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Numb Feet Diabetes

Why Does Tarsal Tunnel Cause Numbness In The Heels And Feet?

Why Does Tarsal Tunnel Cause Numbness In The Heels And Feet?

Tarsal Tunnel Syndrome is the most common cause of numbness in the heels. Often confused with plantar fasciitis, tarsal tunnel sufferers experience numbness, tingling, or the feeling of “pins and needles” rather than sharp, stabbing, or throbbing pain. The tarsal tunnel is a canal linking part of the ankle bone, called the medial malleolus, to a set of ligaments, called the flexor retinaculum, which span the foot. The tendons, nerves and arteries that enable your foot to be flexible and mobile are located inside of this canal. Tarsal tunnel syndrome results from the tibial nerve becoming compressed inside the tarsal tunnel. The tibial nerve is what enables you to experience sensations along the bottom of your foot, and works with the muscle of your calf to make flexing the foot and toes possible. The tarsal tunnel and tibial nerve play a vital role in your ability to stand, walk and run. A hallmark symptom of Tarsal Tunnel Syndrome is numbness in the heel or in other areas of the foot. Symptoms may also include shooting pain and tingling sensations. Who Is At Risk For Tarsal Tunnel Syndrome? Tarsal Tunnel Syndrome can occur at any age, but specific factors may make you more prone to developing this condition. Check this list to see if any of the risk factors apply to you: The presence of any disease, including arthritis, that causes swelling. Swelling can result in the tibial nerve becoming compressed in the foot. A physical anomaly, such as a swollen tendon, a heel spur, a ganglion cyst or a varicose vein. These physical abnormalities can result in nerve compression. Conditions such as fallen arches or flat feet can trigger compression of the tibial nerve. An irregular gait that puts undue pressure on the tarsal tunnel. Participation in high-impact sports such as r Continue reading >>

Numbness Toes: Symptoms & Signs

Numbness Toes: Symptoms & Signs

Numbness of the toes generally is a result of conditions that affect the nerves and/or blood vessels that supply the foot. Numbness of the toes is often associated with tingling. Numbness and tingling sensations in the toes is referred to as paresthesia of the toes. The most common cause of toe numbness is direct compression of the nerves of the foot from footwear from shoes. Numbness of the toe can occur because of injury to the foot, nerve damage (neuropathy), and poor circulation to the foot (such as with diabetes and peripheral vascular disease). Numbness to the foot can also be caused by irritation of nerves in the low back with radiculopathy and herniated disc, Guillain-Barré syndrome, frostbite, stroke, diabetic neuropathy, beriberi, multiple sclerosis (MS), Raynaud's phenomenon, and vasculitis. There is increased potential for irritation of nerves in the foot when skeletal deformity occurs, such as from bunions. REFERENCE: Firestein, Gary S., et al. Kelley's Textbook of Rheumatology, Ninth Ed. China: Elsevier Saunders, 2012. Continue reading >>

Diabetic Neuropathy

Diabetic Neuropathy

Diabetic neuropathy can cause the following symptoms: Numbness (loss of feeling) or painful tingling and burning in parts of the body, especially your feet, legs, and toes. Muscle weakness and difficulty walking. Your feet heal slowly when you get cuts, sores, or blisters on them. Also, they don’t hurt as much as you would expect. Diabetes causes the level of sugar in your blood to be higher than normal. Over time, high blood sugar levels damage your blood vessels and nerves. That’s why people who don’t (or can’t) control their blood sugar very well seem more likely to get diabetic neuropathy. Men are more likely to have diabetic neuropathy than women. High cholesterol levels and smoking also increase your risk. The most important thing is to keep your blood sugar under control. Take your medicines and/or insulin exactly as your doctor prescribes. Eat a healthy diet. If you are overweight, ask your doctor to help you lose weight. Get plenty of exercise. What can I do to prevent foot problems from diabetic neuropathy? Keep your blood sugar level as close to normal as possible. Also, follow your doctor’s advice on diet and exercise. Take your insulin or medicine exactly as prescribed. Here are some other ways to protect your feet: Wash your feet every day with lukewarm (not hot) water and mild soap. Dry your feet well, especially between the toes. Use a soft towel and pat gently; don’t rub. Keep the skin of your feet smooth by applying a small amount of cream or lotion, especially on the heels. If the skin is cracked, talk to your doctor about how to treat it. Check your feet every day. You may need a mirror to look at the bottoms of your feet. Call your doctor if you have redness, swelling, pain that doesn’t go away, numbness, or tingling in any part of you Continue reading >>

What Are The Treatments For Numb Feet In Diabetes?

What Are The Treatments For Numb Feet In Diabetes?

Numbness of the feet may be a symptom of diabetic neuropathy, or nerve damage. Diabetes damages the nerve endings, which leads to neuropathy. One type of diabetic neuropathy is peripheral neuropathy, which affects such body parts as the feet, legs and hands. Neuropathy is not curable, but proper treatment can help prevent the condition from becoming worse, according to a statement paper by the American Diabetic Association in the April 2005 issue of “Diabetes Care." Video of the Day Feet require special care among individuals with diabetes. Not only does diabetes damage nerve endings, the condition hinders the body’s ability to fight infections. Having numbness or reduced sensation in the feet may inhibit one’s awareness of feeling blisters or sores on the feet, which may easily lead to medical complications, such as foot ulcers, serious infections or amputations, according to a 2003 issue of “Lancet." To help prevent medical complications among individuals with numb feet, the American Diabetic Association advises checking feet daily for sores, blisters and cuts. Primary care providers and podiatrists can also check the feet during examinations. Also recommended is checking shoes for rough edges and small objects before putting them on. If foot sores are found, the American Diabetic Association advises seeking medical attention from a podiatrist or primary care provider. Diabetic neuropathy may get better with improved management of blood glucose levels, or blood sugar levels, according to the “Diabetes Care” article. Taking insulin or diabetes medication can help keep blood glucose levels within target range as established by a health care provider. Types of insulin include regular insulin, long-acting insulin and rapid-acting insulin. A health care provide Continue reading >>

Diabetic Neuropathy

Diabetic Neuropathy

Loss of sensation in your feet may be caused by several different factors. However, if you are diabetic, numb or tingling feet may be an indication of nerve damage caused by diabetic neuropathy. Diabetic neuropathy is a complication of diabetes in which high blood sugar (glucose) levels damage the nerves. Nerve damage may be temporary or permanent and can involve a range of symptoms including foot pain, numbness, muscle weakness, and muscle cramps. Other nerves throughout the body such as those that control bodily functions may also be affected. Diabetic neuropathy typically occurs 10 to 20 years after you are diagnosed with diabetes. If you are a diabetic and do not have your blood sugar levels well-controlled, you have an increased risk for diabetic neuropathy. Causes of diabetic neuropathy Nerve damage associated with diabetic neuropathy is caused by high glucose levels. However, other factors that contribute to the disorder include abnormal blood fat levels, low insulin levels and a genetic predisposition to nerve disease. The risk of diabetic neuropathy increases the longer you have diabetes. However, diabetics who have not kept their blood sugar level under control and those who smoke or consume alcohol are more likely to suffer nerve damage. Diabetic neuropathy symptoms Symptoms of diabetic neuropathy affecting the feet include: Loss of sensation Tingling Burning Pain Numbness Muscle weakness Muscle cramps The disorder may also affect the nerves that control bodily functions and cause other symptoms including: Constipation Diarrhea Vomiting Incontinence Difficulty urinating Dizziness Treatment of diabetic neuropathy While there is no cure for diabetic neuropathy, the condition can be managed. Treating diabetic neuropathy begins by controlling blood sugar levels. Continue reading >>

Diabetic Neuropathy: Preventing And Reversing The Damage

Diabetic Neuropathy: Preventing And Reversing The Damage

Imagine living with the haunting possibility that one day, you may lose all feeling in your feet and that this lost sensation could ultimately lead to ulceration, infection, and even amputation of your unsalvageable limbs. This grim but very real condition is called diabetic peripheral neuropathy (DPN), and according to the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Disease 60-70 percent of diabetics suffer some kind of nerve damage. That means as the number of type 2 diabetics continues to spiral out of control, we are facing a growing population suffering from pedal disasters like these. What’s tragic is that with all we now know about diabetes, many of these conditions are preventable and largely reversible when they do occur. To help you prevent DPN or reverse the damage if you are already suffering, in today’s blog I will review some of the issues that lead to the onset of the condition and outline some simple dietary measures and supplements you can take to properly support your feet and reverse the damage. Sadly, these conditions typically begin with one major medical assumption: Diabetes can be controlled by medicine alone. Controlling Diabetes with Medication: Can it Be Done? In my opinion, one of the biggest misconceptions in modern medicine is the assumption that diabetes can be controlled by medication alone. The truth is that it simply can’t be. Somehow our culture has developed this fantasy that people can eat anything they want, do no exercise, and any health complications will be resolved with a few pills or injections. Nothing could be further from the truth. On the surface it may appear that diabetes can be successfully treated with pharmaceuticals. Fasting blood sugar and hemoglobin A1C levels both seem to improve. And while these a Continue reading >>

Diabetic Peripheral Neuropathy

Diabetic Peripheral Neuropathy

Diabetic neuropathy, or nerve damage caused by diabetes, is one of the most common known causes of neuropathy. It is one of many complications associated with diabetes, with nearly 60 percent of diabetics having some form of nerve damage. It is a progressive disease that can involve loss of sensation, as well as pain and weakness, in the feet and sometimes in the hands. Peripheral neuropathy may be more prevalent in people who have difficulty managing their blood sugar levels, have high blood pressure, are overweight, and are over 40 years old. A clinical examination may identify early signs of neuropathy in diabetics without symptoms. Today, doctors are exploring a link between pre-diabetes (also known as impaired glucose tolerance or IGT) and peripheral neuropathy. Approximately 10% of adults in America have what is being called “pre-diabetes” or “borderline diabetes”—a condition where the body has higher than normal blood sugar levels, but not high enough to be diagnosed as true diabetes. If left untreated, people with pre-diabetes are at risk of developing type 2 diabetes, heart disease, and nerve damage (which could result in peripheral neuropathy.) People with pre-diabetes or IGT can significantly reduce their risk of developing type 2 diabetes through diet, exercise and learning to control their blood sugar levels. Pre Diabetes Symptoms & Signs (Not all symptoms and signs may be present.) People with IGT often have no symptoms. People who actually have diabetes—and who therefore are at greater risk of developing peripheral neuropathy—often don’t realize it because the symptoms of diabetes come on so gradually. Pre Diabetic symptoms and its complications include: Frequent urination Blurred vision Constant thirst Fatigue Frequent infections Cuts and Continue reading >>

Why Do My Toes Go Numb When I Exercise?

Why Do My Toes Go Numb When I Exercise?

Numbness in the toes and feet is a relatively common problem for athletes and those who exercise casually. There are several different possible causes of toe numbness during exercise, and different correlating solutions and treatments. Although numbness in the toes or foot can be caused by footwear or by the act of exercise itself, it can also signal an underlying medical problems Consult your doctor if you are concerned about continuing foot or toe numbness. Numbness and Diabetes Numbness in the toes and feet is a common symptom associated with diabetes. If you have diabetes, the condition may cause some damage to your body's nerves in a condition known as diabetic neuropathy. The symptoms of such diabetic neuropathy may be alleviated by quitting smoking, controlling your blood sugar and undergoing regular foot examinations by a health care provider. MedlinePlus recommends patients with diabetes have at least two foot examinations every year. Fluid Buildup Compartment syndrome is caused by fluid buildup -- or swelling -- in one or more of your body's muscle "compartments." Although compartment syndrome is most commonly seen in either the forearm or the lower leg, it is possible to develop the syndrome in your foot -- this is one possible cause of toe numbness while running or working out. You may develop compartment syndrome as a result of a physical trauma or from a repetitive stress injury. Morton's Neuroma Numbness focused around the area between your third and fourth toes, spreading to the ball of your foot, is a characteristic symptom of a condition known as Morton's neuroma. This condition is caused by a thickening of the tissue surrounding one of the nerves connected to your toes. If you have Morton's neuroma, you are likely to feel stinging, burning or numbness Continue reading >>

Diabetic Neuropathy

Diabetic Neuropathy

COULD I HAVE DIABETIC NEUROPATHY? If you have diabetes and feel numbness or tingling in your feet, that could mean you suffer from what’s called diabetic neuropathy. Keep reading to learn more about the causes and symptoms of diabetic neuropathy from the experts at FootSmart. WHAT IS DIABETIC NEUROPATHY? While many people know that diabetes affects blood sugar levels, it may also cause nerve damage in a pattern that first affects the hands and feet. That damage to the nervous system is called diabetic neuropathy, and it can have direct consequences on your feet. Symptoms of diabetic neuropathy may not appear until many years after your diabetes is diagnosed. High blood sugar levels—also called hyperglycemia—can injure the walls of the blood vessels that nourish your nerves and result in nerve damage. That’s why controlling your blood sugar levels with the right medication, diet, and exercise is essential in helping prevent diabetic neuropathy. That nerve damage may result in painful tingling or burning sensations in your feet and legs. But even worse is when you experience decreased protective sensation in your feet—a condition called "peripheral neuropathy" where you become unaware of pressure, pain, heat, and cold. For example, if you develop calluses, fissures, and wounds in your feet without noticing them, your risk of foot and leg infections increases. In addition, motor nerves—the nerves that control your muscles—can be affected as diabetic neuropathy progresses. Combined with the decreased protective sensation, repetitive microtrauma (a series of small, unnoticed injuries) may result in joint damage to your feet and worsen over time. In severe cases, this condition may even lead to foot deformity, which doctors call Charcot neuroarthropathy. Think y Continue reading >>

Tips For Treating Diabetic Nerve Pain

Tips For Treating Diabetic Nerve Pain

Diabetes can cause long-term problems throughout your body, especially if you don’t control your blood sugar effectively, and sugar levels remain high for many years. High blood sugar can cause diabetic neuropathy, which damages the nerves that send signals from your hands and feet. Diabetic neuropathy can cause numbness or tingling in your fingers, toes, hands, and feet. Another symptom is a burning, sharp, or aching pain (diabetic nerve pain). The pain may be mild at first, but it can get worse over time and spread up your legs or arms. Walking can be painful, and even the softest touch can feel unbearable. Up to 50 percent of people with diabetes may experience nerve pain. Nerve damage can affect your ability to sleep, decrease your quality of life, and can also cause depression. Damaged nerves can’t be replaced. However, there are ways that you can prevent further damage and relieve your pain. First, control your blood sugar so the damage doesn’t progress. Talk to your doctor about setting your blood sugar goal, and learn to monitor it. You may be asked to lower your blood sugar before meals to 70 to 130 milligrams per deciliter (mg/dL) and your blood sugar after meals to less than 180 mg/dL. Use diets, exercise, and medications to decrease your blood sugar to a healthier range. Monitor other health risks that can worsen your diabetes, such as your weight and smoking. Ask your doctor about effective ways to lose weight or quit smoking, if necessary. Your doctor might suggest trying an over-the-counter pain reliever, such as acetaminophen (Tylenol), aspirin (Bufferin), or ibuprofen (Motrin IB, Advil), which are available without a prescription but can cause side effects. Use a low dose for a short time to control your symptoms. Other options exist for stronger Continue reading >>

Northwest Foot & Ankle | Natural Care For Active Feet

Northwest Foot & Ankle | Natural Care For Active Feet

Diabetes is a chronic, or lifelong, condition in which your body is unable to maintain a proper blood sugar level. Foot problems are among the most common health concerns diabetics face. Several types of diabetes exist, yet they all may cause similar changes in your feet. Prolonged elevated blood sugar levels may lead to a serious health complication known as neuropathy—a condition involving nerve damage or dysfunction. The nerves in your feet perform many important functions, and they may be particularly susceptible to diabetes-related damage. Diabetic neuropathy can cause significant foot health problems and often affects the following foot functions: Position sense (proprioception): Proprioception is your ability to determine where your body parts are in space. Proprioception is dependent on you having intact position sensors. Elevated blood sugar levels can damage your position sensors, making it difficult for you to know where your feet are in relation to the ground or within your shoe. You may damage your feet or other body parts because you’re unable to properly adapt to varying terrain. Sensation: Most diabetics experience “pins and needles” sensations or burning in their feet and legs about one year before numbness sets in. The numbness usually begins at the ends of your toes and progresses up into your feet. Because of this numbness, you may be unable to feel if your shoe is rubbing a blister on your feet or if an object has fallen into your shoe and is causing foot damage. Diabetics who suffer foot nerve damage may also be unable to appreciate how hot his or her bath water is or how hot the sand at the beach is. Going barefoot is strongly discouraged for this reason. Sebum production: Your sebaceous glands produce an oily substance called sebum that Continue reading >>

9 Early Signs Of Diabetes You Must Know (#2 Is So Often Overlooked)

9 Early Signs Of Diabetes You Must Know (#2 Is So Often Overlooked)

Diabetes is sneaky. The early symptoms can go unnoticed for months or years. In fact, 1 in 3 people with type 2 diabetes don’t know they have it. 1 in 3. Most actually do experience the early signs but don’t realise or understand what they are. Early detection and treatment can have a profound impact on your long-term health. A 3-year delay in diagnosis increases your relative risk of heart disease by 29% (1). Therefore by knowing what to look for, you can take control of the situation before it takes control of you. Diabetes Symptoms In Adults and Children Diabetes is the term given to blood sugar (glucose) levels that are too high for a sustained period of time. The signs or symptoms of high blood sugar are typically the same for both children and adults. Patients with type 1 diabetes usually develop symptoms over a sudden, short period of time. The condition is often diagnosed in an emergency setting. Type 2 diabetes on the other hand progresses quite slowly. Symptoms tend to come on gradually, which is why they are often overlooked. Some don’t experience any early symptoms at all. The following early signs of diabetes are the most common: 1. Increased urination is arguably the most common A significant increase in how often you urinate (Polyuria) is a tell-tale symptom of high blood sugar. As a point of reference, the average person pees 4 to 7 times in a 24-hour period. Waking up during the night to go, even though you already went right before bed, is a common red flag. Why does this happen?: Your kidneys are working overtime to expel the excess sugar in your blood. Sugar that the kidneys are unable to absorb must be urinated out. Therefore high sugar levels leads to more urination. 2. Excessive thirst is one of the classic early signs of diabetes Drinking u Continue reading >>

Diabetic Neuropathy Overview

Diabetic Neuropathy Overview

Diabetic neuropathy, which you may hear called diabetic nerve pain, is diabetes-related nerve damage. It develops over time; the longer you have diabetes, the more at risk you are for diabetic neuropathy. In fact, the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases reports that 60% to 70% of people with either type 1 diabetes or type 2 diabetes will develop a type of diabetic nerve pain.1 There are 4 types of diabetic neuropathy: diabetic peripheral neuropathy (the most common type), proximal neuropathy, autonomic neuropathy, and focal neuropathy. Peripheral neuropathy is the most likely to cause pain, but proximal neuropathy can also cause pain. Diabetic Neuropathy Causes Even though the exact cause of diabetic neuropathies isn't fully understood, researchers in the medical community do know that poor blood glucose control (blood sugar) is related to the development of nerve damage. What they don't understand is how long-term exposure to high blood glucose levels leads to nerve damage. There is an idea that elevated blood glucose levels damage the blood vessels over time. Damaged blood vessels can't bring oxygen and nutrients to the nerves as well as they should be able to, eventually leading to nerve damage. Most likely, diabetic neuropathy develops because of a mix of factors: • Lifestyle: Smoking and excessive alcohol use can contribute to diabetic neuropathy. • Age: The longer you have diabetes, the more likely it is that you will develop diabetic neuropathy. • Nerve Injury: Your nerves can be injured because of other conditions, such as carpal tunnel syndrome, or they may be injured because of inflammation. Injured nerves may be more likely to develop diabetic neuropathy. • Autoimmune Factors: In autoimmune diseases, and type 1 diabetes is Continue reading >>

Cold Toes, Numb Feet, Poor Circulation

Cold Toes, Numb Feet, Poor Circulation

Shivering on a chilly day is often an inescapable part of life and usually nothing serious. There are times though, when feeling cold can't be cured by an extra sweater, a hot drink, or cranking up the thermostat. Feeling cold can be a sign of ill health or an underlying medical condition. Here are some of the reasons. Diabetes Diabetes can lead to hands and feet feeling numb and tingly. It is caused by nerve damage, or neuropathy. It is not entirely clear how diabetes causes nerve damage, but high blood glucose levels are known to interfere with the nerves' ability to transmit signals. The result is you may be less able to feel cold or pain and this loss of sensation could lead to skin damage. A check for this kind of neuropathy should be carried out at your annual diabetes review. This should include looking for damage to the skin and a test that you can sense gentle touch and vibration. Your blood flow should also be checked. Raynaud's disease Raynaud's disease is a common condition that affects blood supply to parts of the body, particularly the fingers and toes. It is named after a 19th century French doctor, Maurice Raynaud, who first recognised the condition. Raynaud's is usually triggered by cold weather, anxiety or stress. Blood vessels go into a temporary spasm, which blocks the flow of blood. Affected areas turn white, then blue and finally change to red as the blood flow returns. Symptoms include pain, numbness and pins and needles. The symptoms can be controlled by techniques such as avoiding cold temperatures and wearing gloves. There is only one medication licensed for treating Raynaud's - nifedipine. Other drugs may be used "off-licence" to treat Raynaud’s. Hypothyroidism The thyroid gland lies in the front of your neck in a position just below your Ad Continue reading >>

What Is Diabetic Nerve Pain?

What Is Diabetic Nerve Pain?

If you have diabetes and shooting, burning, pins and needles pain in your feet or hands, you could have painful diabetic peripheral neuropathy—also known as diabetic nerve pain. It is a common complication of diabetes. The most common cause is poorly controlled blood sugar over time. Diabetic nerve pain can take years to develop. In the early stages, you may have no signs at all, and then only start to feel a tingling or numbness in your feet. As it progresses, you may also feel the pain in your hands and it is often worse at night. This means that your nerves may be damaged for a long time before you experience painful symptoms. Nerve damage can’t be reversed, but controlling your blood sugar can help prevent further damage. Talk to your doctor if you experience any symptoms of diabetic nerve pain. Symptoms of diabetic nerve pain These are some of the most common symptoms of diabetic nerve pain: Shooting Burning Pins and needles Numbness Electric shock-like Throbbing Tingling Stinging Stabbing Radiating Sensitivity to touch How is diabetic nerve pain different from other pain? There are two types of pain—muscle pain or nerve pain. Both types of pain are your body’s way of telling you that something is wrong but each has its own cause, symptoms, and management. Muscle pain is a "protective" form of pain. It is caused by something specific like an injury or inflammation. The nerves in the injured muscle or joint send electric signals to the brain as a warning that damage has occurred and the activity you’re doing is causing harm. If you limit or stop the harmful activity, muscle pain can get better over time. Nerve pain is a "non-protective" form of pain. It occurs when your nerves are damaged by an injury or disease, such as diabetes. Your nerves send extra el Continue reading >>

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