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Oat Bran Diabetes

What's The Best Bread For People With Diabetes?

What's The Best Bread For People With Diabetes?

By Brandon May Bread is perhaps one of the most widely used types of food on the planet. It can also be a food that poses a health risk for people with diabetes. Despite the risk, bread can be one of the hardest foods to give up. Fortunately, there are breads on the market that don't raise blood sugar to extreme levels. Whole-grain breads with high-fiber ingredients, like oats and bran, may be the best option for people with diabetes. Making bread at home with specific, diabetes-friendly ingredients may also help reduce the impact bread has on blood sugar levels. The role of nutrition in controlling diabetes Diabetes has two main types: type 1 and type 2. People with type 1 diabetes have difficulty producing insulin, which is a hormone that "captures" blood sugar (or glucose) and transfers it into cells. Glucose is the preferred energy source for cells. Type 2 diabetes is the most common form of diabetes. This type of diabetes is also the easier form to prevent and manage with lifestyle changes and medication. According to the World Health Organization, over 422 million people have type 2 diabetes worldwide. In the earlier phase of type 2 diabetes, the pancreas can produce insulin, but cells have become insensitive to its effects. This is sometimes due to poor diet, genetics, and lifestyle habits. Because of this, cells can't access blood sugar following a meal. Nutrition plays a crucial role in diabetes control. It's only through putting proper dietary planning into practice that good blood sugar management can be accomplished. A good diet must also be combined with lifestyle changes and medication. A carbohydrate is one of the three major nutrients essential to human health. However, carbohydrates also raise blood sugar and can reduce effective diabetes control. This Continue reading >>

14 Foods That Could Change A Diabetic's Life

14 Foods That Could Change A Diabetic's Life

Print Font: When you think of managing blood sugar, odds are you obsess over everything you can't have. While it's certainly important to limit no-no ingredients (like white, refined breads and pastas and fried, fatty, processed foods), it's just as crucial to pay attention to what you should eat. We suggest you start here. Numerous nutrition and diabetes experts singled out these power foods because 1) they're packed with the 4 healthy nutrients (fiber, omega-3s, calcium, and vitamin D) that make up Prevention's Diabetes DTOUR Diet, and 2) they're exceptionally versatile, so you can use them in recipes, as add-ons to meals, or stand-alone snacks. 1. Beans Beans have more to boast about than being high in fiber (plant compounds that help you feel full, steady blood sugar, and even lower cholesterol; a half cup of black beans delivers more than 7 grams). They're a not-too-shabby source of calcium, a mineral that research shows can help burn body fat. In ½ cup of white beans, you'll get almost 100 mg of calcium—about 10% of your daily intake. Beans also make an excellent protein source; unlike other proteins Americans commonly eat (such as red meat), beans are low in saturated fat—the kind that gunks up arteries and can lead to heart disease. How to eat them: Add them to salads, soups, chili, and more. There are so many different kinds of beans, you could conceivably have them every day for a week and not eat the same kind twice. 2. Dairy You're not going to find a better source of calcium and vitamin D—a potent diabetes-quelling combination—than in dairy foods like milk, cottage cheese, and yogurt. One study found that women who consumed more than 1,200 mg of calcium and more than 800 IU of vitamin D a day were 33% less likely to develop diabetes than those taki Continue reading >>

The Best Cereals For People With Diabetes

The Best Cereals For People With Diabetes

No matter what type of diabetes you have, keeping your blood glucose levels within a healthy range is crucial. And starting the day with a healthy breakfast is one step you can take to achieve that. Breakfast should be a balanced meal with adequate protein, carbohydrates, and healthy fats. It should also be low in added sugar and high in fiber and nutrients. If you have diabetes, you may already be familiar with the glycemic index (GI). The GI is a way to measure how quickly foods with carbohydrates raise blood glucose levels. Carbohydrates give you the energy you need to start your day. But digesting carbohydrates too quickly can cause your blood sugar levels to spike. Foods with a low GI are easier on your body than those with a high GI. They are digested more slowly and minimize spikes after meals. This is something to keep in mind when choosing breakfast cereals. It is important to know what things affect the GI. Processing, cooking methods, and the type of grain can all impact how quickly the food is digested. Cereals that are more processed tend to have a higher GI even if they have fiber added to them. Mixing foods can also affect the GI. Having protein and health fats with your cereal can help prevent spikes in blood sugar. A healthy breakfast that’s easy to prepare can be as simple as a bowl of cereal, provided you choose wisely. The grocery store cereal aisle is stacked high with cereals that satisfy your sweet tooth but sabotage your glucose levels. Many of the most popular cereals have refined grains and sugars at the top of the ingredient lists. Those cereals have few nutrients and lots of empty calories. They can also cause a spike in your blood glucose levels. That’s why it’s important to read labels carefully. Look for cereals that list a whole gra Continue reading >>

Oatmeal And Diabetes: The Do’s And Don’ts

Oatmeal And Diabetes: The Do’s And Don’ts

Diabetes is a metabolic condition that affects how the body either produces or uses insulin. This makes it difficult to maintain blood sugar, which is crucial for the health of those with diabetes. When managing blood sugar, it’s important to control the amount of carbohydrates eaten in one sitting, since carbs directly affect blood sugar. The American Diabetes Association’s general recommendation for carb intake is to consume 45-60 grams per main meal, and 15-30 grams for snacks. It’s also important to choose nutrient-dense types of carbohydrates over refined and processed carbs with added sugar. This means that what you eat matters a great deal. Eating foods that are high in fiber and nutrients but low in unhealthy fat and sugar can help maintain a healthy blood sugar level, as well as improve your overall health. Oatmeal offers a host of health benefits, and can be a great go-to food for those with diabetes, as long as the portion is controlled. One cup of cooked oatmeal contains approximately 30 grams of carbs, which can fit into a healthy meal plan for people with diabetes. Oatmeal has long been a common breakfast food. Oatmeal is made of oat groats, which are oat kernels with the husks removed. It’s typically made of steel cut (or chopped), rolled, or “instant” oat goats. Oatmeal is cooked with liquid mixed in and is served warm, often with add-ins like nuts, sweeteners, or fruit. It can be made ahead and reheated in the morning for a quick and easy breakfast. Because oatmeal has a low glycemic index, it can help maintain glucose levels. This can be beneficial for people with diabetes, who especially need to manage their blood sugar levels. Oatmeal in its pure form may reduce the amount of insulin a patient needs. Oatmeal can also promote heart health, Continue reading >>

Fluffy Oat Bran Pancakes

Fluffy Oat Bran Pancakes

1/2 cup sugar-free pancake and waffle syrup product In a medium bowl, stir together flour, oat bran, brown sugar, baking powder, and salt. Stir in milk and oil just until combined. In a small bowl, beat egg whites with an electric mixer on medium speed until stiff peaks form (tips stand straight); fold into batter (small mounds of egg white will remain). Lightly coat an unheated griddle or large nonstick skillet with nonstick cooking spray. Preheat over medium heat. For each pancake, spoon 1/4 cup of the batter onto hot griddle or skillet; if necessary, spread to a 4-inch circle. Cook about 2 minutes on each side or until pancakes are golden brown, turning to second sides when pancakes have bubbly surfaces and edges are slightly dry. Meanwhile, in a small saucepan, heat syrup product until warm. Stir in orange peel. Serve syrup mixture with pancakes. If desired, serve with orange wedges. Makes 4 servings (3 pancakes per serving). Blueberry-Oat Bran Pancakes: Prepare as directed, except after putting batter on the hot griddle, sprinkle 1/2 cup fresh blueberries evenly atop pancakes. Continue as directed. PER SERVING: 180 cal., 4 g total fat (1 g sat. fat), 1 mg chol., 299 mg sodium, 32 g carb. (2 g fiber), 7 g pro. Continue reading >>

Glycemic Responses Of Oat Bran Products In Type 2 Diabetic Patients

Glycemic Responses Of Oat Bran Products In Type 2 Diabetic Patients

Volume 15, Issue 4 , August 2005, Pages 255-261 Glycemic responses of oat bran products in type 2 diabetic patients Author links open overlay panel N.Tapolaa Cereal products with low postprandial glycemic response are encouraged in the management of hyperglycemia. In this study, we determined the postprandial glycemic response of two different oat bran products in patients with type 2 diabetes. In addition, we investigated the effects of oat bran flour on postprandial glucose response following an oral glucose load. A randomized, controlled, repeated measures design with two test series was used. Twelve type 2 diabetic patients participated in five 2-h meal glucose tolerance tests on separate occasions. Volunteers were given in random order oat bran flour, oat bran crisp and glucose load providing 12.5 g glycemic carbohydrate (series 1), 25 g glucose load alone and 25 g glucose load with 30 g oat bran flour (series 2). Finger-prick capillary blood analysis was carried out fasting and then 15, 30, 45, 60, 90 and 120 min after the start of the meal. The oat bran flour had a lower 0120 min area under the glucose response curve (AUC) (4745 mmol min/L) than the glucose load (11840 mmol min/L) (p<0.002), but there was no difference between the oat bran crisp (9341 mmol min/L) and the glucose load in this respect. The oat bran flour decreased the glucose excursion from baseline by 1.6 mmol/l (2.4, 0.8) (mean (95% CI)) and 1.5 mmol/l (2.0, 1.1) at 30 and 45 min after the glucose load, respectively. Oat bran flour high in -glucan had a low glycemic response and acted as an active ingredient decreasing postprandial glycemic response of an oral glucose load in subjects with type 2 diabetes. Continue reading >>

Appendix A: What About Dietary Fiber?

Appendix A: What About Dietary Fiber?

from Dr. Bernsteins book Diabetes Solution Fiber is a general term that has come to refer to the undigestible portion of many vegetables and fruits. Some vegetable fibers, such as guar and pectin, are soluble in water. Another type of fiber, which some of us call roughage, is not water soluble. Both types appear to affect the movement of food through the gut (soluble fiber slows processing in the upper digestive tract, while insoluble fiber speeds digestion farther down). Certain insoluble fiber products, such as psyllium, have long been used as laxatives. Consumption of large amounts of dietary fiber is usually unpleasant, because both types can cause abdominal discomfort, diarrhea, and flatulence. Sources of insoluble fiber include most salad vegetables. Soluble fiber is found in many beans, such as garbanzos, and in certain fruits, such as apples. I first learned of attempts at using fiber as an adjunct to the treatment of diabetes about twenty-five years ago. At that time, Dr. David Jenkins, in England, reported that guar gum, when added to bread, could reduce the maximum postprandial blood sugar rise from an entire meal by 36 percent in diabetic subjects. This was interesting for several reasons. First of all, the discovery occurred at a time when few new approaches to controlling blood sugar were appearing in the medical literature. Second, I missed the high-carbohydrate foods I had given up, and hoped I might possibly reinstate some. I managed to track down a supplier of powdered guar gum, and placed a considerable amount into a folded slice of bread. I knew how much a slice of bread would affect my blood sugar, and so as an experiment, I used the same amount of guar gum that Dr. Jenkins had used, and then ate the concoction on an empty stomach. The chore was di Continue reading >>

Carrot Oat Bran Muffin Recipe

Carrot Oat Bran Muffin Recipe

Preparation time: 17 minutes. Baking time: 25 minutes. Preheat the oven to 375F, and line 9 tins of a standard muffin pan with muffin papers. In a mixing bowl, combine oat bran, flours, baking powder, baking soda, cinnamon, and allspice. In a small mixing bowl, blend honey, milk, egg, and vegetable oil together. Slowly add wet ingredients to dry ingredients, stirring until dry ingredients are moistened. Stir in shredded carrots. Fill each muffin paper with 3 heaping tablespoons of batter. Bake for approximately 25 minutes until muffins are golden and baked through. Yield: 9 muffins. Serving size: 1 muffin. Calories: 188 calories, Carbohydrates: 27 g, Protein: 5 g, Fat: 7 g, Saturated Fat: 2 g, Sodium: 220 mg, Fiber: 2 g Exchanges per serving: 2 starch, 1 fat. Carbohydrate choices: 2. This recipe was developed by Sharon Palmer, a registered dietitian and freelance writer in Southern California. Disclaimer Statements: Statements and opinions expressed on this Web site are those of the authors and not necessarily those of the publishers or advertisers. The information provided on this Web site should not be construed as medical instruction. Consult appropriate health-care professionals before taking action based on this information. Continue reading >>

Oat Bran Pancakes | Adw Diabetes

Oat Bran Pancakes | Adw Diabetes

By ADW Diabetes |2017-09-15T13:15:52+00:00 September 15th, 2017| Breakfast , Diabetes Recipes | 0 Comments Over medium to medium-high heat, heat nonstick griddle or frying pan. In a large bowl, combine oat bran, flour, Splenda Granular, baking powder and salt. Set aside. With a wire whisk, beat together milk and egg substitute. Pour the egg mixture over dry ingredients. Stir together until ingredients are just blended and no large dry lumps appear. Using a scant 1/4 cup, pour pancake batter onto hot griddle. Cook pancakes until puffed and dry around the edges. Flip and cook other side until golden brown. ADW Diabetes is a diabetic supply mail order company that is dedicated to keeping diabetes management affordable. ADW takes a leading role in offering free diabetic education through Destination Diabetes , an informational component of the ADW website featuring tips and advice from diabetes and nutrition experts, diabetic recipes and more. Save my name, email, and website in this browser for the next time I comment. Notify me by email when the comment gets approved. Cellulitis and Diabetes What Are T... by Roberta Kleinman The information on this site is for informational purposes only and is not intended as a substitute for advice from your own physician or other health professional. You should not use the information contained on this site for diagnosing or treating a health problem or disease, or prescribing any medication. You should read carefully all product packaging. You should consult with a healthcare professional before starting any diet, exercise or supplementation program, before taking any medication, or if you have or suspect you might have a health problem. Information and statements regarding dietary supplements have not been evaluated by the Food and Continue reading >>

Glycemic Responses Of Oat Bran Products In Type 2 Diabetic Patients.

Glycemic Responses Of Oat Bran Products In Type 2 Diabetic Patients.

Glycemic responses of oat bran products in type 2 diabetic patients. Oy Foodfiles Ltd, Kuopio, Finland. [email protected] Cereal products with low postprandial glycemic response are encouraged in the management of hyperglycemia. In this study, we determined the postprandial glycemic response of two different oat bran products in patients with type 2 diabetes. In addition, we investigated the effects of oat bran flour on postprandial glucose response following an oral glucose load. A randomized, controlled, repeated measures design with two test series was used. Twelve type 2 diabetic patients participated in five 2-h meal glucose tolerance tests on separate occasions. Volunteers were given in random order oat bran flour, oat bran crisp and glucose load providing 12.5 g glycemic carbohydrate (series 1), 25 g glucose load alone and 25 g glucose load with 30 g oat bran flour (series 2). Finger-prick capillary blood analysis was carried out fasting and then 15, 30, 45, 60, 90 and 120 min after the start of the meal. The oat bran flour had a lower 0-120 min area under the glucose response curve (AUC) (47+/-45 mmol min/L) than the glucose load (118+/-40 mmol min/L) (p<0.002), but there was no difference between the oat bran crisp (93+/-41 mmol min/L) and the glucose load in this respect. The oat bran flour decreased the glucose excursion from baseline by 1.6 mmol/l (2.4, 0.8) (mean (95% CI)) and 1.5 mmol/l (2.0, 1.1) at 30 and 45 min after the glucose load, respectively. Oat bran flour high in beta-glucan had a low glycemic response and acted as an active ingredient decreasing postprandial glycemic response of an oral glucose load in subjects with type 2 diabetes. Continue reading >>

Oat Bran Muffins - Recipes For Healthy Living By The American Diabetes Association

Oat Bran Muffins - Recipes For Healthy Living By The American Diabetes Association

These moist, delicious muffins make a great breakfast or snack. Bring them to a potluck brunch or early-morning tailgate! 2 tablespoons dried fruit such as raisins, dates, apricots (optional) Mix the first four ingredients in a large bowl. Set aside. Combine milk, egg, and oil. Mix applesauce with mashed banana and blend with liquid ingredients. Add to dry ingredients and mix just until moistened. Pour into muffin tins that have been sprayed with nonstick cooking spray. Do not use paper liners, as the muffins have a tendency to stick to the paper. Bake for 15-17 minutes. TIP: The tops of these muffins dont brown well due to the low sugar content, but they are still moist and full of flavor! From Quick and Healthy Recipes and Ideas by Brenda J. Ponichtera A great book for health-conscious people with little time to cook or plan. This book includes 20 weeks of dinner menus, each with its own grocery list. Don't let traditionally fatty food and drinks ruin your celebration. Find dozens of tips that can help you stay healthy this season. Find healthier concession options and plan ahead so you stick to your meal plan on game day. Calculate the number of calories you should eat each day to maintain your present body weight: Please select an option before you continue. I don't do any physical activity other than what I need to do for my usual activities, such as going to work or school, grocery shopping, or doing chores around the house. I do some moderate exercise every day in addition to doing my usual activities. For example, I walk about 1.5 to 3 miles a day at about 3 to 4 miles an hour. Or I do something else that's moderately active. I am very active every day in addition to doing my usual activities. For example, I walk more than 3 miles a day at about 3 to 4 miles an Continue reading >>

Oat Bran | Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community

Oat Bran | Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community

Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More. Get the Diabetes Forum App for your phone - available on iOS and Android . Find support, ask questions and share your experiences. Join the community I have been reading about the Durkin diet which uses Oat Bran. Does anyone know if Oat bran is as good as Oatflakes for a Type 2 diabetic diet? I have made the pancakes and the muffins (cocoa and vanilla bean flavour - no sugar needed) and they seem to have really filled me up. I know I should test after 2 hours but I never remember!! My fasting sugars are soooo good at the moment I don't want to muck things up. Well, I tried oat bran and it was just as bad for me as actual oats. I suggest you test and see how it affects you, you might get a surprise! This morning only 4.7!!! (thats 4 days in a row it has been <5) Had a oat bran pancake and a small oat bran muffin at lunch with my usual salad and too much humous!!. Now going to the gym to do a spin class so won't be able to do it again until 4 hours but the spin session should use up a lot so maybe not worth testing then. Sometimes it looks as if I have reversed my diabetes with my diet and exercise but I know I daren't eat anything with sugar, high GI stuff or Maltitol sweeteners!!! It is interesting that the dawn phenomenum I usually have seems to have gone. I have been self dosing with a homeoapthic remedy daily and think that is what it is is!! - I am a professional homeopath. At the moment I am one of the lucky ones whose GP practice hasn't sussed I am still getting a prescription a month for testing sticks when I am a Tyoe 2 no meds. Not sure how long it will last!!! Continue reading >>

Is Oatmeal Good For Diabetics?

Is Oatmeal Good For Diabetics?

Here are a few common questions and concerns that we always receive around oatmeal and diabetes: “Do u know if eating oatmeal is good for diabetics?” “I make steel cut oats in the morning and put in honey (from the honey place – real made) some chia seeds, walnuts, half an apple and pumpkin or other seeds if I have them – is this enough to balance out the sugar?” “My sugars go crazy when I eat oatmeal but I was told by a dietitian to eat it.” “I’m confused, can I eat oatmeal, not the packaged kind?” Is Oatmeal Good for Diabetics? (The Short Answer) The short answer: Oatmeal could be okay for you – some type 2 diabetics can eat it. But, it is a higher carb food and for that reason, many type 2 diabetics can’t tolerate it. Unfortunately, there is no clear answer on this, which is often the case with many individual food items. The question for you to ask is, how is your blood sugar and A1C? If you’re struggling to get it under control, you might consider eliminating the oatmeal and opting for lower carb foods (aka more vegetables). Or, you could try testing to see if oats influence your results. Is Oatmeal Good for Diabetics? (The Long Answer) Let’s explore a whole range of things to consider with oats and oatmeal – including nutrition, glycemic index (GI), research, and so forth. Research on Oatmeal and Type 2 Diabetes The research around oats/ oatmeal for type 2 diabetes treatment does show mixed results. A review in Food and Function, 2016, looked at a range of studies but only 4 of those studies included type 2 diabetic patients. An important point to raise is that the results concluded from studies in those without diabetes (healthy subjects) is NOT necessarily going to result in the same conclusions in people who already have diabetes Continue reading >>

5 Surprising Foods That Help Fight Diabetes

5 Surprising Foods That Help Fight Diabetes

Are you bored with sugar-free candy, low carbohydrate pasta, and endless chicken dinners? Having diabetes does not mean that your diet should be boring. In fact, it should be the opposite. Variety keeps your palate interested and ensures that you get a healthy balance of vitamins, nutrients, and antioxidants. The following 5 foods may or may not be a regular part of your diet, but each has a positive effect on diabetes management and prevention. Experiment with some of the “try this” options below for an easy way to incorporate these foods into your meals. Sunflower Seeds Sunflower seeds are a humble snack. They often sit on the shelf overlooked because of the hoards of positive press that almonds and walnuts get. Almonds and walnuts are very healthful nuts, but sunflower seeds are also full of important vitamins and minerals. Some of the nutrients in sunflower seeds that make them unique are copper, vitamin E, selenium, magnesium, and zinc. The presence and combination of so many of these nutrients can be hard to come by in common foods. Sunflower seeds have about 3 grams of fiber and 5 grams of protein in an ounce of kernels. The best part is that sunflower seeds, while high in total fat (about 14 grams), contain mostly polyunsaturated fat, which researchers believe is the best type of fat to combat diabetes. Try this: Swap out your peanuts for sunflower seeds. Or hunt down a jar of sunflower seed butter instead of peanut butter for an easy way to get your fix. Salmon Salmon boasts numerous health benefits. It’s a great source of protein that is low in saturated fat and has important omega-3 fatty acid for excellent heart health. The combination of omega-3 and polyunsaturated fats in salmon keeps blood pressure down and protects the heart from disease. Research Continue reading >>

Diabetes Super Foods

Diabetes Super Foods

Eating right is key to managing diabetes. Fortunately, your food “prescription” includes filling, flavorful fare that tastes like anything but medicine. A diet rich in these 10 “super foods” will help minimize blood sugar and even throw your disease into reverse. Dig in! 1. Vegetables. The advantages of eating more vegetables are undeniable. Packed with powerhouse nutrients, vegetables are naturally low in calories, and they’re full of fiber, so they’re plenty filling. Loading your plate with more vegetables will automatically mean you’re eating fewer simple carbs (which raise blood sugar) and saturated fats (which increase insulin resistance). Aim to get four or five servings a day. (A serving is 1/2 cup canned or cooked vegetables or 1 cup raw vegetables.) Go easier on starchy vegetables — including potatoes and corn, and legumes such as lima beans and peas — which are higher in calories than other vegetables. 2. Fruit. It has more natural sugar and calories than most vegetables, so you can’t eat it with utter abandon, but fruit has almost all the advantages that vegetables do — it’s brimming with nutrients you need, it’s low in fat, it’s high in fiber, and it’s relatively low in calories compared with most other foods. Best of all, it’s loaded with antioxidants that help protect your nerves, your eyes, and your heart. Aim to get three or four servings a day. (A serving is one piece of whole fruit, 1/2 cup cooked or canned fruit, or 1 cup raw fruit.) Strive to make most of your fruit servings real produce, not juice. Many of the nutrients and a lot of the fiber found in the skin, flesh, and seeds of fruit are eliminated during juicing, and the calories and sugar are concentrated in juice. 3. Beans. Beans are just about your best source Continue reading >>

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