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Nutrition And Diabetes

Nutrition Education And Counseling

Nutrition Education And Counseling

At Central Vermont Medical Center, Nutrition and Diabetes education is provided through our Certified Diabetes Educator or through our Community Health Team. Make a change in your life today! Ask your primary care provider for a referral to one our our dietitians or Certified Diabetes Educator. Our Nutrition Education and Counseling Program includes one-on-one nutrition education and counseling, for adults and children, for many conditions. Dietitians, available through our Community Health Team, provide quality and confidential nutrition counseling and education tailored to your specific needs. We work with you to develop realistic lifestyle goals to best improve or maintain your health. Conditions that our dietitians can help you with include diabetes, weight management, heart disease. high cholesterol, high blood pressure, eating disorders, cancer, kidney stones, gastrointestinal issues, food allergies & intolerances, and individualized meal planning. Diabetes Self-Management Education Our Diabetes Self-Management Education program offers training to people with diabetes so they can live healthy lives. Our approach promotes patient-centered care, working with primary care providers to help patients take control of this chronic condition. At CVMC, we provide education to help you manage your blood sugar, diet, and fitness routine. We can tailor a program to your personal diabetes needs. Our services include: One-on-one counseling Diabetes group education Insulin pump therapy Insulin management Continuous glucose monitoring For more information about diabetes, including symptoms and risk factors, click here. Continue reading >>

Diabetes

Diabetes

What is diabetes? When a food containing carbohydrate is eaten, your body digests the carbohydrate into sugar (called glucose), which can then be used as energy by the cells in your body. Diabetes is a condition where your body can’t properly control the amount of glucose in your blood. A hormone called insulin is needed for transferring glucose from the bloodstream to enter the body cells and be converted to energy. In people with diabetes, blood glucose levels are often higher than normal because either the body does not produce insulin (type 1 diabetes) or cannot use insulin properly (type 2 diabetes). High levels of glucose in the bloodstream can lead to short term complications such as: passing large amounts of urine being extremely thirsty and drinking lots of fluids being tired having blurred vision having frequent skin infections and being slow to heal Blood glucose levels are normally between about 4.0 and 8.0 mmol/L. People with diabetes should aim for blood glucose levels as near to normal as possible, but individual targets should always be discussed with your diabetes health care professional. Controlling diabetes is important to prevent serious long term complications such as: heart and circulation problems infections kidney disease eye problems, which can lead to blindness nerve damage to the lower limbs and other parts of the body Types of diabetes There are three types of diabetes: Type 1 diabetes Type 1 diabetes affects less than 1% of all Australians. It can appear at any age, but most commonly in childhood and early adult life. People with type 1 diabetes cannot produce enough insulin, and therefore they must inject themselves with insulin several times a day. Type 2 diabetes Type 2 diabetes is the most common form of diabetes, affecting 7.1 % of a Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Nutrition Education

Diabetes And Nutrition Education

Our accredited program offers one-on-one counseling and group classes to help patients understand their disease. 1-in-4 has diabetes and doesn't know it. Are you the one? Take our Risk Test to see if you are at risk. Then, contact one of our Certified Diabetes Educators to find the best solution for you, call (800) 364-0499. Services Provided: Diabetes education helps individuals with diabetes learn how to manage their disease and be as healthy as possible. It focuses on seven self-care behaviors that are important to focus on to be healthy and fully enjoy life: Healthy eating Being active Monitoring Taking medication Problem solving Healthy coping Reducing risks The goal of diabetes education is to help people with diabetes practice these behaviors every day. This can be difficult but it does work, by helping lower blood sugar (glucose), blood pressure and cholesterol. Most people with diabetes know self-management is important, but many find it overwhelming. Diabetes education helps by designing a specific plan for each person that includes the tools and support to help make the plan easy to follow. How a FirstHealth Diabetes Educator Can Help You If you have diabetes, you know how challenging it can be to manage your disease. Healthy eating, physical activity, monitoring your condition, taking medication and reducing risks to your health are probably part of your daily routine. At times, all of this might seem overwhelming. Our diabetes educators can help. As members of your healthcare team, your diabetes educator will work with you to develop a plan to stay healthy, and give you the tools and ongoing support to make that plan a regular part of your life. FirstHealth will contact your insurance company to confirm the extent of coverage. Insurance coverage varies. Med Continue reading >>

Nutrition, Diabetes And Tuberculosis In The Epidemiological Transition

Nutrition, Diabetes And Tuberculosis In The Epidemiological Transition

Abstract Diabetes prevalence and body mass index reflect the nutritional profile of populations but have opposing effects on tuberculosis risk. Interactions between diabetes and BMI could help or hinder TB control in growing, aging, urbanizing populations. Methods and Findings We compiled data describing temporal changes in BMI, diabetes prevalence and population age structure in rural and urban areas for men and women in countries with high (India) and low (Rep. Korea) TB burdens. Using published data on the risks of TB associated with these factors, we calculated expected changes in TB incidence between 1998 and 2008. In India, TB incidence cases would have increased (28% from 1.7 m to 2.1 m) faster than population size (22%) because of adverse effects of aging, urbanization, changing BMI and rising diabetes prevalence, generating an increase in TB incidence per capita of 5.5% in 10 years. In India, general nutritional improvements were offset by a fall in BMI among the majority of men who live in rural areas. The growing prevalence of diabetes in India increased the annual number of TB cases in people with diabetes by 46% between 1998 and 2008. In Korea, by contrast, the number of TB cases increased more slowly (6.1% from 40,200 to 42,800) than population size (14%) because of positive effects of urbanization, increasing BMI and falling diabetes prevalence. Consequently, TB incidence per capita fell by 7.8% in 10 years. Rapid population aging was the most significant adverse effect in Korea. Nutritional and demographic changes had stronger adverse effects on TB in high-incidence India than in lower-incidence Korea. The unfavourable effects in both countries can be overcome by early drug treatment but, if left unchecked, could lead to an accelerating rise in TB incide Continue reading >>

Diabetes Types 1 And 2: Here's What You Need To Know.

Diabetes Types 1 And 2: Here's What You Need To Know.

What is diabetes mellitus? Diabetes mellitus (DM) is a group of metabolic diseases characterized by high blood sugar resulting from defects in insulin secretion, insulin action, or both. Nearly 90% of patients with DM have Type 2 diabetes. Type 1 DM is absolute insulin deficiency — in other words, the body cannot produce insulin. This is from a defect in the pancreas, the insulin-producing organ of the body. Type 1 DM is often understood to be an auto-immune disorder, in which the body destroys its own tissue (in this case, the cells of the pancreas). Type 2 DM arises because of insulin resistance. In this case, the body may be producing insulin but cannot use it properly. These individuals usually carry excess body fat; 80% of clients with Type 2 DM are obese at onset. Why is diabetes mellitus so important? Over 20 million people in the United States have DM. That is nearly 7% of the population. While risk of Type 2 DM goes up with age, younger people are increasingly susceptible because of poor dietary habits and inactivity. Ethnicity can also affect one’s risk: US survey data shows that Natives (in some regions), African Americans, and Hispanics have higher than average rates of DM. Indeed, among people with Native ancestry living in Southern Arizona, rates of DM average 29% — nearly one-third of the population! [1] DM drastically increases the risk of premature death and disability. Overall, the risk for early death among people with DM is about twice that of people without DM of similar age. If someone has high uncontrolled blood sugar levels for an extended period of time, it can result in organ damage, dysfunction, and failure. DM is linked to many serious health conditions. For example: At least 65% of people with DM die of some form of cardiovascular dise Continue reading >>

Nutrition Guidelines For Diabetes Management

Nutrition Guidelines For Diabetes Management

If you have diabetes, it is important to eat well to help keep yourself healthy. Nutrition care should be personalized for each person based on blood glucose (sugar) level, blood lipid (fat) levels, risk factors for heart disease and high blood pressure, exercise habits, and food preferences. For most people, general guidelines for diabetes are as follows: Aim to maintain a healthy weight Exercise moderately for about 30 minutes at least five times per week Get your carbohydrates mainly from fruits, vegetables, whole grains, legumes, and low-fat or skim dairy products Limit saturated fats, trans fats, and dietary cholesterol Do not use low-carbohydrate diets to control diabetes Weight If you currently have prediabetes, controlling your weight can help prevent you from getting type 2 diabetes. If you already have diabetes, controlling your weight can help you improve your blood sugar levels. A healthy eating pattern, combined with regular physical activity, can help people who are overweight lose weight and keep it off. Frequently, this will also lead to improvements in blood lipid levels. Diets for weight loss Individuals must find a healthy eating pattern that they can continue for a lifetime in order to successfully achieve weight loss and weight maintenance. No best diet exists because different things work for different people. However, changing eating and exercise behaviors is essential for successful weight loss. To lose weight, a deficit (decrease) of approximately 500 calories per day is generally recommended. A combination of eating and drinking fewer calories, and burning more calories through physical activity can create this deficit, and help you lose weight. Generally, about 1 hour per day of moderate-intensity aerobic exercise, such as brisk walking, along Continue reading >>

Condition Driven: Diabetes

Condition Driven: Diabetes

You and your patients can depend on products and programs from Abbott Nutrition – developed using the latest scientific information – to help support diabetes management through healthy eating and lifestyle modifications. The Need for Proper Nutrition for People with Type 2 Diabetes 29.1 million people in the U.S. have diabetes and it has been projected that as many as one of three U.S. adults could have diabetes by 2050. Type 2 diabetes accounts for about 95% diabetes prevalence in adults and rates are expected to rise sharply, in part due to the aging population more likely to develop type 2 diabetes. The prevalence of diagnosed diabetes is about seven times as high among adults aged 65 years or older as among those aged 20–44 years. 1,2 Meeting the Nutritional Needs of Your Patients with Diabetes Nutrition management aims to improve health quality by managing glucose levels to help reduce the risks for secondary complications. The recommended diet can be defined as a meal plan based on a nutrition assessment and mutually accepted treatment goals and desired outcomes. Patient Resources The Impact and Complications of Poor Nutrition Glycemia-targeted nutrition, such as Glucerna, has been shown to support improved blood glucose response References Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Diabetes Report Card 2012. Atlanta, GA: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, US Department of Health and Human Services; 2012. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. National Diabetes Statistics Report: Estimates of Diabetes and Its Burden in the United States, 2014. Atlanta, GA: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services; 2014. Continue reading >>

Type 1 Diabetes Nutrition

Type 1 Diabetes Nutrition

If you have type 1 diabetes, it is important to know how many carbohydrates you eat at a meal. This information helps you determine how much insulin you should take with your meal to maintain blood sugar (glucose) control. Carbohydrates are the main type of food that raises blood sugar. The starch, fruit and milk groups of the Food Group Pyramid for Diabetes are high in carbs. Foods in the Other Carbohydrates and Combination Food groups are also high in carbs. The vegetable group has a small amount of carbohydrates. The meat and fat groups have few or no carbs. The amount of carbohydrates you eat at each meal will determine how high your blood sugar rises after the meal. The other two major nutrients, protein and fat ,also have an effect on blood glucose levels, though it is not as rapid or great as carbohydrates. Most people with diabetes can control their blood sugar by limiting carbohydrate servings to 2-4 per meal and 1-2 per snack. A delicate balance of carbohydrate intake, insulin, and physical activity is necessary for the best blood sugar (glucose) levels. Eating carbohydrates increases your blood sugar (glucose) level. Exercise tends to decrease it (although not always). If the three factors are not in balance, you can have wide swings in blood sugar (glucose) levels. If you have type 1 diabetes and take a fixed dose of insulin, the carbohydrate content of your meals and snacks should be consistent from day to day. CHILDREN AND DIABETES Weight and growth patterns can help determine if a child with type 1 diabetes is getting enough nutrition. Changes in eating habits and more physical activity help improve blood sugar (glucose) control. For children with diabetes, special occasions (like birthdays or Halloween) require additional planning because of the extra sw Continue reading >>

Diabetes

Diabetes

Key points Diabetes has become a major threat to public health. It is one of the major causes of premature illness and death in most countries, and is becoming more common. There are two main types – type 1 and type 2. Around 2.5 million people in the UK have diabetes, most of which is type 2. It is also estimated that up to 750,000 people may have type 2 diabetes without knowing it. Type 1 diabetes (insulin-dependent diabetes) is an auto-immune condition in which the immune system of the body turns against itself, causing permanent damage to particular cells in the pancreas that produce insulin. Insulin production ceases. Type 1 diabetes is managed by injections of insulin coupled with a healthy diet. Type 2 diabetes (non-insulin dependent diabetes) occurs when the body does not produce enough insulin or the insulin produced does not work properly (this is known as insulin resistance). It is typically associated with being overweight or obese. Diet modification and physical activity are the two main approaches to treatment of type 2 diabetes. Eating a healthy balanced diet, taking regular physical activity, and maintaining a healthy body weight can help to prevent or delay the onset of type 2 diabetes. People with diabetes should try to maintain a healthy weight and eat a diet that is low in fat (particularly saturates) and salt but contains plenty of fruit and vegetables (at least five portions a day) and starchy carbohydrate foods such as bread, rice and pasta (particularly whole-grain versions). Public health Diabetes has become a major threat to public health. It is one of the major causes of premature illness and death in most countries, largely through the increased risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD) in people with diabetes. Cardiovascular disease is accounta Continue reading >>

Nutrition, Diabetes And Fitness

Nutrition, Diabetes And Fitness

There are three types of Diabetes: Type 1 diabetes, an autoimmune disease where the pancreas produces very little insulin or no insulin at all. Type 2 diabetes is, largely a lifestyle disease, found mainly in adults as they get older. Gestation diabetes is developed by pregnant women and it usually goes away after birth. This suggests that type 2 diabetes can be both prevented and reversed. So what are the steps that can make sure we never suffer from it, or if we do, we manage to get out of its grip? In truth they are basic, but that’s what also makes them difficult, and they are just three: Exercise Diet Nutrition While this is the usual formula of “exercise more and eat less” the reality is a lot more involved and a number of very recent studies have given us a lot of what we need to successfully unpack it. Diabetes type 2 can be controlled with drugs but these sometimes have unpleasant side-effects and the quality of life of the sufferer drops, anyway so it is worth exploring the alternatives. Exercise for diabetics A 15-year long study that looked at two control groups, one using diet and exercise and the other medication found that the diet and exercise group fared by far the best, reducing the incidence of diabetes by almost a third, as opposed to just 18% in the group using medication. Research published in Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise found, for example, that one single session of moderate exercise can improve the way your body regulates glucose and reduces the spikes in blood sugar that occur after a meal. Others studies have shown that anything between 3.5 and 6 hours of exercise a week can help reverse diabetes type 2. The American College of Sports Medicine and the American Diabetes Association have issued guidelines stating that moderate a Continue reading >>

Nutrition Principles And Recommendations In Diabetes

Nutrition Principles And Recommendations In Diabetes

Medical nutrition therapy is an integral component of diabetes management and of diabetes self-management education. Yet many misconceptions exist concerning nutrition and diabetes. Moreover, in clinical practice, nutrition recommendations that have little or no supporting evidence have been and are still being given to persons with diabetes. Accordingly, this position statement provides evidence-based principles and recommendations for diabetes medical nutrition therapy. The rationale for this position statement is discussed in the American Diabetes Association technical review “Evidence-Based Nutrition Principles and Recommendations for the Treatment and Prevention of Diabetes and Related Complications,” which discusses in detail the published research for each principle and recommendation (1). Historically, nutrition recommendations for diabetes and related complications were based on scientific knowledge, clinical experience, and expert consensus; however, it was often difficult to discern the level of evidence used to construct the recommendations. To address this problem, the 2002 technical review (1) and this position statement provide principles and recommendations classified according to the level of evidence available using the American Diabetes Association evidence grading system. However, the best available evidence must still take into account individual circumstances, preferences, and cultural and ethnic preferences, and the person with diabetes should be involved in the decision-making process. The goal of evidence-based recommendations is to improve diabetes care by increasing the awareness of clinicians and persons with diabetes about beneficial nutrition therapies. Because of the complexity of nutrition issues, it is recommended that a registered d Continue reading >>

Diabetes Nutrition: What A Dietitian Wants You To Know

Diabetes Nutrition: What A Dietitian Wants You To Know

Whether you’ve been managing your diabetes for weeks, months, or years, chances are you’re feeling something like a wannabe nutritionist. Paying super-close attention to how food affects your blood sugar levels is critical to staying healthy with diabetes and preventing progression. In this video, Sharon Richter, RD, recommends diabetic-friendly foods that help maintain consistent blood sugar levels throughout the day. A major ingredient to keep track of is carbohydrates. This refers not only to sugar you may want to add to crispy rice cereal, but also all the various foods that sugar sneaks into (like BBQ sauce and flavored yogurts) and the refined carbs in white pasta and breads. On a diabetic diet, look for grains that have a higher fiber content. These grains are considered complex carbohydrates and the body breaks these down more slowly, so they won’t spike your blood sugar. Look for breads that say 100 percent whole grain, and choose cereals with low sugar levels (time to ditch a certain leprechaun mascot). When it comes to fruits and vegetables and diabetes nutrition, these are considered healthy carbohydrates as well. They’re rich in nutrients and can be a great source of fiber as well. However, be cautious with dried fruits, since it can be easily to eat many of these in a short amount of time, thus consuming a large amount of sugar. That being said, these handy snacks might be perfect in emergency situations when your blood sugar levels are very low. When it comes to proteins on a diabetic diet, look for lower-fat selections. Additionally, research has demonstrated the success of a vegetarian diet to manage diabetes, so plant-based proteins like beans, tofu, tempeh, and nuts are a great option. Here’s more details about the best proteins for a diabet Continue reading >>

Diabetes Care And Education Dpg

Diabetes Care And Education Dpg

The Diabetes Care and Education DPG promotes quality diabetes care and education for people with diabetes and their families and for those at risk for developing diabetes. As leaders in the healthcare community, DCE members make positive contributions for people with diabetes and their families, the DCE membership, healthcare providers, other professional organizations and industry partners. DCE provides an environment for professional growth to members, promotes clinical and educational research, takes a proactive position on nutrition and diabetes legislative and public policy issues and responds to the needs of collaborative diabetes organizations and industry. Members practice in a variety of settings including clinical settings, education, private practice, public health, managed care organizations, industry and research. They also are active at the local, regional and national levels in diabetes organizations. DCE developed Nutrition Practice Guidelines for type 1, type 2 and gestational diabetes and continues to develop nutrition/diabetes publications for professionals and people with diabetes. DCE is a past recipient of the prestigious Charles Best Award from the American Diabetes Association. Mission: Empowering DCE members to be leaders in food, nutrition, and diabetes care and prevention. Vision: Optimizing the health of people impacted by diabetes using food, nutrition, and self-management education. Officers Chair: Liz Quintana, EdD, RD, LD, CDE Chair-elect: Alyce Thomas, RD Past Chair/Industry Relations: Susan Yake, RDN, CDE, CLT, CD Secretary: Susan Rizzo, RD, LDN, CDE Treasurer: Paula Kellogg Leibovitz, MS, RDN, CDE, CDN Treasurer-elect: Mary Angela Niester, MPH, RD Professional Development Chair: Laura Russell, MA, CDE, RD Public Policy Liaison: Donna M Continue reading >>

Indian Foods: Aapi's Guide To Nutrition, Health And Diabetes 2nd Edition!

Indian Foods: Aapi's Guide To Nutrition, Health And Diabetes 2nd Edition!

Indian Foods: AAPI's Guide to Nutrition, Health and Diabetes is an inimitable book from which the entire all can benefit. It gives a short description of the dietary characteristics of different regions of India and illuminates the cultural context from which the ethnic foods and eating habits have evolved. Besides providing practical guidelines on healthy diets and understanding how to manage chronic disease states, it provides information on the health benefits of spices and weight management. It is a comprehensive summary for any anyone interested in improving themselves with a delicious and health conscious diet of South Asian cuisine. The Public Health Committee led by Dr. Thakor Patel (2010-2011) along with a team of registered dietitians and under the editorship of Ranjita Misra, PhD, CHES, FMALRC helped in compiling the 2nd edition. It is AAPI's goal to reach out to the community to promote healthy lifestyles and disease prevention. Click here to download the complete book Indian Foods: AAPI's Guide to Health, Nutrition and Diabetes 2nd Edition Click here to download the entire book Indian Foods: AAPI's Guide to Health, Nutrition and Diabetes 1st Edition Click here to download the entire book Continue reading >>

What's New In Nutrition For Adults With Diabetes?

What's New In Nutrition For Adults With Diabetes?

Nwankwo, Robin MPH, RD, CDE; Funnell, Martha MS, RN, CDE, FAADE HAVE YOU HEARD this faulty advice? All people with diabetes should be on a diabetic or American Diabetes Association (ADA) diet. White potatoes and other white foods are “bad carbs” that people with diabetes should avoid. Sweets, foods made with sugar, fried foods, and alcohol are also off-limits. Everyone who takes insulin should count carbs. Everyone with diabetes should follow sodium restrictions. Many adults with diabetes ask, “What can I eat?” Unfortunately, they're often given the incorrect advice listed above. So what can you tell your patients about how to plan meals in order to reach their glycemic, weight, and other targets? Evidence-based guidelines outlined in this article can help you answer that question. Nutrition therapy recommendations In 2012, the ADA formed an expert committee to review evidence based on the latest research in order to revise the nutrition guidelines that were developed in 2008 for adults with type 1 and type 2 diabetes.1 The Task Force included dietitians and nurses, a physician, and a pharmacist. These updated guidelines, published in 2013, have also been incorporated into the ADA Standards of Medical Care for Diabetes.2 A key element of the new recommendations is the focus on working collaboratively with patients and matching the meal plan to the person with diabetes and his or her lifestyle and cultural preferences.1 Meal planning for diabetes has evolved to include many options that can be matched to patients' personal preferences, goals, and treatment. The general goal of nutrition therapy is “to promote and support healthful eating patterns, emphasizing a variety of nutrient-dense foods in appropriate portion sizes, in order to improve overall health.”1 Continue reading >>

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