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Nursing Assistant Care For Diabetes

Diabetes & Home Care | Interim Healthcare | Since 1966

Diabetes & Home Care | Interim Healthcare | Since 1966

Home > Services > Specialized Home Care > Diabetes Diabetes is a widespread disease that affects people of all ages, races and genders across the U.S. According to the American Diabetes Association, about 25.8 million Americans have diabetes, which makes up 8.3 percent of the country's population. Interim HealthCare can customize a program that helps you: Understand your disease and what causes it to have greater or lesser impact on your health and well-being. Know how to monitor the disease and what to do when levels aren't where they should be. Manage your medications - all of them, not just your insulin. See the impact of behaviors on your diabetes. Well cover nutrition topics as well as other lifestyle items. Learn to watch for signs that your diabetes might be having a negative impact on skin or nerve feelings. Help you communicate effectively with your physician. Diabetes is a chronic disease in which the levels of glucose, or sugar, in the blood are higher than they should be, and there is not enough insulin, a hormone produced by the pancreas, to control it. The disease can be caused by too little insulin, a resistance to insulin or both. There are three major types of diabetes: Type 1 can occur at any age, but is most often diagnosed in children, teens or young adults whose bodies make small amounts of insulin or none at all. Type 2 Diabetes is the most frequently diagnosed, typically during adulthood. However, it is being increasingly diagnosed in teens and young adults because of high obesity rates. Gestational Diabetes refers to the development of high blood sugar in pregnant women who did not previously have the disease. In all cases of diabetes, patients may experience similar symptoms, such as blurry vision, excess thirst, fatigue, frequent urination, hu Continue reading >>

Nurses & Medical Professionals Against Diabetes

Nurses & Medical Professionals Against Diabetes

Is It Difficult to Care for a Patient With Diabetes? You may have heard stories about how difficult it can be as a nurse or CNA to care for a patient with diabetes, but this isnt always the truth, although there can be challenges at times. A lot of this depends upon the patients age, and their other health conditions. For example, if youre dealing with an elderly patient that has refractory diabetes, you might have a difficult time with that. If youre dealing with a younger patient who can control their diabetes with diet and lifestyle changes, then it should be easier to care for them. Diabetes can be a tricky thing for CNAs and RNs to handle because patients dont always follow instructions. Its common for patients to be told to stay away from foods containing excess sugar and they simply ignore the instructions and eat what they want. This is more common with both older and younger patients, but it seems to have more of an impact on the blood sugar level or older patients. There are other problems that CNAs and nurses face when dealing with diabetic patients such as complications from the diabetes. Blood sugar levels that are high over time can lead to a number of problems with patients internal organs, and other parts of their bodies. Diabetic patients are also more susceptible to other illnesses because they dont heal as fast as have suppressed or weakened immune systems. Its important to note that not all diabetic patients suffer from complications from their diabetes, but they are simply predisposed to them, and because of that they may require extra care from their providers or medical staff. As a CNA, if you dont feel qualified to care for a patient who has diabetes, its important that you talk to your supervisor, the head RN, or someone above you on the medica Continue reading >>

Adherence To Standards Of Practice Treatingdiabetes Between Physicians And Nursepractitioners: The National Hospital Andambulatory Medical Care Surveys

Adherence To Standards Of Practice Treatingdiabetes Between Physicians And Nursepractitioners: The National Hospital Andambulatory Medical Care Surveys

Adherence to Standards of Practice TreatingDiabetes between Physicians and NursePractitioners: The National Hospital andAmbulatory Medical Care Surveys College of Nursing, University of South Carolina, Columbia, SC 29208, USA College of Nursing, University of South Carolina, Columbia, SC 29208, USA Submitted date: June 11, 2017; Accepted date: June 20, 2017; Published date: June 27, 2017 Visit for more related articles at Quality in Primary Care Background: Much of the evidence of adherence to mutually agreed-upon rules for the treatment of diabetes among physicians and nurse practitioners comes from single clinics or registries, which leaves open the question as to whether these findings are nationally representative of current practice. Aim: To evaluate standards of practice for treatment of diabetes among physicians and nurse practitioners across the United States. Design: Observational study design using large, publicly available datasets. Methods: We used data from the 2009-2011 National Hospital and Ambulatory Medical Care Surveys NAMCS, NHAMCS). We assessed standards of practice (HbA1c, foot exams, retinal exams) and delivery of patient education, using the checkbox for diabetes to identify all patients. We then examined differences in treatment using multivariate logistic regression models. Results/findings: A total sample of 10,551 ambulatory and 11,546 outpatient department (OPD) records were analyzed (unweighted counts). Patient characteristics associated with provider adherence in both settings were identified by pairwise analysis. After adjustment and assigning survey weights, care was similar between both providers in ambulatory settings. Odds of receiving HbA1c were 2.47 times higher among nurse practitioners in OPD after adjustment. Across both surveys, Continue reading >>

Q&a: Is There A Regulation About Who Can Cut Residents' Nails?

Q&a: Is There A Regulation About Who Can Cut Residents' Nails?

Q&A: Is there a regulation about who can cut residents' nails? by Betty Frandsen, MHA, NHA, RN, CDONA/LTC, C-NE-MT | Feb 24, 2015 Q:Is there a regulation preventing CNAs or nurses from cutting fingernails in a SNF? Is there somewhere I can reference this? A:There is no regulation preventing CNAs or nurses from cutting fingernails in a SNF. In the State Operations Manual Appendix PP, F241 Dignity, CMS instructs surveyors to determine that staff carries out activities that assist the resident to maintain and enhance his/her self-esteem and self-worth. An example given is, "grooming residents as they wish to be groomed" and includes "nails clean and clipped." When a resident has an identified problem with his/her nails, is on blood thinners, or has diabetes, some facilities require by policy that a nurse perform nail care rather than a CNA. Nail care is a component of CNA training. If your facility has an approved CNA training program, you can review the section on ADLs and look for nail care. If you do not have a program, contact a provider of CNA training in your area to obtain information on content for nail care training. You can also contact your state's agency that approves CNA training programs to learn of curriculum requirements and competency testing for this topic. It is worth mentioning here that F328 Special Needs in the SOM addresses foot care, including a requirement that nail disorders of the feet be treated by qualified persons such as a podiatrist, MD, or DO. Continue reading >>

Trainers Tip: The Four Parts To Diabetic Treatment

Trainers Tip: The Four Parts To Diabetic Treatment

Trainers tip: The four parts to diabetic treatment LTC Nursing Assistant Trainer, May 19, 2011 There are four main parts to treating diabetes: 1. Diet. There is no one diabetic diet designed for every diabetic person. There are guidelines to help diabetics with food choices. These guidelines are very similar to the kind of eating that is healthy for anyone. The main rules that diabetics should follow include eating few sugary foods, limited fat (especially saturated fat), a variety of fresh fruits, vegetables, lean meats, and fish, and consuming just enough calories to maintain a healthy weight. 2. Exercise. Exercise usually lowers blood sugar and may help the efficiency of insulin. It helps control weight, improves blood flow, and strengthens the heart. People with diabetes should exercise at least three times a week. Before a diabetic starts a new exercise program, a doctor should approve what kind of exercises are used and for how long. It is important that a diabetic not develop low blood sugar while exercising. Since the body burns sugar during exercise, the diabetic should fuel up with a piece of fruit or half a sandwich within an hour of starting any exercise. 3. Medication. Diabetics might receive insulin shots or they may take pills by mouth. Only a doctor can decide what medication (and how much of it) a diabetic should receive. It can be very dangerous to change a diabetics medication in any way unless it is ordered by a doctor. Diabetics must receive the exact amount of medicine their doctor has ordered, at the times the doctor has ordered. Timing of medicine and meals is important to prevent low blood sugar. 4. Monitoring. Close monitoring of a diabetics blood sugar level is one of the best ways for him or her to prevent long-term complications from the di Continue reading >>

Certified Nursing Assistant, Telemetry Diabetes - Prn

Certified Nursing Assistant, Telemetry Diabetes - Prn

Certified Nursing Assistant, Telemetry Diabetes - PRN Aventura Hospital & Medical Cntr-North Miami Area - Aventura, Florida Certified Nursing Assistant,, PRN (FTE .01) Aventura Hospital and Medical Center a facility of HCAs East Florida Division, is a fully accredited 407-bed acute care medical/surgery facility providing award-winning inpatient and outpatient diagnostic, medical, surgical and cancer services. In order to meet the needs of our ever-growing community we are a designated Level II Trauma Center and have broken ground on a $75.6M expansion project to increase emergency room capacity and bring a new patient tower and parking garage to Aventura Hospital and Medical Center. Ideally located in luxurious South Florida, Aventura Hospital is home to a community rich with diversity and world class infused culture. Our prime location - nestled between Miami and Ft. Lauderdale - means you will be surrounded by the very best South Florida has to offer! Aventura Hospital & Medical Center is a member of the nations leading provider of healthcare services, Hospital Corporation of America. HCA has been named one of Ethispheres Worlds Most Ethical Companies for eight consecutive years. Join our tradition of excellence! We offer a generous compensation package for Full-time and Part-time including: vacation, 401k, and Medical Insurance. Assists patients with activities of daily living, provides basic nursing care to patients within scope of practice. Assists in maintenance of a safe and clean environment. Works under the direction and supervision of a Registered Nurse. Job Responsibilities Include but are not Limited to: Assists in admission, transfer and discharge of patients. Obtains vital signs on all patients (per unit policy and frequency); reports abnormal results to Continue reading >>

Top 2 Online Msn In Diabetes Nursing Programs – Ccne Accredited

Top 2 Online Msn In Diabetes Nursing Programs – Ccne Accredited

Recent research commissioned by the U.S. Department of Education has shown that students benefit tremendously from being able to complete their coursework online. Indeed, their academic outcomes are often better than those of students who have completed their work in classroom settings. The nursing profession, which is keen to ensure their entire workforce is as highly educated as possible, has taken this to heart. As a result, various MSN nursing programs are now offered partially or fully online. Diabetes nurses are those who help people with a disease that stops the body from absorbing or producing enough insulin. The largest proportion of the working day of a diabetes nurse is spent on liaising between patients, their family members and their doctors. As such, communication skills are absolutely vital in this field. Indeed, as a diabetes nurse, you will become an advocate for people who suffer from this disease, or for those who are likely to develop it. Prevention is very important, and educating people about healthy lifestyle choices is a hugely important part of your job. At present, only two online MSN degrees in diabetes nursing exist in the country. One of these is accredited through CCNE, which is the Capella University program. The other one, which is offered by Columbia University, is not accredited. The college itself is accredited through the Middle States Commission on Higher Education. The program is also known by the American Association of Diabetes Educators. However, this association does not currently offer accreditation at all. Hence, although this program is not CCNE accredited, we have still decided to add it in this information, as it is still a high quality program that you may want to enroll in. 1. Capella University At Capella University, stu Continue reading >>

Diabetes Cna Training & Classes

Diabetes Cna Training & Classes

Diabetes has become a widespread disease for many Americans today as many people are leading an unhealthy lifestyle. Diabetes mellitus is a disease known to affect the endocrine system where the use of the carbohydrates from the food is not used efficiently. This is due to the inability of the pancreas to produce enough insulin that is the carrier of carbohydrates into the body or insulin is not used properly in the conversion of carbohydrates to energy. Due to not enough amount of energy being produced, the body tries to burn fat as an alternative. The by-product of fat which is called ketones is produced which can be dangerous if in an imbalanced levels. Several factors can contribute to diabetes although the exact cause of the condition is still not known. Factors such as age, family history and obesity may lead to diabetes. There are two common types of diabetes- type I also known as insulin dependent and type II which is known as non-insulin dependent diabetes. In type I diabetes, residents having those needs to take insulin from time to time in order to control their blood sugar since the bodys immune system are destroying cells that manufactures insulin. Type II diabetes is diagnosed when the body is resistant to insulin and sometimes has low insulin levels. This type of diabetes can be controlled through medication and change in lifestyle. Both types need a thorough meal plan with the right amount of proteins, carbohydrates and fat in order to maintain functioning of the body. People who have diabetes have signs of excessive urination, night sweats, excessive thirst and irritability. A serious complication to diabetes is blindness, failure in the kidney, nerve damages and many others. Even with treatment, once diabetes progresses and cannot be controlled the me Continue reading >>

Roles And Responsibilities

Roles And Responsibilities

Nursing staff have an important role and clear responsibilities when treating patients with diabetes or who are having tests to diagnose diabetes. This role and associated responsibilities will be specified in local workplace guidance and policies and by each member of the nursing team's level of competence. If you are not familiar with the guidance in relation to diabetes care in your work setting, it is important to find out where it is so you can be sure you're providing safe patient care, particularly if you are required to perform tests and observations for your patients. Explore the following activity to learn more about some of the specific competencies relating to caring for a patient with diabetes. Screening, prevention and early detection of type 2 diabetes To prevent and aid early detection of type 2 diabetes you should be able to: describe the risk factors for type 2 diabetes explain the importance of prevention or delay of onset of type 2 diabetes in individuals at risk explain the role that exercise plays in the prevention of, or delay in progression to, type 2 diabetes explain the importance of weight control and the role that diet plays in the prevention of, or delay in progression to, type 2 diabetes. Promoting self-care In order to support the patient to self-care their diabetes you should be able to: support the patient and help them develop their own self-care with guidance from a registered nurse observe and report any concerns that you may have about a patient that would affect their ability to self-care encourage patients to use their personalised care plans. Mental health To care for someone with diabetes and mental illness you should be able to: have an understanding and awareness of how mental health issues, such as depression and anxiety, can Continue reading >>

Foot Care For Patients With Diabetes

Foot Care For Patients With Diabetes

July/September 2010, Volume :26 Number 3 , page 250 - 263 [Free] Join NursingCenter to get uninterrupted access to this Article Heitzman, Jill PT, DPT, GCS, CWS, CEEAA, FACCWS As the rate of patients developing diabetes and prediabetes increases, the risk of developing ulcerations leading to amputation increases. The incidence of open wounds in patients with diabetes is very high and affects 1 of every 6 patients. These nonhealing "diabetic ulcers" are the major cause of leg, foot, and toe amputations. The ulcers do not occur spontaneously but are always preceded by a gradual or sudden injury to the skin by some external factor. Preventing these types of injuries, and early recognition when they do occur, can reduce the risk of the wound progressing to the point of amputation. Healthcare providers play an important role in recognizing the early signs of changes in the feet. Early patient education has been proven to be beneficial in identifying these changes that are brought about as a result of diabetes and, by doing so, reducing the risk of complications. This article reviews the typical changes that may occur in the feet of patients with diabetes and discusses how early recognition and prevention can assist in reducing the complications that occur as a result of ulcerations. More than 5 million people in the United States are at risk for diabetes-related problems. People with diabetes spend more time in the hospital for treatment of foot problems related to diabetes than for any other reason. Approximately 15% of individuals with diabetes have had an ulcer on the foot or ankle. Diabetes is estimated to be the primary causative factor in 45% of all lower extremity amputations, with 60% of nontraumatic amputations being the result of long-term complications of diabete Continue reading >>

Diabetes Knowledge In Nursing Homes And Home-based Care Services: A Validation Study Of The Michigan Diabetes Knowledge Test Adapted For Use Among Nursing Personnel

Diabetes Knowledge In Nursing Homes And Home-based Care Services: A Validation Study Of The Michigan Diabetes Knowledge Test Adapted For Use Among Nursing Personnel

Diabetes knowledge in nursing homes and home-based care services: a validation study of the Michigan Diabetes Knowledge Test adapted for use among nursing personnel BMC NursingBMC series open, inclusive and trusted2016 Providing high-quality diabetes care in nursing homes and home-based care facilities requires suitable instruments to evaluate the level of diabetes knowledge among the health-care providers. Thus, the aim of this study was to examine the psychometric properties of the Michigan Diabetes Knowledge Test adapted for use among nursing personnel. The study included 127 nursing personnel (32 registered nurses, 69 nursing aides and 26 nursing assistants) at three nursing homes and one home-based care facility in Norway. We examined the reliability and content and construct validity of the Michigan Diabetes Knowledge Test. The items in both the general diabetes subscale and the insulin-use subscale were considered relevant and appropriate. The instrument showed satisfactory properties for distinguishing between groups. Item response theory-based measurements and item information curves indicate maximum information at average or lower knowledge scores. Internal consistency and the item-total correlations were quite weak, indicating that the Michigan Diabetes Knowledge Test measures a set of items related to various relevant knowledge topics but not necessarily related to each other. The Michigan Diabetes Knowledge Test measures a broad range of topics relevant to diabetes care. It is an appropriate instrument for identifying individual and distinct needs for diabetes education among nursing personnel. The knowledge gaps identified by the Michigan Diabetes Knowledge Test could also provide useful input for the content of educational activities. However, some revis Continue reading >>

Certified Nursing Assistant, Telemetry Diabetes - Prn

Certified Nursing Assistant, Telemetry Diabetes - Prn

Aventura Hospital and Medical Center a facility of HCAs East Florida Division, is a fully accredited 407-bed acute care medical/surgery facility providing award-winning inpatient and outpatient diagnostic, medical, surgical and cancer services. In order to meet the needs of our ever-growing community we are a designated Level II Trauma Center and have broken ground on a $75.6M expansion project to increase emergency room capacity and bring a new patient tower and parking garage to Aventura Hospital and Medical Center. Ideally located in luxurious South Florida, Aventura Hospital is home to a community rich with diversity and world class infused culture. Our prime location - nestled between Miami and Ft. Lauderdale - means you will be surrounded by the very best South Florida has to offer! Aventura Hospital & Medical Center is a member of the nations leading provider of healthcare services, Hospital Corporation of America. HCA has been named one of Ethispheres Worlds Most Ethical Companies for eight consecutive years. Join our tradition of excellence! We offer a generous compensation package for Full-time and Part-time including: vacation, 401k, and Medical Insurance. Assists patients with activities of daily living, provides basic nursing care to patients within scope of practice. Assists in maintenance of a safe and clean environment. Works under the direction and supervision of a Registered Nurse. Job Responsibilities Include but are not Limited to: Assists in admission, transfer and discharge of patients. Obtains vital signs on all patients (per unit policy and frequency); reports abnormal results to nurse co-assigned to patient. Provides basic nursing care to patients, including actions that meet psychosocial needs and physical needs. Demonstrates flexibility; is o Continue reading >>

Challenges In Managing Elderly People With Diabetes In Primary Care Settings In Norway

Challenges In Managing Elderly People With Diabetes In Primary Care Settings In Norway

Challenges in managing elderly people with diabetes in primary care settings in Norway 1Centre for Evidence-Based Practice, Bergen University College, Bergen, Norway 2Centre for Nursing and Allied Health Research, Deakin University and Barwon Health, Geelong, Australia 3Department of Medicine, Section of Endocrinology, Stavanger University Hospital Stavanger, Norway 4Department of Global Health and Primary Health Care, University of Bergen, Bergen, Norway Correspondence: Marit Graue, Centre for Evidence-Based Practice, Bergen University College, Postbox 7030, N-5020 Bergen, Norway. Tel: + 47 55 58 55 30, or + 47 55 58 75 00. Fax: + 47 55 29 83 64. E-mail: [email protected] Received 2012 Oct 11; Accepted 2013 Oct 7. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution Noncommercial License which permits any noncommercial use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the source is credited. This article has been cited by other articles in PMC. To explore the experiences and clinical challenges that nurses and nursing assistants face when providing high-quality diabetes-specific management and care for elderly people with diabetes in primary care settings. Sixteen health care professionals: 12 registered nurses and four nursing assistants from nursing homes (10), district nursing service (5), and a service unit (1) were recruited by municipal managers who had local knowledge and knew the workforce. All the participants were women aged 3259 years with clinical experience ranging from 1.5 to 38 years. Content analysis revealed a discrepancy between the level of expertise which the participants described as important to delivering high-quality care and their capacity to deliver such care. The discrepancy was due to lac Continue reading >>

Diabetes: Treatment And Complications - The Nurse's Role

Diabetes: Treatment And Complications - The Nurse's Role

The aim of treatment for diabetes is to alleviate the symptoms, maintain quality of life and slow the progression of specific and non-specific complications. This Part looks at treatments for diabetes and related complications. Continue reading >>

Management Of Diabetes In Long-term Care And Skilled Nursing Facilities: A Position Statement Of The American Diabetes Association

Management Of Diabetes In Long-term Care And Skilled Nursing Facilities: A Position Statement Of The American Diabetes Association

Published online 2016 Jan 11. doi: 10.2337/dc15-2512 Management of Diabetes in Long-term Care and Skilled Nursing Facilities: A Position Statement of the American Diabetes Association 1Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center and Joslin Diabetes Center, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 2Geriatric Research Education and Clinical Centers, Miami Veterans Affairs Healthcare System and University of Miami, Miami, FL 3Section of General Internal Medicine, The University of Chicago, Chicago, IL 4Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD 5American Diabetes Association, Alexandria, VA 6Department of Geriatrics, Nova Southeastern University College of Osteopathic Medicine, Ft. Lauderdale, FL 7Kadlec Regional Medical Center, Richland, WA 8University of Rhode Island College of Pharmacy, Providence, RI Copyright 2016 by the American Diabetes Association. Readers may use this article as long as the work is properly cited, the use is educational and not for profit, and the work is not altered. This article has been cited by other articles in PMC. Diabetes is more common in older adults, has a high prevalence in long-term care (LTC) facilities, and is associated with significant disease burden and higher cost. The heterogeneity of this population with regard to comorbidities and overall health status is critical to establishing personalized goals and treatments for diabetes. The risk of hypoglycemia is the most important factor in determining glycemic goals due to the catastrophic consequences in this population. Simplified treatment regimens are preferred, and the sole use of sliding scale insulin (SSI) should be avoided. This position statement provides a classification system for older adults in LTC settings, describes how diabetes goals and management should be tail Continue reading >>

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