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Obesity And Diabetes Risk

The Deliberate Lies They Tell About Diabetes

The Deliberate Lies They Tell About Diabetes

By some estimates, diabetes cases have increased more than 700 percent in the last 50 years. One in four Americans now have either diabetes or pre-diabetes (impaired fasting glucose) Type 2 diabetes is completely preventable and virtually 100 percent reversible, simply by implementing simple, inexpensive lifestyle changes, one of the most important of which is eliminating sugar (especially fructose) and grains from your diet Diabetes is NOT a disease of blood sugar, but rather a disorder of insulin and leptin signaling. Elevated insulin levels are not only symptoms of diabetes, but also heart disease, peripheral vascular disease, stroke, high blood pressure, cancer, and obesity Diabetes drugs are not the answer – most type 2 diabetes medications either raise insulin or lower blood sugar (failing to address the root cause) and many can cause serious side effects Sun exposure shows promise in treating and preventing diabetes, with studies revealing a significant link between high vitamin D levels and a lowered risk of developing type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular disease, and metabolic syndrome By Dr. Mercola There is a staggering amount of misinformation on diabetes, a growing epidemic that afflicts more than 29 million people in the United States today. The sad truth is this: it could be your very OWN physician perpetuating this misinformation Most diabetics find themselves in a black hole of helplessness, clueless about how to reverse their condition. The bigger concern is that more than half of those with type 2 diabetes are NOT even aware they have diabetes — and 90 percent of those who have a condition known as prediabetes aren’t aware of their circumstances, either. Diabetes: Symptoms of an Epidemic The latest diabetes statistics1 echo an increase in diabetes ca Continue reading >>

Diabetes – Chronic Disease Prevention & Health Promotion Division

Diabetes – Chronic Disease Prevention & Health Promotion Division

While some risk factors are out of your control, such as family history of diabetes, age, or ethnicity, most diabetes risk factors are controllable. Risk factors are behaviors or conditions that increase your chances of developing diabetes. Overweight/Obesity The combination of physical inactivity and poor nutrition has led to an alarming increase in obesity in Hawaii. Overweight and obese individuals are at higher risk for developing diabetes and its risk factors, such as high blood pressure and high cholesterol. In Hawaii, over half (58%) of Hawaii adults are overweight or obese and 28% of Hawaii high school students are overweight or obese. A combination of regular exercise and a healthy diet that is low in fat and high in fruits, vegetables, and whole grains is the best way to keep from getting overweight or obese. Be wary of fad diets that restrict certain nutrients and portion sizes that are too large. Physical Inactivity Physical activity can control blood pressure, reduce cholesterol levels, and help control and maintain weight. People who do not get enough physical activity risk developing high blood pressure, high cholesterol, and obesity. Almost one-half of Hawaii adults do not meet the recommendation for physical activity and 19% reported not getting any leisure time physical activity in the past month. Take simple steps to get more exercise – take a walk after dinner with your family or on your lunch break. Reduce television time to two hours or less with each day, and exercise during the commercials of your favorite shows. Aim for 30-60 minutes of physical activity most days of the week, and remember that it can be broken up throughout the day. The important thing is to keep moving! Children and adults should limit cholesterol, sodium, and fat, particula Continue reading >>

Maternal Obesity As A Risk Factor For Early Childhood Type 1 Diabetes: A Nationwide, Prospective, Population-based Case–control Study

Maternal Obesity As A Risk Factor For Early Childhood Type 1 Diabetes: A Nationwide, Prospective, Population-based Case–control Study

Abstract Genetic and environmental factors are believed to cause type 1 diabetes. The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of maternal BMI and gestational weight gain on the subsequent risk of childhood type 1 diabetes. Children in the Swedish National Quality Register for Diabetes in Children were matched with control children from the Swedish Medical Birth Register. Children were included whose mothers had data available on BMI in early pregnancy and gestational weight gain, giving a total of 16,179 individuals: 3231 children with type 1 diabetes and 12,948 control children. Mothers of children with type 1 diabetes were more likely to be obese (9% [n = 292/3231] vs 7.7% [n = 991/12,948]; p = 0.02) and/or have diabetes themselves (2.8% [n = 90/3231] vs 0.8% [n = 108/12,948]; p < 0.001) compared with mothers of control children. Gestational weight gain did not differ significantly between the two groups of mothers. In mothers without diabetes, maternal obesity was a significant risk factor for type 1 diabetes in the offspring (p = 0.04). A child had an increased risk of developing type 1 diabetes if the mother had been obese in early pregnancy (crude OR 1.20; 95% CI 1.05, 1.38; adjusted OR 1.18; 95% CI 1.02, 1.36). Among children with type 1 diabetes (n = 3231) there was a difference (p < 0.001) in age at onset in relation to the mother’s BMI. Among children in the oldest age group (15–19 years), there were more mothers who had been underweight during pregnancy, while in the youngest age group (0–4 years) the pattern was reversed. Maternal obesity, in the absence of maternal diabetes, is a risk factor for type 1 diabetes in the offspring, and influences the age of onset of type 1 diabetes. This emphasises the importance of a normal maternal BMI to po Continue reading >>

Obesity And Type 2 Diabetes

Obesity And Type 2 Diabetes

Obesity and Type 2 Diabetes by Joanne Z. Rogers, MSN, RN, CNSN, APRN, BC-AD, and Christopher D. Still, DO, FACN, FACP To view a PDF Version of this article, please click here. Obesity and type 2 diabetes are diseases that can substantially decrease life expectancy, diminish quality of life and increase healthcare costs. The incidence of obesity and diabetes continues to rise by epidemic proportions. The term “diabesity” has been coined to describe obesity-dependent diabetes. According to the American Diabetes Association, in 2002 18.2 million people, or 6.3 percent of the population, had diabetes. Diabetes was the sixth leading cause of death listed on U.S. death certificates in 2000. The direct and indirect cost of diabetes in the U.S. in 2002 was estimated at $132 billion. It has been estimated that the annual cost of overweight and obesity in the U.S. is $122.9 billion. This estimate accounts for $64.1 billion in direct costs and $58.8 billion in indirect costs. What is Diabetes? Diabetes is a disease characterized by high levels of blood glucose resulting from defects in insulin production, insulin action or both. Type 1 diabetes develops when the body’s immune system destroys pancreatic beta cells, the only cells in the body that make the hormone insulin that regulates blood glucose. This form of diabetes usually strikes children and young adults, although disease onset can occur at any age. Type 1 diabetes accounts for only five to 10 percent of all diagnosed cases of diabetes. Risk factors for type 1 diabetes include autoimmune, genetic and environmental factors. Type 2 diabetes accounts for some 90 to 95 percent of all diagnosed cases of diabetes. It usually begins as insulin resistance, a disorder in which the cells do not use insulin properly. As the nee Continue reading >>

Worldwide Burden Of Cancer Attributable To Diabetes And High Body-mass Index: A Comparative Risk Assessment

Worldwide Burden Of Cancer Attributable To Diabetes And High Body-mass Index: A Comparative Risk Assessment

Jump to Section Summary Diabetes and high body-mass index (BMI) are associated with increased risk of several cancers, and are increasing in prevalence in most countries. We estimated the cancer incidence attributable to diabetes and high BMI as individual risk factors and in combination, by country and sex. We estimated population attributable fractions for 12 cancers by age and sex for 175 countries in 2012. We defined high BMI as a BMI greater than or equal to 25 kg/m2. We used comprehensive prevalence estimates of diabetes and BMI categories in 2002, assuming a 10-year lag between exposure to diabetes or high BMI and incidence of cancer, combined with relative risks from published estimates, to quantify contribution of diabetes and high BMI to site-specific cancers, individually and combined as independent risk factors and in a conservative scenario in which we assumed full overlap of risk of diabetes and high BMI. We then used GLOBOCAN cancer incidence data to estimate the number of cancer cases attributable to the two risk factors. We also estimated the number of cancer cases in 2012 that were attributable to increases in the prevalence of diabetes and high BMI from 1980 to 2002. All analyses were done at individual country level and grouped by region for reporting. We estimated that 5·6% of all incident cancers in 2012 were attributable to the combined effects of diabetes and high BMI as independent risk factors, corresponding to 792 600 new cases. 187 600 (24·5%) of 766 000 cases of liver cancer and 121 700 (38·4%) of 317 000 cases of endometrial cancer were attributable to these risk factors. In the conservative scenario, about 4·5% (626 900 new cases) of all incident cancers assessed were attributable to diabetes and high BMI combined. Individually, high B Continue reading >>

Increased Risk For Obesity And Diabetes With Neurodegeneration In Developing Countries

Increased Risk For Obesity And Diabetes With Neurodegeneration In Developing Countries

1Centre of Excellence for Alzheimer’s Disease Research and Care, School of Medical Sciences, Edith Cowan University, 270 Joondalup Drive, Joondalup, 6027, Australia 2School of Psychiatry and Clinical Neurosciences, The University of Western Australia, Nedlands, 6009, Australia 3McCusker Alzheimer's Research Foundation, Hollywood Medical Centre, 85 Monash Avenue, Suite 22, Nedlands, 6009, Australia Citation: Martins IJ (2013) Increased Risk for Obesity and Diabetes with Neurodegeneration in Developing Countries. J Mol Genet Med S1:001. doi:10.4172/1747-0862.S1-001 Copyright: © 2013 Martins IJ. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited Visit for more related articles at Journal of Molecular and Genetic Medicine Abstract The incidence of global obesity and Type 2 diabetes has increased and is predicted to rise to 30% of the global population. Diet and lifestyle factors are incapable to resolve the increased incidence for obesity and diabetes in various populations of the world. Developing countries have come to the forefront because of the higher diabetic epidemic. The urbanization may possibly provide an explanation for the global diabetic epidemic. In Western countries the metabolic syndrome and non alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) have reached 30 % of the population and now at present NAFLD afflicts 20% of developing populations. Western diets and sedentary lifestyles cause metabolic disorders in developing countries which may increase neurodegenerative diseases by the disrupted metabolism of xenobiotics in urban populations. In developing countries access to high calorie Continue reading >>

Nutrient Sensor Links Obesity With Diabetes Risk

Nutrient Sensor Links Obesity With Diabetes Risk

Overeating can lead to the development of insulin resistance and diabetes. A component of the mTOR nutrient signaling pathway now bridges the mechanistic gap between obesity and insulin resistance. Additional access options: Affiliations Continue reading >>

The Effect Of Tobacco Cessation On Weight Gain, Obesity, And Diabetes Risk

The Effect Of Tobacco Cessation On Weight Gain, Obesity, And Diabetes Risk

Abstract Objective Most smokers gain weight after quitting, and some develop new onset obesity and type 2 diabetes. The purpose of this paper is to synthesize the current science investigating the consequences of tobacco cessation on body weight and diabetes, as well as intervention strategies that minimize or prevent weight gain while still allowing for successful tobacco cessation. Systematic reviews and relevant studies that were published since prior reviews were selected. Smoking cessation can cause excessive weight gain in some individuals and can be associated with clinically significant outcomes such as diabetes or obesity onset. Interventions that combine smoking cessation and weight control can be effective for improving cessation and minimizing weight gain but need to be tested in specific populations. Conclusions Despite the health benefits of quitting tobacco, post-cessation weight gain and new onset obesity and diabetes are a significant concern. Promising interventions may need to be more widely applied to reduce the consequences of both obesity and tobacco use. Introduction Tobacco use continues to be a major public health problem and the leading preventable cause of death. Unfortunately, most smokers will gain weight after quitting, and a significant minority of smokers will gain an excess amount which may increase their risk for diabetes onset. This article presents a narrative review of the prevalence and impact of cessation-related weight gain on obesity and diabetes and a summary of cessation interventions aimed at addressing post-cessation weight gain. We primarily used PubMed to search for English language articles describing the effects of tobacco cessation on weight, diabetes, and glucose control as well as studies examining mechanisms for those Continue reading >>

Wife’s Obesity Could Increase Risk Of Diabetes In Men: 5 Handy Tips To Keep Obesity In Check

Wife’s Obesity Could Increase Risk Of Diabetes In Men: 5 Handy Tips To Keep Obesity In Check

Obesity is a disorder involving excessive body fat that increases the risk of various other health problems. For the longest time, experts have studied the effect of obesity on an individual in detail, but according to a latest study, a wife’s obese condition can not only up her diabetes risk but her husband’s too. The study revealed that obesity can substantially increase her risk of developing Type 2 diabetes, especially in middle age -- but women with an obese husband have no additional risk. The study revealed that for every 5 kg/m2 higher BMI in a wife, the husband's Type 2 diabetes risk was 21 per cent higher when accounting for the man's own BMI. Adam Hulman from Aarhus University in Denmark said, "Having an obese wife increases a man's risk of diabetes over and above the effect of his own obesity level, while among women, having an obese husband gives no additional diabetes risk beyond that of her own obesity level.” "Our results indicate that on finding obesity in a person, screening of their spouse for diabetes may be justified," Hulman added. The research, also suggests that people over 55 with a spouse with Type 2 diabetes tend to be more obese than their peers without a diabetic partner. The study presented at the 2017 European Association for the Study of Diabetes (EASD) Annual Meeting in Lisbo further explained that obesity or Type 2 diabetes in one partner could lead to Type 2 diabetes in the other due to the many risk behaviours which often leads to diabetes shared by couples, such as unhealthy eating habits and inadequate physical activity. "Recognising shared risk between spouses may improve diabetes detection and motivate couples to increase collaborative efforts to eat more healthily and boost their activity levels," Hulman said. From heart di Continue reading >>

Cardiovascular Disease & Diabetes

Cardiovascular Disease & Diabetes

The following statistics speak loud and clear that there is a strong correlation between cardiovascular disease (CVD) and diabetes. At least 68 percent of people age 65 or older with diabetes die from some form of heart disease; and 16% die of stroke. Adults with diabetes are two to four times more likely to die from heart disease than adults without diabetes. The American Heart Association considers diabetes to be one of the seven major controllable risk factors for cardiovascular disease. Why are people with diabetes at increased risk for CVD? Diabetes is treatable, but even when glucose levels are under control it greatly increases the risk of heart disease and stroke. That's because people with diabetes, particularly type 2 diabetes, may have the following conditions that contribute to their risk for developing cardiovascular disease. High blood pressure (hypertension) High blood pressure has long been recognized as a major risk factor for cardiovascular disease. Studies report a positive association between hypertension and insulin resistance. When patients have both hypertension and diabetes, which is a common combination, their risk for cardiovascular disease doubles. Abnormal cholesterol and high triglycerides Patients with diabetes often have unhealthy cholesterol levels including high LDL ("bad") cholesterol, low HDL ("good") cholesterol, and high triglycerides. This triad of poor lipid counts often occurs in patients with premature coronary heart disease. It is also characteristic of a lipid disorder associated with insulin resistance called atherogenic dyslipidemia, or diabetic dyslipidemia in those patients with diabetes. Learn more about cholesterol abnormalities as they relate to diabetes. Obesity Obesity is a major risk factor for cardiovascular disease Continue reading >>

Obesity Increases Childhood Diabetes Risk

Obesity Increases Childhood Diabetes Risk

Children with obesity may be 4 times more likely to develop type 2 diabetes. Obesity and diabetes have plagued individuals around the world with numerous health problems, including heart disease and death. While the link between obesity and diabetes has been well-established, the prevalence of both conditions continues to grow around the world. This epidemic has also spread to children, with obesity affecting more than 12.7 million children and teenagers in the United States alone. Findings from a new large-scale study published by the Journal of the Endocrine Society suggests that pediatric obesity may quadruple the risk of developing type 2 diabetes. "As the prevalence of obesity and being overweight has rapidly risen, an increasing number of children and young adults have been diagnosed with diabetes in the United Kingdom since the early 1990s," said study author, Ali Abbasi, MD, PhD. "A child with obesity faces a four-fold greater risk of being diagnosed with diabetes by age 25 than a counterpart who is normal weight." Included in the study were data from electronic health records, body mass index, diabetes status, and other information for 369,362 patients aged 2 to 15. Between 1994 and 2013, the authors found that 1318 patients were diagnosed with type 1 diabetes, while 654 were diagnosed with type 2 diabetes. Approximately half of all patients diagnosed with type 2 diabetes during this time had obesity, according to the study. The authors reported no link between type 1 diabetes and obesity. Since type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune condition, it has not been associated with obesity or overweight. Another study discovered that incidence of newly-diagnosed type 1 diabetes among youth increased approximately 1.8% each year from 2002 to 2012, and cases of type 2 diabet Continue reading >>

Obesity, Poverty Help Explain Higher Diabetes Risk For U.s. Blacks

Obesity, Poverty Help Explain Higher Diabetes Risk For U.s. Blacks

(Reuters Health) - Even though black adults are more likely to develop diabetes than white adults, the increased risk is largely due to obesity and other risk factors that may be possible to change, a U.S. study suggests. Researchers followed 4,251 black and white men and women starting when they were 18 to 30 years old; none of them had diabetes to start with. After an average follow-up of more than 24 years, 504 of the participants developed diabetes. Compared to white women, black women were almost three times more likely to develop diabetes, researchers report in the Journal of the American Medical Association. Black men, meanwhile, had 67 percent higher odds of becoming diabetic than white men. However, there was no longer a meaningful difference in diabetes risk between black and white people once researchers accounted for a variety of factors that can contribute to this disease including obesity, neighborhood segregation and poverty levels, depression, education and employment. “Our work suggests that if we can eliminate these differences in traditional risk factors between blacks and whites then we can reduce the race disparities in the development of diabetes,” said lead study author Michael Bancks, a researcher at Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine in Chicago. This isn’t an easy fix, Bancks acknowledged. “To eliminate the higher rate of diabetes, everybody needs to have access to healthy foods, safe spaces for physical activity and equal economic opportunity to have enough money to afford these things and live in communities that offer this,” Bancks said by email. “Prior research by our team has shown that black adults live in neighborhoods that have higher rates of poverty, fewer grocery stores and (fewer) safe places for physical Continue reading >>

The Magnitude Of Association Between Overweight And Obesity And The Risk Of Diabetes: A Meta-analysis Of Prospective Cohort Studies

The Magnitude Of Association Between Overweight And Obesity And The Risk Of Diabetes: A Meta-analysis Of Prospective Cohort Studies

Abstract The objectives of this meta-analysis were to examine the magnitude of the relative risk (RR) of developing type 2 diabetes for overweight and obese populations, compared to those with normal weight, and to determine causes of the variation in RR between various cohort studies. The magnitude of the RR was analyzed by combining 18 prospective cohort studies that matched defined criteria. The variance in RR between studies was explored. The overall RR of diabetes for obese persons compared to those with normal weight was 7.19, 95% CI: 5.74, 9.00 and for overweight was 2.99, 95% CI: 2.42, 3.72. The variation in RR among studies was explored and it was found that the effect of heterogeneity was highly related with sample size, method of assessment of body mass index (BMI) and method of ascertainment of type 2 diabetes. By combining only cohort studies with more than 400 cases of incident diabetes (>median), adjusted by at least three main confounding variables (age, family history of type 2 diabetes, physical activity), measured BMI, and diabetes determined by clinical diagnosis, the RR was 7.28, 95% CI: 6.47, 8.28 for obesity and 2.92, 95% CI: 2.57, 3.32 for overweight. Continue reading >>

Anti-stress Compound Reduces Obesity And Diabetes Risk

Anti-stress Compound Reduces Obesity And Diabetes Risk

Summary: A protein associated with anxiety and depression has been found to act as a link between the stress regulatory system and metabolic processes, research report. Source: Max Planck Institute. For the first time, scientists from the Max Planck Institute of Psychiatry in Munich could prove that a stress protein found in muscle has a diabetes promoting effect. This finding could pave the way to a completely new treatment approach. For some time, researchers have known that the protein FKBP51 is associated with depression and anxiety disorders. It is involved in the regulation of the stress system – when the system does not function properly; mental disorders may develop. Now, researchers at the Max Planck Institute of Psychiatry have discovered a new, surprising role for this protein: It acts as a molecular link between the stress regulatory system and metabolic processes in the body. “FKBP51 influences a signaling cascade in muscle tissue, which with excessive calorie intake leads to the development of glucose intolerance, i.e., the key indicator of diabetes type 2,” project leader Mathias Schmidt summarizes. An unhealthy diet, rich in fat means stress for the body. If FKBP51 is increasingly produced in the muscle it leads to reduced absorption of glucose – as a result, diabetes and obesity may develop. If FKBP51 is blocked, diabetes will not develop, even if too many calories are consumed or the body is still stressed. Less FKBP51 in the muscle tissue means reduced glucose intolerance and thus maintenance of normal metabolism. If FKBP51 is blocked, diabetes will not develop, even if too many calories are consumed or the body is still stressed. Less FKBP51 in the muscle tissue means reduced glucose intolerance and thus maintenance of normal metabolism. Neur Continue reading >>

Studies On Uk Couples Suggest They Share The Risk Of Obesity And Type 2 Diabetes

Studies On Uk Couples Suggest They Share The Risk Of Obesity And Type 2 Diabetes

In people aged 50 or older, having an obese wife substantially increases a man's risk of developing type 2 diabetes (T2D), according to the first study to investigate the sex-specific effect of spousal obesity on diabetes risk. The research, being presented at this year's European Association for the Study of Diabetes (EASD) Annual Meeting in Lisbon, Portugal (11-15 September), also suggests that the over 55s with a spouse with T2D tend to be more obese than their peers without a diabetic partner. The authors say that obesity or T2D in one partner could lead to T2D in the other due to the many risk behaviours that lead to diabetes shared by couples, such as poor eating habits and little physical activity. People who are obese or have a family history of T2D are already known to have a much higher risk of T2D. But until now, the sex-specific effect of spousal obesity beyond the person's own obesity level on the risk of developing T2D was unclear. These are the first studies that specifically analyse these links. In the first of two studies, Adam Hulman from Aarhus University in Denmark and colleagues examined the association of spousal diabetes and obesity with the risk of developing T2D in 3650 men and 3478 women (aged 50 or older) from the English Longitudinal Study of Ageing (ELSA)--a nationally representative sample of older men and women living in England. Participants were interviewed every 2.5 years during 1998-2015, and incidence of T2D was identified from self-reports or clinical examination. The results were adjusted for potential factors that might contribute to the risk of developing T2D such as age, ethnicity, socioeconomic status, and an individual's own obesity level (i.e., body mass index and waist circumference). Over the median follow-up of 11.5 years, Continue reading >>

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