrome. Aim for strong co-operation and adoption of common protocols across different geographic regions within this consortium. Maximise opportunities for success by leveraging existing infrastructure and promoting interdisciplinary research by world class experts in Europe and Asia. Family trios of South Asians, both in their native countries and migrant populations across Europe, will be studied. Early life determinants of growth and development will be investigated to identify the importance of genomic, biological and lifestyle factors determining future disease risk. Generation of hypotheses will be driven by understanding early life predictors of cardiometabolic disease. Consideration will be given to epidemiological, nutritional, genomic and societal dat Continue reading >>

Bridges

Bridges

Community-based diabetes prevention program in Thai population (ST12-041) This project took place in 4 geographical regions of Thailand: Central region (Nakhon Nayok and Samut Sakhon provinces), Northern region (Phitsanulok and Phrae provinces), Northeastern region (Nakhon Wichai Aekplakorn; Somkiat Potisat; Thawat Matte The community-based diabetes prevention program in Thailand is a study to test a pre-designed knowledge management program to prevent or delay of type 2 diabetes in people with high-risk of diabetes. Thirty-two primary care units with 2,240 individuals having high-risk of diabetes aged 30-59 participated in the study. The participants were randomly assigned either to the intervention program or in the usual care group. The participants followed at 6, 12, and 18 months after the intervention started and count the number of new cases of diabetes in both group and compared. World Diabetes Congress, Melbourne (Australia), December 2013 Thailand Non-Communicable Disease Forum, August 2014 (2 presentations) 8th Thailand Congress of Nutrition 2014, October 2014 Joint Conference in Medical Sciences 2015, Bangkok (Thailand), June 2015 Thailand Non-Communicable Disease Forum, August 2015 Basic training course for thai diabetes educators, May & September 2015 World Diabetes Congress, Vancouver (Canada), December 2015 Continue reading >>

The Diabetes Prevention Program (dpp)

The Diabetes Prevention Program (dpp)

Go to: Abstract The purpose of the present article is to provide a detailed description of the highly successful lifestyle intervention administered to 1,079 participants, which included 45% racial and ethnic minorities and resulted in a 58% reduction in the incidence rate of diabetes (2). The two major goals of the Diabetes Prevention Program (DPP) lifestyle intervention were a minimum of 7% weight loss/weight maintenance and a minimum of 150 min of physical activity similar in intensity to brisk walking. Both goals were hypothesized to be feasible, safe, and effective based on previous clinical trials in other countries (3–7). The methods used to achieve these lifestyle goals include the following key features: 1) individual case managers or “lifestyle coaches;” 2) frequent contact with participants; 3) a structured, state-of-the-art, 16-session core-curriculum that taught behavioral self-management strategies for weight loss and physical activity; 4) supervised physical activity sessions; 5) a more flexible maintenance intervention, combining group and individual approaches, motivational campaigns, and “restarts;” 6) individualization through a “toolbox” of adherence strategies; 7) tailoring of materials and strategies to address ethnic diversity; and finally 8) an extensive network of training, feedback, and clinical support. Abbreviations: DPP, Diabetes Prevention Program; IGT, impaired glucose tolerance The Diabetes Prevention Program (DPP) was a 27-center randomized clinical trial to determine whether lifestyle intervention or pharmacological therapy (metformin) would prevent or delay the onset of diabetes in individuals with impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) who are at high risk for the disease (1). Recently, it was reported that both the lifestyle Continue reading >>

The Diabetes Prevention Program (dpp)

The Diabetes Prevention Program (dpp)

The purpose of the present article is to provide a detailed description of the highly successful lifestyle intervention administered to 1,079 participants, which included 45% racial and ethnic minorities and resulted in a 58% reduction in the incidence rate of diabetes[ 2 ]. The two major goals of the Diabetes Prevention Program (DPP) lifestyle intervention were a minimum of 7% weight loss/weight maintenance and a minimum of 150 min of physical activity similar in intensity to brisk walking. Both goals were hypothesized to be feasible, safe, and effective based on previous clinical trials in other countries[ 3 , 4 , 5 , 6 , 7 ]. The methods used to achieve these lifestyle goals include the following key features: 1) individual case managers or "lifestyle coaches;" 2) frequent contact with participants; 3) a structured, state-of-the-art, 16-session core-curriculum that taught behavioral self-management strategies for weight loss and physical activity; 4) supervised physical activity sessions; 5) a more flexible maintenance intervention, combining group and individual approaches, motivational campaigns, and "restarts;" 6) individualization through a "toolbox" of adherence strategies; 7) tailoring of materials and strategies to address ethnic diversity; and finally 8) an extensive network of training, feedback, and clinical support. The Diabetes Prevention Program (DPP) was a 27-center randomized clinical trial to determine whether lifestyle intervention or pharmacological therapy (metformin) would prevent or delay the onset of diabetes in individuals with impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) who are at high risk for the disease[ 1 ]. Recently, it was reported that both the lifestyle intervention and metformin were effective in decreasing the incidence of diabetes. Lifestyle Continue reading >>

Diabetes Program Home

Diabetes Program Home

To achieve these goals, the program supports the following activities: Prevention of type 2 diabetes and its complications. Quality Improvement for better diabetes care. Quality Diabetes Education Initiative to increase access to quality diabetes self-management education and support. Epidemiology and Surveillance of diabetes, its complications and risk factors. Evaluation to improve program performance, account for our public health actions, and share lessons learned. Partnerships and Coordination to share resources, and increase the scope and effectiveness of interventions. The Montana Diabetes Program Fact Sheet summarizes our program activities, key statistics, and contact information. To see how we are working with schools, worksites, healthcare systems, communities, and the environment, and with other public health programs in Montana,go to the Chronic Disease Prevention & Health Promotion Bureau page. The State Public Health Actions (1305) and the Four Domains of Chronic Disease Prevention Infographic shows howwe are part of a national effort for chronic disease prevention and health promotion. From 2013 to 2018, the Montana Diabetes Program is implementing a work plan underthe State Public Health Actions to Prevent and Control Diabetes, Heart Disease, Obesity and Associated Risk Factors and Promote School Health (1305) grant funded by the Centers for Disease Control & Prevention .The objectives of this work plan can only be accomplished through the joint efforts of healthcare leaders, insurers, public health agencies, policy makers, and healthcare organizations serving Montanans, and the engagement of the people of Montana. Continue reading >>

Walking Away From Type 2 Diabetes: Implementation Of A Diabetes Prevention Programme

Walking Away From Type 2 Diabetes: Implementation Of A Diabetes Prevention Programme

The Walking Away from Type 2 Diabetes is an evidence-based person-centred diabetes prevention programme that is focused on a holistic approach to lifestyle and health. It is centred on a 3.5 hour group-based structured education programme, delivered to 8-10 participants, aimed at promoting increased physical activity and a healthy lifestyle through targeting perceptions and knowledge of diabetes and diabetes risk, self-efficacy beliefs around lifestyle change, barriers to change and self-regulation. The programme meets criteria for structured education and is specifically designed for implementation within primary care; this includes a full educator training and quality development infrastructure. Example Aims and objectives The aim of the project was to implement the Walking Away from Type 2 Diabetes programme within primary care in diverse settings across the UK. - To work with a few diverse primary care organisations nationally to implement the Walking Away programme and identify and address key barriers to implementation. - Gather detailed feedback from educators and patients at each site, through focus groups and semi-structured qualitative interviews. - To establish the likely overall 'real world' cost of running the programme. - To work with further primary care organisations nationally to implement the Walking Away programme once the initial phase was complete. - To increase capacity for diabetes risk management within the context of the NHS Health Checks Programme or other local initiatives, by using risk score technology to set up systems for identifying and referring high risk individuals onto The Walking Away programme. Reasons for implementing your project Type 2 diabetes is a leading cause of disability and mortality nationally and exerts a huge financial Continue reading >>

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