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Nutmeg Diabetes

Nutmeg Soothes Nerve Pain Dr. Elaine

Nutmeg Soothes Nerve Pain Dr. Elaine

Many diabetes experience severe nerve pain, known as diabetic neuropathy. Approximately 70 percent of all diabetics experience this condition. It usually affects the feet, but can also impact the hands. Symptoms including pain, tingling and or a burning sensation in the extremities. This damage is cause by prolonged elevation of the blood sugar level, over an extended period of time. Sign Up For My 7-Day Accelerate Your Health Challenge! Discover the tools and techniques that will empower you to immediately take charge of your health and well-being in ways you never knew were possible. I agree to have my personal information transfered to AWeber ( more information ) Pain relievers, including anti-inflammatory medications , and anti-epileptic medications have been used, with limited improvement. Unfortunately, the but Painkillers are one of the main treatments, but some cannot be taken for prolonged periods as they can cause stomach ulcers. Based on findings of an earlier study that demonstrated nutmeg extracts promising ability to significantly reduce inflammation, by lowering the levels of prostaglandins, a group of chemicals that play an essential role in inflammation in our bodies, researchers at the University of the West Indies created a nutmeg sprain that may ease the pain caused by diabetic neuropathy. Applied three times a day, scientists believe it will relieve diabetic neuropathy. where the nerves become damaged by too much sugar in the blood. The medical study conducted at the University of the West Indies, patients will use the spray on the affected part of their body for at least four weeks. The trial follows earlier research that found the spice appears to have strong anti-inflammatory effects. Nutmeg and other spices, such as cinnamon also have indicatio Continue reading >>

The Health Benefits Of Nutmeg!

The Health Benefits Of Nutmeg!

Nutmeg powder has a number of health benefits. Not only is it a common spice made from the kernel of an exotic fruit, but it also has antibacterial properties and contains ingredients that can help improve memory, benefit the heart, relax muscles and aid with digestion. So if your only encounter with nutmeg is during the holiday season, check out some of the amazing health benefits associated with this spice, lets take a look! If you suffer from acne or have acne scars, try mixing a little with water or honey into a paste. Apply it to the skin like a mask or use like a scrub and your skin will benefit. Nutmeg has ant-inflammatory components that will help reduce the redness and puffiness associated with pimples. It will help remove blackheads, make scars less noticeable and make your skin smoother. Looking to stay away from prescribed medications to bring euphoria back into the bedroom, Yes, one of the many health benefits is its aphrodisiac effects. Researchers have found that at low dosages it is capable of increasing sexual activity, increasing both libido and potency in men. Before you go dowsing yourself in this little spice, you should be aware that at higher doses, nutmeg does have adverse effects and can cause heart palpitations and nausea. As individuals withtype 1 diabetes we all know how vitally important it is to protect our kidneys.Detoxification is an important factor of good health (anyone remember me talking about alkalizing ;-)). Diet, pollution, stress, tobacco, medication and other external substances can lead to the build-up of toxins in your organs. The liver and kidney are two of the organs where this toxic build-up usually develops. As a tonic, nutmeg can clean your liver and kidney and remove these toxins. If you are suffering from a liver disea Continue reading >>

8 Simple Ways You Can Manage Diabetes

8 Simple Ways You Can Manage Diabetes

Rediff.com Getahead 8 simple ways you can manage diabetes Did you know that mushrooms can help you keep diabetes under check? Maintaining blood sugar levels close to a healthy range can dramatically reduce the risk of serious complications of diabetes, such as heart disease, blindness, kidney failure, and amputations (related to diabetic neuropathy). Natural foods and supplements with medicinal properties is a cost effective way to achieve significant health benefits by preventing or managing diabetes. Functional foods also help increase medication effectiveness, maintain your nutritional status and prevent adverse complications. Photograph:Cinnamon Vogue/Creative Commons Ginger is rich in active compounds called gingerols, which increase the uptake of glucose into muscle cells and may therefore assist in the management of high blood sugar levels. It can also help to delay the onset and progression of cataract, a common complication of diabetes. Cinnamon and other common spices such as nutmeg, basil, garlic, bay leaf, oregano and others are found to play a role in lowering blood glucose, increasing insulin sensitivity, lower blood pressure and decrease the risk of cardiovascular diseases, one complication associated with diabetes. To achieve these benefits only a small daily dose is essential, 1 to 1.5 teaspoons. People with type 2 diabetes (non-insulin dependent) can benefit greatly with a daily dose of ginger, cinnamon and lemon as these foods can help in long-term sugar control. A tea can be made by boiling water with one-inch piece of ginger, strain in a cup and add 1.5 teaspoon of cinnamon and 1 teaspoon of lemon juice. Photograph:Peter Stevens/Creative Commons Several types of mushrooms have been identified and used as anti-diabetic agents, some of these medical Continue reading >>

Nutmeg And Mace: Uses, Side Effects, Interactions, Dosage, And Warning

Nutmeg And Mace: Uses, Side Effects, Interactions, Dosage, And Warning

Fleur de Muscade, Jaatipatree, Jaiphal, Jatikosha, Jatipatra, Jatipatri, Jatiphal, Jatiphala, Jatiphalam, Javitri, Jayapatri, Macis, Muscade, Muscade et Macis, Muscadier, Muskatbuam, Muskatnuss, Myristica, Myristicae Aril, Myristica fragrans, Myristica officinalis, Myristicae Semen, Noix de Muscade, Noix de Muscade et Macis, Nuez Moscada, Nuez Moscada y Macis, Nux Moschata, Ron Dau Kou. Nutmeg and mace are plant products. Nutmeg is the shelled, dried seed of the plant Myristica fragrans, and mace is the dried net-like covering of the shell of the seed. Nutmeg and mace are used to make medicine. Nutmeg and mace are used for diarrhea , nausea , stomach spasms and pain, and intestinal gas. They are also used for treating cancer , kidney disease, and trouble sleeping ( insomnia ); increasing menstrual flow; causing a miscarriage ; as a hallucinogen; and as a general tonic. Nutmeg and mace are applied to the skin to kill pain, especially pain caused by achy joints (rheumatism), mouth sores, and toothache . In foods, nutmeg and mace are used as spices and flavorings. In manufacturing, nutmeg oil is used as a fragrance in soaps and cosmetics . Nutmeg oil is distilled from worm-eaten nutmeg seeds. The worms remove much of the starch and fat, leaving the portions of the seed that are rich in oil. Nutmeg and mace contain chemicals that might affect the central nervous system . Nutmeg and mace might also kill bacteria and fungi. Producing hallucinations . Eating 5-20 grams of nutmeg powder (1-3 whole seeds) might cause psychoactive effects. Because nutmeg and mace are so similar, high doses of mace might also have psychoactive effects but, as yet, this has not been proven. Nutmeg and mace are POSSIBLY SAFE when taken by mouth and used appropriately. Nutmeg and mace are commonly u Continue reading >>

Cinnamon For Diabetes

Cinnamon For Diabetes

The use of cinnamon to help treat diabetes remains controversial. We know that cinnamon is so good at controlling one’s blood sugar that you can cheat on a diabetes test by consuming two teaspoons of cinnamon the night before your glucose tolerance test. That’s where they make you drink some sugar water to see how well your body can keep your blood sugar levels under control, and if you eat those two teaspoons right when the test starts or 12 hours before you can significantly blunt the spike. Even a teaspoon a day appears to make a significant difference. A review of the best studies done to date found that the intake of cinnamon by type 2 diabetics or prediabetics does lower their blood glucose significantly. So what’s the controversy? Well, as I described in my video The Safer Cinnamon, cassia cinnamon, also known as Chinese cinnamon (probably what you’re getting at the store if it just says “cinnamon”) contains a compound called coumarin which may be toxic to the liver at high doses. Originally the concern was mainly for kids during Christmas-time where they might get an above average exposure, but more recently some researchers suggest that kids just sprinkling some cassia cinnamon on their oatmeal a few times a week might exceed the recommended safety limit. As you can see in my 5-min video Update on Cinnamon for Blood Sugar Control just a quarter teaspoon of cinnamon a few times a week may be too much for little kids, and if they’re eating that cinnamon-sprinkled oatmeal more like every day they can bump up against the limit for adults. So a teaspoon a day of cassia cinnamon might be too much for anyone, but can’t we just switch from cassia cinnamon to Ceylon cinnamon and get the benefits without the potential risks? Without the risks, yes, but we Continue reading >>

9 Surprising Health Benefits Of Nutmeg

9 Surprising Health Benefits Of Nutmeg

Beyond its delicate and slightly sweet flavor accenting dishes throughout the world nutmeg offers an abundance of health benefits. In fact, thanks to its dense nutritive content, nutmeg health benefits include relieving pain, helping digestion and improving the libido, among others. Nutmeg comes from the evergreen nutmeg trees, which are native to the Spice Islands of Indonesia. When the fruit (Myristica frangrans) is ripe, it splits open to reveal a black nutmeg seed inside. This seed is covered with vein-like threads, known as mace, which is also edible. Nutmeg comes wholebut is most often used in powder form or essential oil obtained by steam distillation. It contains more than 50 chemical compounds. Just a dusting of nutmeg adds aroma and enhances the taste of food. It also provides key minerals such as potassium, calcium, iron and manganese to help keep your immune system strong. Lets have a closer look at the many health benefits of nutmeg and why you should use it more often. Those who suffer from chronic or persistent pain from conditions such as inflammatory diseases, cancer or diabetes have a reduced quality of life. Clinical researchers, therefore, are continually challenged to discover safer, more effective and better-tolerated painkillers. For centuries, nutmeg has been a staple in ancient Chinese medicine for inflammation and abdominal pain. An animal study published in the Journal of Food and Nutrition injected rats with nutmeg oil to test its anti-inflammatory and analgesic effects on chronic pain. Researchers found that nutmeg oil could potentially alleviate joint swelling and pain associated with chronic inflammation. Additionally, nutmeg oil was effective on pain caused by increased sensitivity, making it an ideal pain reliever. By adding nutmeg as a Continue reading >>

5 Bad Habits That May Increase Your Risk Of Prediabetes

5 Bad Habits That May Increase Your Risk Of Prediabetes

1 / 6 How Certain Habits May Affect Your Prediabetes Risk If diabetes runs in your family, you may be worried about eventually developing the disease yourself. After all, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), prediabetes — the precursor to type 2 diabetes — affects one out of three Americans, or about 84 million people, and 90 percent of those individuals are unaware they have it. But when it comes to type 2 diabetes, do your genes determine your fate? Not exactly. As it turns out, certain activities and habits — some of which are particularly easy to develop nowadays — may increase your risk of developing prediabetes. Those tendencies range from dining out to using your smartphone to vaping, experts say. “Deciding to make healthy choices may not be a complete guarantee to perfect health, but it could mean the difference between having a substantial health issue and circumventing one,” says Anna Simos, CDE, manager of the education and prevention program at Stanford Health Care in Palo Alto, California. Here are just a few of the bad habits that experts recommend avoiding — but keep in mind that everybody is different, and just because you spot a bad habit of yours on this list doesn’t mean you’re destined for diabetes. Continue reading >>

Spice It Up! Boosting Your Health With Spices And Herbs (part 3)

Spice It Up! Boosting Your Health With Spices And Herbs (part 3)

Spice It Up! Boosting Your Health with Spices and Herbs (Part 3) I enjoy cooking and baking, especially around the holidays. And this time of year is perfect for what I consider to be a trifecta of spices: cinnamon , ginger , and nutmeg. So, this week, well take a closer look at nutmeg. Nutmeg trees actually produce two spices: nutmeg and mace. The trees, which can grow as tall as 66 feet, are native to the Banda Islands of Indonesia and are part of the Spice Islands. Nutmeg is from the seed kernel of the nutmeg fruit, which looks like an apricot, and mace comes from the red, lace-like covering that surrounds the nutmeg kernel. You can buy a nutmeg kernel, which is small, brown, and wrinkled, or you can buy nutmeg already ground. Nutmeg has been used in some interesting ways over the ages. For example, Henry VI apparently had the streets of Rome fumigated with nutmeg before his arrival. In the middle ages, men kept a nutmeg kernel in their armpit to attract admirers (that couldnt have been comfortable!). Nutmeg has also been used to treat a number of conditions, including the following: Nutmeg is also used in ayurvedic medicine for digestive problems, premature ejaculation, and urinary incontinence. Nutmeg oil is used in some medicines, dental products (it seems to help kill off bacteria in the mouth), and perfumes. As a supplement, nutmeg is available in capsule form, and it is also used in Chinese medicine. Some words of warning: Ingesting too much nutmeg can be harmful. Nutmeg contains myristicin, also known as methoxy-safrole, a substance found in nutmeg oil. Myristicin has hallucinogenic properties, and may lead to nausea, vomiting, double vision, circulation problems, and psychoactive effects. The amount of nutmeg that we typically use in cooking or baking is har Continue reading >>

A Naturopathic Approach To Type 2 Diabetes

A Naturopathic Approach To Type 2 Diabetes

A Naturopathic Approach To Type 2 Diabetes According to the American Diabetes Association, nearly 21 million people in the United States have diabetes, with about 90 to 95% having Type 2 diabetes. These diagnosed cases were once limited to adults, but the number of children diagnosed with Type 2 is increasing as sedentary lifestyles, poor diets, and obesity continue to rise. In addition, there are over 40 million undiagnosed people in the United States who have pre-diabetes. They are insulin resistant, overweight or obese, but their blood sugar levels have not yet reached diabetic status. In women, a common cause of pre-diabetes is Poly Cystic Ovarian Syndrome or PCOS, a hormonal imbalance in women which often involves insulin resistance. The national cost of diabetes in the U.S. in 2007 exceeded $174 billion. This estimate includes $116 billion in excess medical expenditures attributed to diabetes, as well as $58 billion in reduced national productivity. People with diagnosed diabetes, on average, have medical expenditures that are approximately 2.3 times higher than the expenditures would be in the absence of diabetes. Approximately $1 in $10 health care dollars is attributed to diabetes. Indirect costs include increased factors such as absenteeism, reduced productivity, and lost productive capacity due to early mortality. Type 2 diabetes is a chronic condition that involves insulin resistance, which affects the way your body metabolizes sugar (glucose). People with Type 2 diabetes are still able to produce insulin at diagnosis. However, the insulin they produce is unable to perform its primary job, which is helping the bodys cells use glucose for energy. As a result, glucose builds up in the blood instead of entering cells, which causes cells to be deprived of energ Continue reading >>

Cinnamon And Nutmeg: Do They Really Have Healing Properties?

Cinnamon And Nutmeg: Do They Really Have Healing Properties?

The health benefits of herbs and spices have been known for thousands of years. Eastern medicine uses herbs and spices as part of healing certain ailments and bringing balance back to the body. In the Western world of medicine, using herbs and spices in healing is usually termed alternative/holistic medicine and most often not used in traditional medical practice. In recent years in the United States, people have begun to look for other ways to heal health problems rather than taking medication. This has led to the popularity and marketing of many over the counter herbs and spices to people who may not want to take medication for a health problem. What people may not realize is these supplements are not regulated by the Food and Drug Administration or any other 3rd party, which can put people at risk for health complications. Many of these traditionally eastern therapies can be used safely by gaining a better understanding of the herb/spice that will be used as a therapy. It can also be a good idea to consult a specialist in alternative medicine. There is a good website called Natural Medicine Comprehensive Database that was created as an evidence-based resource site for natural medicines. If you are taking or planning on taking an herbal or spice supplement this would be a great place to evaluate its safety and effectiveness. Two spices that are usually thought of for cooking have recently been marketed for their healing potential. These two spices are cinnamon and nutmeg. Cinnamon is used in Chinese medicine to control blood sugar and treat cold and flu symptoms. In recent research, cinnamon has been found to decrease blood sugar, triglyceride levels, and cholesterol in Type II diabetics. The amount of cinnamon thought to give added health benefits is about 1 teaspoo Continue reading >>

Managing Diabetes With Nutmeg Seeds

Managing Diabetes With Nutmeg Seeds

It may soon be possible to manage the serious condition of diabetes naturally using nutmeg seeds (Myristica fragrans) according to new research presented today at the British Pharmaceutical Conference in Manchester. Diabetes is a metabolic disorder that is estimated by the Department of Health to affect 2.35 million people in England alone. This figure is expected to rise to 2.5m by 2010. Diabetes is a serious condition by which the body is unable to break down sugar (glucose) in the blood due to a deficiency of insulin. People with diabetes often have raised fat (lipid) levels in the blood, which increases the risk of cardiovascular disease. Breakthrough technology offers hope for early diagnosis of type 1 diabetes Nutmeg has been used across the world as a ground spice in cooking for centuries. In the tribal areas of India, where there is a lack of access to conventional medicine, nutmeg is also used for treating diabetes, as well as other ailments such as diarrhoea, mouth sores, and insomnia. But, to date, there was no scientific data to support its anti-diabetic activity. Knowledge of nutmeg's traditional use led pharmacists in Pune and Sagar, India, to study nutmeg scientifically. Their controlled tests on rats showed that extracts of the spice: significantly decreases blood glucose levels stimulate the beta-cells of the pancreas to release insulin improves body and organ (liver and pancreas) weight Rahul Somani, Assistant Professor, Sinhgad College of Pharmacy, Pune, India, who led the research, says that the research results are an important finding in the management and treatment of diabetes. "Diabetes affects thousands of people all around the world," he says. "This research suggests that nutmeg has a significant anti-diabetic effect and may offer a user-frien Continue reading >>

9 Spices Proven To Fight Cancer, Diabetes And Inflammation For Under $9

9 Spices Proven To Fight Cancer, Diabetes And Inflammation For Under $9

9 Spices Proven to Fight Cancer, Diabetes and Inflammation For Under $9 The new year is a great time to make your resolutions for the upcoming year. Many people find themselves trying to eat healthier, and incorporating spices can be a simple way to boost the antioxidant power of your overall diet. The 9 spices in this article are superheroes in the food world, and can boost your metabolic rate, strengthen your brain power, prevent against cancer, decrease inflammation, reverse diabetes and improve cardiovascular disease at the same time. If I could award the nobel prize to any single spice, Turmeric would win it every time. Considered the single most anti-inflammatory compound in the world, there is almost nothing that turmeric cant do. Turmeric is the king of all spices, and gives pharmaceutical companies a run for their money. With virtually no side effects, turmeric has been demonstrated to positively modulate over 160 different physiological pathways, and is effective in killing cancer stem cells, reducing inflammation and boosting immune function. The scientific literature boasts more than 5,000 abstracts containing over 600 potential health benefits of turmeric and its bioactive compound curcumin (16). Of these health benefits discovered, some of turmerics most notable healing properties include: Ghorbani Z, Hekmatdoost A, Mirmiran P. Anti-hyperglycemic and insulin sensitizer effects of turmeric and its principle constituent curcumin. Int J Endocrinol Metab. 2014 Oct;12(4):e18081. Ghosh S, Banerjee S, Sil PC. The beneficial role of curcumin on inflammation, diabetes and neurodegenerative disease: A recent update. Food Chem Toxicol Int J Publ Br Ind Biol Res Assoc. 2015 Sep;83:11124. He Y, Yue Y, Zheng X, Zhang K, Chen S, Du Z. Curcumin, inflammation, and chronic Continue reading >>

3 Myths Busted About Type 2 Diabetes

3 Myths Busted About Type 2 Diabetes

Did you know that heart disease is the leading cause of death for diabetics? The biggest commonality with every diabetic or heart disease patient that I see is that they have been told, You need to take this medication (Metformin, Lipitor) for the rest of your life, and this condition is likely to get worse. Unfortunately, if you follow those directions, and do nothing else, it is true. You are likely going to get worse. However, there are steps you can take that completely change the game. It doesnt have to get worse. Lets examine one case example from my practice. For many of my patients, experiences accumulated over their lifetime have led them to the path of diabetes and/or heart disease. Emily was 26 years old when she first presented to my office, and she was already on the road toward diabetes and heart disease. She had struggled with severe anxiety since her early teens and her primary care physician helped her to suppress these symptoms with anti-depressants and anti-anxiety medications. She had been taking these medications since the age of 14 without much relief from her anxiety and as a result she had gained over 40 pounds, developed high cholesterol, high blood pressure, and her fasting blood sugar levels were slowly increasing. Her primary care physician then recommended some dietary changes in an attempt to delay her need to begin blood pressure and cholesterol-lowering medications. He did, however, warn her that she would likely need them at some point in the future. When she first came to see me, Emily was very anxious about her health and struggling to maintain the diet changes recommended by her primary care doctor. She described how she was easily overwhelmed by daily life, resulting in extreme irritability and panic, as well as tension headaches ev Continue reading >>

Benefits Of Nutmeg Seed

Benefits Of Nutmeg Seed

Sylvie Tremblay holds a Master of Science in molecular and cellular biology and has years of experience as a cancer researcher and neuroscientist. Based in Ontario, Canada, Tremblay is an experienced journalist and blogger specializing in nutrition, fitness, lifestyle, health and biotechnology, as well as real estate, agriculture and clean tech. A bowl of whole nutmeg on a wooden table.Photo Credit: GooDween123/iStock/Getty Images Native to Indonesia, the Myristica fragrans serves as a source of two spices -- its seeds make up nutmeg, while the rough outer seed coat is ground to make mace. Nutmeg has long been prized for its medicinal benefits, and its pungent, spicy aroma makes it a welcome addition to recipes. Adding nutmeg seed to your diet offers a number of nutritional benefits, including increased fiber and mineral intake, but consuming too much might cause harmful side effects. Use nutmeg seed in your cooking as a source of dietary fiber -- a nutrient important for lifelong health. Fiber helps control both your blood cholesterol and your blood sugar levels, and following a fiber-rich diet helps reduce your risk of chronic illnesses, including Type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease. Fiber also softens your stool, so you're less likely to suffer from constipation, and fights other digestive disorders, such as diverticular disease. Each 2-tablespoon serving of ground nutmeg seed provides you with 2.9 grams of dietary fiber -- 8 percent of the daily recommended intake for men and 11 percent for women, as set by the Institute of Medicine. Nutmeg seed also offers health benefits by boosting your mineral intake, particularly copper and manganese. Both minerals help keep your skeleton strong and heathy. Manganese also helps you synthesize sex hormones, while copper Continue reading >>

Health Benefits Of Cloves, Allspice, Nutmeg, Cinnamon & Ginger

Health Benefits Of Cloves, Allspice, Nutmeg, Cinnamon & Ginger

Health Benefits of Cloves, Allspice, Nutmeg, Cinnamon & Ginger Spices such as cloves, allspice, nutmeg, cinnamon and ginger lend familiar, warm flavor to classic recipes, such as gingerbread, and chai -- a traditional Indian spiced tea. Individually or in combinations, they can also inject exciting variety into your newest kitchen creations: Think ginger and nutmeg smoothies or rice with cinnamon and allspice. Aside from their culinary uses, each of these spices offers potential health benefits. Eugenol, the active component of cloves, offers a range of potential health benefits, including antioxidant, anti-inflammatory and anti-cancer effects, according to a review of previously published research that appeared in the May 2012 issue of the journal "Molecules." You can also use eugenol as a topical antiseptic and painkiller for minor cuts and scrapes. Researchers noted that the clove extract has shown inhibitory effects against skin, bone, blood and stomach cancers. Allspice offers robust antioxidant and detoxifying benefits, according to a test tube study published in the January 2011 issue of "Natural Products Research." Researchers identified eugenol as the main active compound in allspice, noting that it exhibited significant ability to neutralize free radicals -- reactive molecules that cause cell damage. The compound also showed strong metal-binding ability, indicating that it may be useful for removing toxic metals, such as mercury and lead, from the body. Anti-aging benefits of nutmeg were demonstrated in a tissue culture study of human skin cells published in a 2012 issue of "Biological and Pharmaceutical Bulletin." A nutmeg compound called macelignan protected the cells against damage from ultraviolet radiation by inhibiting activity of tissue-damaging enzyme Continue reading >>

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