diabetestalk.net

Nursing Management Of Diabetes

Improving Nursing Management Of Patients With Diabetes Using An Action Research Approach - Contemporary Nurse: Healthcare Across The Lifespan

Improving Nursing Management Of Patients With Diabetes Using An Action Research Approach - Contemporary Nurse: Healthcare Across The Lifespan

Improving nursing management of patients with diabetes using an action research approach Clinical Nurse Consultant, Diabetes Education Centre, Endocrinology, St George Hospital, NSW Faculty of Nursing, Midwifery and Health, University of Technology, Sydney, Sydney NSW Diabetes Educator, Diabetes Education Centre, Endocrinology, St George Hospital, Kogarah NSW Research Officer, Acute Care Nursing Professorial Unit, St George Hospital, Kogarah NSW Nurses in an acute hospital implemented an action research process supporting changes to the assessment and management of acutely ill patients admitted with diabetes and other co-morbidities. An audit of practice identified inaccurate documentation and uncoordinated care that included inflexible protocols for blood glucose level (BGL) assessment and administration of insulin, unrelated to patients' meals and snacks, that in some instances resulted in hypoglycaemic episodes. Specialist nurses and ward staff collaborated to improve practice by increasing nurses' knowledge of insulin and by designing and trialling a blood glucose monitoring form that enabled a more individualised approach to patient care. A subsequent audit showed improved coordination of BGL measurement and insulin administration in relation to meals, sustained over eighteen months, and increased accuracy in documentation. American Diabetes Association (2000): Tests of glycaemia in diabetes. Diabetes Care, 23 (suppl 1): S80-S81. American Diabetes Association (2001): Standards of medical care for patients with diabetes mellitus (Position statement). Diabetes Care, 24(suppl. 1): S33-S34. Balfour M & Clarke C (2001): Searching for sustainable change. Journal of Clinical Nursing, 10(1): 44-50. Beebe C (1987): Self blood glucose monitoring: an adjunct to dietary and i Continue reading >>

Nursing Management Diabetes Mellitus

Nursing Management Diabetes Mellitus

Sort MODERATE ACTIVITY Active housework Bicycling (light) Bowling Dancing Gardening Golf Roller skating Walking briskly VIGOROUS ACTIVITY Aerobic exercise Bicycling (vigorous) Hard labor Ice skating Outdoor sports Running Soccer Tennis Wood chopping Continue reading >>

Diabetes Mellitus

Diabetes Mellitus

Melvin, a 32-year- old,always complains of his increasing need for water. He also feels an increasing need to urinate almost every now and then,and always feels hungry. There is tingling on his extremities and numbness. His once clear vision is now experiencing cloudiness. He already feels tired just a few hours after waking up even though he does not have any job and only stays at home. The wound on his right knee has been there weeks but no improvement is seen. 11 Nursing Management The major sources of the glucose that circulates in the blood are through the absorption of ingested food in the gastrointestinal tract and formation of glucose by the liver from food substances. Diabetes mellitus is a group of metabolic diseases that occurs with increased levels of glucose in the blood. Diabetes mellitus most often results in defects in insulin secretion, insulin action, or even both. The classification system of diabetes mellitus is unique because research findings suggest many differences among individuals within each category, and patients can even move from one category to another, except for patients with type 1 diabetes. Diabetes has major classifications that include type 1 diabetes, type 2 diabetes, gestational diabetes, and diabetes mellitus associated with other conditions. The two types of diabetes mellitus are differentiated based on their causative factors, clinical course, and management. Diabetes Mellitus has different courses of pathophysiology because of it has several types. Insulin is secreted by beta cells in the pancreas and it is an anabolic hormone. When we consume food, insulin moves glucose from blood to muscle, liver, and fat cells as insulin level increases. The functions of insulin include the transport and metabolism of glucose for energy, sti Continue reading >>

Recognition And Nursing Management Of Diabetes In Children

Recognition And Nursing Management Of Diabetes In Children

Women experiencing a miscarriage are a regular daily occurrence in some Accident and Emergency (A & E) departments. Each woman's miscarriage experience is unique and individual and women deserve an individual response to their problems, one that is built on trust and communication. Therefore, emergency nurses must appreciate that each woman is an individual and must explore the history she brings ... [Show full abstract] to the current event, the meaning she attributes to the miscarriage, and its impact on her life. These women need to be cared for in an environment that not only allows privacy but also respect and dignity. Nurses need to be able to communicate effectively, to give good physical care and be willing to take on the emotional significance that miscarriage can have. This paper aims to explore the needs of the woman experiencing a miscarriage. It attempts to look at what emergency nurses can do to meet those needs, and what can be done to make this difficult time as tolerable as possible for the woman or couple, when they present to the A & E department. The diabetes mellitus, insulin glucose infusion in acute myocardial infarction (DIGAMI) study (Malmberg et al, 1994; 1995; 1996; 1997) assessed the effects of intravenous insulin and glucose, followed by multi-dose subcutaneous insulin, on mortality after acute myocardial infarction (AMI) in patients with hyperglycaemia. The study suggested improved survival rates in those patients who had ... [Show full abstract] received insulin and glucose. These results prompted many clinicians to question and alter their practice. However, the study did cause some controversy. The suggested regimen was not without problems and the trial raised questions about the importance of chronic versus acute metabolic control. Th Continue reading >>

Nursing Management: Diabetes Mellitus

Nursing Management: Diabetes Mellitus

Published by Morgan Stone Modified over 3 years ago Presentation on theme: "Nursing Management: Diabetes Mellitus" Presentation transcript: Chapter 49 Nursing Management: Diabetes Mellitus 2 1. Ideally, the goal of patient diabetes education is to 1. make all patients responsible for the management of their disease. 2. involve the patients family and significant others in the care of the patient. 3. enable the patient to become the most active participant in the management of the diabetes. 4. provide the patient with as much information as soon as possible to prevent complications of diabetes. Answer: 3 Rationale: The goal of diabetes education is to enable the patient to become the most active participant in his or her own care. 2. A patient screened for diabetes at a clinic has a fasting plasma glucose of 120 mg/dL (6.7 mmoL/L). The nurse explains to the patient that this value 1. is diagnostic for diabetes. 2. is normal, and diabetes is not a problem. 3. reflects impaired glucose tolerance, which is an early stage of diabetes. 4. indicates an intermediate stage between normal glucose use and diabetes. Answer: 3 Rationale: Impaired fasting glucose (fasting blood glucose level between 100 and 126 mg/dL) and impaired glucose tolerance (2-hour plasma glucose level between 140 and 199 mg/dL) represent an intermediate stage between normal glucose homeostasis and diabetes. This stage is called prediabetes. 3. A patient with type 1 diabetes calls the clinic with complaints of nausea, vomiting, and diarrhea. It is most important that the nurse advise the patient to 1. hold the regular dose of insulin. 2. drink cool fluids with high glucose content. 3. check the blood glucose level every 2- to 4- hours. 4. use a less strenuous form of exercise than usual until the illness res Continue reading >>

Child Health - The Nurses Role In Childhood Diabetes

Child Health - The Nurses Role In Childhood Diabetes

Child health - The nurses role in childhood diabetes Focus on the role of the nurse in the treatment and management of childhood diabetes The nurse is the primary educator but acts as part of a team. This initially involves the paediatrician, the nurse or nurse specialist and the dietician. Other professionals involved may include the psychologist, the social worker, the opthalmologist, the GP, the public health nurse, the dentist and the chiropodist. All of these have their own specialties, but all the combined information given to children and their families can make it easier to understand diabetes and how to control it. Education should be approached on an individual basis, taking into consideration the age of the child, the IQ, previous knowledge of diabetes, social background and family support. It is the responsibility of the nurse to obtain any relevant information from the family and assess the type of approach most suited to them. The nurse is often the first person from the team to meet the child and the family, so a friendly approach is required. The aim of education is to teach the child to be as independent as possible, bearing in mind his/her age. The family also needs to be educated as a support team. A measure of responsibility for the child can avoid diabetes taking over the lives of the whole family. Other people may require education, eg teachers, hobby instructors or babysitters. It is the responsibility of the nurse to provide all leaflets and relevant information for these people. There are various models available and the nurse should be familiar with all models and new or updated information. The sales reps from any of the companies are happy to provide this. Involve the child from day one when using a glucometer, encouraging them to press the Continue reading >>

Nursing Care Plan For Diabetes

Nursing Care Plan For Diabetes

Diabetes is really prevalent. Just recall all the patients you saw today and theres probably a handful of them who are diabetic. According to the National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health PromotionDivision of Diabetes Translation, up to 30.3 million people in the United States have diabetes. Because of how prevalent it is, nurses need to be highly knowledgeable and skilled when it comes to educating and caring for their patients. That includes preparing the right nursing care plan for diabetes. Diabetes ordiabetes mellitusis a metabolic disease where blood glucose levels are abnormally high. Symptoms of high blood glucose levels include: In general, there are three types of diabetes and each one varies in terms of treatment and management. Type 1 diabetes is also called insulin-dependent and juvenile-onset diabetes. This type of diabetes often begins early in childhood. Its an autoimmune disorder where the bodys immune system attacks its own pancreas, inhibiting its capacity to produce insulin. Type 2 diabetes accounts for the 95% of diabetes cases in the US. Onset is usually late in adulthood. It happens when the pancreas is unable to produce adequate insulin to meet the bodys needs or when the bodys cells become resistant to it. Type 2 diabetes can be managed with lifestyle and diet changes as well as intake of oral hypoglycemic agents (OHAs). Gestational diabetes is characterized by pregnancy-induced insulin resistance. It affects roughly 2% to 10% of pregnancies. Diabetic patients need complex nursing care. Here are some of the most important NCPs for diabetes: 1. Deficient knowledge regarding disease process, treatment, and individual care needs verbal statements of concerns or misconceptions improper or inadequate follow-through of instructions de Continue reading >>

Nursing Care Plan For Diabetes

Nursing Care Plan For Diabetes

Grab Free Cheat Sheet Quick! Is this aPTT Count Dangerous? Hesitant? Never Feel Anxious About Lab Values Again... Diabetes Mellitus is when blood glucose (sugar in the blood) is unable to move into the cells and help in the making of ATPAKA energy. The body makes insulin to assist with this process. Insulin is a hormone that allows the sugar in the blood to move across the cell wall so the body can use to to produce ATP. There are two types of diabetes. Type I and Type II. Type I is an autoimmune disorder where the cells attack the insulin producing cells in the pancreas. Thus the body is producing very little or no insulin leaving the sugar in the blood and the cells starve. Type II is when the cells dont respond to the insulin trying to get sugar into them, called insulin resistance. Thus the sugar stays in the blood and the cells starve. The cause for Type I diabetes is unknown, but hypothesized to be potentially genetic or triggered by a virus. The cause for Type II diabetes is caused by a storm of events culminating such as weight gain, lack of activity, genetics, and stress levels. Blood sugar control with minimal side effects. Diabetes Mellitus (Type I and Type II) Nursing Care Plan Blood sugar monitoring: Normal range 70-180 mg/dL *patient may have a different target blood sugar level, make sure to know what each patients target is. The physician will make a target blood glucose level. Teach the patient that they need to monitor their blood glucose.They need to call their primary care physician if they have blood glucose levels higher than their target for multiple days or if they have 2 readings of greater than 300 mg/dL. Teach the patient how to use their glucometer and record their results. Insulin administration -Rapid Acting: Humalog Novolog -Fast/short Ac Continue reading >>

Roles And Responsibilities

Roles And Responsibilities

Nursing staff have an important role and clear responsibilities when treating patients with diabetes or who are having tests to diagnose diabetes. This role and associated responsibilities will be specified in local workplace guidance and policies and by each member of the nursing team's level of competence. If you are not familiar with the guidance in relation to diabetes care in your work setting, it is important to find out where it is so you can be sure you're providing safe patient care, particularly if you are required to perform tests and observations for your patients. Explore the following activity to learn more about some of the specific competencies relating to caring for a patient with diabetes. Screening, prevention and early detection of type 2 diabetes To prevent and aid early detection of type 2 diabetes you should be able to: describe the risk factors for type 2 diabetes explain the importance of prevention or delay of onset of type 2 diabetes in individuals at risk explain the role that exercise plays in the prevention of, or delay in progression to, type 2 diabetes explain the importance of weight control and the role that diet plays in the prevention of, or delay in progression to, type 2 diabetes. Promoting self-care In order to support the patient to self-care their diabetes you should be able to: support the patient and help them develop their own self-care with guidance from a registered nurse observe and report any concerns that you may have about a patient that would affect their ability to self-care encourage patients to use their personalised care plans. Mental health To care for someone with diabetes and mental illness you should be able to: have an understanding and awareness of how mental health issues, such as depression and anxiety, can Continue reading >>

Nursing Management Of The Person With Diabetes Mellitus. Part 2.

Nursing Management Of The Person With Diabetes Mellitus. Part 2.

Nursing management of the person with diabetes mellitus. Part 2. Department of Nursing and Midwifery, University of Hertfordshire. Br J Nurs. 2007 Feb 22-Mar 7;16(4):232-5. Diabetes mellitus (DM) is a syndrome of a relative or absolute lack of insulin resulting in hyperglycaemia. Patients with type 1 diabetes need insulin to regulate their blood glucose levels, while for patients with type 2 diabetes, weight loss and dietary management may be sufficient in controlling blood glucose levels (Porth, 2005). People from black and ethnic minority groups are six time more likely to develop the condition than their white counterparts (Department of Health, 2005a). Department of Health guidelines (2005a) give clear guidelines for healthcare workers in caring for patients with diabetes. There is no known cure for diabetes, however management of patients with diabetes include dietary management, physical activity, oral antidiabetic agents and insulin regimen. Care can also be complex as some of the patients may suffer from other long-term conditions, such as coronary artery disease. Part 2 of this article discusses the nurse's need to adhere to the National Institute for Clinical Excellence guidelines (2002a, 2004) in the management for type 1 and type 2 diabetes. Continue reading >>

Diabetes: Nursing Management Seminar (dec 10 - 11, 2018)

Diabetes: Nursing Management Seminar (dec 10 - 11, 2018)

Diabetes: Nursing Management Seminar is organized by Ausmed Education Pty Ltd and will be held from Dec 10 - 11, 2018 at Rydges Capital Hill, Canberra, Australian Capital Territory, Australia. The target audience for this medical event is Nurses. This CME Conference has been approved for a maximum of 10.30 CPD Hours. Attend this seminar to learn about the modern nursing care and the management of people affected by diabetes mellitus. Update your knowledge of: Current protocols for the administration of insulin Measurement and management of blood glucose levels Lifestyle factors relating to diabetes mellitus Diabetes is becoming more prevalent worldwide and the associated nursing care is becoming more complex. Nurses are at the forefront of both the prevention and management of diabetes and are critical to patient education and the minimization of complications. Nurses across a wide range of healthcare settings have a key role in managing diabetes. Therefore, all nurses need ongoing access to quality education in order to be well-informed about the latest evidence and best practice in the management of this complex chronic illness. The purpose of this seminar is to provide nurses with a general update on modern adult diabetes management that translates into improved outcomes for patients with diabetes. Complete an assessment of a patient with diabetes and implement an evidence-based plan of care Evaluate assessment techniques for patients with diabetes, including the effective use of tools such as blood glucose meters, pathology, and monofilaments Recognise when a person has metabolic syndrome, pre-diabetes, or issues with glycaemic control and know how to develop an appropriate nursing care plan to prevent escalation of disease Determine how lifestyle factors that impa Continue reading >>

Diabetes Mellitus Nclex Review Notes Medications & Nursing Management

Diabetes Mellitus Nclex Review Notes Medications & Nursing Management

Below are review notes for Diabetes Mellitus to help you study for the NCLEX exam or your nursing lecture exams. As the nurse taking care of the diabetic patient, you must know how to properly care for them, especially newly diagnosed diabetics. The nurses role include educating, assessing, planning, administering medications, and evaluating treatment. These NCLEX review notes will cover: Diet Exercise Oral Diabetic Medications Insulin Mnemonics After reviewing these notes, don’t forget to take the Diabetes NCLEX quiz. Lecture on Diabetes Mellitus for NCLEX Review Diabetes Nursing Management Nurse’s role: educating, monitoring, and administering (medications) Teach patient to follow the Triangle of Diabetes Management **Diet, medications, and exercise all work together while monitoring blood glucose Example: Patient wants to make sure their diet is balanced with their medication (insulin/oral meds) and they use exercise to manage glucose levels (doing all this while monitoring blood glucose). As the nurse you will be educating the diabetic…so for the NCLEX know education pieces like: Diet, exercising, oral medications, giving insulin (peak times), drugs that increase blood glucose and lower glucose etc. DIET: Diets are individualized due to physical activity and medication therapy (they always need tweaking)…recommend following American Diabetic Association Diet (ADA) Limitation of the following: Carbs (45-60%) grains, vegetables with starches potatoes, corn, sweets…cookies, soda, dried beans, milk) Fats (<20 %)….limit unhealthy fats saturated, trans fats, cholesterol: lard, gravies, whole milk, bologna, hot dogs, sausage, processed foods hydrogenated oils…concentrate on mono & polyunsaturated avocadoes, olives, peanuts, nuts Proteins (15-20%) meats don’ Continue reading >>

Nursing Management/care For Diabetes|rome |italy|europe|usa|middle East|asia Pacific|allied Academies|

Nursing Management/care For Diabetes|rome |italy|europe|usa|middle East|asia Pacific|allied Academies|

Nursingmanagement of diabetesincludes effective treatment to normalizeblood glucose and decreasecomplications using insulin replacement, balanced diet and exercise. The nurseshould stress the importance of complying with the prescribed treatmentprogram. Management includes teaching patients needs, abilities anddevelopmental stage. Stress the effect of blood glucose control on long-termhealth Risk for Ineffective Therapeutic Regimen Management Diabetes Research - Advanced Technologies in Diabetes Research and Therapy 2018 (USA) Diabetic psychological care - Advanced Technologies in Diabetes Research and Therapy 2018 (USA) Advanced Technologies for the Treatment of Diabetes - Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism (CPD Accredited) 2018 (United Kingdom) Alternative medicine for Diabetes - 2nd International Conference on Diabetes, Nutrition, Metabolism & Medicare 2018 (USA) Biomarkers for Diabetes Mellitus - Diabetes and Endocrinology (CPD Accredited ) 2018 (France) Cancer and Obesity - International Obesity Summit and Expo 2018 (USA) Cardiovascular and Obesity - International Obesity Summit and Expo 2018 (USA) Case Studies on Diabetes Melitus - Diabetes and Endocrinology (CPD Accredited ) 2018 (France) Childhood Obesity - International Obesity Summit and Expo 2018 (USA) Clinical Diabetes & Diagnostic Approaches - 2nd International Conference on Diabetes, Nutrition, Metabolism & Medicare 2018 (USA) Current Focuses on Diabetes Mellitus - Diabetes and Endocrinology (CPD Accredited ) 2018 (France) Diabetes & Associated Complications - 2nd International Conference on Diabetes, Nutrition, Metabolism & Medicare 2018 (USA) Diabetes & Metabolism - 2nd International Conference on Diabetes, Nutrition, Metabolism & Medicare 2018 (USA) Diabetes Case Studies - 2nd International Confere Continue reading >>

Diabetes: Treatment And Complications - The Nurse's Role

Diabetes: Treatment And Complications - The Nurse's Role

The aim of treatment for diabetes is to alleviate the symptoms, maintain quality of life and slow the progression of specific and non-specific complications. This Part looks at treatments for diabetes and related complications. Continue reading >>

Education, Prevention And The Role Of The Nursing Team

Education, Prevention And The Role Of The Nursing Team

Education Self-management skills are an essential part of diabetes care and with the help and support of nursing staff the condition can be managed to help people stay healthy and prevent complications. Diabetes UK provide resources for health care professionals to increase the provision and uptake of diabetes self-management education. Three of the main diabetes education courses available to people with the condition in the UK are: DAFNE is a working collaborative of 75 diabetes services from NHS Trusts and Health Boards across the UK and Ireland. It is a structured education programme in intensive insulin therapy for adults with type 1 diabetes providing them with the necessary skills to estimate the carbohydrate content of their meal and to inject the correct dose of insulin. DESMOND is a group of self-management education modules, toolkits and care pathways for people with, or at risk of, type 2 diabetes. The programme offers training and quality assurance for health care professionals and lay educators to deliver any of the modules to people in their local communities. X-PERT Diabetes Programme is for people with diabetes and aims to increase the knowledge, skills and understanding of the condition in order that they can make lifestyle choices to manage their blood glucose levels effectively. Type 2 Diabetes and Me is an online step-by step guide for people with type 2 diabetes that provides information about the condition and the options and support available to them. The RCN has developed Diabetes essentials, a CPD online learning resource covering the core concepts of diabetes, diagnosis and current treatments and the role of the nursing team in treating people with diabetes. Prevention Making lifestyle changes can often help people with type 2 diabetes and tho Continue reading >>

More in diabetes