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Nursing Articles On Diabetes Mellitus

The Clinical Outcomes Of Nursing Intervention For Children With Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus On The Treatment Adherence

The Clinical Outcomes Of Nursing Intervention For Children With Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus On The Treatment Adherence

Research Article - Biomedical Research (2017) Volume 28, Issue 15 The clinical outcomes of nursing intervention for children with type 2 diabetes mellitus on the treatment adherence Hezang Ba * , Xinxin Yu, Shuzhen Han, Lijuan Kang, Chuanwei Xu, Rongyan Xue and Mingyu Li Department of Paediatrics, Binzhou Peoples Hospital, Binzhou, Shandong, PR China Visit for more related articles at Biomedical Research Objective: To observe the effects of treatment by nursing intervention for children with type 2 diabetes mellitus. Methods: 90 children with type 2 diabetes mellitus were randomly divided into control group and experimental group. For children in the control group, routine nursing methods were implemented. For children in the experimental group, nursing interventions were carried out. The two groups were kept identical in the case number, for both of which the number of cases were 45. The effects of nursing were examined respectively for both groups after nursing. Results: The results demonstrated that children in the experimental group were obviously better than children in the control group, including dietary control compliance, excise treatment compliance and drug compliance (P<0.05). Children in the experimental group were more normal than children in the control group in blood glucose, blood lipids, blood pressure and body mass (P<0.05). Children and parents in the experimental group were more satisfied with the quality of nursing than those in the control group (P<0.05). Conclusion: The cure compliance of children with type 2 diabetes mellitus can be obviously enhanced through active and effective nursing intervention projects. Higher degree of satisfaction can be brought. Widespread use of nursing intervention is feasible. Nursing intervention, Type 2 diabetes m Continue reading >>

Journal Of Diabetes Nursing - Dotn

Journal Of Diabetes Nursing - Dotn

Ensuring the safe prescribing and management of insulin is a key concern for many healthcare professionals who treat... The Journal of Diabetes Nursing: New faces, new formats and new frontiers Simon Breed shares the latest developments with the journal. Andrew McGovern presents his research into the presence of type 3c diabetes. Journal scan: Continuous glucose monitoring and retinopathy Too busy to keep up to date with the latest research? Trisha Dunning reviews the latest research papers for diabetes nurses. News: Weight loss programme in primary care leads to diabetes remission Landmark trial shows type 2 diabetes remission with intensive low-calorie diet. Managing frailty in older people with diabetes Alan Sinclair discusses the latest international guidance on the management of frail older people. Debbie Hicks introduces the flash glucose monitoring system that was recently approved on the NHS Drug Tariff. The 77th American Diabetes Association meeting: What I learnt Gayle Richards describes her experience of the latest ADA meeting and highlights some of most interesting sessions. Journal scan: GLP-1 receptor agonists and cardiovascular outcomes; insulin in type 2 diabetes; and CGM in pregnancy Too busy to keep up to date with the latest research? Erwin Castro shares some research highlights from the recent EASD meeting in Lisbon. NICE updates PH38 guidance on preventing type 2 diabetes The amended guidelines make recommendations about who should be offered intensive lifestyle-change interventions to prevent type 2 diabetes. Dietary management of obesity and type 2 diabetes Pam Dyson outlines the evidence base for the available dietary strategies commonly recommended in the UK. Debbie Hicks considers whether the NHS RightCare diabetes pathway will deliver improve Continue reading >>

Diabetes Mellitus And The Importance Of Self-care

Diabetes Mellitus And The Importance Of Self-care

Diabetes Mellitus and the Importance of Self-care Self-care is believed to play an important role in diabetes mellitus (DM) management, and the relationship between DM self-care and glycemic control has been extensively examined in the literature. However, most existing DM self-care literature focuses on patients' routine health behaviors. The literature has not examined in detail the relationship between health outcomes and patient decision making/nonroutine responses to signs and symptoms of DM. This article adopted Riegel and Dickson's situation-specific theory of heart failure self-care [J Cardiovasc Nurs. 2008;23(3):190-196], which incorporates an examination of patient decision making and nonroutine behaviors in their working concept of self-care, and used it as a framework for reviewing the research literature relevant to how DM self-care influences health outcomes. MinKyoung Song, PhD(c), MSN, RN, CRNP Doctoral Candidate, University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing, Philadelphia. Corresponding author MinKyoung Song, PhD(c), MSN, RN, CRNP, University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing, 418 Curie Blvd, Philadelphia, PA 19104-6096 ( [email protected] ). 2010 Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, Inc. Thought you might appreciate this item(s) I saw at Journal of Cardiovascular Nursing. Your message has been successfully sent to your colleague. Some error has occurred while processing your request. Please try after some time. Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus In Nursing Home Patients: Effects On Bone Turnover, Bone Mass, And Fracture Risk

Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus In Nursing Home Patients: Effects On Bone Turnover, Bone Mass, And Fracture Risk

Context: Fractures are a major health burden in elderly institutionalized persons. Type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM) has a high prevalence in nursing home patients and has been associated with positive effects on bone mass in younger, community-dwelling elderly. Objective: The objective of this study was to investigate whether type 2 DM affects bone mass, bone turnover, or prospective fracture rates in frail, elderly women living in nursing homes. Design, Setting, and Participants: This study was a prospective cohort of 583 patients with type 2 DM and 1081 control (CTR) individuals above age 70 recruited from 95 nursing homes in Austria. Patients were enrolled and followed up by mobile study teams. Main Outcome Measures: We performed quantitative bone ultrasound measurements at the calcaneus, radius, and proximal third phalanx, measurements of quadriceps strength, and biochemical parameters of mineral metabolism and bone turnover. Patients were prospectively followed for hip and other nonvertebral fractures over 2 yr. Results: Patients with type 2 DM had significantly higher age-, weight-, and mobility score-adjusted calcaneal stiffness (P < 0.0001), radial speed of sound (P < 0.005), and phalangeal speed of sound (P < 0.05) measurements when compared with CTRs. Mean serum PTH (20.7%) and osteocalcin levels (22.3%) were significantly lower (both P < 0.0001) in patients with treated type 2 DM despite comparable low serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels and slightly higher adjusted total serum calcium levels compared with CTRs. Important independent determinants of bone turnover in both patient groups were PTH, creatinine clearance, alanine aminotransferase, as well as glycosylated hemoglobin levels, together accounting for 3040% of its variance. A total of 110 hip fractures occu Continue reading >>

Fears And Health Needs Of Patients With Diabetes: A Qualitative Research In Rural Population

Fears And Health Needs Of Patients With Diabetes: A Qualitative Research In Rural Population

Go to: 1. INTRODUCTION Patients with type II diabetes, especially insulin-dependent are usually suffering from diabetes several years before the initiation of insulin therapy. Treatment of diabetes has now as a central character, the patient himself who co-decides with the physician-nurse team. The primary concern is the patient’s acceptance of the disease in the early stages and his gradual familiarization with the treatment (1). According to International Diabetes Federation, at least 285 million people worldwide have diabetes and this number is expected to increase to 438 million by 2030, with two-thirds of all cases living in low or middle income countries (2, 3). Apart from pharmaceutical care, the nurse also provides psychological care which is necessary for the disease process, both at the individual and the family level. Psychological support for patients, may positively affect the acceptance, the treatment and the course of the disease (4). Patients have a number of care needs both in early as well as in later stages of the disease. It is important for nurses not to treat all patients with diabetes mellitus the same way, but, to approach, at first the patient as an individual and then the disease. In this way, we can see the specificities in each individual-patient (5). According to the literature, the diagnosis itself causes fear which rises in the course of the disease as patients’ awareness regarding the disease and its complications increases. The holistic approach of diabetic patients produces positive results, both in the acceptance of the disease, as well as to the recognition of complications, and the protection from them. Continue reading >>

Eric - Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus In Youth, Journal Of School Nursing, 2003

Eric - Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus In Youth, Journal Of School Nursing, 2003

Quarry-Horn, Jill L.; Evans, Barbara J.; Kerrigan, James R. In the United States, the incidence of type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM) in children and adolescents has been increasing at an alarming rate. Early recognition and intervention can delay the onset of type 2 DM and prevent the long-term complications. School nurses have an essential role in implementing the American Diabetes Association (ADA) recommended screening guidelines to identify youth at high risk for type 2 DM and in implementing student health programs that focus positively on the importance of physical activity and healthy eating habits. The purpose of this article is to present an overview of the epidemiology, pathophysiology, complications, diagnosis, and treatment, as well as the recommended screening guidelines for type 2 DM in the pediatric age group. The information provided will enhance awareness, promote screening, and empower the school nurse to more effectively promote healthy lifestyle education. (Contains 4 tables and 1 figure.) Continue reading >>

Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus In Children And Young People

Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus In Children And Young People

Key learning points: Given the increasing prevalence of type 1 diabetes in children and young people, it is important to maintain an up-to-date register, in line with the quality and outcomes framework, of those diagnosed with the condition in your area Know the signs and symptoms to ensure rapid referral for diagnosis, treatment and effective long-term management Understand long-term management as stipulated in NICE guidance so you can engage with the patient and their family to reinforce the work undertaken in secondary care An estimated 415 million people worldwide have diabetes and the figure is projected to reach 642 million by 2040. Of the two main types (type 1 and type 2), type 2 diabetes comprises 90 to 95% of cases worldwide, while type 1 diabetes is one of the most common conditions in childhood. Risk factors for type 1 are not clear, but have been linked to infections and other environmental risk factors. Europe has the highest number of under-14s with type 1 diabetes (approximately 140,000) with roughly 21,600 new cases reported between 2014 and 2015. Alongside Germany and the Russian Federation, the UK contributes the highest numbers to this total (27,600 up to the age of 24 years) and has one of the highest incidence rates per year (12.1 per 100,000 aged four years old and under and 31.1 per 100,000 aged 10 to 14 years), and also one of the worst rates of glycaemic control in Europe.1-3 Poor glycaemic control is associated with later microvascular problems (retinopathy, neuropathy, nephropathy) and macrovascular problems (cardio- and peripheral vascular disease, cerebrovascular disease), as demonstrated in the landmark Diabetes Control and Complications Trial (DCCT) and its follow-up studies.4,5,6 Signs and symptoms Type 1 diabetes is a condition in which Continue reading >>

Diabetes

Diabetes

What is diabetes? There are currently 3.5 million people diagnosed with diabetes in the UK, and an estimated 549,000 people who have the condition, but don’t know it (Diabetes UK, 2016). It is a lifelong condition that causes a person's blood sugar (glucose) level to become too high. Whilst both type 1 and type 2 diabetes are characterised by having higher than normal blood glucose levels, the cause and development of the conditions are different. Type 1 diabetes Type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune disease which develops when the insulin-producing cells in the body have been destroyed and the body is unable to produce insulin. No one knows why this happens but the most likely reason is that the body has an abnormal reaction to the cells. This could be triggered by an infection or virus but again this is not known for sure. Type 1 diabetes is often referred to as insulin-dependent diabetes. It can develop at any age but usually appears before the age of 40, and especially in childhood. A person with type 1 diabetes will need to take insulin injections for life. They will also need to ensure that their blood glucose level stays balanced by eating a healthy diet, take regular physical activity and carry out regular blood tests. People with type 1 diabetes make up only 10% of all people with diabetes. Type 2 diabetes Type 2 diabetes develops when the body can still produce some insulin but not enough for it to function properly, or when the cells in the body do not react properly to insulin. This is called insulin resistance. The treatment of type 2 diabetes centres on lifestyle management including a healthy diet, regular exercise and the person monitoring their blood glucose level. As the condition progresses over time oral therapies are used, however, if these do not prov Continue reading >>

Hypoglycemia In Diabetes Mellitus

Hypoglycemia In Diabetes Mellitus

September 2017, Volume 35 Number 8 , p 414 - 419 This article has an associated Continuing Education component. Expires September 30, 2019. Go to CE Details Hypoglycemia is a serious acute complication of diabetes treatment. Recognizing the risk factors and taking steps to prevent low blood glucose should be a part of self-management education for all people taking glucose-lowering medications. It is important for home care clinicians to evaluate their patient's understanding of hypoglycemia and the appropriate treatment options. Hypoglycemia is an acute complication of diabetes treatment and is regarded as the main limiting factor in tight glucose control. It has been linked to adverse outcomes including ischemic events, arrhythmias, and neurological damage and can lead to increased morbidity and mortality ( McCall, 2014 ). It has also been identified as a reason for emergency department (ED) visits accounting for more than 9% of adverse drug events in one study ( Geller et al., 2014 ), and noted as the primary reason for approximately 300,000 adult ED visits in 2009 ( Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 2014a , 2014b ). It is the most common and serious adverse event of insulin therapy ( Lee, 2014 ). The American Diabetes Association (ADA) defines hypoglycemia as a plasma blood glucose >=70 mg/dL ( ADA, 2017a , 2017b ) and it is classified depending on the degree of debilitating symptoms rather than the absolute value of blood glucose. In people without diabetes, glucose homeostasis is maintained by the interplay of various hormones. Glucose is the body's primary source of energy and must always be available in the blood. Excess glucose is stored in the liver as glycogen that can be converted to glucose if needed for energy. Two hormones produced by the islet Continue reading >>

Improvement Of Diabetic Patients Nursing Care By The Development Of Educational Programs

Improvement Of Diabetic Patients Nursing Care By The Development Of Educational Programs

Improvement of Diabetic Patients Nursing Care by the Development of Educational Programs We are experimenting with display styles that make it easier to read articles in PMC. The ePub format uses eBook readers, which have several "ease of reading" features already built in. The ePub format is best viewed in the iBooks reader. You may notice problems with the display of certain parts of an article in other eReaders. Generating an ePub file may take a long time, please be patient. Improvement of Diabetic Patients Nursing Care by the Development of Educational Programs Bakalis Vissarion, Maria Malliarou, [...], and Sofia Zyga Diabetes is a major health problem with many social and economic consequences in general population. The importance of education in the diabetic patient and his family, led to the development of diabetes clinical nurse specialist. The role of diabetes clinical nurse specialist is essential and crucial to the hospitals and the community, in order to form a relationship with the diabetic patient and his/her family. In this way health is promoted to the maximum extent possible. In conclusion educational programs help patients with diabetes to obtain information about their condition and improve their self-care skills. Key words: diabetes, diabetes clinical nurse specialist, training Diabetes is among the chronic diseases that feature significantly in public health and are the greatest cause of disability and premature death in Europe. Diabetes is a chronic, and largely preventable, disease that can lead to cardiovascular disease, blindness, kidney failure, loss of limbs and loss of life. It causes suffering and hardship for the approximately 60 million people in the European Region currently living with the disease, while also straining its health syste Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus- Disease, Diagnosis And Treatment

Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus- Disease, Diagnosis And Treatment

School of Public Health, Xinxiang Medical University, Xinxiang, Henan Province, PR China #The authors have equal contribution Citation: Zhao Y, Xu G, Wu W, Yi X (2015) Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus- Disease, Diagnosis and Treatment. J Diabetes Metab 6:533. doi: 10.4172/2155-6156.1000533 Copyright: © 2015 Zhao Y, et al. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited. Visit for more related articles at Journal of Diabetes & Metabolism Abstract Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is a fast-growing disease and a leading global public health concern. Multiple complications are associated with T2DM. Patient education with lifestyle modifications and pharmacotherapy are main methods for treatment of patients afflicted with T2DM. Lifestyle interventions are effective strategies but usually persist for a short term whereas T2DM patients with long-term treatment still present challenges in many cases. In this review, we have briefly summarized recent progress for T2DM diagnosis and treatment. We attempt to provide an outline for T2DM diagnosis and treatment. In addition, we introduce Chinese herbal medicine as an alternate treatment for physicians and T2DM patients Keywords Type 2 diabetes; Diagnosis; Treatment; Bariatric surgery; Chinese herbal medicine Introduction Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is a metabolic disorder and typically results from excess of caloric intake over energy expenditure. It is characterized by a progressive insulin secretory defect due to insulin resistance, which increases the body’s demand for insulin in order to retain glucose homeostasis. If pancreatic β-cells fail to s Continue reading >>

Journal Of Diabetes & Metabolic Disorders

Journal Of Diabetes & Metabolic Disorders

Journal of Diabetes & Metabolic Disorders The prevalence of diabetes mellitus is increasing in Indonesia due to population growth, urbanization, and lifestyle. Diabetes mellitus (DM) is the leading cause of chronic kidney disease that escalates mortal... Authors: Laurentia Mihardja, Delima Delima, Roy G. A. Massie, Muhammad Karyana, Pringgodigdo Nugroho and Em Yunir Citation: Journal of Diabetes & Metabolic Disorders 2018 :338 Increased serum complement C3 has been related to body fat mass, metabolic syndrome and chronic diseases. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the levels of C3 in the subjects of normal weight obese (here... Authors: Maryam Karkhaneh, Mostafa Qorbani, Mohamad Reza Mohajeri-Tehrani and Saeed Hoseini Citation: Journal of Diabetes & Metabolic Disorders 2017 16:49 Iranian university students lifestyle and health status survey: study profile The physical health assessment of university students in Iran is a national large scale assessment examining health behaviors among tertiary education students. Understanding risky health behaviors which are t... Authors: Masoume Mansouri, Farshad Sharifi, Mehdi Varmaghani, Hamid Yaghubi, Yousef Moghadas Tabrizi, Maede Raznahan, Alireza Khajavi, Maryam Ghodsi, Payam Roshanfekr, Gita Shafiee, Abasali Keshtkar and Mahdi Ebrahimi Citation: Journal of Diabetes & Metabolic Disorders 2017 16:48 Carbohydrate restricted diet regimen is widely accepted as therapeutic approach for the treatment of kidney disease associated with type-2 diabetes, obesity and hypertensive disorders. The present study tested... Authors: Pawan Krishan, Gaaminepreet Singh and Onkar Bedi Citation: Journal of Diabetes & Metabolic Disorders 2017 16:47 We had earlier reported that the extract of Pueraria tuberosa significantly inhibits DPP-IV en Continue reading >>

Diabetes Mellitus: Occurrence Of Risk Factors And Care Among Nursing Workers

Diabetes Mellitus: Occurrence Of Risk Factors And Care Among Nursing Workers

Diabetes mellitus: occurrence of risk factors and care among nursing workers * Diabetes mellitus: factores de riesgo, ocurrencia y cuidados entre trabajadores de enfermera Darlene Mara dos Santos TavaresI; Nayara Arajo ReisII; Flavia Aparecida DiasIII; Fabiana Augusta Moreira LopesIV IDoctorate in Nursing. Associate Professor of the Department of Education and Community Health Nursing (DEESC) of the Graduation in Nursing (CGE) course of the Federal University of Tringulo Mineiro - FUTM - Uberaba (MG), Brazil IIUndergraduate Nursing Student of CGE of FUTM. Scientific Initiation Scholarship of CNPq IIIRegistered Nurse. Masters student of the Post-Graduate Program in Health Care of the Federal University of Tringulo Mineiro - FUTM - Uberaba (MG), Brazil. Masters scholarship financed by Capes IVRegistered Nurse. Specialist in Collective Health Masters student of the Post-Graduate Program in Health Care of the Federal University of Tringulo Mineiro - FUTM - Uberaba (MG), Brazil OBJECTIVE: To identify the occurrence of Diabetes Mellitus (DM), risk factors, stress and health-care activities performed by diabetic nursing workers. METHODS: This is a descriptive study with 418 professional nurses, working at a university hospital. Data were collected through a semi-structured instrument and were analyzed using the frequency distribution, the chi-square test (p <0.05) and the odds ratio. RESULTS: Most of the professionals were female and had between 20 and 30 years of age. All risk factors for DM were present, including the factors that can be modified. It was found a larger proportion of diabetic workers that had: overweight; arterial hypertension and capillary blood glucose altered, when compared to those without the disease. It was not found an increased likelihood of developi Continue reading >>

The Role Of Obesity In The Onset Of Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

The Role Of Obesity In The Onset Of Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

The role of obesity in the onset of type 2 diabetes mellitus Linda Cloete Lecturer, Discipline of Nursing, Avondale College of Higher Education, Sydney, Australia Brett Mitchell Associate professor of nursing and director of Lifestyle Research Centre, Discipline of Nursing, Avondale College of Higher Education, Sydney, Australia Darren Morton Senior lecturer and course coordinator of postgraduate studies in lifestyle medicine, Lifestyle Research Centre, Avondale College of Higher Education, Sydney, Australia The onset of type 2 diabetes mellitus is associated with various modifiable and non-modifiable risk factors, including lifestyle factors. Obesity is the principal lifestyle factor associated with an increased risk of developing type 2 diabetes. It is essential for nurses to have an understanding of the pathophysiology associated with factors that contribute to an increased risk of type 2 diabetes, particularly those associated with obesity. Nurses who have an understanding of the interaction between obesity and the onset of type 2 diabetes are better equipped to discuss the importance of weight loss and other necessary lifestyle adjustments in the prevention and management of obesity and diabetes associated with obesity, to implement evidence-based practice and to support patients to manage their health effectively. Nursing Standard. 31, 22,59-71. doi: 10.7748/ns.2017.e10672 This article has been subject to external double-blind peer review and checked for plagiarism using automated software Continue reading >>

Cochrane Review Brief: Cinnamon For Diabetes Mellitus

Cochrane Review Brief: Cinnamon For Diabetes Mellitus

Cochrane Review Brief: Cinnamon for Diabetes Mellitus Citation: Andrews, L., (February 26, 2013) "Cochrane Review Brief: Cinnamon for Diabetes Mellitus" OJIN: The Online Journal of Issues in Nursing Vol. 18 No. 2. Keywords: Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1 diabetes, Type 2 diabetes, cinnamon, blood glucose regulation What are the effects of cinnamon in patients with diabetes mellitus? Long-term control of blood glucose is essential to reduce the risk of developing complications such as retinopathy, neuropathy, nephropathy, cardio-vascular disease and stroke in individuals with diabetes mellitus. Healthcare professionals need to be aware of the risks and benefits of any potential intervention that claims to have the ability to control blood glucose levels, such as cinnamon, especially in the presence of an increasing variety of over the counter products. There is therefore a need to review the available evidence of their effectiveness in diabetes mellitus to inform healthcare policies and practice. The evidence included in this summary is from a Cochrane systematic review containing 10 prospective, parallel group design randomised controlled trials (RCTs) involving 577 adult participants. All but one study involved participants with a diagnosis of Type 2 diabetes mellitus; the remaining study involved participants with Type 1 diabetes mellitus. The mean age of participants ranged from 52-63 years, with one trial involving adolescents with a mean age of 15 years. The setting was predominantly university outpatient clinics in a range of geographical locations including the USA (4 trials), UK (1trial), Pakistan (2 trials), Germany (1 trial), Thailand (1 trial) and the Netherlands (1 trial). All studies used monopreparations of cinnamon (primarily Cinnamomum cassia) in tablet or c Continue reading >>

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