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Numb Toes Diabetes

Caring For Your Feet

Caring For Your Feet

Diabetes and your feet People with diabetes have special reason to take good care of their feet. Long term high blood glucose levels may make feet susceptible to injury and infection. This is because the protective sensation in the toes or feet – your “pain alarm system” may slowly disappear with long term high blood glucose levels. We have fully experienced Podiatrists in our Dublin & Cork Care Centres and will be opening more Specialist care centres when funding allows. Dublin: Northwood Business Campus, Santry, Dublin 9 Cork: 36 Mary St, (off Georges Quay) Cork city Members discount on services Learning good foot care Learning good foot care habits can prevent most foot problems. To ensure continuous foot care education tailored to your needs, it is important that you have a foot examination each year. A good podiatrist will educate you on foot care while they are treating your feet. Advice about foot care You may be advised about foot care soon after you get diabetes, even if you have no current foot problems. You may think this is unnecessary at first but many problems can be avoided, if you establish a daily foot care routine early. Caring for your feet To protect your feet, you should always wear soft, well-fitted shoes that allow a little extra room since feet expand, or swell, later in the day and when warm. Shoes that are too tight can cause sores within just a few hours. Socks should be seamless. Foot examinations every day Examine your feet every day and report problems immediately. Look for cuts and for changes in skin and nails. Check your feet in good light. Use a mirror to see the entire foot. Signs of infection Learn to spot the first signs of infection. These are elevated skin temperature, red areas and swelling. Pain and tenderness suggest that Continue reading >>

7 Natural Diabetic Neuropathy Treatments That Work

7 Natural Diabetic Neuropathy Treatments That Work

Diabetes itself is extremely common, affecting about one in every three adults in the U.S., and diabetic neuropathy is one of the most likely complications to develop as a side effect because high blood sugar levels affect nerve fibers throughout the body. Neuropathy is a pathological condition that encompasses more than 100 different forms and manifestations of nerve damage, both in people with diabetes and those without. (1) Diabetic neuropathy (also sometimes called peripheral neuropathy) is the term for nerve damage caused by diabetes, a chronic condition that occurs when the body doesn’t use the hormone insulin properly. Neuropathy can form anywhere but is most likely to affect nerves running through the limbs, hands and feet. Not every person with diabetes symptoms develops complications such as neuropathy, but many do. In fact, up to 60 percent to 70 percent of all diabetics experience some form of neuropathy. For some people, only mild symptoms develop from nerve damage, such as tingling or numbness in the limbs. But for others, neuropathy causes a good amount of pain, digestive issues, problems with the heart and blood vessels, the inability to go about life normally, and even death if major organs are affected badly enough. Diabetic neuropathy can trigger a cascade of events that lead to even more serious complications. Just like with diabetes itself, there is no known “cure” for peripheral neuropathy, only ways to manage it and stop progression, similarly to the natural treatments for diabetes. It’s a dangerous problem to have, but fortunately most people are able to keep it under control by regulating their blood sugar levels, changing their diets and adopting healthier lifestyles overall, all of which help control their diabetes. 7 Natural Remedies Continue reading >>

Neuropathy

Neuropathy

Tweet Neuropathy (or diffuse neuropathy) is a nerve disorder which may be categorised as sensory neuropathy, motor neuropathy or autonomic neuropathy. Neuropathy can be caused by both type 1 and type 2 diabetes. Types of neuropathy Diabetic neuropathy may be categorised as follows: Sensory neuropathy occurs when nerves which detect touch and temperature are damaged. This form of neuropathy commonly affects the feet and hands. Motor neuropathy results from damage to the nerves affecting muscle movement. Autonomic neuropathy follows if the nerves which control involuntary actions, such as digestion or heart rate are affected. Over time, people with diabetes who do not control their condition, may develop damage to the nerves around the body. The term peripheral neuropathy may also be used and the term simply refers to nerve damage affecting any nerve outside of the brain or spinal cord. How common is diabetic neuropathy? Incidences are more common in patients with poor control, overweight, have higher levels of blood fat and blood pressure, and are over the age of 40. The longer a person has diabetes, the greater the risk of developing neuropathies. Neuropathy may affect up to 50% of people with diabetes.[1] Symptoms of neuropathy will often first manifest as numbness or pain in the hands, feet, arms or legs (distal symmetric neuropathy). However, they may also affect the organs, including the heart and sex organs. What exactly causes neuropathy amongst people with diabetes? The exact effect of glucose on the nervous system is still not known. However, prolonged exposure to higher than normal glucose levels certainly damages the nerves, causing neuropathy. High levels of triglycerides, a key blood fat which is measured during a cholesterol check, are also associated with Continue reading >>

Caring For Diabetes-related Nerve Disorders (neuropathy)

Caring For Diabetes-related Nerve Disorders (neuropathy)

What is diabetic neuropathy? Some diseases consume the body like wildfire. Others are more like a slow burn. Diabetes is a malady that takes its time. If not controlled, diabetes slowly eats away at the body's cells, especially nerve cells. Doctors call the gradual breakdown of nerve cells "neuropathy." At first, nobody misses a few dead cells here and there. But after a decade or two, the damage can be impossible to ignore. Many patients suffer numbness or the opposite, extreme pain. As a result of decreased sensation, many people with diabetes may not be aware when they've broken the skin or suffered a cut or scrape on one of their feet. Bacteria can then set up housekeeping -- an invasion aided by impaired circulation and small vessel disease caused by diabetes. In some cases, these unnoticed infections can lead to raging infections and loss of the limb. Despite many recent advances in diabetes treatment, neuropathy remains frighteningly common. About 60 to 70 percent of people with either type 1 or type 2 diabetes will eventually develop nerve damage, though not all of them will have symptoms. But if you have diabetes, remember this: the key to avoiding nerve damage is prevention. By carefully controlling your blood sugar, you can help keep your nerve cells out of harm's way. What causes diabetic neuropathy? When people with diabetes experience pain, tingling, numbness or other sensory symptoms, typically in the feet, high blood sugar seems to be the real culprit. In general, nerve cells only start dying when blood sugar stays too high over a long period of time. Nobody knows why extra sugar is so toxic. Perhaps it upsets the chemical balance in the nerves. Or perhaps the sugar slows down blood circulation and cuts off the oxygen supply to the nervous system. Expert Continue reading >>

Numb Feet, Toes & Legs

Numb Feet, Toes & Legs

Visit our Health Index for More Subjects, Conditions and Answers What causes the numbness? Foot numbness is a condition where you feel a loss of sensation in one or both feet, including the toes. Many people complain about numbness in their feet and legs, and have been given all sorts of reasons why. They can be told it is lack of blood to the area, pressure on the nerves, sitting or standing in the same position for a long time or from repetitive motion. Most often it is thought to be poor circulation. Depending on the cause, this loss of sensation can disappear quickly. Numbness after sitting for a long time will fade away once you move your legs and feet around and the blood flow returns. However, chronic numbness in the feet indicates some level of damage to the nerves. A continual numb foot indicates neuropathy. You can find a list of reasons that a person can get this numbness, such as injury, side effect of shingles, infection, inflammation, trauma, nerve entrapment, diabetes, etc. but all these causes are due to nerve damage and it is called neuropathy. Often, there are other symptoms that precede the numbness. Foot numbness comes after symptoms of pins-and-needles, prickling, pain or burning sensations. These symptoms are referred to as parenthesis. This is due to the nature of the problem. When communication through the nerves is starting to break down due to nerve damage, symptoms of tingling, pins and needles, burning and pain are felt. When the damage gets worse, there is no communication going through the nerves and the area feels numb – no feeling. What can you do about numbness? When there is nerve damage, the body needs to repair the nerves. Sometimes this happens on its own when it isn’t severe as the body starts repairing the damage. But numbness Continue reading >>

Diabetic Peripheral Neuropathy

Diabetic Peripheral Neuropathy

Diabetic neuropathy, or nerve damage caused by diabetes, is one of the most common known causes of neuropathy. It is one of many complications associated with diabetes, with nearly 60 percent of diabetics having some form of nerve damage. It is a progressive disease that can involve loss of sensation, as well as pain and weakness, in the feet and sometimes in the hands. Peripheral neuropathy may be more prevalent in people who have difficulty managing their blood sugar levels, have high blood pressure, are overweight, and are over 40 years old. A clinical examination may identify early signs of neuropathy in diabetics without symptoms. Today, doctors are exploring a link between pre-diabetes (also known as impaired glucose tolerance or IGT) and peripheral neuropathy. Approximately 10% of adults in America have what is being called “pre-diabetes” or “borderline diabetes”—a condition where the body has higher than normal blood sugar levels, but not high enough to be diagnosed as true diabetes. If left untreated, people with pre-diabetes are at risk of developing type 2 diabetes, heart disease, and nerve damage (which could result in peripheral neuropathy.) People with pre-diabetes or IGT can significantly reduce their risk of developing type 2 diabetes through diet, exercise and learning to control their blood sugar levels. Pre Diabetes Symptoms & Signs (Not all symptoms and signs may be present.) People with IGT often have no symptoms. People who actually have diabetes—and who therefore are at greater risk of developing peripheral neuropathy—often don’t realize it because the symptoms of diabetes come on so gradually. Pre Diabetic symptoms and its complications include: Frequent urination Blurred vision Constant thirst Fatigue Frequent infections Cuts and Continue reading >>

Sensitive Feet And Diabetes: Why My Feet Hurt?

Sensitive Feet And Diabetes: Why My Feet Hurt?

What is nerve damage from diabetes? Diabetic neuropathies are nerve damage caused by diabetes. Neuropathy is one of the most common long term complications of diabetes. It can occur anywhere in the body, and in any organ. Symptoms such as numbness, tingling, and loss of protective sensation can be found in the hands, arms, fingers, feet, legs, toes, and lips. You may also have symptoms of nerve damage in the digestive system (gastroparesis), in the heart, or in sexual organs (erectile dysfunction, or vaginal dryness). In this article, we will be mainly looking at peripheral neuropathy in the feet, also commonly known as sensitive feet. What are sensitive feet? Patients complain about numbness and tingling in their feet and toes, or elsewhere, with a frequency that is more often than in similar reports of other diabetes complications they experience. It’s no wonder these patients with diabetes have complaints of neuropathy symptoms. Other than the tingling sensation or the numbness usually associated with neuropathy, those who have it complain about how much it hurts to put their socks and shoes on. The skin is sensitive to touch, to a point where one can’t even brush up against anything. It is likened to an over-sensitivity and mild pain that is uncomfortable. If it goes on day in and day out, it can be frustrating. Sometimes, a person with diabetes may also get other related foot problems, such as plantar fasciitis. This condition affects the heel of the foot, and can be extremely painful. You will find it too sore to walk with plantar fasciitis. Even without heel problems, the generalized foot pain and soreness can become severe. It has been found that as many as 60 to 70% of people with diabetes have neuropathy somewhere in their body. The longer you have diabete Continue reading >>

The Reality Of Diabetic Peripheral Neuropathy In The Feet

The Reality Of Diabetic Peripheral Neuropathy In The Feet

Dear CDE, Lately my feet are feeling weird – like they are being squeezed tight inside my socks, but I am not wearing any socks. Then at night I get sharp sudden pains that just shoot into my ankles, heels and feet from nowhere that feels like an electric shock. It wakes me up, and keeps me awake. What is going on? Do I have that diabetes nerve pain like they show on TV? I am 36 years old, an active mom (2 kids ages 11 and 9), work part-time, and go for walks with my kids and the dog. I have been diabetic for 17 years. - Sarah Hello Sarah – What you are describing are typical signs and symptoms of nerve damage caused by peripheral neuropathy, which is the most common and well-known form of neuropathy that happens to people with diabetes (PWDs). Diabetic peripheral neuropathy (DPN) affects the transmission of biochemical-electric nerve signals from the brain to the spine to the peripheral nerves in the extremities, such as the lower legs, feet and toes, and arms, hands and fingers. The electric shock “pricks” you describe feeling are the result of the nerves trying to fire signals from your brain to your feet, but the transmission gets interrupted through wiring that has been damaged by the chronic fluctuations of hyper- and hypoglycemia that happens over the years when you have diabetes. With DPN sensation is altered and can be either increased or decreased. For example, nerve damage from DPN causes diminished or loss of feeling in the feet and hands. However, it can also increase sensation that feels like pin pricks, tingling, stinging, jabbing, throbbing, short quick electric shock-like pain, and a tight squeeze “stocking glove” sensation such as you describe of wearing socks when you aren’t wearing any socks. You are not alone – peripheral neuropathy Continue reading >>

Nerve Damage (diabetic Neuropathies)

Nerve Damage (diabetic Neuropathies)

What are diabetic neuropathies? Diabetic neuropathies are a family of nerve disorders caused by diabetes. People with diabetes can, over time, develop nerve damage throughout the body. Some people with nerve damage have no symptoms. Others may have symptoms such as pain, tingling, or numbness—loss of feeling—in the hands, arms, feet, and legs. Nerve problems can occur in every organ system, including the digestive tract, heart, and sex organs. About 60 to 70 percent of people with diabetes have some form of neuropathy. People with diabetes can develop nerve problems at any time, but risk rises with age and longer duration of diabetes. The highest rates of neuropathy are among people who have had diabetes for at least 25 years. Diabetic neuropathies also appear to be more common in people who have problems controlling their blood glucose, also called blood sugar, as well as those with high levels of blood fat and blood pressure and those who are overweight. What causes diabetic neuropathies? The causes are probably different for different types of diabetic neuropathy. Researchers are studying how prolonged exposure to high blood glucose causes nerve damage. Nerve damage is likely due to a combination of factors: metabolic factors, such as high blood glucose, long duration of diabetes, abnormal blood fat levels, and possibly low levels of insulin neurovascular factors, leading to damage to the blood vessels that carry oxygen and nutrients to nerves autoimmune factors that cause inflammation in nerves mechanical injury to nerves, such as carpal tunnel syndrome inherited traits that increase susceptibility to nerve disease lifestyle factors, such as smoking or alcohol use What are the symptoms of diabetic neuropathies? Symptoms depend on the type of neuropathy and which Continue reading >>

Pins And Needles Numbness

Pins And Needles Numbness

Numbness is a condition where you can't feel anything in part of your body, usually a patch of skin. Pins and needles are a tingling or prickling sensation that is often felt in hands or feet. Most numbness or pins and needles sensation is due to pressure on nerves or the blood vessels that supply nerves. This often happens after you've been in an awkward position, like sitting cross-legged, or it may be the sign of a trapped nerve. Occasionally, it may be the sign of a more serious underlying problem such as diabetes. The most common causes are mentioned below. What are numbness/pins and needles? Numbness/pins and needles occur when you lose normal sensation in an area of the body. This happens because pressure cuts off the blood supply to nerves that carry messages about sensation to the brain. If you have numbness, you don't feel anything; if a doctor used a pin to prick your skin, it wouldn't feel sharp. When you experience pins and needles, you have an abnormal, usually unpleasant feeling in a part of your body. It may feel like lots of tiny pinpricks, tingling or shooting pains that travel down an arm or leg, or affect just one toe or both feet. Who is affected by numbness/pins and needles? You can get numbness/pins and needles by putting pressure on a part of your body, like wearing tight shoes or sitting on your foot. People with back pain, those who have diabetes or people who use vibrating tools are more prone to develop the problem. What problems can cause numbness and pins and needles? This list does not include all the possible causes of numbness/pins and needles but lists some of the more common causes including: Pressure Wearing tight shoes or sitting on your foot can give you a numb foot or leg or cause pins and needles. This kind of numbness has an obvi Continue reading >>

Numb Toes And Diabetes

Numb Toes And Diabetes

Have you ever been burned by a hot pan? Can you imagine having that feeling from your whole foot? It’s called diabetic neuropathy, and it’s what some diabetics have to endure. Their nerves stop working correctly when their sugar levels rise high enough, and for long enough. Numbness is the most common sensation experienced, but there can also be tingling, “pins and needles”, or the aforementioned burning. This lack of feeling develops first in the toes, which is because neuropathy is a “length dependent” process. This means that the longer nerves are affected by the disease first. Naturally, that means the toes are most lacking in sensation. The effects can be disastrous. Pain is a very beneficial feeling: it tells a person that they have a problem, and something needs to be done. Without pain, an individual with neuropathy can have skin breakdown, which means the tissues beneath are exposed, and our most important barrier to bacteria is lost. This is the reason more diabetics have an amputation of a foot or leg than any other population group. If a diabetic is not “on guard”, a simple ingrown nail can lead to loss of a limb, and largely because of the very nasty infections that occur without an intact skin layer. And it certainly doesn’t help that many diabetics experience reduced circulation. The last piece of the puzzle is immunopathy, a decrease in the ability to fight off various types of bacteria. The key for those afflicted: 1) be observant for new problems; 2) keep your skin healthy and well hydrated; 3) GET TREATMENT EARLY (before a minor problem becomes big); 4) get educated and attend an educational session for diabetes, because THE MORE YOU KNOW, THE BETTER YOU WILL DO! Continue reading >>

Diabetes Tingling Or Numbness | No 9 Of 10 Symptoms Of Diabetes Type 2

Diabetes Tingling Or Numbness | No 9 Of 10 Symptoms Of Diabetes Type 2

Symptoms of Diabetes Type 2 – Numbness Or Tingling in Hands and Feet Symptoms of Diabetes Type 2 can include numbness or tingling in your hands or feet. This tingling and numbness could be a symptom of diabetic neuropathy. Diabetic neuropathy is damage to nerves in the body that occurs due to high blood sugar levels from diabetes. Diabetes is one of the most common causes of neuropathy, although nerve trauma or pressure, chemotherapy, B vitamin deficiencies or alcoholism could be to blame. Neuropathy can also be idiopathic – meaning from an “unknown” cause. This diabetes tingling or numbness symptom is one of ten symptoms of diabetes type 2. Your body is a network of nerves that run from head to toe. The brain sends electrical messages through these wiry filaments of tissue, which snake down the spine before branching off in every direction. From fingertips to toes, nerves control everything from heartbeats to itches. They tell your muscles when and how to move. They also control body systems that digest food and pass urine. This complex network is vital for health. Unfortunately, diabetes can damage this crucial system. The American Diabetes Association estimates that 60 to 70 percent of people with diabetes have some form of neuropathy. While diabetic neuropathy rarely hurts the nerves of the brain or spine, those in the rest of the body are fair game. According to the Mayo Clinic, prolonged exposure to high blood sugar (glucose) can damage delicate nerve fibers, causing diabetic neuropathy. Why this happens isn’t completely clear, but a combination of factors likely plays a role, including the complex interaction between nerves and blood vessels. High blood glucose interferes with the ability of the nerves to transmit signals. It also weakens the walls of t Continue reading >>

Diabetic Neuropathy

Diabetic Neuropathy

LYRICA is contraindicated in patients with known hypersensitivity to pregabalin or any of its other components. Angioedema and hypersensitivity reactions have occurred in patients receiving pregabalin therapy. There have been postmarketing reports of hypersensitivity in patients shortly after initiation of treatment with LYRICA. Adverse reactions included skin redness, blisters, hives, rash, dyspnea, and wheezing. Discontinue LYRICA immediately in patients with these symptoms. There have been postmarketing reports of angioedema in patients during initial and chronic treatment with LYRICA. Specific symptoms included swelling of the face, mouth (tongue, lips, and gums), and neck (throat and larynx). There were reports of life-threatening angioedema with respiratory compromise requiring emergency treatment. Discontinue LYRICA immediately in patients with these symptoms. Antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) including LYRICA increase the risk of suicidal thoughts or behavior in patients taking AEDs for any indication. Monitor patients treated with any AED for any indication for the emergence or worsening of depression, suicidal thoughts or behavior, and/or any unusual changes in mood or behavior. Pooled analyses showed clinical trial patients taking an AED had approximately twice the risk of suicidal thoughts or behavior than placebo-treated patients. The estimated incidence rate of suicidal behavior or ideation among 27,863 AED-treated patients was 0.43%, compared to 0.24% among 16,029 placebo-treated patients, representing an increase of approximately one patient for every 530 patients treated with an AED. The most common adverse reactions across all LYRICA clinical trials are dizziness, somnolence, dry mouth, edema, blurred vision, weight gain, constipation, euphoric mood, balance Continue reading >>

Remedy The Numbness In Your Feet With These Handy Tips

Remedy The Numbness In Your Feet With These Handy Tips

That feeling of numbness in your feet and toes can be caused by a variety of conditions. Numbness is often accompanied by a tingling feeling. The cause may not be serious - it can be as uncomplicated as paresthesia (your foot 'falling asleep'), however it my be as serious as diabetes, multiple sclerosis, or a symptom of a much more serious condition. Whatever the cause may be, it's essential to address the numbness in your feet. Avoiding to do so may affect your ability to walk. Typical causes of numbness Numbness of the toes generally occurs due to conditions that affect the nerves or blood vessels of the foot. Most common causes of toe numbness include: Compressed nerves of the foot from footwear Injury to the foot Poor blood circulation to the foot, usually due to diabetes and peripheral vascular disease Irritation of nerves in the lower back (possibly due to a herniated disk) Frostbite Stroke Multiple sclerosis Vasculitis (inflammation of the blood vessels) Once you and your doctor have identified what is causing the numbness in your toes, here's how you may go about resolving the issue: Method 1: Dealing with occasional numbness 1. Exercise Sitting or standing in one place for a long time may cause numbness. To counteract the problem, stimulate circulation in the foot by moving around. A short walk, or moving your foot as you are sitting down, will help too. In addition, bear in mind the following: To begin with, regular exercise can help prevent numbness. So be sure to incorporate physical activity into your daily schedule. If high impact exercises, such as jogging, causes numbness in the feet and toes, try lower impact exercises, such as swimming or cycling. Before you start your workout, be sure to stretch well, wear appropriate shoes and exercise on level surfa Continue reading >>

Prediabetes’ #1 Symptom

Prediabetes’ #1 Symptom

If you are wondering whether you could have prediabetes, it may seem logical to ask: “What are its symptoms?” Unfortunately, unlike many chronic conditions, the single most common symptom of prediabetes is actually no symptom at all, which is why nearly 90% of people are not aware they have it. So being on the lookout for obvious signs is actually a very unreliable way to find out if you are at risk. Prediabetes is a condition in which blood sugar levels are higher than normal, but not yet high enough to be considered type 2 diabetes. But unless lifestyle changes are made, many people who are newly diagnosed with prediabetes will worsen and convert to full-blown type 2 diabetes within a few years. That’s why prediabetes should really be thought of as simply an earlier stage of type 2 diabetes. But while prediabetes might come without obvious, external symptoms, that does not make it harmless. In fact, evidence suggests that some people with prediabetes are already experiencing internal damage – the tiny vessels that supply blood to your eyes, kidneys, and nerve may already be starting to be harmed. In other words, it must be taken seriously. So what is the best way to find out if you are at risk? It takes less than a minute to take the CDC’s prediabetes screening test. If it turns out that you are at high risk, take comfort in knowing that while prediabetes might be hard to spot from the outside, it doesn’t mean it’s hard to treat. In fact, Prevent has helped the majority of our participants reduce their excess weight and other risk factors for developing type 2 diabetes. That said, if you already know you have prediabetes, you should also be on the lookout for signs of type 2 diabetes. A 2011 study surveyed people in early stages of diabetes to find out w Continue reading >>

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