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Nursing Journal Diabetes Education

Diabetes Education Nurses Handle Complexity With Care

Diabetes Education Nurses Handle Complexity With Care

Diabetes education nurses handle complexity with care Do you want a career where you help patients of all ages confront complex problems? Then consider joining the team that helps patients who have diabetes. You'll connect with patients of all ages when you choose this challenging career path. Patricia Donohue-Porter is director of the PhD program at the School of Nursing at Adelphi University in Garden City, N.Y. BOTH NEW AND EXPERIENCED nurses should consider exploring the wide array of opportunities and challenges in the field of diabetes nursing and patient education, or diabetes education. It can be an exciting, demanding, and rewarding career path. By focusing on type 1, type 2, and gestational diabetes, you'll deal with patients at every stage of human development. You'll help them cope with the many disease processes that complicate the illness as well as complex family issues and their psychological responses to this chronic illness. In this article, I'll focus on six challenging areas in diabetes education where you can use your complex critical-thinking skills and caring actions to help patients. Interdisciplinary team involvement. Diabetes is a chronic illness that makes huge demands of patients. For self-management, they need information from a team of expert healthcare providers, including professionals from pharmacy, medicine, nutrition, psychology, exercise physiology, podiatry, and nursing. You'll learn from other perspectives that transcend traditional nursing knowledge. You'll also share your nursing perspective with other team members. For example, as a clinical specialist in diabetes, I've made rounds with an interdisciplinary team. I've been able to educate medical residents about nursing roles in diabetes management. For instance, I've taught res Continue reading >>

Identifying The Continuing Diabetes Education Needs Of Acute Care Nurses In Northern Ontario

Identifying The Continuing Diabetes Education Needs Of Acute Care Nurses In Northern Ontario

To identify the continuing diabetes education needs and preferences of acute care nurses in Northern Ontario. A needs assessment was conducted with acute care nurses (N=152) from 2 urban and 6 rural hospitals across Northern Ontario to determine: 1) their knowledge about current key concepts in diabetes care and 2) their preferred mode of receiving continuing education. Of 6 themes, the 3 with the largest knowledge gap (i.e. lowest score) were therapeutic goals (32.8%), medications (38.5%) and types of diabetes/therapies (39.9%). Nutrition had the most correct responses, although the mean score was only 59.2%. Nurses comments pointed to medications as a key area of need for continuing education. Inservices (82%) were the preferred form of continuing education, followed by workshops (62%), 1-page fact sheets (47.3%), videos (40%) and online courses (30%) (n=150). In collaboration with acute care nurses, diabetes educator specialists in Northern Ontario can use the information from this study to develop continuing diabetes education tools tailored to the learning needs and preferences of acute care nurses. Cerner les besoins de formation diabtique continue et les prfrences du personnel infirmier des tablissements de soins actifs du nord de l'Ontario. Une valuation des besoins a t effectue auprs du personnel infirmier (n = 152) de deux hpitaux urbains et de six hpitaux ruraux du nord de l'Ontario pour dterminer ses connaissances des principaux concepts actuels des soins diabtologiques et ce qu'il prfre comme mthode de formation continue. Parmi les 6 sujets, les trois o les lacunes taient les plus marques (scores les plus bas) ont t les objectifs thrapeutiques (32,8 %), les mdicaments (38,5 %) et les types de diabte et de traitement (39,9 %). Les rponses aux questions touc Continue reading >>

Nurses Knowledge Of Contents Of Diabetes Patient Education In Ondo State, Nigeria | Oyetunde | Journal Of Nursing Education And Practice

Nurses Knowledge Of Contents Of Diabetes Patient Education In Ondo State, Nigeria | Oyetunde | Journal Of Nursing Education And Practice

Journal of Nursing Education and Practice International Peer-reviewed and Open Access Journal for the Nursing Specialists Nurses knowledge of contents of diabetes patient education in Ondo state, Nigeria Background: Diabetes patient education is central to achieving active participation in management of diabetes. This participation is critical to quality and quantity of life among diabetic patients. However, observations show uncontrolled and complicated diabetes; noncompliance with the treatment regimen traceable to poor transfer of knowledge. The study was designed to assess nurses knowledge of diabetes patient education in government hospitals in Ondo State. Method: The survey consisted of Four hundred and one registered randomly selected nurses working in various units of the selected hospitals. The instrument was a validated, self administered 44 item questionnaire developed by the researchers using the professional prompter worksheet for diabetes education and content areas of diabetes education. The questionnaire focused on four content areas of diabetes education- nutrition, exercise and activity, glucose monitoring, and foot and skin care. Result: The result showed that the respondents were majorly females (82.3%). Seventy two percent of the respondents had between 1year and 5years of work experience. Only 8.2% had 1st degree. Respondents demonstrated poor know- ledge in the specified content areas of diabetes patients education. Good knowledge of nutrition was only 29.2% while that of exercise/activity was 24.9% of respondents. For glucose monitoring, only 24.9% had good knowledge while that of hygiene/foot care was 34.4% of the respondents. The mean scores for the content areas were nutrition: 5115; exercise/activity: 5014; glucose monitoring: 5014 and foot Continue reading >>

Diabetes Self-management Education: Miles To Go

Diabetes Self-management Education: Miles To Go

Diabetes Self-Management Education: Miles to Go 1Division of Research, MacroCognition LLC, P.O. Box 533, Yellow Springs, OH 45387, USA 2Department of Psychology, Wright State University, Dayton, OH 45435, USA Received 13 July 2012; Revised 19 November 2012; Accepted 29 December 2012 Copyright 2013 Helen Altman Klein et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License , which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. This meta-analysis assessed how successfully Diabetes Self-Management Education (DSME) interventions help people with type 2 diabetes achieve and maintain healthy blood glucose levels. We included 52 DSME programs with 9,631 participants that reported post-intervention A1c levels in randomized controlled trials. The training conditions resulted in significant reductions in A1c levels compared to control conditions. However, the impact of intervention was modest shifting of only 7.23% more participants from diabetic to pre-diabetic or normal status, relative to the control condition. Most intervention participants did not achieve healthy A1c levels. Further, few DSME studies assessed long-term maintenance of A1c gains. Past trends suggest that gains are difficult to sustain over time. Our results suggested that interventions delivered by nurses were more successful than those delivered by non-nursing personnel. We suggest that DSME programs might do better by going beyond procedural interventions. Most DSME programs relied heavily on rules and procedures to guide decisions about diet, exercise, and weight loss. Future DSME may need to include cognitive self-monitoring, diagnosis, and planning skills to help patients detect anomalies, ident Continue reading >>

Partnering With Diabetes Educators To Improve Patient Outcomes

Partnering With Diabetes Educators To Improve Patient Outcomes

Go to: One in every three Americans currently has or is at risk to develop diabetes mellitus.1 Worldwide, the number of individuals with diabetes is growing at an unprecedented rate and is expected to surpass 550 million by 2030.2 Diabetes mellitus (diabetes) is actually a group of diseases characterized by high blood glucose levels that result from defects in the body’s ability to produce and/or use insulin. The hyperglycemia resulting from the excessive amounts of circulating glucose can be aggravated by exogenous factors, such as food consumption, physical activity, inflammation, medications, and stress. The chronic, progressive nature of diabetes necessitates ongoing medical care; it benefits from timely access to patient self-management education and support to prevent acute complications and to reduce the risk of long-term complications.3 Adequately responding to and managing circulating glucose requires an assortment of elements, including an ongoing assessment of pharmacology, nutritional interventions, and monitoring. Historically, diabetes was depicted as a condition managed by diet, exercise, and medication. Seemingly straightforward, diabetes management has always been challenging. Changes in each of these treatment elements over the past 2 decades have increased the overall complexity of the disease’s management. Nutritional intake remains the foundation of diabetes management. However, the diabetes diet has shifted away from a physician-prescribed, calorie-restricted exchange diet toward an individualized meal plan that takes into account a patient’s cultural background and nutritional likes and dislikes. Exercise, which is still widely recognized as an anchor to diabetes management, is now carefully linked to the patient’s routine so as to maximiz Continue reading >>

Validating A Web-based Diabetes Education Program In Continuing Nursing Education: Knowledge And Competency Change And User Perceptions On Usability And Quality

Validating A Web-based Diabetes Education Program In Continuing Nursing Education: Knowledge And Competency Change And User Perceptions On Usability And Quality

Journal of Diabetes & Metabolic Disorders Validating a Web-based Diabetes Education Program in continuing nursing education: knowledge and competency change and user perceptions on usability and quality Moattari et al.; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.2014 Nurses as the members of health care professionals need to improve their knowledge and competencies particularly in diabetes mellitus through continuing nursing education programs. E-learning is an indirect method of training that can meet nurses educational needs. This study is aimed at validating a web-based diabetes education program through measurement of nurses knowledge and clinical competency in diabetes and nurses perception about its usability and quality. This Quasi-experimental research was conducted on a single group of 31 nurses employed in hospitals affiliated with Shiraz University of Medical Sciences. We used a 125 MCQ knowledge test and Objective Structured Clinical Exam (OSCE) to measure knowledge and clinical competency of nurses in diabetes before and after intervention. A Learning Management System (LMS) was designed to provide educational content in the form of 12 multimedia electronic modules, interactive tests; a forum and learning activities. Nurses were trained for two months in this system after which the post-test was administered. Each nurse completed two questionnaires for measurement of their perceptions on usability and quality. We used descriptive statistics for demographic and descriptive data analysis. Paired t-test was used to compare pre- and post-data using SPSS. The findings showed significant differences in knowledge scores (p < 0.001), total score of clinical competencies (p < 0.001), and all ten assessed clinical competencies. The range of ratings given by participants varied on Continue reading >>

Diabetes Educator, The

Diabetes Educator, The

Editor(s): James Fain, PhD, RN, BC-ADM, FAAN the official journal of the American Association of Diabetes Educators (AADE) The Diabetes Educator (TDE) is a peer-reviewed journal intended to serve as a reference source for the science and art of diabetes management. TDE publishes original articles that relate to aspects of patient care and education, clinical practice and/or research, and the multidisciplinary profession of diabetes education as represented by nurses, dietitians, physicians, pharmacists, mental health professionals, podiatrists, and exercise physiologists. Already subscribed to this product through your institution? Start accessing your content now. Author/Editor: James Fain, PhD, RN, BC-ADM, FAAN *As stated by the 2016 ISI Journal Citation Reports Customers who purchased this product also purchased these products: FSTA Food Science and Technology Abstracts FSTA covers topics relating to every aspect of the food chain including all the major food commodities plus biotechnology, microbiology, food safety, and nutrition. Northern Light Life Sciences Conference Abstracts This grey literature database provides unique access to 2.5 million abstracts and posters from medical and life sciences conferences from across the globe. JBJS Case Connector This cross-referenced online journal compiles symptoms, conditions, and demographic details to empower surgeons to find cases similar to theirs and to mine the database to reveal emerging trends and identify patterns. Diseases of the Colon & Rectum Recognized as the authority in conditions affecting the colon, rectum, and anus this journal includes peer-reviewed original research, reviews, selected abstracts of the literature, and more. Avoiding Common Errors in the Emergency Department Covers 400 errors commonly mad Continue reading >>

Delivering Diabetes Education Through Nurse-led Telecoaching. Cost-effectiveness Analysis

Delivering Diabetes Education Through Nurse-led Telecoaching. Cost-effectiveness Analysis

Delivering Diabetes Education through Nurse-Led Telecoaching. Cost-Effectiveness Analysis Affiliation Leuven Institute for Healthcare Policy, KU Leuven, Leuven, Belgium Affiliation Leuven Institute for Healthcare Policy, KU Leuven, Leuven, Belgium Affiliation Department of Endocrinology, OLV Hospital Aalst, Aalst, Belgium Affiliation Academic Center for General Practice, KU Leuven, Leuven, Belgium Affiliation Academic Center for General Practice, KU Leuven, Leuven, Belgium Affiliation Department of Public Health, Ghent University, Ghent, Belgium Delivering Diabetes Education through Nurse-Led Telecoaching. Cost-Effectiveness Analysis People with diabetes have a high risk of developing micro- and macrovascular complications associated with diminished life expectancy and elevated treatment costs. Patient education programs can improve diabetes control in the short term, but their cost-effectiveness is uncertain. Our study aimed to analyze the lifelong cost-effectiveness of a nurse-led telecoaching program compared to usual care in people with type 2 diabetes from the perspective of the Belgian healthcare system. The UKPDS Outcomes Model was populated with patient-level data from an 18-month randomized clinical trial in the Belgian primary care sector involving 574 participants; trial data were extrapolated to 40 years; Quality Adjusted Life Years (QALYs), treatment costs and Incremental Cost-Effectiveness Ratio (ICER) were calculated for the entire cohort and the subgroup with poor glycemic control at baseline (elevated HbA1c subgroup) and the associated uncertainty was explored. The cumulative mean QALY (95% CI) gain was 0.21 (0.13; 0.28) overall and 0.56 (0.43; 0.68) in elevated HbA1c subgroup; the respective incremental costs were 1,147 (188; 2,107) and 2,565 (654; 4, Continue reading >>

Top 2 Online Msn In Diabetes Nursing Programs – Ccne Accredited

Top 2 Online Msn In Diabetes Nursing Programs – Ccne Accredited

Recent research commissioned by the U.S. Department of Education has shown that students benefit tremendously from being able to complete their coursework online. Indeed, their academic outcomes are often better than those of students who have completed their work in classroom settings. The nursing profession, which is keen to ensure their entire workforce is as highly educated as possible, has taken this to heart. As a result, various MSN nursing programs are now offered partially or fully online. Diabetes nurses are those who help people with a disease that stops the body from absorbing or producing enough insulin. The largest proportion of the working day of a diabetes nurse is spent on liaising between patients, their family members and their doctors. As such, communication skills are absolutely vital in this field. Indeed, as a diabetes nurse, you will become an advocate for people who suffer from this disease, or for those who are likely to develop it. Prevention is very important, and educating people about healthy lifestyle choices is a hugely important part of your job. At present, only two online MSN degrees in diabetes nursing exist in the country. One of these is accredited through CCNE, which is the Capella University program. The other one, which is offered by Columbia University, is not accredited. The college itself is accredited through the Middle States Commission on Higher Education. The program is also known by the American Association of Diabetes Educators. However, this association does not currently offer accreditation at all. Hence, although this program is not CCNE accredited, we have still decided to add it in this information, as it is still a high quality program that you may want to enroll in. 1. Capella University At Capella University, stu Continue reading >>

Patient Education: Diabetes

Patient Education: Diabetes

March/April 2009, Volume :5 Number 2 , page 26 - 27 [Free] Join NursingCenter to get uninterrupted access to this Article Gattullo, Barbara Ann RN, ANP-BC, CDE, MS Diabetes is a disease that affects the way your body uses food. Most of the food you eat changes into glucose, or sugar, for your body to use as energy. The pancreas, an organ near the stomach, makes a hormone called insulin, which helps sugar get into the body's cells. The cells use sugar for energy. When you have diabetes, your body either doesn't make enough insulin or it can't use the insulin that it makes. This causes you to have high blood sugar. There are two types of diabetes-type 1 and type 2. In type 1 diabetes, the body doesn't make insulin. This type of diabetes often develops before age 30. Most people with diabetes have type 2, which usually develops in adults over age 40. With type 2 diabetes, the body still makes insulin but the cells can't use it. The cause of diabetes isn't known, but you may be more likely to have it if someone else in your family does. Your healthcare provider will look for certain well-known symptoms known as the "diabetes alert." These include the need to urinate often, extreme thirst or hunger, blurry vision, sores that won't heal, weakness and fatigue. He'll also order one or more tests, which may include: * Urinalysis. This looks for sugar in your urine. * Fasting plasma glucose test. This test measures the sugar level in your blood. You'll have to stop eating and drinking for at least 8 hours before this test. * Random (nonfasting) plasma glucose test. This test also measures the amount of sugar in your blood, but you don't have to stop eating or drinking before the test. * Oral glucose tolerance test. For this test, you'll fast for at least 8 hours, then drink a su Continue reading >>

Journals For Professionals

Journals For Professionals

Scholarly journals are key information resources for your doctors. The American Diabetes Association publishes four prestigious journals that help your doctors stay abreast of the latest research and state-of-the-art approaches to care. Diabetes is a journal for scientists studying diabetes and its causes. The studies published in the journal seek to uncover how diabetes works and how it leads to complications such as vision loss and nerve damage. The cutting-edge research in Diabetes could, over time, lead to new medicines and therapies for diabetes and may one day lead to a cure. Find out more about Diabetes . Diabetes Care provides information of interest to health care practitioners, including your primary care doctor and diabetes specialist. The journal publishes studies that advance your doctors understanding of diabetes medicines, blood glucose control, diabetes during pregnancy, and many other topics. Diabetes Care also publishes guidelines from the Association that your doctor can use to help make decisions to improve your health. Find out more about Diabetes Care . Clinical Diabetes is a resource for doctors that treat patients with many different needs. The journal publishes articles your family doctor can use to learn about the latest advances and state-of-the-art care for people with diabetes. Clinical Diabetes is also a forum where doctors can discuss problems they face in their practice, share information about diabetes care, and access patient education materials. Find out more about Clinical Diabetes . Diabetes Spectrum caters to any health care professional who cares for people with diabetes. The journal features articles about the latest diabetes research and treatment options your diabetes educator, nutritionist, or nurse practitioner can use to hel Continue reading >>

Internet Scientific Publications

Internet Scientific Publications

Narrative interviews were analysed using qualitative content analysis. Not making a mountain out of a molehill, the more routine, the less life, and to err is human were identified as themes in the participants views about what nurses could learn, reflecting a criticism of some traditional aspects of diabetes nursing; i.e., a one-sided disease perspective, high adherence expectations, and a paternalistic attitude. Diabetes specialty nurses are focused on preventing complications by striving to regulate diabetes. A challenge for these nurses is to show they are partners; i.e., on the same side as the patients. Otherwise, nurses and patients will both lose. Possibly core caring values of nursing such as consoling, relieving, healing, and relating have not been given enough priority or have been replaced with more goal-oriented values such as treating, curing, and being effective. In Sweden, patients with type 2 diabetes are treated by general practitioners (GPs) and diabetes specialty nurses working in primary health care at local health care centres. Recommended diabetes care consists of an annual visit to a GP, who evaluates present laboratory measurements and adjusts medical treatment according to evidence-based recommendations in national guidelines. Semi-annually patients are offered an appointment to a specially educated diabetes nurse, who focuses on supporting lifestyle changes and patient education. 1 Swedish national guidelines follows international guidelines, where effective self-management including lifestyle modification is explicitly defined as a cornerstone in type 2 diabetes treatment.2 Lifestyle modification includes: 1) regular eating habits, consisting of a diet that is low and slow in carbohydrate content, rich in fibre, and low in fats particularly Continue reading >>

Journal Of Diabetes Nursing

Journal Of Diabetes Nursing

Within the field of bariatric surgery, preoperative education to empower patients to adapt to the postoperative lifestyle and get the best outcomes in terms of health and quality of life is not standardised across the UK and is based mainly on clinical experience. In this study, the authors used qualitative research and a structured framework to design a preoperative psychosocial education course for people undergoing surgery. Qualitative interviews were performed to determine issues that previous surgery recipients felt were missing from their preoperative education, and the current educational course was redesigned to include this content. The study provides a template from which other Trusts could evaluate and improve their education. Increasing numbers of young children are being diagnosed with type 1 diabetes (T1D), which has significant implications for primary schools. This study examined support provided to young children with T1D diabetes in two primary schools in the north of England. Case studies were used to examine the influences, perspectives and interactions of all adults involved in diabetes management. The framework approach was used to qualitatively analyse data from the 19 participants. A mix of direct and indirect support was provided by school personnel. There were five common themes: safety, knowledgeable individuals, appropriate environment, being treated as an individual, and independence. Safety was the major primary concern. School personnel providing direct support to children with T1D are ideally placed to increase children's confidence, resilience and independence through diabetes self-management skills. Greater collaboration and flexibility will aid children's acquisition of the self-manaeement skills needed over time. The diabetes team at Continue reading >>

Improving Insulin Adherence In Diabetes Care

Improving Insulin Adherence In Diabetes Care

Despite the benefits of insulin therapy, many people with diabetes don’t adhere to treatment. Some avoid insulin therapy or refuse to start it. A recent study found more than a third of the roughly 25 million Americans with diabetes don’t take insulin as prescribed and 20% intentionally skip some doses, which can lead to serious health risks. A study of nurses and physicians found nurses can play a more important role in improving insulin adherence. As nurses, we’re well positioned to help patients improve adherence because we play a key part in patient education, spend proportionately more time with patients than do other healthcare providers, and may be more familiar with a patient’s health history. Although time constraints may pose a challenge for nurses, if we ask the right questions during outpatient visits and hospital stays and address patient concerns, we can help motivate patients to take control of diabetes and adhere to insulin therapy over the long term. Using the strategies described in this article, you can help patients better understand and address the challenges of insulin therapy. Patients who receive more comprehensive information about their care are better able to monitor and manage their condition at home. Tailor the treatment plan When talking with patients, ask about their lifestyle and concerns about treatment. Then work with the healthcare provider who manages their insulin to develop a treatment plan customized to each patient’s needs and abilities. Communication is especially crucial before and during initiation of insulin therapy. But you also should continue to communicate with patients after treatment begins or when it’s modified. In many cases, patients don’t ask for help or discuss concerns related to self-care while in th Continue reading >>

Emerging Models For Diabetes Education Delivery In Low-income Populations | 65953

Emerging Models For Diabetes Education Delivery In Low-income Populations | 65953

With the rising disease burden of type 2 diabetes mellitis in the United States, new strategies for diabetes education andhealthcare delivery are emerging. Peer-led diabetes group education and diabetes group visits are two models which haveshown effectiveness. Homeless and low-income populations have unique challenges that may be overcome by these models. Dr.Davis has implemented these methods in homeless and low-income populations in Michigan, USA. Dr. Davis' implementated a4-week peer-led education program in a homeless community in Grand Rapids, Michigan. These findings were recently publishedin the article "A peer-led diabetes education program in a homeless community to improve diabetes knowledge and empowerment"in the Journal of Community Health Nursing. Knowledge scores increased significantly during sessions covering signs, symptoms,and complications of diabetes and diabetes medications (ps <.05). Empowerment scores after attending the 4-week program weresignificantly increased when compared to scores prior to the first session (p = .027). Field notes and postimplementation focus groupsupport increased empowerment and knowledge among participants. Currently Dr. Davis is implementing diabetes group visits inthe primary care setting at a Federally Qualified Health Center in the Metro-Detroit area. Patient cohorts complete a 7-week groupvisit program following the American Academy of Diabetes Educators 7 Self-Care Behaviors. Group visits consist of group educationwith a registered nurse and one-on-one time with the provider. The cohort then returns in 3 months for a follow-up group diabetesvisit. Data is currently being collected. Continue reading >>

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