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Novorapid In Pregnancy

Insulin Aspart Use During Pregnancy | Drugs.com

Insulin Aspart Use During Pregnancy | Drugs.com

Pregnancies complicated by hyperglycemia pose an increased risk of birth defects, pregnancy loss, or other adverse events. The estimated background risk of major birth defects in women with pre-gestational diabetes and a HbA1c less than 7% is 6% to 10% compared with 20% to 25% in women with a HbA1c greater than 10%. Compared to human insulin, insulin aspart has not been shown to have different adverse effects or effect the health of the fetus differently. Patients with diabetes or a history of gestational diabetes should maintain good metabolic control before conception and during pregnancy. During pregnancy, insulin requirements may decrease during the first trimester; increase during the second and third trimesters, and rapidly decline after delivery. AU TGA pregnancy category A: Drugs which have been taken by a large number of pregnant women and women of childbearing age without any proven increase in the frequency of malformations or other direct or indirect harmful effects on the fetus having been observed.US FDA pregnancy category B: Animal reproduction studies have failed to demonstrate a risk to the fetus and there are no adequate and well-controlled studies in pregnant women. Use is considered acceptableAU TGA pregnancy category: AUS FDA pregnancy category: BComment: For women who are pregnant, and for women who are contemplating pregnancy, intensified blood glucose control and close monitoring of blood glucose is essential. Exogenous insulins, including the newer biosynthetic insulins (i.e. aspart, detemir, glargine, glulisine, lispro) appear to be excreted into breast milk. Insulin is a protein that is inactivated if taken by mouth. If absorbed, it would be destroyed in the digestive tract of the infant. Lactation onset occurs later in women with type 1 diab Continue reading >>

Novorapid Full Prescribing Information, Dosage & Side Effects | Mims.com Indonesia

Novorapid Full Prescribing Information, Dosage & Side Effects | Mims.com Indonesia

NovoRapid is a rapid-acting insulin analogue. NovoRapid dosage is individual and determined on the basic of the physician's advice in accordance with the needs of the patient. It should normally be used in combination with intermediate-acting or long-acting insulin given at least once a day. Blood glucose monitoring and insulin dose adjustment are recommended to achieve optimal glycaemic control. The individual insulin requirement in adults and children is usually between 0.5 and 1.0 U/kg/day. In a basal-bolus treatment regimen, 50-70% of this requirement may be provided by NovoRapid and the remainder by intermediate-acting or long-acting insulin. Adjustment of dosage may be necessary if patients undertake increased physical activity, change their usual diet or during concomitant illness. NovoRapid has a faster onset and a shorter duration of action than soluble human insulin. Due to the faster onset of action, NovoRapid should generally be given immediately before a meal. When necessary NovoRapid can be given soon after a meal. Due to the shorter duration, NovoRapid has a lower risk of causing nocturnal hypoglycaemic episodes. No studies have been performed in children under the age of 2 years. Special populations: As with all insulin products, in elderly patients with renal or hepatic impairment, glucose monitoring should be intensified and the insulin aspart dosage adjusted on an individual basis. Paediatric population: NovoRapid can be used in children in preference to soluble human insulin when a rapid onset of action might be beneficial. For example, in the timing of the injections in relation to meals. Transfer from other insulin products: When transferring from other insulin products, adjustment of the NovoRapid dose and the dose of the basal insulin may be nec Continue reading >>

Novorapid

Novorapid

How does this medication work? What will it do for me? Insulin is a naturally occurring hormone made by the pancreas that helps our body use or store the glucose (sugar) it gets from food. For people with diabetes, either the pancreas does not make enough insulin to meet the body's requirements, or the body cannot properly use the insulin that is made. As a result, glucose cannot be used or stored properly and accumulates in the bloodstream. Insulin injected under the skin helps to lower blood glucose levels. There are many different types of insulin and they are absorbed at different rates and work for varying periods of time. Insulin aspart is a rapid-acting insulin. It takes 10 to 20 minutes to begin working after the injection, has its maximum effect between 1 hour and 3 hours, and stops working after 3 to 5 hours. Insulin aspart should be used along with an intermediate or long-acting insulin. This medication may be available under multiple brand names and/or in several different forms. Any specific brand name of this medication may not be available in all of the forms or approved for all of the conditions discussed here. As well, some forms of this medication may not be used for all of the conditions discussed here. Your doctor may have suggested this medication for conditions other than those listed in these drug information articles. If you have not discussed this with your doctor or are not sure why you are being given this medication, speak to your doctor. Do not stop using this medication without consulting your doctor. Do not give this medication to anyone else, even if they have the same symptoms as you do. It can be harmful for people to use this medication if their doctor has not prescribed it. What form(s) does this medication come in? NovoRapid® 3 mL P Continue reading >>

Novorapid In Pregnancy - Safety And Efficacy Versus Human Insulin.

Novorapid In Pregnancy - Safety And Efficacy Versus Human Insulin.

NovoRapid in pregnancy - safety and efficacy versus human insulin. From 31st May you may not able to access Springer Nature websites. This could be because you are using an older browser or an unsupported proxy. Please update your browser or speak to your IT department. NovoRapid in pregnancy - safety and efficacy versus human insulin. Indications Pregnancy; Pregnancy complications; Preterm birth; Type 1 diabetes mellitus Focus Adverse reactions; Pharmacodynamics; Therapeutic Use 01 Mar 2010 Exploratory analysis comparing patients randomised pre-conception and patient randomised in early pregnancy published in Diabetes Care. 12 May 2009 Actual end date (Apr 2005) added as reported by ClinicalTrials.gov. 01 Mar 2009 Cost-effectiveness analysis published in Current Medical Research and Opinion. Oops, it looks like you dont have a valid subscription to this content. To gain full access to the content and functionality of the AdisInsight database try one of the following. Login with a username/password associated to an account with a valid subscription Contact your organizations admin about adding this content to your AdisInsight subscription Continue reading >>

Pregnancy - Iddt

Pregnancy - Iddt

From a study carried out in Finland and published in Diabetic Medicine 2002, Vol looking at pregnancy from 22 weeks to one year after birth. The rate of congenital abnormalities in babies born to women with diabetes has not changed in recent years. The perinatal mortality remains 3-5 times higher in women with diabetes than in non-diabetic women. The proportion of perinatal deaths caused by congenital abnormalities has reduced but the post-natal mortality has significantly increased. Diabetic mothers of malformed babies were significantly younger than mother of babies that were not malformed. Nearly two thirds of the malformed babies were boys. The study points out that the reduction in prenatal deaths and increase in post-natal deaths could be due to better care during pregnancy. But it is also worth noting that the mortality rate in the general population has also reduced markedly. In England in 1960 it was 32.5 per 1000 total births compared with 7.6 per 1000 births in 1992. Note: A perinatal death is usually defined as death of the foetus after 28 weeks of pregnancy and the first week of the babys life. For more information on losing weight, please visit the NHS Choices website: Continue reading >>

Insulin Aspart Safe During Pregnancy

Insulin Aspart Safe During Pregnancy

Use of the rapid-acting insulin analogue insulin aspart, as a component of basal-bolus therapy with NPH insulin, indicates that it is as safe and effective as regular human insulin in pregnant women with type 1 diabetes. Lead researcher Dr. Elisabeth Mathiesen stated that, "We now feel secure in letting women continue with modern fast-acting insulin analogues during their pregnancy.” In addition, these drugs "used during pregnancy might reduce the number of severe hypoglycemic events, fetal losses and preterm deliveries when compared to human insulin." Dr. Mathiesen of the University of Copenhagen and colleagues conducted an open-label study of 322 women with type 1 diabetes who were pregnant or were planning pregnancy. They were randomized to insulin aspart or human insulin as meal-time insulin. All had A1C of 8% or less at confirmation of pregnancy. Insulin doses were titrated toward predefined glucose targets and A1C below 6.5%. The AIC target was achieved by 80% of subjects in the second and third trimester. Human insulin and aspart were comparable in this regard. The risk of major hypoglycemia or major nocturnal hypoglycemia was considerably less with aspart (relative risk, 0.48). Nevertheless, the difference did not reach significance. At the end of first and third trimesters, average postprandial plasma glucose increments were significantly lower with insulin aspart than human insulin, as were mean plasma glucose levels 90 minutes after breakfast. Maternal safety profiles and pregnancy outcomes were similar between treatments. Summing up, Dr. Mathiesen pointed out that performing randomized studies in pregnant women presents an ethical dilemma, but "it might be more unethical not to try to obtain evidence for the best treatment modality during pregnancy." It is Continue reading >>

Novorapid Flexpen | Healthdirect

Novorapid Flexpen | Healthdirect

Novorapid Flexpen is a medicine containing the active ingredient(s) insulin aspart. On this page you will find out more about Novorapid Flexpen, including side effects, age restrictions, food interactions and whether the medicine is subsidised by the government on the pharmaceutical benefits scheme (PBS) You should seek medical advice in relation to medicines and use only as directed by a healthcare professional. Always read the label. If symptoms persist see your healthcare professional. healthdirect medicines information is not intended for use in an emergency. If you are suffering an acute illness, overdose, or emergency condition, call triple zero (000) and ask for an ambulance. Reasonable care has been taken to provide accurate information at the time of creation. This information is not intended to substitute medical advice, diagnosis or treatment and should not be exclusively relied on to manage or diagnose a medical condition. Please refer to our terms and conditions . Active ingredient in this medicine: insulin aspart If you are over 65 years of age, there may be specific risks and recommendations for use of this medicine. Please discuss your individual circumstances with your pharmacist, doctor or health professional. For more information read our page on medication safety for older people . Novorapid Flexpen 100 units/mL injection solution, 5 x 3 mL cartridges This leaflet may also be found inside the medicine package. It contains information on side effects, age restrictions and other useful data. Continue reading >>

Insulin For Gestational Diabetes - What It Is And How It Works

Insulin For Gestational Diabetes - What It Is And How It Works

Where blood sugar levels cannot be lowered and stabilised enough through dietary and lifestyle changes, or through using medication such as Metformin, some ladies will be required to use insulin for gestational diabetes. Insulin is a hormone in the body produced by the pancreas. Your body uses insulin to move the sugar (glucose) obtained from food and drink from the bloodstream into cells throughout the body. The cells are then able to use the sugar for energy. Here are the most commonly asked Q&A on insulin for gestational diabetes from our Facebook support group Why do I need to take insulin for gestational diabetes? If lower blood sugar levels cannot be reached through diet, exercise and medication such as Metformin, then many will be required insulin for gestational diabetes. If blood sugar levels remain high, then the diabetes is not controlled and can cause major complications with the pregnancy and baby. If your levels are rising out of target range, your own insulin production may need to be topped up at the meal time. You may need to take insulin at one or all of your meals. Sometimes the insulin you produce in-between your meals and overnight may also require a top up. This may mean that you require an extra slower-release insulin at bedtime and/or in the morning. Some consultants will prescribe insulin on diagnosis of gestational diabetes on the basis of your GTT results or following other complications relating to gestational diabetes. For the majority, you will be given some time to try diet and exercise changes and then medication such as Metformin before insulin is introduced as a way to help lower and control your levels. NICE guidelines for timing and use of insulin for gestational diabetes 1.2.19 Offer a trial of changes in diet and exercise to women w Continue reading >>

Novorapid (insulin Aspart)

Novorapid (insulin Aspart)

What is it used for? How does it work? NovoRapid vials, prefilled pens (FlexPen and Flextouch pens) and penfill cartridges (for use with NovoPens) all contain the active ingredient insulin aspart. They are used to treat diabetes. People with diabetes have a deficiency or absence of a hormone manufactured by the pancreas called insulin. Insulin is the main hormone responsible for the control of sugar (glucose) in the blood. People with type 1 diabetes need to have injections of insulin to control the amount of glucose in their bloodstream. Insulin injections act as a replacement for natural insulin and allow people with diabetes to achieve normal blood glucose levels. The insulin works in the same way as natural insulin, by binding to insulin receptors on cells in the body. Insulin causes cells in the liver, muscle and fat tissue to increase their uptake of glucose form the bloodstream. It also decreases the production of glucose by the liver, and has various other effects that lower the amount of glucose in the blood. NovoRapid injections contain a type of insulin called insulin aspart. This is known as a fast-acting insulin. When it is injected under the skin it starts to lower blood sugar within approximately 10 to 20 minutes, and its effects last for three to five hours. This type of insulin should be injected shortly before or if necessary shortly after a meal, to control increasing blood glucose levels after eating. Insulin aspart is usually given in combination with intermediate or longer-acting types of insulin, which provide control over blood glucose throughout the day. It is important to monitor your blood glucose regularly and adjust your insulin dose as required. Your doctor or diabetic team will explain how to do this. Keeping your blood glucose level as cl Continue reading >>

Which Insulins Cant Be Taken When Pregnant?

Which Insulins Cant Be Taken When Pregnant?

Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community Find support, ask questions and share your experiences. Join the community which insulins cant be taken when pregnant? hello, i'm currently planning a pregnancy with my partner. i have been told that some insulins arent safe to take whilst pregnant. i'm on levemir & novorapid. if my insulin has to be changed, will this happen when i'm trying for a baby or once i'm pregnant? i have an appointment in april with diabetic consultant so i'm going to make them aware of my plans. i just want to be prepared & roughly know what to expect Hope you can get specific help and advice from a pre-conception diabetes clinic. Many drugs, not just insulins, have not been tested / approved for use in pregnancy, but that doesn't necessarily mean than they can't be used during pregnancy. Unless things have changed since I was last pregnant (3 years ago) there are no insulins licensed for pregnancy because it would be unethical to test them on pregnant women!! However, we obviously have to carry on taking our insulin so not advised to change. I remember waiting till after one of my pregnancies to change onto a newer insulin analogue as they wouldn't switch me while I was pregnant (think that was the lantus). Good luck! None of them have been specifically tested on pregnant women, however there's absolutely no reason to think that any of them would have any mechanism of harming a foetus. The disruption of blood sugar while you're changing would do harm, so best to leave things as they are. Always discuss it with your nurse / doc though I have a gorgeously healthy 2 yr old girl, throught the entire pregnancy was on Lantus and Novorapid. thanks for the replies ladies. i was told by sum1 else on here that i would have to stop taking my novorapid becau Continue reading >>

Commencing Of Insulin Therapy During Pregnancy

Commencing Of Insulin Therapy During Pregnancy

You have commenced insulin therapy because diet therapy is not enough to keep your blood sugar levels stable. If your blood sugar is too high in the morning before breakfast, it will be treated by long-acting insulin Protaphane in the evening. But if blood sugar rises too high after meals, fast-acting insulin Novorapid will be used. You may possibly need both fast-acting bolus insulin and long-acting basal insulin. Usually insulin therapy is discontinued at delivery. During insulin therapy your blood sugar level may be too low (less than 4.0 mmol/l) in case you take too much insulin. If you follow the instructions given to you, too low blood sugar levels will not occour. The symptoms of low blood sugar level are headache, trembling and anxiety. In addition skin can be pale and sweaty. If you feel somehow unwell or any kind of strange or abnormal symptoms appear, check your blood sugar to see if it is too low or too high. If your blood sugar is too low, you should eat something containing sugar, for example rye bread and milk. How to use a prefilled insulin pen Prefilled insulin pen contains 300 iu of insulin. Iinsulin pen is disposed when empty. 1. How to prepare a prefilled insulin pen for use · Wash your hands. · Remove the cap of the pen. · Check that the insulin pen contains correct insulin. · If you use Protaphan-insulin which looks cloudy, roll the pen 10 times between your palms and flip/turn the pen up and down 10 times to mix it completely. Do not shake. · Meal/bolus insulin is clear and needs no mixing. 2. How to attach needle to pen · Remove the needle's cover paper. · Screw the needle with cap on tightly to the pen clockwise. · Always attach needle to pen before you select the dose. · Replace a new needle for each injection. 3. Dos Continue reading >>

Wondering About Lantus & Pregnancy. . .

Wondering About Lantus & Pregnancy. . .

Member T1 since June 1980, at 9 years old. On Lan & NovoR I am currently 8 1/2 weeks pregnant, and I've just been switched back to NPH from Lantus. I'm wondering if anyone here has continued using Lantus thru their pregnancy. One dr. tells me one thing... another dr. tells me something else! My usual D dr. tells me that Novo Rapid falls under the same category (analog) as Lantus, so if Lantus isn't safe for pregnancy, why are they letting me continue to use Novo Rapid....?!? If anyone could shed some light on this, as well, let me know about your experience with Lantus while pregnant, I'd appreciate it! Thanks!! Hiya Jenn. Well, there a number of women here that have used Lantus without any issues. Cheryl has used it and I believe she also used NPH. If it's any ease to your mind, I used humalog in my pump throughout my pregnancy. It's also a rapid insulin just different company. There were no problems from it. I'm not aware that it's proven for Lantus or Novorapid to be harmful. Yes with my first three pregnancies I was on NPH, and with my last pregnancy I was on Lantus..... let me tell you, my last son was the easiest smallest child and he was the only lantus child...i had, the others while I had no problems with my diabetes on NPH per say....I gained more weight and had 8 pounders..... With my last son I gained 22 pounds total and he was 6 pounds 6 ozs and is still as healthy as a horse.... So my conclusion is....I think Lantus is fine.....I was a bit concerned too at first, but no one switched me back to NPH.....at all....and I did like I said remarkable better weight physically and emotionally on Lantus with Jacob Friend T1 since 11/07, pumping since 4/08 TECHNICALLY, lantus isn't approved for pregnancy. Thats why my dr switched me over to a pump w/novolog. He did Continue reading >>

Insulin Aspart In Diabetic Pregnancy: State Of The Art.

Insulin Aspart In Diabetic Pregnancy: State Of The Art.

Insulin aspart in diabetic pregnancy: state of the art. State University Hospital of Copenhagen, Centre for pregnant women with diabetes, Department of Endocrinology, Rigshospitalet, Blegdamsvej, DK 2100 Copenhagen, Denmark. [email protected] Womens Health (Lond). 2008 Mar;4(2):119-24. doi: 10.2217/17455057.4.2.119. Pregnancy in women with diabetes is associated with an increased risk of obstetric complications and perinatal mortality. Maintenance of near-normal glycemia during pregnancy can bring the prevalence of fetal, neonatal and maternal complications closer to that of the nondiabetic population. Changes in insulin requirements during pregnancy necessitate short-acting insulins for postprandial control of hyperglycemia. The fast-acting insulin analogue insulin aspart has been tested in a large, randomized trial of pregnant women with Type 1 diabetes and offers benefits in control of postprandial hyperglycemia with a tendency towards fewer episodes of severe hypoglycemia compared with human insulin. Treatment with insulin aspart was associated with a tendency toward fewer fetal losses and preterm deliveries than treatment with human insulin. Insulin aspart could not be detected in the fetal circulation and no increase in insulin antibodies was found. Thus, the use of insulin aspart in pregnancy is regarded safe. Continue reading >>

Novorapid

Novorapid

How does this medication work? What will it do for me? Insulin is a naturally occurring hormone made by the pancreas that helps our body use or store the glucose (sugar) it gets from food. For people with diabetes, either the pancreas does not make enough insulin to meet the body's requirements, or the body cannot properly use the insulin that is made. As a result, glucose cannot be used or stored properly and accumulates in the bloodstream. Insulin injected under the skin helps to lower blood glucose levels. There are many different types of insulin and they are absorbed at different rates and work for varying periods of time. Insulin aspart is a rapid-acting insulin. It takes 10 to 20 minutes to begin working after the injection, has its maximum effect between 1 hour and 3 hours, and stops working after 3 to 5 hours. Insulin aspart should be used along with an intermediate or long-acting insulin. This medication may be available under multiple brand names and/or in several different forms. Any specific brand name of this medication may not be available in all of the forms or approved for all of the conditions discussed here. As well, some forms of this medication may not be used for all of the conditions discussed here. Your doctor may have suggested this medication for conditions other than those listed in these drug information articles. If you have not discussed this with your doctor or are not sure why you are being given this medication, speak to your doctor. Do not stop using this medication without consulting your doctor. Do not give this medication to anyone else, even if they have the same symptoms as you do. It can be harmful for people to use this medication if their doctor has not prescribed it. What form(s) does this medication come in? NovoRapid® 3 mL P Continue reading >>

Novorapid Flexpen 100 U/ml Solution For Injection In Pre-filledpen

Novorapid Flexpen 100 U/ml Solution For Injection In Pre-filledpen

NovoRapid FlexPen 100 U/ml solution for injection in pre-filledpen NovoRapid is a modern insulin (insulin analogue ) with a rapid-acting effect. Modern insulins are improved versions of human insulin. NovoRapid is used to treat diabetes mellitus in adults, children and adolescents aged 2 to 17 years. NovoRapid will start to lower your blood sugar 10-20 minutes after you take it, a maximum effect occurs between 1 and 3 hours and the effect lasts for 3-5 hours. Due to this short action NovoRapid should normally be taken in combination with intermediate-acting or long-acting insulin preparations. What do you have to consider before using it? If you are allergic hypersensitive to insulin aspart, or any of the other ingredients of NovoRapid see 6 Further information If you suspect hypoglycaemia low blood sugar is starting see 4 Possible side effects If FlexPen is dropped, damaged or crushed If it has not been stored correctly or if it has been frozen see 5 How to store NovoRapid If the insulin does not appear water clear and colourless. Check the label to make sure it is the right type of insulin Always use a new needle for each injection to prevent contamination. If you have trouble with your kidneys or liver, or with your adrenal, pituitary or thyroid glands If you are exercising more than usual or if you want to change your usual diet, as this may affect your blood sugar level If you are ill carry on taking your insulin and consult your doctor If you are going abroad travelling over time zones may affect your insulin needs and the timing of the injections. Consult your doctor if you are planning such travelling. NovoRapid can be used in children instead of soluble human insulin when a rapid onset of effect is preferred. For example, when it is difficult to dose the child Continue reading >>

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