diabetestalk.net

Nurses Role In Diabetes Prevention

The Role Of The Nurse In Preventative Health Care

The Role Of The Nurse In Preventative Health Care

The Role of the Nurse in Preventative Health Care Preventative health care has become an increasingly popular area of the health care sector. Using a variety of methods to educate populations and avoid illnesses, this type of health care works to improve the overall wellness of Americans. Preventative health care informs populations, promotes healthy lifestyles and provides early treatment for illnesses. In the industry, the emergence of health care reform and an increased number of individuals suffering from chronic conditions has led to an amplified role for nurses in disease prevention. Nurses in preventative health care are tasked with improving the health of patients through evidence-based recommendations while encouraging individuals to receive preventative services such as screenings, counseling and precautionary medications. Through public health education, nurses can inspire a larger group of people to engage in healthy lifestyles and ultimately live longer lives. Preventative health care nurses encourage: Regular exercise: Nurses promote regular activity (preferably 30 minutes of exercise at least five days a week) to combat heart conditions, high blood pressure and other diseases such as stroke, diabetes and arthritis. Weight management: Exercise also encourages weight management. Preventative care includes maintaining and controlling weight with exercise and healthy eating habits to prevent diseases such as obesity, cardiovascular disease and osteoarthritis. Avoidance of smoking and drug abuse: Aside from the addiction threat associated with smoking and drug use, there is the risk of lung cancer, emphysema and other forms of cancer. Moderated alcohol use: Education about the effects of alcohol consumption, as well as early screening for diseases such as liv Continue reading >>

Foot Care For People With Diabetes: Prevention Of Complications And Treatment

Foot Care For People With Diabetes: Prevention Of Complications And Treatment

This article for nurses on foot care for people with diabetes is the second in a series of five evidence reviews being written by Sarah Chapman for the British Journal of Community Nursing through 2017. It was published there in April. The prevalence of diabetes, one of the most common chronic conditions in the UK, is increasing. In England, the number of people diagnosed with diabetes rose from 1.9 million in 2006 to 2.9 million in 2013 and this is expected to rise to more than 5 million by 2025. The life expectancy of people with diabetes is shortened by up to 15 years, and 75% die of macrovascular complications (NICE, 2016). Diabetic neuropathy and peripheral arterial disease put people with diabetes at greater risk of foot problems and it is estimated that one in ten will have a foot ulcer due to diabetes during their lives. Diabetes is also the most common cause of limb amputation not associated with trauma, and 80% of these amputations will be preceded by foot ulceration (NICE, 2016). Foot ulcers have a significant impact on people’s quality of life, while the annual cost to the NHS of foot ulcers or amputations was estimated to be around £650 million in 2012, or £1 in every £150. There is considerable regional variation in services and practice for preventing and treating foot problems in people with diabetes, highlighted by NICE in their latest guideline on Diabetic foot problems: prevention and management (NICE, 2016). Evidence-based practice in foot care for people with diabetes Evidence-based practice is the use of current best evidence in making decisions about the care of individual patients combined with clinical expertise and the patient’s preferences and values (Sackett DL et al, 1996). This evidence review will focus on Cochrane reviews relevant Continue reading >>

Preventing Diabetes: The Travel Nurses Role

Preventing Diabetes: The Travel Nurses Role

Preventing Diabetes: The Travel Nurses Role Preventing Diabetes: The Travel Nurses Role During National Diabetes Month, and throughout the year, travel RNs can educate and help prevent type 2 diabetes Onward Healthcares travel nurses are passionate about patient care, including educating people about disease prevention and management. During the month of November--American Diabetes Month--travel nurses can join with doctors, hospital staff and health organizations to raise awareness and educate others on this global epidemic. In fact, as the seventh leading cause of death in the United States, diabetes deserves our attention throughout the year. Diabetes affects millions of people around the world. It is a chronic, metabolic disease where a persons blood glucose levels are elevated. Over time, the condition can lead to serious damage to the heart, eyes, kidneys and nerves. There are two main types of diabetes, one of which can normally be prevented: type 2. Yet these cases have been increasing rapidly over the years, due in part to rising obesity rates and unhealthy lifestyle habits. The World Health Organization (WHO), the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the American Diabetes Association (ADA) and other organizations hope to reverse this trend through greater awareness, education and prevention. Travel nurses and other healthcare professionals can help fight diabetes by sharing the facts and educating those at risk about causes, symptoms and consequences. They can also help patients who are afflicted to manage their symptoms and support the best outcomes possible. Here are some quick facts about diabetes: 422 million people today have diabetes around the world, according to WHO 29.1 million Americans (9.3% of the population) are estimated to hav Continue reading >>

Roles And Responsibilities

Roles And Responsibilities

Nursing staff have an important role and clear responsibilities when treating patients with diabetes or who are having tests to diagnose diabetes. This role and associated responsibilities will be specified in local workplace guidance and policies and by each member of the nursing team's level of competence. If you are not familiar with the guidance in relation to diabetes care in your work setting, it is important to find out where it is so you can be sure you're providing safe patient care, particularly if you are required to perform tests and observations for your patients. Explore the following activity to learn more about some of the specific competencies relating to caring for a patient with diabetes. Screening, prevention and early detection of type 2 diabetes To prevent and aid early detection of type 2 diabetes you should be able to: describe the risk factors for type 2 diabetes explain the importance of prevention or delay of onset of type 2 diabetes in individuals at risk explain the role that exercise plays in the prevention of, or delay in progression to, type 2 diabetes explain the importance of weight control and the role that diet plays in the prevention of, or delay in progression to, type 2 diabetes. Promoting self-care In order to support the patient to self-care their diabetes you should be able to: support the patient and help them develop their own self-care with guidance from a registered nurse observe and report any concerns that you may have about a patient that would affect their ability to self-care encourage patients to use their personalised care plans. Mental health To care for someone with diabetes and mental illness you should be able to: have an understanding and awareness of how mental health issues, such as depression and anxiety, can Continue reading >>

Diabetes In Schools Responsibilities Of School Nurses

Diabetes In Schools Responsibilities Of School Nurses

Diabetes in schools responsibilities of school nurses Diabetes in schools responsibilities of school nurses We know how few of you there are and the pressures on your time. We also know that its quite likely that you are stretched over several schools and organising care and support for every child with a medical condition is next to impossible. However, working with the childs paediatric diabetes specialist nurse (PDSN), we hope you will be able to make sure schools get the right support in place for children with diabetes in schools. A school nurses main responsibility in supporting schools to look after children with medical conditions is making sure enough staff are competently trained to look after a child and that the child is being supported properly. A child with Type 1 diabetes should have at least two members of staff fully trained to look after them. Every child with diabetes should have their own paediatric diabetes specialist nurse (PDSN). The PDSN will normally be responsible for identifying what support a child will need in school, helping put together their Individual Healthcare Plan (IHP), making sure training is in place and that staff have been signed off as competent to deliver care. If the PDSN is unable to deliver this service then you willneed to liaisewith the childs healthcare team and the school to make sure the right expertise and training are in place. Schoolsshould also make sure all relevant staff members are aware of the childs diabetes and understand the condition and the childs IHP. You may be asked to arrange diabetes awareness training for other members of school staff, and, depending on local arrangements, may play a part in training. Schools shouldmake sure staff know what to do in emergencies. If you do provide or organise any trai Continue reading >>

Preventing Type 2 Diabetes: Applying The Evidence In Nursing Practice

Preventing Type 2 Diabetes: Applying The Evidence In Nursing Practice

Preventing type 2 diabetes: applying the evidence in nursing practice An overview of the evidence on preventing diabetes, how to calculate and communicate risk and practical interventions to reduce risk Thomas Yates, PhD, MSc, BSc, is diabetes education and physical activity researcher, department of cardiovascular sciences, University of Leicester; Janet Jarvis, MSc, BSc, RN, is nurse research fellow, diabetes research, University Hospitals of Leicester Trust; Jacqui Troughton, BSc, SRD, is senior research associate, diabetes research, University Hospitals of Leicester Trust; Melanie JaneDavies, MD,FRCP, is professor of diabetes medicine, department of cardiovascular sciences, University of Leicester. Yates, T. et al (2009) Preventing type 2 diabetes: applying the evidence in nursing practice. Nursing Times; 105: 41, early online publication. Preventing type 2 diabetes is now a public health priority. Nurses will be at the forefront of implementing and running future diabetes prevention initiatives. This article gives an overview of the evidence from evaluated diabetes prevention programmes, reviews different strategies for identifying high-risk groups and highlights key strategies for communicating risk and promoting lifestyle change. Keywords:Diabetes, Prevention, Structured education, Long term conditions This article has been double-blind peer reviewed Nurses have a key role in promoting physical activity and other lifestyle behaviours that reduce risk of diabetes. Structured education is an effective and systematic way of providing self management and behaviour change strategies for those at risk of diabetes. The use of risk scores can accurately highlight risk status non-invasively with limited resources. Communicating risk is key to starting the behaviour chang Continue reading >>

Nurses’ Role In Diabetic Foot Prevention And Care; A Review

Nurses’ Role In Diabetic Foot Prevention And Care; A Review

Abstract Diabetes as one of Non-communicable diseases has allocated a large proportion of cost, time and human resources of health systems. Now, due to changes in lifestyle and industrial process, incidence of diabetes and its complications have been increased. Accordingly diabetic foot considered as a common complication of diabetes. Nurses are health care providers who actively involved in prevention and early detection of diabetes and its complications. The nurses’ role could be in health care, health, community education, health systems management, patient care and improving the quality of life. Diabetes Nurses play their educating role in the field of prevention of diabetic foot, foot care and preventing from foot injury. In care dimension, nurses responsible for early detection of any changes in skin and foot sensation, foot care, dressing and apply novel technology. In the area of rehabilitation, help patient sufferings from diabetic foot ulcer or amputation, to have movement are diabetes nurse’s duties. Consequently, nurses need to attend in special training to use the latest instructions of diabetic foot care in order that provides the effective services to facilitate promote diabetic patients health. Continue reading >>

Education, Prevention And The Role Of The Nursing Team

Education, Prevention And The Role Of The Nursing Team

Education Self-management skills are an essential part of diabetes care and with the help and support of nursing staff the condition can be managed to help people stay healthy and prevent complications. Diabetes UK provide resources for health care professionals to increase the provision and uptake of diabetes self-management education. Three of the main diabetes education courses available to people with the condition in the UK are: DAFNE is a working collaborative of 75 diabetes services from NHS Trusts and Health Boards across the UK and Ireland. It is a structured education programme in intensive insulin therapy for adults with type 1 diabetes providing them with the necessary skills to estimate the carbohydrate content of their meal and to inject the correct dose of insulin. DESMOND is a group of self-management education modules, toolkits and care pathways for people with, or at risk of, type 2 diabetes. The programme offers training and quality assurance for health care professionals and lay educators to deliver any of the modules to people in their local communities. X-PERT Diabetes Programme is for people with diabetes and aims to increase the knowledge, skills and understanding of the condition in order that they can make lifestyle choices to manage their blood glucose levels effectively. Type 2 Diabetes and Me is an online step-by step guide for people with type 2 diabetes that provides information about the condition and the options and support available to them. The RCN has developed Diabetes essentials, a CPD online learning resource covering the core concepts of diabetes, diagnosis and current treatments and the role of the nursing team in treating people with diabetes. Prevention Making lifestyle changes can often help people with type 2 diabetes and tho Continue reading >>

The Role Of The Diabetes Specialist Nurse

The Role Of The Diabetes Specialist Nurse

Author(s): Susan Josephine Cable Diabetes Specialist Nurse, Ashford and St Peters NHS Foundation Trust, UK Correspondence: Susan Cable [email protected] Abstract The following article focuses upon the essential role of the Diabetes Specialist Nurse (DSN) in the care and management of patients with diabetes. The author is a DSN in the United Kingdom (UK), where the specialist nursing role has become a fundamental and crucial part of the diabetes multidisciplinary team (MDT) and service. The author draws upon her own experiences within the UK as a DSN and discusses ways in which the role could prove advantageous for a low income country such as South Sudan. The article considers key targets for developing countries and how the DSN role could help them to be achieved. There are two main types of diabetes: type 1 and type 2. Global statistics often do not differentiate between the two, therefore in this article the author refers to both types under the general term of ‘diabetes’. There is, however, a greater emphasis placed upon type 2. Key words: Role, Diabetes, Specialist, Nurse, DSN. Background Diabetes has become an increasingly serious health issue on a global scale, with the number of people living with diabetes rising significantly over the last 35 years. There are now reported to be 422 million adult diabetics (1 in 11) internationally, the majority having type 2 [1]. According to the World Health Organisation (WHO), the biggest increase is amongst low and middle income countries, such as South Sudan, where an estimated 7.43% of the population has diabetes [1]. The rise in diabetes in developing countries is suggested to be due to population growth, ageing and urbanisation: Urbanisation tends to result in physical inactivity and a greater risk of obesity [2] Continue reading >>

Nursing 101 - Nursing Role In Diabetes

Nursing 101 - Nursing Role In Diabetes

Welcome to the Nursing role in Diabetes wiki page As stated by the Canadian Diabetes Association, "Diabetes is a serious problem that affects the entire planet". It is estimated that 246 million people are affected by diabetes with the numbers increasing yearly by 7 million, to an estimated 380 million by 2025. Diabetes is now the 4th leading cause of death. Canadian Diabetes AssociationNursing plays a key role in health promotion and prevention of diabetes. Nurses who work primarily with diabetes receive certification and use the designation Canadian diabetes educator (CDE) behind their name. This program is available through continuing education courses at the Michener Institute in Toronto as well as many other facilities within Ontario. The Michener Institutehttp:www.michener.ca/ce/postdiploma/diabetes_educator.php Please see below for a short video that describes diabetes briefly: Video of Type 1, Type 2 Diabetes and Insulin: Recent updates, news from the Canadian Diabetes Association One of the roles of the nurse educator in diabetes is to assist the public in having an understanding that if left untreated or improperly managed that diabetes can result in a variety of complications. The nurse educator understands and stresses that the key in prevention or delaying the onset of these complications is to be alert to risk factors as well as signs and symptoms of diabetes. (Canadian Diabetes Association [CDA],"Are you at risk?", 2008) If you are age 40 or over you are at risk for type 2 diabetes and should be tested every 3 years. (CDA,2008) Similarly if a person has prediabetes where blood glucose levels are higher than normal but not yet high enough to be diagnosed as type 2 diabetes they must also be made aware of the risks and the importance of being tested. If a Continue reading >>

Diabetes: Treatment And Complications - The Nurse's Role

Diabetes: Treatment And Complications - The Nurse's Role

The aim of treatment for diabetes is to alleviate the symptoms, maintain quality of life and slow the progression of specific and non-specific complications. This Part looks at treatments for diabetes and related complications. Continue reading >>

Nurses’ Role In Diabetes Care; A Review

Nurses’ Role In Diabetes Care; A Review

Abstract Abstract The prevalence of diabetes is rising in tandem with the increase in the population growth rate and urbanization all over the world. Learning how to deal with the disease and keeping the blood glucose within suitable levels have become the greatest challenge for diabetics, pointing out the importance of patient education as a self-empowerment treatment modality necessary for improving the quality of life in these patients. The vast majority of diabetics believe their physicians are exclusively responsible for educating them in this regard; the role of non-physician health-care providers, however, has gained increasing acceptance in different parts of the world during the past 25 years. Many believe nurses should fulfil a leading role in diabetes treatment and care education as existing clinical and observational clinical trials have shown nurses to be capable of providing an effective quality care at lower costs. Drawing upon the expertise of nurses in providing care for diseases such as diabetes in different clinical, social and educational units, benefiting from nurses in the education programs can reduce not only the number of unnecessary referrals to specialists but also the heavy burden of such visits impose to the society. Policy makers, therefore, are urged to focus more attention on the referral system in different levels of health-care system. Keywords: Nurses’ role, Diabetes care, Education, Self-care Discover the world's research 14+ million members 100+ million publications 700k+ research projects Join for free The prevalence of diabetes is rising in tandem with the increase in the population growth rate and urbanization all over the world. Learning how to deal with the disease and keeping the blood glucose within suitable levels have beco Continue reading >>

Ucsf Study: Inexpensive Method For Diabetes Prevention

Ucsf Study: Inexpensive Method For Diabetes Prevention

UCSF Study: Inexpensive Method for Diabetes Prevention A simple, inexpensive method for preventing type 2 diabetes that relies on calling people and educating them on the sort of lifestyle changes they could make to avoid developing the disease has proven effective in a study conducted by researchers at the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF) and the City of Berkeley Department of Public Health. The study involved 230 people in poor, urban neighborhoods in the San Francisco Bay Area cities of Richmond, Oakland and Berkeley. Contacted by phone about once a month, half of them received specific dietary guidance and other lifestyle counseling. After six months, those who had received the counseling had on average lost more weight, were consuming less fat, were eating more fruits and vegetables and showed more improvements in lowering in their blood triglycerides, a key risk measure for type 2 diabetes. Described this week in the American Journal of Public Health, the new intervention is specifically designed for urban, poor, and predominantly minority communities. It addresses the need for diabetes prevention interventions in these communities and highlights a simple fact that doctors at UCSF and elsewhere have been repeating for years—that type 2 diabetes is preventable in the first place. “Diabetes is not something you are necessarily going to get just because it runs in your family,” said Alka Kanaya, MD, an associate professor of medicine at UCSF and one of two senior authors on the study. “It is very preventable, and lifestyle changes can really impact the onset of diabetes.” “You can do something about it,” said Anita Stewart, PhD, a professor at the UCSF Institute for Health & Aging and the Center for Aging in Diverse Communities who is the Continue reading >>

Jentashapir Journal Of Health Research

Jentashapir Journal Of Health Research

1 Student Researches Committee, Nursing and Midwifery School, Ahvaz Jundishapur University of Medical Sciences, Ahvaz, IR Iran * Corresponding author: Morteza Nasiri, Nursing and Midwifery School, Ahvaz Jundishapur University of Medical Sciences, Ahvaz, IR Iran. Tel: +98-9171745485, Fax: +98-7726223012,, E-mail: [email protected] Jentashapir Journal of Health Research: October 2014, 5 (5) ; e23226 Published Online: October 13, 2014 To Cite: Amirmohseni L, Nasiri M. The Important Role of Specialist Nurse in the Improvement of Patients With Diabetic Foot Ulcer: Letter to the Editor, Jundishapur J Helath Res. 2014 ;5(5):e23226. doi: 10.17795/jjhr-23226 . Diabetic Foot Ulcer (DFU) is considered as one of the main causes of hospitalization in diabetic patients, which can lead to infection, gangrene, amputation, and even death if the necessary care is not provided. Based on the recent investigations, one of the most effective tactics to manage diabetic foot ulcer is to form a multidisciplinary team including a general practitioner, a nurse, an educator, podiatrists, and some consultants. Although all team members play their own important roles in reduction of DFU and amputation incidence, the role of nurses seems to be more essential. In the developed countries, the diabetes nursing is divided into several categories which one of them is diabetic foot specialist nurse. Totally, these specialists play an effective role in prevention, care, and rehabilitation of the patients with diabetic foot ulcer. Today, the specialist nurses provide effective foot ulcer management and treatment in many countries; however, these specialists, in some developing countries such as Iran, highlight a lack of specialist training as an obstacle to effective healthcare provision. Therefo Continue reading >>

Health Promotion And Disease Prevention In Rural Communities

Health Promotion And Disease Prevention In Rural Communities

Health promotion and disease prevention in rural communities Author: Diana Niland, APRN, FNP-C, WCC, and Tricia Barbarito, RN Diabetes and risk of diabetes is high nationwide, especially within rural communities with limited access to care. Group Lifestyle Balance programs offer opportunities to educate community participants about lifestyle changes to reduce their risks for diabetes. As healthcare professionals, nurses focus on preventing disease and reducing the risk of exacerbation in patients with chronic disease, which decreases the rate of hospital readmissions. To ensure success, our work should begin at the community level with intervention, education , and support. This article describes a program implemented by a critical access hospital (CAH) in rural West Virginia to address that communitys increasing rate of diabetes. According to the 2014 National Diabetes Statistics Report, 29.1 million people in the United States have diabetes, and approximately 86 million adults have prediabetes. In rural areas, the risks are even higher, with the added insult of restricted access to care. A community health needs assessment conducted in January 2016 by our CAH confirmed the grim statistics of unhealthy lifestyles and poor health in our region. West Virginia leads the nation with the highest rates of cardiovascular disease, obesity, and smoking. And its second in the nation in prevalence of diabetes, hypertension, and fair or poor health. West Virginia received a community transformation grant from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and called it Change the Future WV. One of its initiatives was implementing a Group Lifestyle Balance (GLB) program, part of the CDC-led National Diabetes Prevention Program that is taught nationwide. One member of our CAH Continue reading >>

More in diabetes