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Oats Recipe For Diabetes

Diabetic Oatmeal-raisin Cookies

Diabetic Oatmeal-raisin Cookies

Preheat the oven to 325 degrees. Mix the flour with the cinnamon. Cream the butter and both the sugars until fluffy. Add the egg, milk, and vanilla. Gradually add the flour mixture. Stir in oats and raisins. Drop by teaspoonfuls if small cookies are desired, tablespoons if larger cookies are desired onto parchment paper (this stuff is reusable - one sheet will do the whole batch). Bake until golden brown, 10-12 minutes. Cool on wire racks. Continue reading >>

Oats Recipe For Diabetics

Oats Recipe For Diabetics

Take a look at more Breakfast Recipes. You may also want to try Healthy Savoury Carrot and Parsley Pancakes, Best Sambar Mini Idly, Easy Red Rice String Hopper - Idiyappam Handful of - moth beans, soaked overnight 2 tsp - oil 1 tsp - coriander leaves, chopped Pressure cook moth beans with very little water and salt for 1 to 2 whistles Wash oats quickly and drain the water thoroughly and steam cook immediately for exactly 4 to 5 mins on a high flame Remove immediately and sprinkle some salt and 1 tsp oil, and mix lightly, to prevent the oats from becoming mushy Heat a pan with 1 tsp oil, splutter mustard, cumin, onion, chilli and curry leaves and ginger, increase the flame to high, add the moth beans and cook till dry. Add the oats, turmeric and fry on a high flame for 2 mins, switch off the heat, add the lemon juice, carrot, coconut and coriander leaves, mix and serve. Recipe Courtesy: Indian Healthy Recipes Continue reading >>

Oatmeal And Diabetes: The Do’s And Don’ts

Oatmeal And Diabetes: The Do’s And Don’ts

Diabetes is a metabolic condition that affects how the body either produces or uses insulin. This makes it difficult to maintain blood sugar, which is crucial for the health of those with diabetes. When managing blood sugar, it’s important to control the amount of carbohydrates eaten in one sitting, since carbs directly affect blood sugar. The American Diabetes Association’s general recommendation for carb intake is to consume 45-60 grams per main meal, and 15-30 grams for snacks. It’s also important to choose nutrient-dense types of carbohydrates over refined and processed carbs with added sugar. This means that what you eat matters a great deal. Eating foods that are high in fiber and nutrients but low in unhealthy fat and sugar can help maintain a healthy blood sugar level, as well as improve your overall health. Oatmeal offers a host of health benefits, and can be a great go-to food for those with diabetes, as long as the portion is controlled. One cup of cooked oatmeal contains approximately 30 grams of carbs, which can fit into a healthy meal plan for people with diabetes. Oatmeal has long been a common breakfast food. Oatmeal is made of oat groats, which are oat kernels with the husks removed. It’s typically made of steel cut (or chopped), rolled, or “instant” oat goats. Oatmeal is cooked with liquid mixed in and is served warm, often with add-ins like nuts, sweeteners, or fruit. It can be made ahead and reheated in the morning for a quick and easy breakfast. Because oatmeal has a low glycemic index, it can help maintain glucose levels. This can be beneficial for people with diabetes, who especially need to manage their blood sugar levels. Oatmeal in its pure form may reduce the amount of insulin a patient needs. Oatmeal can also promote heart health, Continue reading >>

Oatmeal For People With Diabetes

Oatmeal For People With Diabetes

The American Diabetes Association recommends whole grains, like oatmeal, as a good way to increase soluble fiber in the diet. Soluble fiber can help improve blood glucose control by slowing the absorption of sugar from the digestive system. Oatmeal can lower low density lipoprotein, or "bad" cholesterol, when it's consumed daily. People with diabetes have at least double the risk for heart disease, according to the American Heart Association, and lowering cholesterol is one way to help reduce the risk for heart disease. Video of the Day Benefits of Oatmeal A December 2013 article in "Forschende Komplementärmedizin/Research in Complementary Medicine" reported that eating oatmeal may help improve sensitivity to the blood-sugar-regulating hormone insulin in obese people with poorly controlled type 2 diabetes. Another study in the August 2012 issue of "Nutrition Journal" found that people who consumed oatmeal daily for 6 weeks, as part of a low-fat diet based on nutritious whole foods, decreased waist size by 1/2 inch and reduced LDL cholesterol by 15 mg/dL. The control group in this study ate wheat noodles instead of oatmeal and experienced a 1/3-inch gain in waist size. LDL cholesterol dropped by 7 mg/dL in the control group. Steel cut oats are the least processed and cook in about 45 minutes. Rolled oats are slightly processed to reduce cooking time, but they still contain the whole grain and cook in about 10 minutes. Quick-cooking oats cook in even less time. Instant oatmeal contains less fiber and often contains added sugar, although plain instant oatmeal without added sugar is available. One cup of cooked oatmeal contains about 27 g of carbohydrates. Healthy toppings include a sprinkle of chopped nuts, cinnamon, berries or other fruit and low-fat milk. Continue reading >>

Is Oatmeal Good For People With Diabetes?

Is Oatmeal Good For People With Diabetes?

Oatmeal, also known as porridge, is a popular breakfast food made from oats. There are several different types of oatmeal including rolled oats (old-fashioned), instant, and steel-cut. All oatmeal starts with whole raw oats, which are harvested and cleaned. The outer shell, or hull, is removed, leaving the edible grain or "groat" behind. People can buy and consume oat groats, but they need to be cooked for 50-60 minutes to soften. Steel-cut oats are made when the groats are chopped with a metal blade. Steel-cut oats cook more quickly - about 20-30 minutes - because they are further broken down. Rolled oats or old-fashioned oatmeal is made by steaming and rolling the groats into flakes. This cuts cooking time down to 3-5 minutes. Instant oats or "quick oats" are made by further steaming and rolling the oats, bringing the cook time down to as little as 30-60 seconds. The texture of steel-cut, old-fashioned, and instant oats differs widely, and which one is best is a personal preference. People who have tried quick oats and not enjoyed their softer texture should try the hardier steel-cut oats. The nutritional profile of each cut of oats is the same when they are plain. However, many instant oats have added sugar and flavorings and are often high in sodium. Also, the higher the level of processing, the quicker the speed of digestion, and the higher the glycemic index, a measure of how quickly blood sugar rises when eating. How does oatmeal affect people with diabetes? Oatmeal is mainly a source of carbohydrate. Carbohydrates are converted to sugar when digested and increase sugar levels in the bloodstream. Carbohydrates that have fiber cause a slower release of sugar into the bloodstream, lowering the potential spike in blood sugar after a meal. A diet that is high in proc Continue reading >>

Baked Apple And Banana Oatmeal

Baked Apple And Banana Oatmeal

Upgrade your oatmeal with this baked version – made especially heart-healthy with the use of canola oil, which is rich in omega-3 fat and is a good source of vitamin E. You can substitute berries for the apple if you prefer. Ingredients 2 cups rolled oats 500 mL 1/2 Tbsp baking powder 7 mL 1 tsp cinnamon 5 mL 1/4 tsp salt 1 mL 1 apple, diced 1 banana, sliced 1 egg 1 cup skim milk 250 mL 3 Tbsp canola oil 45 mL 1/3 cup maple syrup or brown sugar 75 mL 3/4 tsp vanilla extract 4 mL canola oil cooking spray Instructions Preheat oven to 350°F (180°C). In large bowl, mix together oats, baking powder, cinnamon and salt. Stir in apples and banana; set aside. In another bowl, whisk together egg, milk, canola oil, maple syrup or brown sugar and vanilla extract. Pour over dry mixture and gently stir to combine. Spray 8- x 8-inch (20- x 20-cm) baking dish with canola oil spray. Pour mixture into baking dish and bake for 45 minutes or until golden brown. Notes Serving size: 1/2 cup (125 mL) Recipe courtesy of canolainfo.org, featured in the Canadian Diabetes Association’s 2014 Healthy Living Calendar. To download the latest recipes, visit diabetes.ca/calendar. Calories 270 Total Fat 7 g Saturated Fat 0.5 g Cholesterol 25 mg Carbohydrates 33 g Fibre 3 g Sugars 15 g Protein 5 g Sodium 170 mg Potassium 182 mg Continue reading >>

14 Foods That Could Change A Diabetic's Life

14 Foods That Could Change A Diabetic's Life

Print Font: When you think of managing blood sugar, odds are you obsess over everything you can't have. While it's certainly important to limit no-no ingredients (like white, refined breads and pastas and fried, fatty, processed foods), it's just as crucial to pay attention to what you should eat. We suggest you start here. Numerous nutrition and diabetes experts singled out these power foods because 1) they're packed with the 4 healthy nutrients (fiber, omega-3s, calcium, and vitamin D) that make up Prevention's Diabetes DTOUR Diet, and 2) they're exceptionally versatile, so you can use them in recipes, as add-ons to meals, or stand-alone snacks. 1. Beans Beans have more to boast about than being high in fiber (plant compounds that help you feel full, steady blood sugar, and even lower cholesterol; a half cup of black beans delivers more than 7 grams). They're a not-too-shabby source of calcium, a mineral that research shows can help burn body fat. In ½ cup of white beans, you'll get almost 100 mg of calcium—about 10% of your daily intake. Beans also make an excellent protein source; unlike other proteins Americans commonly eat (such as red meat), beans are low in saturated fat—the kind that gunks up arteries and can lead to heart disease. How to eat them: Add them to salads, soups, chili, and more. There are so many different kinds of beans, you could conceivably have them every day for a week and not eat the same kind twice. 2. Dairy You're not going to find a better source of calcium and vitamin D—a potent diabetes-quelling combination—than in dairy foods like milk, cottage cheese, and yogurt. One study found that women who consumed more than 1,200 mg of calcium and more than 800 IU of vitamin D a day were 33% less likely to develop diabetes than those taki Continue reading >>

Diabetic Recipes Recipes

Diabetic Recipes Recipes

This category has been viewed 658115 times Healthy Recipes > 343 A bunch of delicious and meticulously-planned recipes that put the fun back into diabetic-friendly meals! Starting from breakfast to snacks and soups, to the main course and desserts, this section is sure to change the misconception that diabetes and good food do not go together! Here, we also re-introduce you to smart, low-carb, high-fibre variants of all your favourite foods, which you sadly pushed away due to diabetes! Created by a team of experienced nutritionists, these healthy recipes will help you keep blood sugar in control while enjoying delicious meals like the Babycorn, Bean Sprouts and Cucumber Salad with Lemony Basil Dressing, Baked Nachni Chivda, Black Jamun Ice - Cream! Moreover the nutrition content of each recipe is also shared, to help you chalk out a healthy and tasty meal plan. Recipe# 33702 13 Nov 17 Apple Pancake, Healthy Diabetic Dessert Recipe by Tarla Dalal The aroma of apples stewed with cinnamon is just too hard to resist! The fruity and spicy aroma and flavour are guaranteed to delight the taste buds. While this combo has proved its worth in many forms ranging from pies to cakes, here we have harnessed it to make a delightfully tasty but easy de .... Recipe# 3568 26 Nov 12 Dahi Bhindi ki Subji by Tarla Dalal Recipe# 3510 20 Aug 11 Recipe# 42030 25 Aug 17 Recipe# 3511 20 Aug 11 Recipe# 38028 12 Apr 15 Recipe# 7436 12 Apr 15 Recipe# 33772 18 Jan 17 Recipe# 39646 10 Oct 14 Recipe# 5524 31 Oct 17 Recipe# 33771 02 Aug 16 Recipe# 3476 27 Dec 16 Recipe# 39956 07 Oct 17 Recipe# 35073 18 Oct 10 Tomato Methi Rice ( Iron Rich Recipe ) by Tarla Dalal Recipe# 4652 11 Sep 14 Recipe# 35079 18 Oct 10 Recipe# 39597 23 Nov 15 Recipe# 22166 23 Mar 13 Recipe# 41178 07 Oct 16 Recipe# 4664 11 Sep 14 Continue reading >>

Healthy Recipe For Diabetics: Oats Upma

Healthy Recipe For Diabetics: Oats Upma

/ Healthy recipe for diabetics: Oats upma A bowl of freshly cooked oats upma can be one of the healthiest options for breakfast. Naini Setalvad | Updated: November 14, 2014 10:13 am Tags: Diabetic food Oatmeal Oats Oats upma Recipes World Diabetes Day World Diabetes Day 2014 A bowl of freshly cooked oats upma can be one of the healthiest options for breakfast. Oats is rich in dietary fibre while the vegetables are rich sources of vitamins and minerals. The spices added to this dish benefits the digestive system. Mixed vegetables like carrot, green beans and peas 2 cups Add mustard, jeera and channa dal. Once it splutters, add chopped onion and saute till golden brown. Add chopped chillies and ginger and saute for 3 minutes. Add all the vegetables and saut briefly. Add water to the vegetables and bring to a boil. Cover with a lid and cook till the oats are cooked. Published: November 13, 2014 11:51 pm | Updated:November 14, 2014 10:13 am Disclaimer: TheHealthSite.com does not guarantee any specific results as a result of the procedures mentioned here and the results may vary from person to person. The topics in these pages including text, graphics, videos and other material contained on this website are for informational purposes only and not to be substituted for professional medical advice. Continue reading >>

Problem Foods: Can Diabetics Eat Oatmeal?

Problem Foods: Can Diabetics Eat Oatmeal?

Problem Foods: Can Diabetics Eat Oatmeal? Problem Foods: Can Diabetics Eat Oatmeal? Our registered dietitian and CDE Amy Reeder weighs in on whether or not you should eat oatmeal. Amy Reeder is a Certified Diabetes Educator with a masters degree in nutrition from the University of Utah. She has worked in the diabetes field since 2005 and has been a Certified Diabetes Educator since 2007. There are several foods that share a common theme among people with diabetes: they wreak havoc on your blood sugar. Pizza, pasta, and cereal are a few. Oatmeal is another. Most people report a spike in blood glucose after eating oatmeal compared to other breakfast foods. Surprisingly, for such a simple food, oatmeal can be found in many different formsinstant, slow-cooking, flavored, unflavored, plain, and chock-full of toppings. Some of the flavored oatmeals, like apple cinnamon and maple brown sugar, contain as much as four teaspoons of added sugar. Combine that added sugar with the fact that some people with diabetes are more insulin resistant in the morning time and you have a recipe for challenging blood sugar control! If you do enjoy oatmeal for breakfast (or anytime) and it does cause your blood sugars to surge, here are a few tips that might work to even things out: Cook plain, whole oats, or steel-cut oats on the stove top. These oats have not been processed as much as instant oats and take longer to digest and absorb as glucose in the bloodstream. Try the overnight oats recipe below if you only have time to heat in the morning as opposed to cook. Add your own sweetener. If you like your oatmeal a little sweet, add a touch of Splenda, agave, or honey. A little goes a long way. And theres a good chance you wont add nearly as much as the company making the flavored stuff. A few Continue reading >>

Spiced Overnight Oats With Applesauce And Chia

Spiced Overnight Oats With Applesauce And Chia

Afraid of eating oatmeal because of the carb count? I was too until I read The End of Diabetes by Joel Fuhrman, MD (affiliate link) and noticed that most of his breakfasts were oat-based. Variations of Spiced Overnight Oats with Applesauce and Chia have become a go-to in our house. I’ve been intrigued with the idea of soaking oats overnight for quite a while. The CompostMaster said he remembers his mother doing it when he was young, but when he asked her for instructions late in her life, she had no idea what he was talking about. Then I saw The Healthy Maven’s recipe for Pumpkin Spiced Latte Overnight Oats. I wasn’t particularly interested in the coffee aspect of the recipe, but I remembered having a bit of leftover pumpkin after making Pumpkin Pineapple Muffins, so I thought I’d give it a spin. I went to the refrigerator in search of the pumpkin and couldn’t find it anywhere. I finally asked the CompostMaster if he knew where it was. “Remember those mashed sweet potatoes I made the other night?” he said. “Guess what the secret ingredient was?” Still determined to try the oats, I substituted some of my incredibly easy to make Cinnamon Applesauce that was in the refrigerator and switched up the spices. I haven’t tried the original pumpkin flavor yet, but I’m extremely pleased with how my apple version turned out. The trickiest part about making spiced overnight oats is remembering to soak the oatmeal. I can’t tell you how many mornings I got up thinking we were going to have oatmeal and then realized I’d forgotten to soak the oats the night before. I ended up putting a sticky note on my cabinet to remind me. Make Spiced Overnight Oats Portable If you are the eat-breakfast-at-the-office type of person, this recipe is perfect for you. Mix it up i Continue reading >>

7 Easy Breakfast Ideas For Type 2 Diabetes

7 Easy Breakfast Ideas For Type 2 Diabetes

Cooking with less fat by using nonstick pans and cooking sprays and avoiding fat- and sugar-laden coffee drinks will help ensure that you're eating a healthy breakfast. For many people, breakfast is the most neglected meal of the day. But if you have type 2 diabetes, breakfast is a must, and it can have real benefits. “The body really needs the nutrients that breakfast provides to literally ‘break the fast’ that results during sleeping hours,” says Kelly Kennedy, MS, RD, an Everyday Health dietitian. “Having a source of healthy carbohydrates along with protein and fiber is the perfect way to start the morning.” Eating foods at breakfast that have a low glycemic index may help prevent a spike in blood sugar all morning long — and even after lunch. Eating peanut butter or almond butter at breakfast, for example, will keep you feeling full, thanks to the combination of protein and fat, according to the American Diabetes Association. And a good breakfast helps kick-start your morning metabolism and keeps your energy up throughout the day. Pressed for time? You don't have to create an elaborate spread. Here are seven diabetes-friendly breakfast ideas to help you stay healthy and get on with your day. 1. Breakfast Shake For a meal in a minute, blend one cup of fat-free milk or plain nonfat yogurt with one-half cup of fruit, such as strawberries, bananas, or blueberries. Add one teaspoon of wheat germ, a teaspoon of nuts, and ice and blend for a tasty, filling, and healthy breakfast. Time saver: Measure everything out the night before. 2. Muffin Parfait Halve a whole grain or other high-fiber muffin (aim for one with 30 grams of carbohydrates and at least 3 grams of fiber), cover with berries, and top with a dollop of low- or nonfat yogurt for a fast and easy bre Continue reading >>

From Pre-diabetes To No Diabetes In Sight. This Guy Rocked It! + Overnight Steel Cut Oats

From Pre-diabetes To No Diabetes In Sight. This Guy Rocked It! + Overnight Steel Cut Oats

I’ve received many an email from people telling me what a bastard I am to mention weight loss as a benefit of eating a Whole Food Plant Based diet. I’m always happy to get these emails because I like hearing different viewpoints. From what I’ve gathered, there are a couple of directions that people generally take on the losing weight train. There are the people who stand up for Big is Beautiful and any mention of weight loss stems from a collective societal dictation based on unrealistic and contrived views on beauty and acceptance. (Say that three times fast) Then we have people who for whatever reason are pro weight loss. Maybe for people trying to sell stuff it’s an easy market to tap; maybe some people are hung up on supermodels, and maybe some people just feel better after they lose a few pounds. It’s different for everyone, and everyone’s view should be accepted, regardless of your take. But here’s the thing. There’s not a fine line, there’s a line the size of the Grand fucking Canyon between losing weight when one is already healthy, and losing weight to save one’s life or to add a great deal of quality to that life. The conversation about losing weight for actual health reasons transcends any conversation about whether or not the topic of weight loss puts a damper on people’s confidence and self acceptance in society. For some people, there’s no angle or agenda, losing weight for them means going from pre-diabetes to no diabetes, having high blood pressure to normal blood pressure and having high cholesterol to perfect cholesterol. So for me, mentioning weight loss as a benefit of eating a plant based diet isn’t just important; it’s really fucking important. There are people who have turned their entire world around by dropping extra Continue reading >>

5 Overnight Oats Recipes For Stable Blood Sugar All Morning

5 Overnight Oats Recipes For Stable Blood Sugar All Morning

Start your day with a slow-burning, nutrient dense breakfast. For five years, I followed a raw vegan diet, which completely transformed my life and body. While I no longer eat strictly raw foods, I will never forget all of the recipes that I learned along the way. The reason that I stuck with the lifestyle for so long was because it was actually super easy: I ate in abundance, and, though I ate pounds of fruit each day, I never had a sugar crash. This is because I combined my foods in a way that helped me have sustained energy for hours while my body focused on absorbing the nutrients I had consumed. So what’s to say that those same recipes can’t make an appearance in my not-so-raw-life now? And who says that you have to be vegan to benefit from them? This lifestyle oozes in healthy eating, and so any recipe that you venture to try is likely fueling your body in the best possible way. This is especially helpful for those of us with diabetes because every single bite we take makes a huge difference in our health, both short term and long term. Here are a few key nutrients that are packed in most overnight oats recipes: Omega 3s Omega 3s are like the nutritional powerhouse for diabetics. A lot of the difficulties that diabetes causes can be counterbalanced with a healthy dose of omega 3 fatty acids in the diet. Omega 3s are easily found in walnuts, flaxseeds, chia seeds, and hemp seeds. Vitamin C has been found to reduce blood glucose levels and lipids in patients with type 2 diabetes. It’s not too difficult to get your daily dose of vitamin C either as it can be found in virtually every fruit and vegetable! Vitamin E Vitamin E helps support the heart against the detrimental effects of diabetes according to the Journal of Clinical Pharmacy and Therapeutics. Plus, he Continue reading >>

Overnight Oats 3 Ways

Overnight Oats 3 Ways

It isn't news that oatmeal is one of the healthiest ways you can start your day. But if you're anything like me, it's not your favorite way. Ever since I was a little girl, the texture of oatmeal has been pretty darn gag-worthy. While I am learning to like it, this take on oatmeal might make it a bit more palatable for those who don't love it. And if you loved it already? Well maybe this is even better! Oatmeal is considered a power food for a number of reasons. It boosts energy, supports weight loss and heart health, AND drum roll please... helps lower risk of type 2 diabetes! And for those of us who are managing type 1 or type 2 diabetes, oatmeal has been proven to help stabilize blood sugars. As a big Pinterest fan, I've pinned dozens of "overnight refrigerator oats" recipes. But what I have created with these three oatmeal variations are breakfast dishes that are a little higher in protein and lower in sugars. All three recipes have the same base: almond milk, oats, chia seeds, Siggi's yogurt, and honey. But they have slightly different nutritional benefits. I was pretty excited to discover Siggi's Icelandic Skyr a few months back, as yogurt is a regular part of my breakfast routine. Before discovering Siggi's I was typically eating Greek yogurt in the morning with something mixed in such as fruit or paleo granola. Like Greek yogurt, Icelandic Sykr is much higher in protein and lower in carbohydrates than traditional yogurt or Greek yogurt. In fact, 1 serving of Siggi's has 14 grams of protein with only 100 calories and 11 grams of carbohydrates. It's a bit thicker and much more tart than Greek yogurt, but tastes great with fruit mixed in. Yogurt of any kind is absolutely worth incorporating into your diet; the live active cultures in yogurt (good bacteria, if you w Continue reading >>

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