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Oatmeal And Diabetes

Stabilize Blood Glucose With Oats

Stabilize Blood Glucose With Oats

Look on the Labels Eating oats and other fiber-rich foods for breakfast appears to help keep blood glucose under control throughout the day. When shopping for oat products, look for heart-health claims on the label. The U. S. Food and Drug Administration allows oat products containing 3 or more grams of soluble fiber per serving to make one of these two health claims: "Soluble fiber from oatmeal, as part of a diet low in saturated fat and cholesterol, may reduce the risk of heart disease." "Diets low in saturated fat and cholesterol that include 3 grams of soluble fiber from whole oats per day may reduce the risk of heart disease." The Many Oat Options During processing, the hulls are removed from oats without stripping away the bran or germ, so oats retain their beneficial fiber and nutrients. Roasting gives oats their distinctive toasty, home-style flavor. Further processing methods result in a variety of products. Oat groats: These whole oats have been hulled and roasted. Try them in hot breakfast cereals or stuffings. They take 30 to 40 minutes to cook. Steel-cut oats: When roasted whole oats are cut into bits, they're called steel-cut oats. They take about 30 minutes to cook, but you can cook them ahead and reheat before serving. Old-fashioned rolled oats: These oat kernels have been steamed and flattened into flakes, which lets them cook in about 5 minutes. Quick-cooking rolled oats: When old-fashioned oats are cut finer, they're called quick-cooking because they cook even faster -- in 3 minutes. Instant oatmeal: These oats are rolled very thin and precooked to speed cooking time to 1 minute. Added ingredients can affect the nutrition value, so read labels carefully. Oat bran: Made from the outer layers of the grain, oat bran has a fine texture and is often used i Continue reading >>

Eat Your Oatmeal, Get Diabetes

Eat Your Oatmeal, Get Diabetes

Okay, I confess. That headline is a bit of an exaggeration. Unless you’re eating a sugared-up instant oatmeal, and not balancing out those 32 grams of carbs with an equal amount of protein — say, a half a dozen eggs, or five slices of Canadian bacon. Then it’s very little exaggeration at all. Yeah, I hear ya. “But I thought oatmeal was health food!” Maybe some oatmeal, prepared certain ways, but this stuff? You might as well have Twizzlers for breakfast. Seriously… 1 packet of Quaker Oats Maple & Brown Sugar instant oatmeal has: 157 calories 2 grams of fat 4 grams of protein 32 grams of carbohydrate ( incl 3 g fiber & 13 g added sugar) Similar in macronutrient profile to: 4 Twizzlers, or 2 Fat Free Fudgesicle bars, or a York Peppermint Patty. I have a very personal reason for being so passionate about this. My mom had Type 2 Diabetes, which some studies suggest doubles one’s chances of developing Alzheimer’s. Which my mom also developed. For years she followed the low-fat diet recommended by the American Heart Association and the Diabetes Association. Her breakfast was usually a bowl of oatmeal, wheat toast with a spray of fake butter, fruit, and black coffee. When she ate the low-fat, high-carb breakfast she thought was healthy, it would throw her blood sugar high, and she needed Metformin to bring it down. However, one day when she ate at my house and I served her a balanced breakfast, taking her Metformin made her blood sugar plummet to dangerous levels. (We ended up in the ER.) I often wonder if my she’d had a better understanding of carbs, sugars, insulin and health, if she could have avoided or forestalled Alzheimer’s. It’s too late for her, but you still have time: Kick the corporate food! Shop in the produce section, buy lean meat, educate Continue reading >>

7 Easy Breakfast Ideas For Type 2 Diabetes

7 Easy Breakfast Ideas For Type 2 Diabetes

Cooking with less fat by using nonstick pans and cooking sprays and avoiding fat- and sugar-laden coffee drinks will help ensure that you're eating a healthy breakfast. For many people, breakfast is the most neglected meal of the day. But if you have type 2 diabetes, breakfast is a must, and it can have real benefits. “The body really needs the nutrients that breakfast provides to literally ‘break the fast’ that results during sleeping hours,” says Kelly Kennedy, MS, RD, an Everyday Health dietitian. “Having a source of healthy carbohydrates along with protein and fiber is the perfect way to start the morning.” Eating foods at breakfast that have a low glycemic index may help prevent a spike in blood sugar all morning long — and even after lunch. Eating peanut butter or almond butter at breakfast, for example, will keep you feeling full, thanks to the combination of protein and fat, according to the American Diabetes Association. And a good breakfast helps kick-start your morning metabolism and keeps your energy up throughout the day. Pressed for time? You don't have to create an elaborate spread. Here are seven diabetes-friendly breakfast ideas to help you stay healthy and get on with your day. 1. Breakfast Shake For a meal in a minute, blend one cup of fat-free milk or plain nonfat yogurt with one-half cup of fruit, such as strawberries, bananas, or blueberries. Add one teaspoon of wheat germ, a teaspoon of nuts, and ice and blend for a tasty, filling, and healthy breakfast. Time saver: Measure everything out the night before. 2. Muffin Parfait Halve a whole grain or other high-fiber muffin (aim for one with 30 grams of carbohydrates and at least 3 grams of fiber), cover with berries, and top with a dollop of low- or nonfat yogurt for a fast and easy bre Continue reading >>

Problem Foods: Can Diabetics Eat Oatmeal?

Problem Foods: Can Diabetics Eat Oatmeal?

Problem Foods: Can Diabetics Eat Oatmeal? Problem Foods: Can Diabetics Eat Oatmeal? Our registered dietitian and CDE Amy Reeder weighs in on whether or not you should eat oatmeal. Amy Reeder is a Certified Diabetes Educator with a masters degree in nutrition from the University of Utah. She has worked in the diabetes field since 2005 and has been a Certified Diabetes Educator since 2007. There are several foods that share a common theme among people with diabetes: they wreak havoc on your blood sugar. Pizza, pasta, and cereal are a few. Oatmeal is another. Most people report a spike in blood glucose after eating oatmeal compared to other breakfast foods. Surprisingly, for such a simple food, oatmeal can be found in many different formsinstant, slow-cooking, flavored, unflavored, plain, and chock-full of toppings. Some of the flavored oatmeals, like apple cinnamon and maple brown sugar, contain as much as four teaspoons of added sugar. Combine that added sugar with the fact that some people with diabetes are more insulin resistant in the morning time and you have a recipe for challenging blood sugar control! If you do enjoy oatmeal for breakfast (or anytime) and it does cause your blood sugars to surge, here are a few tips that might work to even things out: Cook plain, whole oats, or steel-cut oats on the stove top. These oats have not been processed as much as instant oats and take longer to digest and absorb as glucose in the bloodstream. Try the overnight oats recipe below if you only have time to heat in the morning as opposed to cook. Add your own sweetener. If you like your oatmeal a little sweet, add a touch of Splenda, agave, or honey. A little goes a long way. And theres a good chance you wont add nearly as much as the company making the flavored stuff. A few Continue reading >>

Is Oatmeal Good For Diabetics?

Is Oatmeal Good For Diabetics?

Here are a few common questions and concerns that we always receive around oatmeal and diabetes: “Do u know if eating oatmeal is good for diabetics?” “I make steel cut oats in the morning and put in honey (from the honey place – real made) some chia seeds, walnuts, half an apple and pumpkin or other seeds if I have them – is this enough to balance out the sugar?” “My sugars go crazy when I eat oatmeal but I was told by a dietitian to eat it.” “I’m confused, can I eat oatmeal, not the packaged kind?” Is Oatmeal Good for Diabetics? (The Short Answer) The short answer: Oatmeal could be okay for you – some type 2 diabetics can eat it. But, it is a higher carb food and for that reason, many type 2 diabetics can’t tolerate it. Unfortunately, there is no clear answer on this, which is often the case with many individual food items. The question for you to ask is, how is your blood sugar and A1C? If you’re struggling to get it under control, you might consider eliminating the oatmeal and opting for lower carb foods (aka more vegetables). Or, you could try testing to see if oats influence your results. Is Oatmeal Good for Diabetics? (The Long Answer) Let’s explore a whole range of things to consider with oats and oatmeal – including nutrition, glycemic index (GI), research, and so forth. Research on Oatmeal and Type 2 Diabetes The research around oats/ oatmeal for type 2 diabetes treatment does show mixed results. A review in Food and Function, 2016, looked at a range of studies but only 4 of those studies included type 2 diabetic patients. An important point to raise is that the results concluded from studies in those without diabetes (healthy subjects) is NOT necessarily going to result in the same conclusions in people who already have diabetes Continue reading >>

Oatmeal And Milk Blood Sugar Spike

Oatmeal And Milk Blood Sugar Spike

Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community Find support, ask questions and share your experiences. Join the community As you all know the doctor recommends to eat oatmeal with milk for breakfast, actually my doctor said to add some dried fruits so I did that and boom my blood sugar was 189 mg/dl after two hours. I don't understand how a doctor can prescribe something like this to a diabetic is crazy, what's the deal with this diets, they want to kill as faster? Also how much do you spike after such a meal? I would spike through the roof. Far too many carbs in oatmeal, and we also have to be careful with milk because it contains a lot of natural sugar. Dried fruits need to be avoided. Doctors need educating about what raises blood sugars! I would spike through the roof. Far too many carbs in oatmeal, and we also have to be careful with milk because it contains a lot of natural sugar. Dried fruits need to be avoided. Doctors need educating about what raises blood sugars! I used to really like a big stodgy bowl of porridge oats and I had this unsweetened with only water added. Before I started my more severe diet I reduced the quantity of oats and bought the version with added wheat and oat bran. Oatmeal is a moderate GI food so on paper it should be OK as part of a controlled diet. There is 27g of carbs in a 50g (dry) serving of the oats with oatbran and wheat bran that I have in the cupboard. That serving also has 6g of fibre and 6g of protein. If you made that as a 35g serving the carb load would only be 19g. I think it's all down to quantities and your own personal carb limits. I hope I can go back to enjoying a (small) portion of oats for breakfast in the future! Everyone is different and oats cause problems for some and not for others. However, dried fruit is prob Continue reading >>

The Metabolic Effects Of Oats Intake In Patients With Type 2 Diabetes: A Systematic Review And Meta-analysis

The Metabolic Effects Of Oats Intake In Patients With Type 2 Diabetes: A Systematic Review And Meta-analysis

Go to: 1. Introduction Type 2 diabetes is a common chronic disease with great global health and economic burden. The prevalence is still increasing due to lifestyle changes, especially in developing countries [1,2]. Diabetic education, nutrition therapy, physical activity, pharmacotherapy and glucose monitoring are key components of diabetes management. Lifestyle intervention including diet control is recommended as the fundamental approach for all patients with type 2 diabetes. Diabetic patients are suggested to consume at least the amount of fibers and whole grains recommended for the general public, which is 14 g fiber/1000 kcals daily or about 25 g/day for adult women and 38 g/day for adult men [3]. Dietary fibers promote one or more of the beneficial effects such as laxation, reduction in blood lipids, modulation of blood glucose due to their non-digestibility in the small intestine and fermentation in the colon. Oats are a good source of soluble dietary fiber rich in β-glucan, which is considered as a bioactive component in reducing postprandial glucose and insulin responses, improving insulin sensitivity, maintaining glycemic control and regulating blood lipids [4,5,6,7]. The United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) suggested that the consumption of 3 g or more per day of β-glucan from oats or barley may reduce the risk of coronary heart disease [8]. A number of studies have reported the beneficial metabolic effects of oats or β-glucan on people with and without type 2 diabetes [9,10,11,12]. A modified diet with β-glucan from oats was reported to be superior to the American Diabetic Association’s diet in improving metabolic and anthropometric profiles in well controlled type 2 diabetic patients: larger decreases in glycosylated hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c Continue reading >>

12 Breakfast Rules For Diabetes

12 Breakfast Rules For Diabetes

First, eat it iStock/EasyBuy4u Even if your blood sugar is high in the morning, don't skip breakfast. Research shows that forgoing a morning meal increases the risk for obesity and insulin resistance. And studies confirm that breakfast eaters are better able to resist fatty and high-calorie foods later in the day. Aim to eat your breakfast at the same time every day, since keeping your blood sugar levels even throughout the day means eating consistently from day to day. Try to incorporate these healthy carbs for diabetes into your breakfast. iStock/ShotShare You can't (and shouldn't) avoid restaurants altogether, but there's one meal you should almost always eat at home: breakfast. Look at the alternatives: Diner-style breakfasts can include 1,000 calories or more with astronomical amounts of carbohydrates and fats. A healthy-sounding whole-wheat bagel with light cream cheese from a bagel shop may contain up to 67 grams of carbs, 450 calories, and 9 grams of fat. A sausage muffin may pack 29 grams of carbs, 370 calories, and 22 grams of fat. Compare those to a bowl of oatmeal (half a cup) with a half cup of fat-free milk, which contains a mere 12 grams of carbs, 195 calories, and 3 grams of fat. iStock/MarkGillow We assume you're already starting out with a cereal that contains at least 5 grams of fiber per serving. (Studies have found that people who regularly eat whole-grain cereal gain less weight than people who don't.) Make it even more diabetes-friendly by adding half a cup (one serving) of fresh fruit, such as strawberries or blueberries. Here's why fruit is healthy for diabetes (not forbidden!). Sprinkle 1 or 2 tablespoons of ground flaxseed on hot and cold cereal and yogurt iStock/Sasha Radosavljevic Rich in protein and fiber, these tiny seeds are a godsend to Continue reading >>

14 Foods That Could Change A Diabetic's Life

14 Foods That Could Change A Diabetic's Life

Print Font: When you think of managing blood sugar, odds are you obsess over everything you can't have. While it's certainly important to limit no-no ingredients (like white, refined breads and pastas and fried, fatty, processed foods), it's just as crucial to pay attention to what you should eat. We suggest you start here. Numerous nutrition and diabetes experts singled out these power foods because 1) they're packed with the 4 healthy nutrients (fiber, omega-3s, calcium, and vitamin D) that make up Prevention's Diabetes DTOUR Diet, and 2) they're exceptionally versatile, so you can use them in recipes, as add-ons to meals, or stand-alone snacks. 1. Beans Beans have more to boast about than being high in fiber (plant compounds that help you feel full, steady blood sugar, and even lower cholesterol; a half cup of black beans delivers more than 7 grams). They're a not-too-shabby source of calcium, a mineral that research shows can help burn body fat. In ½ cup of white beans, you'll get almost 100 mg of calcium—about 10% of your daily intake. Beans also make an excellent protein source; unlike other proteins Americans commonly eat (such as red meat), beans are low in saturated fat—the kind that gunks up arteries and can lead to heart disease. How to eat them: Add them to salads, soups, chili, and more. There are so many different kinds of beans, you could conceivably have them every day for a week and not eat the same kind twice. 2. Dairy You're not going to find a better source of calcium and vitamin D—a potent diabetes-quelling combination—than in dairy foods like milk, cottage cheese, and yogurt. One study found that women who consumed more than 1,200 mg of calcium and more than 800 IU of vitamin D a day were 33% less likely to develop diabetes than those taki Continue reading >>

From Pre-diabetes To No Diabetes In Sight. This Guy Rocked It! + Overnight Steel Cut Oats

From Pre-diabetes To No Diabetes In Sight. This Guy Rocked It! + Overnight Steel Cut Oats

I’ve received many an email from people telling me what a bastard I am to mention weight loss as a benefit of eating a Whole Food Plant Based diet. I’m always happy to get these emails because I like hearing different viewpoints. From what I’ve gathered, there are a couple of directions that people generally take on the losing weight train. There are the people who stand up for Big is Beautiful and any mention of weight loss stems from a collective societal dictation based on unrealistic and contrived views on beauty and acceptance. (Say that three times fast) Then we have people who for whatever reason are pro weight loss. Maybe for people trying to sell stuff it’s an easy market to tap; maybe some people are hung up on supermodels, and maybe some people just feel better after they lose a few pounds. It’s different for everyone, and everyone’s view should be accepted, regardless of your take. But here’s the thing. There’s not a fine line, there’s a line the size of the Grand fucking Canyon between losing weight when one is already healthy, and losing weight to save one’s life or to add a great deal of quality to that life. The conversation about losing weight for actual health reasons transcends any conversation about whether or not the topic of weight loss puts a damper on people’s confidence and self acceptance in society. For some people, there’s no angle or agenda, losing weight for them means going from pre-diabetes to no diabetes, having high blood pressure to normal blood pressure and having high cholesterol to perfect cholesterol. So for me, mentioning weight loss as a benefit of eating a plant based diet isn’t just important; it’s really fucking important. There are people who have turned their entire world around by dropping extra Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes: Get Your Oatmeal On!

Type 2 Diabetes: Get Your Oatmeal On!

Theres a whole grain craze going on in America and everywhere you look, some company is advertising the fact that their product is made from whole grain. Breads, pasta, pancakes, crackers, mustard, its everywhere! For diabetics, whole grain foods can offer our body nutrients, fiber, vitamins, and minerals that are beneficial to our health. I typically start my day with a cup of oatmeal. This insures that I get a healthy dose of fiber. Oatmeal is just one form of whole grain foods but it has been shown that three grams of soluble fiber from oatmeal can reduce the risk of heart disease. Heart disease is a real concern for diabetics as diabetics are said to be at a higher risk for heart attack and stroke. Oatmeal also packs 16% fiber per serving which is great because fiber helps control blood sugar. I read a Mercola article online which stated that people who eat more than 26 grams of fiber a day have an 18 percent lower chance of developing Type II diabetes. But what if youre already a diabetic? Well, 26 grams of fiber can go a long way in helping reverse diabetes. For a healthier serving of oatmeal, I sometimes add blueberries, Truvia, and a tablespoon of coconut oil to give me added health benefits. If you want to help your body, get your oatmeal on! america Diabetes eat clean fiber grams Health magazine minerals Product type 2 diabetes vitamins whole grain 3 thoughts on Type 2 Diabetes: Get Your Oatmeal On! This is terrible advice for a type 2 diabetic. The amount of carbs from eating oats, regardless of how healthy it might seem, causes concerning damage due to blood glucose spikes. All the same nutrients are available in much better carbohydrate choices like leafy greens, vegetables, meat, cheese, nuts and the list goes on. A better choice of fiber is bran because Continue reading >>

Is Oatmeal Good For People With Diabetes?

Is Oatmeal Good For People With Diabetes?

Oatmeal, also known as porridge, is a popular breakfast food made from oats. There are several different types of oatmeal including rolled oats (old-fashioned), instant, and steel-cut. All oatmeal starts with whole raw oats, which are harvested and cleaned. The outer shell, or hull, is removed, leaving the edible grain or "groat" behind. People can buy and consume oat groats, but they need to be cooked for 50-60 minutes to soften. Steel-cut oats are made when the groats are chopped with a metal blade. Steel-cut oats cook more quickly - about 20-30 minutes - because they are further broken down. Rolled oats or old-fashioned oatmeal is made by steaming and rolling the groats into flakes. This cuts cooking time down to 3-5 minutes. Instant oats or "quick oats" are made by further steaming and rolling the oats, bringing the cook time down to as little as 30-60 seconds. The texture of steel-cut, old-fashioned, and instant oats differs widely, and which one is best is a personal preference. People who have tried quick oats and not enjoyed their softer texture should try the hardier steel-cut oats. The nutritional profile of each cut of oats is the same when they are plain. However, many instant oats have added sugar and flavorings and are often high in sodium. Also, the higher the level of processing, the quicker the speed of digestion, and the higher the glycemic index, a measure of how quickly blood sugar rises when eating. How does oatmeal affect people with diabetes? Oatmeal is mainly a source of carbohydrate. Carbohydrates are converted to sugar when digested and increase sugar levels in the bloodstream. Carbohydrates that have fiber cause a slower release of sugar into the bloodstream, lowering the potential spike in blood sugar after a meal. A diet that is high in proc Continue reading >>

Quaker Oats For Breakfast, Diabetes For Lunch?

Quaker Oats For Breakfast, Diabetes For Lunch?

Sitting down to a bowl full of sugar every morning is a pretty surefire way to lead yourself to a whole host of metabolic derangements down the line, whether or not your waistline is showing it. Insulin dis-regulation not only leads to difficulty managing blood sugar, but also has a direct effect on the status of the other hormones in our bodies which are the way most of our body functions are managed. This is where the old saying, “you are what you eat” becomes a bit freaky when we're sitting down to a big bowl of cereal to start our days. I've already ranted about Kashi comparing it's GoLean Crunch Cereal to an egg, because that commercial was and is appalling. If you even took one minute to THINK about how those huge vats of grains and sweeteners arrive on a truck at a factory door before going through miles of machinery to be portioned out into bags and boxes of cereal, you might possibly pause to think about whether or not cereal is even FOOD. Or perhaps not. I know I didn't think much about it before maybe five or six years ago. I ate tons of cereal. With skim milk. Seriously. And I was hungry ALL the time. After seeing the latest commercial from Quaker where The Biggest Loser trainer Bob Harper pimps their Oatmeal Squares cereal as a “superfood,” I couldn't resist another little rant. I don't even have time to get into every last detail here about how sugar and grains (yes, even “whole grains”) negatively impact our blood sugar and our waist lines. If you aren't clear yet on how that all works, a tiny bit of research will turn up TONS of information on how a low-fat/high-carb USDA-recommended diet promotes dis-regulation of insulin secretions in your body leaving you hungry, craving more sugar, likely still fat (despite the caloric deficit you struggl Continue reading >>

Oatmeal And Diabetes: The Do’s And Don’ts

Oatmeal And Diabetes: The Do’s And Don’ts

Diabetes is a metabolic condition that affects how the body either produces or uses insulin. This makes it difficult to maintain blood sugar, which is crucial for the health of those with diabetes. When managing blood sugar, it’s important to control the amount of carbohydrates eaten in one sitting, since carbs directly affect blood sugar. The American Diabetes Association’s general recommendation for carb intake is to consume 45-60 grams per main meal, and 15-30 grams for snacks. It’s also important to choose nutrient-dense types of carbohydrates over refined and processed carbs with added sugar. This means that what you eat matters a great deal. Eating foods that are high in fiber and nutrients but low in unhealthy fat and sugar can help maintain a healthy blood sugar level, as well as improve your overall health. Oatmeal offers a host of health benefits, and can be a great go-to food for those with diabetes, as long as the portion is controlled. One cup of cooked oatmeal contains approximately 30 grams of carbs, which can fit into a healthy meal plan for people with diabetes. Oatmeal has long been a common breakfast food. Oatmeal is made of oat groats, which are oat kernels with the husks removed. It’s typically made of steel cut (or chopped), rolled, or “instant” oat goats. Oatmeal is cooked with liquid mixed in and is served warm, often with add-ins like nuts, sweeteners, or fruit. It can be made ahead and reheated in the morning for a quick and easy breakfast. Because oatmeal has a low glycemic index, it can help maintain glucose levels. This can be beneficial for people with diabetes, who especially need to manage their blood sugar levels. Oatmeal in its pure form may reduce the amount of insulin a patient needs. Oatmeal can also promote heart health, Continue reading >>

Best Foods For Type 2 Diabetes

Best Foods For Type 2 Diabetes

Prevent dangerous blood sugar spikes with the help of these foods. Oatmeal Studies have shown that eating a diet rich in whole grains and high-fiber foods may reduce the risk of diabetes by between 35 and 42 percent. An excellent source of both is heart-healthy oatmeal: It’s packed with soluble fiber, which slows the absorption of glucose from food in the stomach — keeping blood-sugar levels under control. Top oatmeal with 1 to 2 tablespoons of chopped pecans, almonds, or walnuts to add protein and healthy fat, which stabilize blood sugars further. Plus, the nuts add great crunch and flavor to your morning meal. Continue reading >>

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