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Nursing Research Articles On Diabetes

Nurses Participating In Research To Improve Diabetes Care

Nurses Participating In Research To Improve Diabetes Care

Nurses participating in research to improve diabetes care From coast to coast, nurses are participating in or conducting research that may change the way they and their colleagues care for patients with diabetes. [My job] is fantastic, said Terry Zierenberg, RN, CDE, a diabetes nurse educator at the Diabetes & Metabolism Research Institute at City of Hope in Duarte, Calif. We can see the difference we make in the lives of people with diabetes. Zierenberg works on the islet cell transplant program, evaluating candidates self-management skills and qualifications to participate in the study and helping coordinate blood glucose management after transplant. My role is to assess that we have exhausted all measures in attempting to control [the candidates], Zierenberg said. Trial participants, who have severe type 1 diabetes and frequent hypoglycemia or hypoglycemia unawareness, receive islet cells from the pancreas of a deceased donor through the hepatic circulation and the anti-rejection medication anti-thymocyte globulin. Participants can receive up to three transplants. Patients continue to self-manage their disease and will initially receive small doses of insulin and then are weaned off of it. City of Hope will follow them for five years. Some participants in prior islet cell trials at the institute have been followed for 10 years, including one woman whose islets are becoming exhausted. She is now waiting to start the new trial. While Fouad Kandeel, MD, PhD, said in a release that islet cells may provide a cure for type 1 diabetes, Zierenberg said, the goal of islet transplantation is to get rid of the dangerously and potentially life-threatening hypoglycemic events that occur. She also indicated a goal is to manage patients with islet cells but no immunosuppression. Z Continue reading >>

Professional Nursesand#8217; Knowledge Level On Type Ii Diabetes Mellitus At Selected Teaching And Training Hospitals In The Central Region Of Ghana | Omics International

Professional Nursesand#8217; Knowledge Level On Type Ii Diabetes Mellitus At Selected Teaching And Training Hospitals In The Central Region Of Ghana | Omics International

Nurses; Knowledge; Michigan diabetes knowledge test;Type II diabetes mellitus; Professionals ; Selected; Teaching andtraining hospitals Diabetes Mellitus is a global public health concern for many nationsin the 21st Century and approximately 246 million people worldwide have diabetes. Almost 6% the worlds adult population have it. About80% of these clients live in the developing countries, of which 40% arein the 40-59 year group [ 1 ]. It is one of the most common chronicdiseases in the Western world since 2007 [ 2 ]. According to [ 3 ] thenumber of people with diabetes has reached 366 million contributingto approximately 4.6 million of deaths. King et al (1998) cited in [ 4 ]predicted that by the year 2025, the number of patients with diabetesmellitus would increase to 300 million [ 2 ]. It is becoming an increasing worldwide health problem [ 5 ]. The 23million people represent 8% of the population. Of this 11.5 million arewomen and 12 million are men, representing 10.2% and 11.2% of thepopulation respectively. It is the seventh leading cause of death and islikely to be underreported as a cause of death [ 6 ]. China has thesecond largest number of people suffering from diabetes in the world.According to WHO, rapid changes in lifestyle and socio-economicdevelopments in Asia will cause major increases in the prevalence of diabetes mellitus in mainland China and India.In 2003, the number ofpeople with diabetes mellitus exceeded 30 million [ 7 ]. Apart from the limited number of professional health staff in mostdeveloping countries, it has been indicated that health workers areinsufficiently trained in chronic disease management [ 8 , 9 ]. It has alsobeen reported that the effort of healthcare professionals hastraditionally been spent on developing methods for ensuringcom Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes: Growing To Epic Proportions

Type 2 Diabetes: Growing To Epic Proportions

Diabetes can be characterized as a prevailing, incapacitating, and deadly disease. According to the 2011 National Diabetes Fact Sheet, 25.8 million children and adults in the United States have diabetes8.3% of the populationwith 7 million people undiagnosed. Data further reveal that 1.9 million new cases of diabetes were diagnosed in people age 20 and older in 2010. 1 In addition, diabetes is affecting the younger population like never before; about 1 in every 400 children and adolescents has diabetes. (See Table 1 .) The complications of this disease are costly to the healthcare system. The total cost (direct and indirect) of diabetes in 2007 was $174 billion. 2 These estimated costs include medical care, disability, and premature death. As the incidence of diabetes continues, there's growing concern about the morbidity and mortality of this disease. Literature indicates a concern for an increase in diabetes-related complications, which may devastate the healthcare delivery system. 2 About a third of people with diabetes are age 65 or older, and diabetes-attributable healthcare expenditures for this age group reached $65 billion in 2007. 3 This age group generally uses Medicare as their primary insurance. Diabetes decreases a person's life expectancy by up to 15 years. Literature reveals that diabetes increases cardiovascular heart disease risk and is the leading cause of kidney failure, lower limb amputations, and adult-onset blindness. It's clear that diabetes is on the rise in the United States. In 2050, it's predicted that the number of people with diabetes will increase to 48.3 million. 4 With the tripling of the number of diabetes cases comes an increase in the medical expense of the disease and its comorbidities. Nurses are educators and, therefore, we must com Continue reading >>

Endocrine Archives - American Nurse Today

Endocrine Archives - American Nurse Today

Reducing barriers to glucose control in patients with gestational diabetes Author: Preventing adverse outcomes may hinge on your ability to identify and overcome barriers that prevent some pregnant women from managing their diabetes properly. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), 9.2% of pregnant women develop gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) as a serious complication during pregnancy. A positive glucose tolerance test in the second trimester can be a shock for an expectant woman. Poor glucose control can lead to poor . . . Author: Stacey A. Seggelke, MS, RN, CNS, CDE, BC-ADM Learning objectives 1. Differentiate between enteral and parenteral nutrition. 2. Discuss how to manage hypoglycemia and hyperglycemia in patients with diabetes who are receiving supplemental nutrition. 3. Describe insulin use in patients with diabetes who are receiving supplemental nutrition. Purpose/goal: To provide nurses with information on . . . Author: Julie S. Lampe, MSN, CNS, CNS-BC, ADM-BC Its lunchtime. Three of your patients are scheduled to receive rapid-acting insulin in addition to sliding-scale insulin. Mr. Jones, age 87, has type 2 diabetes. His blood glucose level is 223 mg/dL. Hes on a clear diet. Mrs. Smith, age 63, has type 1 diabetes . . . Author: Stacey A. Seggelke, MS, RN, ACNS-BC, BC-ADM, CDE Approximately 25.8 million children and adults in the United States have diabetes. Especially with the diabetes rate rising yearly, youre likely to care for many patients with this disorder. Of those diagnosed with diabetes, 80% take diabetes medication (oral drugs, insulin, or both). Hypoglycemia is one of the . . . FDA approves new drug for type 2 diabetes On August 1, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved Jardiance (empagliflozin) table Continue reading >>

Journal Of Diabetes Nursing - Dotn

Journal Of Diabetes Nursing - Dotn

Ensuring the safe prescribing and management of insulin is a key concern for many healthcare professionals who treat... The Journal of Diabetes Nursing: New faces, new formats and new frontiers Simon Breed shares the latest developments with the journal. Andrew McGovern presents his research into the presence of type 3c diabetes. Journal scan: Continuous glucose monitoring and retinopathy Too busy to keep up to date with the latest research? Trisha Dunning reviews the latest research papers for diabetes nurses. News: Weight loss programme in primary care leads to diabetes remission Landmark trial shows type 2 diabetes remission with intensive low-calorie diet. Managing frailty in older people with diabetes Alan Sinclair discusses the latest international guidance on the management of frail older people. Debbie Hicks introduces the flash glucose monitoring system that was recently approved on the NHS Drug Tariff. The 77th American Diabetes Association meeting: What I learnt Gayle Richards describes her experience of the latest ADA meeting and highlights some of most interesting sessions. Journal scan: GLP-1 receptor agonists and cardiovascular outcomes; insulin in type 2 diabetes; and CGM in pregnancy Too busy to keep up to date with the latest research? Erwin Castro shares some research highlights from the recent EASD meeting in Lisbon. NICE updates PH38 guidance on preventing type 2 diabetes The amended guidelines make recommendations about who should be offered intensive lifestyle-change interventions to prevent type 2 diabetes. Dietary management of obesity and type 2 diabetes Pam Dyson outlines the evidence base for the available dietary strategies commonly recommended in the UK. Debbie Hicks considers whether the NHS RightCare diabetes pathway will deliver improve Continue reading >>

Diabetes Mellitus: Occurrence Of Risk Factors And Care Among Nursing Workers

Diabetes Mellitus: Occurrence Of Risk Factors And Care Among Nursing Workers

Diabetes mellitus: occurrence of risk factors and care among nursing workers * Diabetes mellitus: factores de riesgo, ocurrencia y cuidados entre trabajadores de enfermera Darlene Mara dos Santos TavaresI; Nayara Arajo ReisII; Flavia Aparecida DiasIII; Fabiana Augusta Moreira LopesIV IDoctorate in Nursing. Associate Professor of the Department of Education and Community Health Nursing (DEESC) of the Graduation in Nursing (CGE) course of the Federal University of Tringulo Mineiro - FUTM - Uberaba (MG), Brazil IIUndergraduate Nursing Student of CGE of FUTM. Scientific Initiation Scholarship of CNPq IIIRegistered Nurse. Masters student of the Post-Graduate Program in Health Care of the Federal University of Tringulo Mineiro - FUTM - Uberaba (MG), Brazil. Masters scholarship financed by Capes IVRegistered Nurse. Specialist in Collective Health Masters student of the Post-Graduate Program in Health Care of the Federal University of Tringulo Mineiro - FUTM - Uberaba (MG), Brazil OBJECTIVE: To identify the occurrence of Diabetes Mellitus (DM), risk factors, stress and health-care activities performed by diabetic nursing workers. METHODS: This is a descriptive study with 418 professional nurses, working at a university hospital. Data were collected through a semi-structured instrument and were analyzed using the frequency distribution, the chi-square test (p <0.05) and the odds ratio. RESULTS: Most of the professionals were female and had between 20 and 30 years of age. All risk factors for DM were present, including the factors that can be modified. It was found a larger proportion of diabetic workers that had: overweight; arterial hypertension and capillary blood glucose altered, when compared to those without the disease. It was not found an increased likelihood of developi Continue reading >>

Journal Of Diabetes Nursing

Journal Of Diabetes Nursing

Within the field of bariatric surgery, preoperative education to empower patients to adapt to the postoperative lifestyle and get the best outcomes in terms of health and quality of life is not standardised across the UK and is based mainly on clinical experience. In this study, the authors used qualitative research and a structured framework to design a preoperative psychosocial education course for people undergoing surgery. Qualitative interviews were performed to determine issues that previous surgery recipients felt were missing from their preoperative education, and the current educational course was redesigned to include this content. The study provides a template from which other Trusts could evaluate and improve their education. Increasing numbers of young children are being diagnosed with type 1 diabetes (T1D), which has significant implications for primary schools. This study examined support provided to young children with T1D diabetes in two primary schools in the north of England. Case studies were used to examine the influences, perspectives and interactions of all adults involved in diabetes management. The framework approach was used to qualitatively analyse data from the 19 participants. A mix of direct and indirect support was provided by school personnel. There were five common themes: safety, knowledgeable individuals, appropriate environment, being treated as an individual, and independence. Safety was the major primary concern. School personnel providing direct support to children with T1D are ideally placed to increase children's confidence, resilience and independence through diabetes self-management skills. Greater collaboration and flexibility will aid children's acquisition of the self-manaeement skills needed over time. The diabetes team at Continue reading >>

New Possibilities In Life With Type 2 Diabetes: Experiences From Participating In A Guided Self-determination Programme In General Practice

New Possibilities In Life With Type 2 Diabetes: Experiences From Participating In A Guided Self-determination Programme In General Practice

New Possibilities in Life with Type 2 Diabetes: Experiences from Participating in a Guided Self-Determination Programme in General Practice 1Faculty of Health Science, University of Stavanger, 4036 Stavanger, Norway 2Department of Home Care, Municipality of Stavanger, Stavanger, Norway Correspondence should be addressed to Bjrg Karlsen ; [email protected] Received 9 October 2017; Accepted 4 February 2018; Published 20 March 2018 Copyright 2018 Bjrg Karlsen et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License , which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. Research suggests that guided self-determination programmes can support self-management of diabetes by empowering self-determined goal setting and competence building. As most research in this area has focused on people with type 1 diabetes, knowledge is lacking on how adults with type 2 diabetes mellitus experience participation in such programmes. This study reports the modelling phase of a complex intervention design that explored the experiences of adults with type 2 diabetes who participated in a nurse-led guided self-determination programme in general practice and examines how the programme affected patients motivation to self-manage diabetes. The qualitative design with semistructured interviews included 9 adults with type 2 diabetes who participated in the programme. Qualitative content analysis was used to analyse the data. The findings indicate that the participants experienced new life possibilities after participating in the programme, which seemed to have a positive influence on their motivation for self-management. Through reflections about how to live with diabetes, the participan Continue reading >>

International Journal Of Diabetes And Endocrinology :: Science Publishing Group

International Journal Of Diabetes And Endocrinology :: Science Publishing Group

International Journal of Diabetes and Endocrinology Gdon Bongo, Koto-te-Nyiwa Ngbolua, Colette Ashande, Benjamin Gbolo, Claudine Tshiama, Dorothe Tshilanda, Damien Tshibangu, Nadge Ngombe, Thophile Mbemba, Pius Mpiana Pages: 7-14Published Online: May 4, 2018 Md Rezaul Karim, Afsarunnesa Syeda Pages: 1-6Published Online: Apr. 3, 2018 lk Saygl, Serap Parlar Kl Pages: 50-54Published Online: Jan. 15, 2018 Maurice Place, Alexandra Louise Whitehead, Joanna Reynolds Pages: 43-49Published Online: Aug. 18, 2017 International Journal of Diabetes and Endocrinology (IJDE) is an online Open Access journal featuring current research in diabetes and endocrinology, which covers steroid hormones, clinical chemistry and biochemistry, neuroendocrinology, hypoglycemia in diabetes, etc. The main article types include original research, topical review, highlight, resource, and meeting report. The topics related to this journal include but are not limited to: Continue reading >>

Patient Education: Diabetes

Patient Education: Diabetes

March/April 2009, Volume :5 Number 2 , page 26 - 27 [Free] Join NursingCenter to get uninterrupted access to this Article Gattullo, Barbara Ann RN, ANP-BC, CDE, MS Diabetes is a disease that affects the way your body uses food. Most of the food you eat changes into glucose, or sugar, for your body to use as energy. The pancreas, an organ near the stomach, makes a hormone called insulin, which helps sugar get into the body's cells. The cells use sugar for energy. When you have diabetes, your body either doesn't make enough insulin or it can't use the insulin that it makes. This causes you to have high blood sugar. There are two types of diabetes-type 1 and type 2. In type 1 diabetes, the body doesn't make insulin. This type of diabetes often develops before age 30. Most people with diabetes have type 2, which usually develops in adults over age 40. With type 2 diabetes, the body still makes insulin but the cells can't use it. The cause of diabetes isn't known, but you may be more likely to have it if someone else in your family does. Your healthcare provider will look for certain well-known symptoms known as the "diabetes alert." These include the need to urinate often, extreme thirst or hunger, blurry vision, sores that won't heal, weakness and fatigue. He'll also order one or more tests, which may include: * Urinalysis. This looks for sugar in your urine. * Fasting plasma glucose test. This test measures the sugar level in your blood. You'll have to stop eating and drinking for at least 8 hours before this test. * Random (nonfasting) plasma glucose test. This test also measures the amount of sugar in your blood, but you don't have to stop eating or drinking before the test. * Oral glucose tolerance test. For this test, you'll fast for at least 8 hours, then drink a su Continue reading >>

Fears And Health Needs Of Patients With Diabetes: A Qualitative Research In Rural Population

Fears And Health Needs Of Patients With Diabetes: A Qualitative Research In Rural Population

Go to: 1. INTRODUCTION Patients with type II diabetes, especially insulin-dependent are usually suffering from diabetes several years before the initiation of insulin therapy. Treatment of diabetes has now as a central character, the patient himself who co-decides with the physician-nurse team. The primary concern is the patient’s acceptance of the disease in the early stages and his gradual familiarization with the treatment (1). According to International Diabetes Federation, at least 285 million people worldwide have diabetes and this number is expected to increase to 438 million by 2030, with two-thirds of all cases living in low or middle income countries (2, 3). Apart from pharmaceutical care, the nurse also provides psychological care which is necessary for the disease process, both at the individual and the family level. Psychological support for patients, may positively affect the acceptance, the treatment and the course of the disease (4). Patients have a number of care needs both in early as well as in later stages of the disease. It is important for nurses not to treat all patients with diabetes mellitus the same way, but, to approach, at first the patient as an individual and then the disease. In this way, we can see the specificities in each individual-patient (5). According to the literature, the diagnosis itself causes fear which rises in the course of the disease as patients’ awareness regarding the disease and its complications increases. The holistic approach of diabetic patients produces positive results, both in the acceptance of the disease, as well as to the recognition of complications, and the protection from them. Continue reading >>

Social Determinants Of Type 2 Diabetes And Health In The United States

Social Determinants Of Type 2 Diabetes And Health In The United States

Social determinants of type 2 diabetes and health in the United States Number of Hits and Downloads for This Article Jun 15, 2014 (publication date) through Apr 30, 2018 Baishideng Publishing Group Inc, 7901 Stoneridge Drive, Suite 501, Pleasanton, CA 94588, USA Copyright 2014 Baishideng Publishing Group Inc. All rights reserved. World J Diabetes.Jun 15, 2014;5(3): 296-304 Published online Jun 15, 2014.doi: 10.4239/wjd.v5.i3.296 Social determinants of type 2 diabetes and health in the United States Myra L Clark, Sharon W Utz, University of Virginia School of Nursing, Charlottesville, VA 22908-0782, United States Author contributions: Clark ML and Utz SW contributed equally to this paper. Correspondence to: Myra L Clark, PhD, RN, Assistant Professor of Nursing, University of Virginia School of Nursing, PO Box 800782, Charlottesville, VA 22908-0782, United States. Diabetes is the sixth leading cause of death in the United States. To date, most research and resulting clinical strategies have focused on the individual with short-term health improvements that have not been maintained over time. Researchers more recently have recognized the need to consider the social determinants of diabetes and health along with individual factors. The purpose of this literature review is to examine current understanding of the social determinants affecting diabetes and health. A search of medical and nursing literature was conducted using PubMed, PsychInfo, CINAHL and MEDLINE databases, selecting articles published between 2000 and 2013. Search terms included: type 2 diabetes, social determinants, and health determinants. Inclusion criteria were: English language, human studies, social determinants of diabetes and health, and research in the United States. Additional search methods includ Continue reading >>

The Clinical Outcomes Of Nursing Intervention For Children With Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus On The Treatment Adherence

The Clinical Outcomes Of Nursing Intervention For Children With Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus On The Treatment Adherence

Research Article - Biomedical Research (2017) Volume 28, Issue 15 The clinical outcomes of nursing intervention for children with type 2 diabetes mellitus on the treatment adherence Hezang Ba * , Xinxin Yu, Shuzhen Han, Lijuan Kang, Chuanwei Xu, Rongyan Xue and Mingyu Li Department of Paediatrics, Binzhou Peoples Hospital, Binzhou, Shandong, PR China Visit for more related articles at Biomedical Research Objective: To observe the effects of treatment by nursing intervention for children with type 2 diabetes mellitus. Methods: 90 children with type 2 diabetes mellitus were randomly divided into control group and experimental group. For children in the control group, routine nursing methods were implemented. For children in the experimental group, nursing interventions were carried out. The two groups were kept identical in the case number, for both of which the number of cases were 45. The effects of nursing were examined respectively for both groups after nursing. Results: The results demonstrated that children in the experimental group were obviously better than children in the control group, including dietary control compliance, excise treatment compliance and drug compliance (P<0.05). Children in the experimental group were more normal than children in the control group in blood glucose, blood lipids, blood pressure and body mass (P<0.05). Children and parents in the experimental group were more satisfied with the quality of nursing than those in the control group (P<0.05). Conclusion: The cure compliance of children with type 2 diabetes mellitus can be obviously enhanced through active and effective nursing intervention projects. Higher degree of satisfaction can be brought. Widespread use of nursing intervention is feasible. Nursing intervention, Type 2 diabetes m Continue reading >>

The Impact Of Orems Self-care Model On The Quality Of Life In Patients With Type Ii Diabetes | Biomedical And Pharmacology Journal

The Impact Of Orems Self-care Model On The Quality Of Life In Patients With Type Ii Diabetes | Biomedical And Pharmacology Journal

The Impact of Orems Self-Care Model on the Quality of Life In Patients With Type II Diabetes Milad Borji1,2, Masoumeh Otaghi3and Shiva Kazembeigi4 1Young Researchers and Elite Club, Isfahan (Khorasgan) Branch, Islamic Azad University, Isfahan, Iran. 2Nurse, Faculty of Nursing and Midwifery, Ilam University of Medical Sciences, Ilam, Iran. 3Department, Ilam University of Medical Sciences, Ilam, Iran. 4Student Research Committee, Ilam University of Medical Sciences, Ilam, Iran. Corresponding Author E-mail: [email protected] DOI : Diabetes mellitus is a chronic disease that reduces the quality of life in patients. Therefore, this research aimed to the effect of Orems self-care model on the quality of life(QOL) in patients with type II diabetes at Ilam, Iran. A quasi-experimental study was performed on 80 patients with type II diabetes in Ilam in the year 2015. The research tools used in this study were a demographic questionnaire and the SF-36 survey. The patients were divided randomly into control and experimental groups. Orems self-care programme was performed in six 60-90 minute sessions for six weeks in the experimental group. The data were analysed using SPSS software and descriptive and inferential statistics. The findings showed that the mean and standard deviation of the quality of life in the experimental group before and after the intervention were 47.1 9.21 and 67.91 12.87 respectively, which was statistically significant (P<0.001). However, in the control group it was 47.66 8.4 and 47.41 8.6 respectively, indicating that there was no statistically significant difference (P>0.05).Regarding the effectiveness of self-care programmes based on Orems theory on the quality of life in patients with diabetes, it is suggested that in nursing care this self-care pro Continue reading >>

Monitoring And Managing Mothers With Gestational Diabetes Mellitus: A Nursing Perspective

Monitoring And Managing Mothers With Gestational Diabetes Mellitus: A Nursing Perspective

Editor who approved publication: Dr Cindy Hudson Diane C Berry,1 Quinetta B Johnson,2,3 Alison M Stuebe2,3 1The University of North Carolina School of Nursing, 2Women's Primary Health Care, The University of North Carolina School of Medicine, Division of Maternal Fetal Medicine, 3The University of North Carolina Gillings School of Global Public Health, Chapel Hill, NC, USA Abstract: Women diagnosed with gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) must work in partnership with their health care team to improve both maternal and fetal outcomes. This team may include physicians, midwives, nurse practitioners, physician assistants, registered nurses, certified diabetes educators, and registered dietitians. Management should include medical nutrition therapy, self-monitoring of blood glucose with tight control, and exercise to prevent postprandial hyperglycemia. Approximately 80% of women diagnosed with GDM are well controlled with medical nutrition therapy, self-monitoring of blood glucose, and exercise; however, approximately 20% require medication to bring their blood glucose levels under control during pregnancy. The risk of developing type 2 diabetes mellitus decreases dramatically for women who engage in interventions to lose weight postpartum, improve their nutrition and increase their physical activity. Therefore, postpartum women with GDM should be retested and reclassified at 6 weeks postpartum and strongly encouraged to lose weight through proper nutrition and exercise. Keywords: gestational diabetes mellitus, medical nutrition therapy, self-monitoring of blood glucose, exercise, medication, type 2 diabetes This work is published and licensed by Dove Medical Press Limited. The full terms of this license are available at and incorporate the Creative Commons Attribution - Continue reading >>

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