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Nuts For Diabetes Prevention And Management

Diabetes Prevention - An Overview | Sciencedirect Topics

Diabetes Prevention - An Overview | Sciencedirect Topics

Marie-ve Leblanc, Paul Poirier, in Nutrition in the Prevention and Treatment of Abdominal Obesity , 2014 The Finnish Diabetes Prevention Study (DPS) included 522 overweight Finnish adults with impaired glucose tolerance, who were divided into two groups: these were given (1) standard intervention or (2) intensive therapy. The median follow-up for participants was 7years [99]. In the intensive therapy group, the strategy consisted of weight reduction, limited total and saturated fat intake, and the consumption of fiber, whole-grain products, vegetables, fruit, low-fat milk, soft margarines, and vegetable oils rich in monounsaturated fat, combined with an increase in exercise [100]. After 3.2years of follow-up, WC was reduced by 4.4cm in the intensive therapy group compared to 1.3cm in the control group, and blood pressure was reduced by 5/5mmHg in the intensive group compared to 1/3mmHg in the intervention group for systolic/diastolic blood pressure [100]. Maryann N. Mugo, ... James R. Sowers, in Comprehensive Hypertension , 2007 The Finnish Diabetes Prevention Study showed that overweight subjects with glucose intolerance randomized to intensified lifestyle intervention, consisting of diet and moderate exercise for at least 30 minutes per day, resulted in a marked reduction in the risk of developing DM2 and a significant drop in BP (4 mmHg for SBP and 2 mmHg for diastolic BP compared with control subjects).55 A prospective study of 8302 Finnish men and 9139 women showed that regular physical activity was associated with a significantly reduced risk for HTN in men and women, independent of age, education, smoking habits, alcohol intake, and history of DM, BMI, and SBP at baseline.56 Overweight and obesity were also associated with an increased risk of HTN, and the prote Continue reading >>

5 Surprising Foods That Help Fight Diabetes

5 Surprising Foods That Help Fight Diabetes

Are you bored with sugar-free candy, low carbohydrate pasta, and endless chicken dinners? Having diabetes does not mean that your diet should be boring. In fact, it should be the opposite. Variety keeps your palate interested and ensures that you get a healthy balance of vitamins, nutrients, and antioxidants. The following 5 foods may or may not be a regular part of your diet, but each has a positive effect on diabetes management and prevention. Experiment with some of the “try this” options below for an easy way to incorporate these foods into your meals. Sunflower Seeds Sunflower seeds are a humble snack. They often sit on the shelf overlooked because of the hoards of positive press that almonds and walnuts get. Almonds and walnuts are very healthful nuts, but sunflower seeds are also full of important vitamins and minerals. Some of the nutrients in sunflower seeds that make them unique are copper, vitamin E, selenium, magnesium, and zinc. The presence and combination of so many of these nutrients can be hard to come by in common foods. Sunflower seeds have about 3 grams of fiber and 5 grams of protein in an ounce of kernels. The best part is that sunflower seeds, while high in total fat (about 14 grams), contain mostly polyunsaturated fat, which researchers believe is the best type of fat to combat diabetes. Try this: Swap out your peanuts for sunflower seeds. Or hunt down a jar of sunflower seed butter instead of peanut butter for an easy way to get your fix. Salmon Salmon boasts numerous health benefits. It’s a great source of protein that is low in saturated fat and has important omega-3 fatty acid for excellent heart health. The combination of omega-3 and polyunsaturated fats in salmon keeps blood pressure down and protects the heart from disease. Research Continue reading >>

Eat Nuts To Control Blood Sugar & Fat

Eat Nuts To Control Blood Sugar & Fat

Nuts contain unsaturated fats, protein and a range of vitamins and minerals that lower cholesterol, inflammation and insulin resistance. A recent study suggests that you should include at least 50 grams of almonds, cashews, chestnuts, walnuts or pistachios in your diet to control blood fats (triglycerides) and sugars - two of the five markers for metabolic syndrome. The study was published in the journal BMJ Open. Tree nuts tend to healthier than others. Family of tree nuts includes almonds, Brazil nuts, cashews, chestnuts, hazelnuts, hickory nuts, macadamia nuts, pecans, pine nuts, pistachios, and walnuts amongst others. A person develops metabolic syndrome if he or she has three of the following risk factors - low levels of "good" cholesterol, high triglycerides, high blood pressure, high blood sugar and extra weight around the waist. By including at least 50 grams of almonds, cashews, chestnuts, walnuts or pistachios in your diet, blood fats (triglycerides) and sugars can be controlled effectively. "Eating tree nuts is good for lowering risk for heart disease and other health problems such as diabetes and strokes," said John Sievenpiper, a physician at St Michael's Hospital in Toronto. However, the greatest benefit can be reaped only if they are consumed daily. The study found a "modest decrease" in blood fats known as triglycerides and blood sugars among people who added tree nuts to their diets compared to those who ate a control diet. To reach this conclusion, Sievenpiper screened 2,000 articles published in peer-reviewed journals and found 49 randomised control trials with 2,000 participants. Sievenpiper says that the largest reductions in triglycerides and blood glucose were seen when tree nuts replaced refined carbohydrates rather than saturated fats. He also a Continue reading >>

Nuts Will Change Your Life

Nuts Will Change Your Life

Last year everyone was talking about how good nuts are for diabetes. This year they’re just as good, and new research shows it. If you aren’t eating lots of nuts yet, I’m going to try to get you started. Nuts are great because they are seeds and fruit combined. They are literally full of life. According to Wikipedia, while fruit seeds are separate from the fruit itself, in nuts (according to the botanical definition of the term), the seeds and fruit (which the seed will use to grow if planted) are bound up together, making them among the most nutritious foods on the planet. New research from Louisiana State University found that people who regularly eat tree nuts — including almonds, macadamias, pistachios, walnuts, and cashews — have lower risks for Type 2 diabetes and heart disease. Their C-reactive protein (a major marker of inflammation) levels were lower. Their HDL (“good cholesterol”) levels were higher. According to The Huffington Post, the study was funded by the International Tree Nut Council Nutrition Research & Education Foundation. Study results often show what the funders wanted them to show, but I tend to believe this one. It appeared in the Journal of the American College of Nutrition and was based on analyzing data from NHANES, the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, the gold standard for this kind of study in the US. This research confirms dozens of other studies. As Web Editor Diane Fennell wrote in 2011, “Nuts are well known for their nutritional benefits, including their high levels of heart-healthy fats, protein, antioxidants…, plant sterols (natural substances found in plants that can help lower cholesterol), fiber, and minerals.” Nutritionist Amy Campbell explained in this article that nuts are good because they h Continue reading >>

Preventing Diabetes Naturally (type 2, Diet, Causes, Symptoms)

Preventing Diabetes Naturally (type 2, Diet, Causes, Symptoms)

Type 2 diabetes prevention tips and facts While genetics plays an important role in the development of diabetes, an individual still has the ability to influence their health to prevent type 2 diabetes. There is no known way to prevent type 1 diabetes. This article focuses on ways to control risk factors for type 2 diabetes. People should watch their weight and exercise on a regular basis to help reverse prediabetes, and prevent the development of type 2 diabetes. Diet is important because it helps with weight loss. Some foods such as nuts in small amounts provide health benefits in blood sugar regulation. There is no single recommended diabetes prevention diet, but following a sound nutrition plan and maintaining a healthy weight are important steps in preventing the disease. Exercise is even more beneficial with weight loss in the prevention of type 2 diabetes. Smoking is harmful in many ways including increasing the risk of cancer and heart disease. It also increases the risk of developing type 2 diabetes. There are medications available that have been shown in large trials to delay or prevent the onset of overt diabetes. Metformin (Glucophage) is recommended by the American Diabetes Association for prevention of diabetes in high-risk people. The coming years will be very exciting regarding the advances in the field of prevention of diabetes. However, the cornerstone of therapy will likely remain a healthy lifestyle. There are two major forms of diabetes - type 1 and type 2. This article focuses specifically on the prevention of type 2 diabetes since there is no know way to prevent type 1 diabetes. This form of diabetes is virtually a pandemic in the United States. This information reviews the risk factors for developing type 2 diabetes and reviews key points regardi Continue reading >>

The Best Nuts For Diabetes: Walnuts, Almonds, And More

The Best Nuts For Diabetes: Walnuts, Almonds, And More

When you’re looking for a satisfying diabetes-friendly snack, it’s hard to beat nuts. “Nuts are a super snack food for people with diabetes because they’re the total package — low in carbs and high in protein, fiber, and healthy fat — and they create a feeling of fullness,” says Cheryl Mussatto, RD, founder of Eat Well to Be Well in Osage City, Kansas. Nuts: A Good Choice for Diabetes and Your Heart The healthy fat in nuts protects your ticker, says Melissa Joy Dobbins, RDN, CDE, a spokesperson for the American Association of Diabetes Educators. That’s important because people with diabetes are 2 to 4 times more likely to die of heart disease than those without it, according to the American Heart Association. Heart-healthy monounsaturated and polyunsaturated fats found in nuts can lower your LDL, or “bad” cholesterol, Mussatto says. “At the same time, nuts also raise levels of ‘good,’ or HDL, cholesterol,” she says. “This cholesterol acts sort of like a sanitation worker, removing cholesterol from the tissues for disposal, which prevents plaque buildup in the arteries.” What’s more, nuts help regulate blood sugar, which makes them a better option to reach for than, say, pretzels, when afternoon hunger strikes, Mussatto says. Many kinds of nuts have this effect: Almonds have been shown to slow down the blood sugar response when eaten with carbohydrate-rich foods, according to a small study published in the journal Metabolism that focused on healthy people without the disease. A study published in March 2011 in the European Journal of Clinical Nutrition found similar results for pistachios when eaten by healthy volunteers. For those people already diagnosed with diabetes, regularly eating tree nuts can also improve blood sugar management, Continue reading >>

Nuts As A Replacement For Carbohydrates In The Diabetic Diet

Nuts As A Replacement For Carbohydrates In The Diabetic Diet

Abstract OBJECTIVE Fat intake, especially monounsaturated fatty acid (MUFA), has been liberalized in diabetic diets to preserve HDL cholesterol and improve glycemic control, yet the exact sources have not been clearly defined. Therefore, we assessed the effect of mixed nut consumption as a source of vegetable fat on serum lipids and HbA1c in type 2 diabetes. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS A total of 117 type 2 diabetic subjects were randomized to one of three treatments for 3 months. Supplements were provided at 475 kcal per 2,000-kcal diet as mixed nuts (75 g/day), muffins, or half portions of both. The primary outcome was change in HbA1c. RESULTS The relative increase in MUFAs was 8.7% energy on the full-nut dose compared with muffins. Using an intention-to-treat analysis (n = 117), full-nut dose (mean intake 73 g/day) reduced HbA1c (−0.21% absolute HbA1c units, 95% CI −0.30 to −0.11, P < 0.001) with no change after half-nut dose or muffin. Full-nut dose was significantly different from half-nut dose (P = 0.004) and muffin (P = 0.001), but no difference was seen between half-nut dose and muffins. LDL cholesterol also decreased significantly after full-nut dose compared with muffin. The LDL cholesterol reduction after half-nut dose was intermediate and not significantly different from the other treatments. Apolipoprotein (apo) B and the apoB:apoA1 ratio behaved similarly. Nut intake related negatively to changes in HbA1c (r = −0.20, P = 0.033) and LDL cholesterol (r = −0.24, P = 0.011). CONCLUSIONS Two ounces of nuts daily as a replacement for carbohydrate foods improved both glycemic control and serum lipids in type 2 diabetes. Replacement of carbohydrate by healthy fat, such as monounsaturated fatty acids (MUFAs) and polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs), has be Continue reading >>

North Carolina’s Guide To Diabetes Prevention And Management

North Carolina’s Guide To Diabetes Prevention And Management

Manage weight | Live tobacco free | Participate in lifestyle change programs | Participate in diabetes education | Adhere to treatment plan | Get adequate sleep Introduction The number of North Carolinians who have or who are at risk for diabetes is growing. The financial burden, human suffering and loss of productivity that are a part of this disease are real and will get worse if more people do not take action now. While diabetes can present challenges on a daily basis, it is now evident that steps can be taken to prevent or delay the onset of diabetes or manage existing diabetes with or without complications. All North Carolinians have a role in these efforts. We can all have a positive impact on the lives of those at risk for or with diabetes. This guide includes basic information about diabetes, its effects on the North Carolina population, and suggestions on how individuals can prevent and manage the disease. The guide also includes specific strategies for community groups, employers and health care providers to help people manage their risk for developing diabetes, gain and maintain control of diabetes, and reduce risks for diabetes-related complications. North Carolina’s Guide to Diabetes Prevention and Management 2015- 2020 Sustained high blood glucose levels over time can cause damage to blood vessels, resulting in serious health complications such as high blood pressure, heart disease and stroke, blindness, kidney failure and amputations.2 Persons with diabetes also have an increased risk for other diabetes complications: hearing loss, sleep apnea, periodontal disease, certain forms of cancer including colorectal and breast, sexual dysfunction and cognitive impairments including dementia.3 There are four primary types of diabetes: prediabetes; type 1 d Continue reading >>

Nuts And Diabetes

Nuts And Diabetes

Tweet Nuts provide a number of benefits for people with diabetes. Studies suggest that nuts may even decrease the risk of type 2 diabetes. A study published in the Journal of the American College of Nutrition found that "nut consumption was associated with a decreased prevalence of selected risk factors for cardiovascular disease, type 2 diabetes, and metabolic syndrome.[138] This page explores the various benefits of nuts for people with type 2 diabetes. Do different nuts have different health benefits for people with diabetes? Yes. Some nuts have benefits that others don't. Almonds contain a lot of nutrients, particularly vitamin E Walnuts contain healthy omega-3 fatty acids Cashews offers lots of magnesium Almonds, peanuts, and pistachios all reduce 'bad' cholesterol Almost all nuts offer something good for people with diabetes. Salted nuts, however, should be avoided. Excessive salt consumption is consistently linked to an increased risk of heart disease. Nuts and cholesterol One of the most prominent characteristics of nuts for people with diabetes is their effect on cholesterol levels. Avoiding high cholesterol levels is essential for people with diabetes, because exposure to high blood glucose levels increases the risk of the arteries narrowing. Almonds, peanuts, and pistachios all reduce "bad" cholesterol very effectively. "Bad" cholesterol refers to small, dense particles of low-density lipoprotein (LDL), too much of which can clog the arteries. Almonds, walnuts, pistachios, pecans, and hazelnuts reduce "bad" cholesterol by increasing levels of high-density-lipoprotein (HDL), or 'good' cholesterol. HDL clears out 'bad' cholesterol, thus reducing the risk of heart disease. Nuts and the glycemic index (GI) The glycemic index measures the speed at which your body Continue reading >>

5 Best Foods For Diabetes

5 Best Foods For Diabetes

Health Concerns: Diabetes , Type 2 Diabetes Diabetes is the 7th leading cause of death in the U.S., and doubles the risk of heart attack and stroke.1 However, type 2 diabetes is a lifestyle disease - our food choices can either prevent or promote insulin resistance and resultant diabetes. Many conventional diabetes diets rely on meat or grains as the major calorie source. However, these strategies have serious drawbacks. High-nutrient, low glycemic load (GL) foods are the optimal foods for diabetics, and these foods also help to prevent diabetes in the first place: Green vegetables: Nutrient-dense green vegetables leafy greens, cruciferous vegetables, and other green vegetables are the most important foods to focus on for diabetes prevention and reversal. Higher green vegetable consumption is associated with lower risk of developing type 2 diabetes, and among diabetics, higher green vegetable intake is associated with lower HbA1c levels.2, 3 A recent meta-analysis found that greater leafy green intake was associated with a 14 percentdecrease in risk of type 2 diabetes.4 One study reported that each daily serving of leafy greens produces a 9 percent decrease in risk.5 Non-starchy vegetables: Non-green, non-starchy vegetables like mushrooms, onions, garlic, eggplant, peppers, etc. are essential components of a diabetes prevention (or diabetes reversal) diet. These foods have almost nonexistent effects on blood glucose and are packed with fiber and phytochemicals. Beans: Beans, lentils, and other legumes are the ideal carbohydrate source. Beans are low in GL due to their moderate protein and abundant fiber and resistant starch, carbohydrates that are not broken down in the small intestine. This reduces the amount of calories that can be absorbed from beans; plus, resistan Continue reading >>

Which Nuts Can A Diabetic Eat

Which Nuts Can A Diabetic Eat

Managing diabetes requires a number of lifestyle changes, including becoming more active and making changes in your diet. Often that means saying goodbye to foods you enjoy, but nuts aren't one you need to worry about. Not only can diabetics eat nuts, but they may actually help minimize the impact of some other health issues that often come along with diabetes. Depending on your condition and circumstances, there are several techniques you might use to manage your meals and their impact on your blood sugars and overall health. The American Diabetes Association favors counting the grams of carbs in your diet, while some people with diabetes monitor the glycemic index, or GI, of the foods they eat. If you're trying to lose weight, you might also be on a calorie-restricted plan. Nuts can play a role in your diet, whichever of these strategies you follow: Carb Counting: Most nuts have a low impact on your carb count. An ounce of walnuts contains only 4 grams of carbohydrates, almonds and peanuts have 6 grams, and cashews have 9 grams. Glycemic Index: The Glycemic Index, or GI, measures how quickly a food raises your blood sugar, and the lower the number the better, with any GI below 55 considered "low." Most nuts are very low: The GI of peanuts is 13, for example, and even cashews – relatively high in carbs, for a nut – have a GI of 22. * Calorie Counting: Nuts are more problematic in a weight-loss scenario, because they're high in calories. An ounce of walnuts contains 185 calories, for example, and almonds contain 170. However, their combination of protein, healthy fats and fiber make them a filling and healthful snack, and may help you stay away from less-virtuous foods. Nuts and Health Benefits "First, do no harm" is a fundamental principle in medicine, but nuts go Continue reading >>

Diabetes

Diabetes

Are you trying to prevent diabetes, lower your blood sugar levels, or just looking to understand the condition? Learn more about diabetes and check out this list of healthy snacks handpicked by our Health Nut and Registered Dietitian. Successfully managing diabetes is all about balancing blood sugar levels and maintaining or achieving a healthy weight. What is Diabetes? Diabetes (often referred to in the medical community as diabetes mellitus) is caused by the body's inability to produce any or enough insulin. Insulin is the hormone the converts sugar, a.k.a glucose, to energy. Without adequate levels of insulin, sugar accumulates in the bloodstream instead of being delivered to cells to use as energy. This glucose build-up leads to high blood sugar, which triggers the signs and symptoms of diabetes. What is the Difference Between Type 1 and Type 2 Diabetes? Type 1 diabetes (formerly known as juvenile diabetes) is characterized by a complete lack of insulin. This type of diabetes only accounts for about 5% of people who have diabetes, and is typically diagnosed in children and young adults. In Type 1 diabetes, the immune system destroys pancreatic cells that are required to produce insulin. Blood sugar levels rise without insulin to convert glucose to energy. Type 2 diabetes (also referred to as adult-onset diabetes) is the most common form of diabetes. Affecting 95% of people with diabetes, type 2 is usually detected in adulthood, although children can also develop it. In Type 2 diabetes, the body does not effectively use insulin, a condition known as insulin resistance. Initially, the pancreas responds by making more insulin to compensate, but over time, it produces less and less. This results in insulin deficiency because the body can't make enough insulin to keep bl Continue reading >>

Possible Benefit Of Nuts In Type 2 Diabetes

Possible Benefit Of Nuts In Type 2 Diabetes

Possible Benefit of Nuts in Type 2 Diabetes Clinical Nutrition and Risk Factor Modification Center, St. Michael's Hospital, Toronto, Canada, M5C 2T2 Division of Endocrinology and Metabolism, St. Michael's Hospital, Toronto, Canada, M5C 2T2 Department of Nutritional Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, University of Toronto, Toronto, Canada M5S 3E2 Search for other works by this author on: Departments of Nutrition and Epidemiology, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, MA 02215 Search for other works by this author on: National Centre of Excellence in Functional Foods, University of Wollongong, Wollongong NSW 2522, Australia Search for other works by this author on: Clinical Nutrition and Risk Factor Modification Center, St. Michael's Hospital, Toronto, Canada, M5C 2T2 Department of Nutritional Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, University of Toronto, Toronto, Canada M5S 3E2 Search for other works by this author on: Clinical Nutrition and Risk Factor Modification Center, St. Michael's Hospital, Toronto, Canada, M5C 2T2 Department of Nutritional Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, University of Toronto, Toronto, Canada M5S 3E2 College of Pharmacy and Nutrition, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, Canada S7N 5C9 Search for other works by this author on: The Journal of Nutrition, Volume 138, Issue 9, 1 September 2008, Pages 1752S1756S, David J. A. Jenkins, Frank B. Hu, Linda C. Tapsell, Andrea R. Josse, Cyril W. C. Kendall; Possible Benefit of Nuts in Type 2 Diabetes, The Journal of Nutrition, Volume 138, Issue 9, 1 September 2008, Pages 1752S1756S, Nuts, including peanuts, are now recognized as having the potential to improve the blood lipid profile and, in cohort studies, nut consumption has been associated with a reduced risk of coronary heart disease (CHD). More recently, inter Continue reading >>

Health Benefits Of Nuts In Prevention And Management Of Diabetes.

Health Benefits Of Nuts In Prevention And Management Of Diabetes.

Abstract The effects of tree nuts on risk factors for coronary heart disease (CHD), in particular blood lipids, have been investigated in a number of studies and the beneficial effects are now recognized. The beneficial effects of nuts on CHD in cohort studies have also been clearly demonstrated. However, while there is also reason to believe the unique micro- and macronutrient profiles of nuts may help to control blood glucose levels, relatively few studies have investigated their role in diabetes control and prevention. Nuts are low in available carbohydrate, have a healthy fatty acid profile, and are high in vegetable protein, fiber and magnesium. Acute feeding studies indicate that when eaten alone nuts have minimal effects on raising postprandial blood glucose levels. In addition, when nuts are consumed with carbohydrate rich foods, they blunt the postprandial glycemic response of the carbohydrate meal. Despite the success of these acute studies, only a limited number of trials have been conducted with nuts in type 2 diabetes. These studies have either been of insufficient duration to observe changes in HbA1c, as the standard measure of glycemic control, or have been underpowered. Therefore, more long-term clinical trials are required to examine the role of nuts on glycemic control in patients with prediabetes and diabetes. Overall, there are good reasons to justify further exploration of the use of nuts in the prevention of diabetes and its micro- and macrovascular complications. Continue reading >>

Health Benefits Of Nuts & Type 2 Diabetes Prevention

Health Benefits Of Nuts & Type 2 Diabetes Prevention

Health Benefits of Nuts & Type 2 Diabetes Prevention Health Benefits of Nuts & Type 2 Diabetes Prevention Research is making a strong case in favor of adding more nuts to your diet. In a study, the people who ate an ounce of nuts or a couple of tablespoons of peanut butter five times per week had a much lower risk of type 2 diabetes compared to the people who rarely ate nuts or peanut butter. The health benefits of nuts are extensive -- they are high in healthy fats and other nutrients that may help ward off type 2 diabetes by keeping blood sugar levels steady. Eating nuts or peanut butter several times a week isn't enough to protect against type 2 diabetes by itself, but it may help. Nuts and peanut butter are high in magnesium and poly- and monounsaturated fats -- nutrients that help maintain optimal glucose and insulin levels. When adding calorie-dense nuts to your diet, cut back on other foods that are high in fat and calories to help balance things out. For example, if you have a handful of nuts as a snack, skip your usual chips or crackers and cheese. If you add peanut butter to your bagel, have half a bagel instead of a whole one. To kick your antidiabetes lifestyle into high gear, exercise for at least 30 minutes on most days of the week and keep your weight down. Not only will you reap the health benefits of nuts, but youll enjoy their taste as well. So go ahead, be a real nut case! Continue reading >>

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