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Novolog 70/30 Sliding Scale

What Is Novolog (insulin Aspart)?

What Is Novolog (insulin Aspart)?

Before you receive DARZALEX®, tell your healthcare provider about all of your medical conditions, including if you: have a history of breathing problems have had shingles (herpes zoster) are pregnant or plan to become pregnant. DARZALEX® may harm your unborn baby. Females who are able to become pregnant should use an effective method of birth control during treatment and for at least 3 months after your final dose of DARZALEX®. Talk to your healthcare provider about birth control methods that you can use during this time. are breastfeeding or plan to breastfeed. It is not known if DARZALEX® passes into your breast milk. Tell your healthcare provider about all the medicines you take, including prescription and over-the-counter medicines, vitamins, and herbal supplements. DARZALEX® may be given alone or together with other medicines used to treat multiple myeloma. Your healthcare provider will decide the time between doses as well as how many treatments you will receive. Your healthcare provider will give you medicines before each dose of DARZALEX® and on the first day after each dose of DARZALEX® to help reduce the risk of infusion reactions. If you miss any appointments, call your healthcare provider as soon as possible to reschedule your appointment. Infusion reactions. Infusion reactions are common with DARZALEX® and can be severe. Your healthcare provider may temporarily stop your infusion or completely stop treatment with DARZALEX® if you have infusion reactions. Tell your healthcare provider right away if you get any of the following symptoms: shortness of breath or trouble breathing dizziness or lightheadedness (hypotension) cough wheezing throat tightness runny or stuffy nose headache itching nausea vomiting chills fever Changes in blood tests. DARZALEX Continue reading >>

Insulin Dosing Made Simple

Insulin Dosing Made Simple

I have found, in my years of practicing correctional medicine, that few practitioners who come to corrections are comfortable with insulin dosing. In my experience, this is especially true for physician assistants and nurse practitioners, but many physicians have problems, too. Insulin dosing can be complicated and tricky at times, but for most patients, 10 simple rules will get you to where you need to be. We first need to cover some groundwork and some terms. Insulin terminology can be confusing. First, it is very important to remember that this discussion applies to type 1 diabetics only. Type 2 diabetics sometimes use insulin, but that’s a “whole ‘nother ballgame.” There are two types of insulin used for two very different purposes when treating type 1 diabetics. The first is basal insulin, which is used to replace the insulin that the normal pancreas releases constantly—whether we eat or not. Long-acting insulin is used to provide coverage for the basal metabolic needs of type 1 diabetics. Examples are insulin glargine (Lantus) and insulin detemir (Levemir). The most commonly used long-acting insulin is Lantus, so I am going to use that name in this article. (I have no financial ties to the maker of Lantus—I use that name because it is the name most commonly used by patients). The second type of insulin that type 1 diabetics need is short-acting insulin, which is given to cover the carbohydrates in the food they eat. Short-acting insulins are given just before a meal or snack and, ideally, the dose should vary depending on how many carbohydrates are in the food. Examples of short acting insulins are insulin regular, insulin aspart (Novolog) and insulin lispro (Humalog). Again, I will use the term Humalog in this article because it is the term most often Continue reading >>

Novolog Mix 70/30 Confusion

Novolog Mix 70/30 Confusion

When prescribing NovoLog® Mix 70/30 analog insulin, health care professionals may write an unclear prescription, or if using an EMR system, inadvertently select Novolin® 70/30 human insulin instead. Be on the lookout for these errors. Read on for a breakdown of the key differences between these 2 types of insulin. Before the new “insulin pens” came out, there were four types of insulin: rapid-acting, short-acting, intermediate-acting, and long-acting. When it comes to the pre-mixed insulins, like Novolog 70/30, there are fewer differences between the brands (for example, Novolog versus Novolin)…. Whether contained in a bottle or in a pen, the premixed insulins all contain a combination of both an intermediate-acting insulin and a short-acting insulin. The numbers on the bottle or pen refer to the percentage of each type of insulin contained in the mixture. That means both Novolin 70/30 and Novolog 70/30 contain a mixture that is 70% intermediate-acting insulin with 30% short-acting insulin. However, Novolin 70/30 takes slightly longer to begin working than Novolog 70/30, which has a rapid onset. Both Novolin 70/30 and Novolog 70/30 may last up to 24 hours in the system. Novolin® 70/30 is not available in a pen. Novolin is the brand name given to all human insulins made by Novo Nordisk. Under this brand are specific types of insulin such as regular, nph, and 70/30. Novolog insulin is a synthetic recombinant insulin that is very rapid acting. You may often get this question because novolog is more expensive than any of the novolins. However, they cannot be substituted for each other. Two euglycemic clamp studies assessed glucose utilization after dosing of healthy volunteers. NovoLog Mix 70/30 has an earlier onset of action than human premix 70/30 in studies of n Continue reading >>

New Insulin And Crashing

New Insulin And Crashing

This last week I had to switch Bender over to a new insulin. Vetsulin is no longer available and it is unknown how long it will be till it is. These last few months have been great. I got Bender regulated. Down to 22ml per shot, he was up to 37 at one point. Healthy eating on a home cooked diet. And in general a happy dog. That all ended this week. I started Bender out on the normal measurement. It is some thing like .75 units per kilogram. Bender is 45 lb = 20.4116 kg x .75 = 15 units. My vet recommended Novolin N and I could get the generic from Walmart called ReliOn N. Which I did. He got 15 units per shot the first day. That night he crash. Peanut Butter and carrots to the rescue. The next night the same thing. By the third day I changed his dose to 10 units. He started to get worse. He was crashing twice a day. Last night was scary. Woke at 1:30 to Bender milling around. He was crashing. I got him PB and carrots. After ten minutes he was ok. We went back to bed. 20 minutes later he is up milling around, worse than before. Falling over, bumping into every thing. He has never been this bad. I tested his level. 41. My meter doesn’t read below 40. It just says low. This time I give him some honey and 1/3 of his food for a meal. After 25 minutes I test his glucose level. It was 61. Not high enough. So I gave him the rest of his food and sat up with him for another 45 mins. At that point he was 109 and we went back to bed. At 9am I tested him after I fed him. 192. Excellent. He got 7 units. By 6. He was crashing again. No time to test. I gave him a spoon full of honey and then his meal. Afterwards I tested. He was at 90. No shot. Some thing is going on here. There has to be a huge difference between Vetsulin and Novolin – N. Upon some research, there is. I honestly n Continue reading >>

Novolog Mix 70-30

Novolog Mix 70-30

NovoLog® Mix 70/30 (70% insulin aspart protamine suspension and 30% insulin aspart) Injection, [rDNA origin]) Suspension for Subcutaneous Injection DESCRIPTION NovoLog Mix 70/30 (insulin aspart protamine and insulin aspart rdna origin) (70% insulin aspart protamine suspension and 30% insulin aspart injection, [rDNA origin]) is a human insulin analog suspension containing 70% insulin aspart protamine crystals and 30% soluble insulin aspart. NovoLog Mix 70/30 is a blood glucoselowering agent with an earlier onset and an intermediate duration of action. Insulin aspart is homologous with regular human insulin with the exception of a single substitution of the amino acid proline by aspartic acid in position B28, and is produced by recombinant DNA technology utilizing Saccharomyces cerevisiae (baker's part (NovoLog) has the empirical formula C256H381N65O79S6 and a molecular weight of 5825.8 Da. Figure 1: Structural formula of insulin aspart NovoLog Mix 70/30 (insulin aspart protamine and insulin aspart rdna origin) is a uniform, white, sterile suspension that contains insulin aspart 100 Units/mL. Inactive ingredients for the 10 mL vial are mannitol 36.4 mg/mL, phenol 1.50 mg/mL, metacresol 1.72 mg/mL, zinc 19.6 μg/mL, disodium hydrogen phosphate dihydrate 1.25 mg/mL, sodium chloride 0.58 mg/mL, and protamine sulfate 0.32 mg/mL. Inactive ingredients for the NovoLog Mix 70/30 (insulin aspart protamine and insulin aspart rdna origin) FlexPen are glycerol 16.0 mg/mL, phenol 1.50 mg/mL, metacresol 1.72 mg/mL, zinc 19.6 μg/mL, disodium hydrogen phosphate dihydrate 1.25 mg/mL, sodium chloride 0.877 mg/mL, and protamine sulfate 0.32 mg/mL. NovoLog Mix 70/30 (insulin aspart protamine and insulin aspart rdna origin) has a pH of 7.20 - 7.44. Hydrochloric acid or sodium hydroxide may Continue reading >>

Making Insulin Work

Making Insulin Work

As you all probably experience in your own lives, it often seems like things come in waves. And this past week the wave I have been experiencing has been full of worried emails from people who report that they or a loved one have recently started insulin but that it isn't working. In every case, the insulin is a slow acting insulin, Lantus or Levemir, and there's a good reason why the insulin isn't working. It is because the dose being used is far too low to have an impact on an insulin resistant Type 2. When doctors intially start a person with Type 2 diabetes on a slow acting insulin they start out with a very low dose, usually 10 units. This is prudent. One in ten "Type 2s" is not really a Type 2. Most of these misdiagnosed "type 2s" turn out to be people in the early stages of LADA, Latent Autoimmune Diabetes of Adults, which is a a slow onset form of autoimmune diabetes. People with LADA usually have normal or near normal insulin sensitivity and for them an injection of ten units is a LOT of insulin. One or two percent of people diagnosed as Type 2 turn out to be people like me who have other oddball genetic forms of diabetes that also make them very sensitive to insulin. So starting everyone out at a low dose of insulin makes sense since this way the misdiagnosed people who turn out to have normal insulin sensitivity will avoid hypos caused by too much insulin. But once it is clear that a person really is a Type 2--since they see no response at all to a dose of 10 units of insulin, the doctor is supposed to raise the dose until it gets to the level where it will drop the fasting blood sugars. But many doctors do not explain this to their patients and quite a few raise the dose so slowly that it does seem to the poor patient that insulin won't solve their problems. Continue reading >>

Medication Error: Order Comes Up Short

Medication Error: Order Comes Up Short

March 2009, Volume :39 Number 3 , page 12 - 12 [Free] Join NursingCenter to get uninterrupted access to this Article Computerized prescriber order entry and electronic medication administration records (MARs) can simplify healthcare and make it safer. But sometimes technology itself can create sources of errors that aren't discovered until a problem arises. A hospital that prints computer-generated MARs for distribution to patient-care units discovered this the hard way. NovoLog Mix 70/30 (insulin aspart protamine, insulin aspart), 10 units by subcutaneous injection before breakfast, was prescribed for a patient with diabetes. The hospital used insulin pens to improve the safety and efficacy of insulin delivery, so the order was entered into the pharmacy computer as "insulin aspart prot:insulin aspart (NovoLog FlexPen 70/30) 10 unit SUBCUT ACBRKF." Because the computerized MAR allowed a limited number of characters per field, this order was truncated and appeared as "NovoLog FlexPen 70." The patient also was receiving regular insulin via a NovoLog FlexPen for sliding scale coverage, so the nurse administered 70 units. The patient became hypoglycemic and needed 50% dextrose and close monitoring, but didn't suffer any lasting harm. The error wasn't noticed until 2 days later, when another nurse misinterpreted the drug name on a different patient's MAR and a more experienced nurse questioned the high dosage. The hospital has since changed its MAR profile for the NovoLog Mix 70/30 FlexPen and is working with the computer system vendor to prevent data truncation on MARs and pharmacy labels. Providing the full brand name (including the word "mix") can help distinguish NovoLog Mix 70/30 from NovoLog. If you have computerized MARs, check with your pharmacy to learn if this is Continue reading >>

Starting With Novolog® Mix 70/30

Starting With Novolog® Mix 70/30

Do not share your NovoLog® Mix 70/30 FlexPen® with other people, even if the needle has been changed. You may give other people a serious infection, or get a serious infection from them. Who should not take NovoLog® Mix 70/30? Do not take NovoLog® Mix 70/30 if: your blood sugar is too low (hypoglycemia) or you are allergic to any of its ingredients. Before taking NovoLog® Mix 70/30, tell your healthcare provider about all your medical conditions including, if you are: pregnant, planning to become pregnant, or are breastfeeding. taking new prescription or over-the-counter medicines, including supplements. Talk to your health care provider about how to manage low blood sugar. How should I take NovoLog® Mix 70/30? Read the Instructions for Use and take exactly as directed. NovoLog® Mix 70/30 starts acting fast. If you have type 1 diabetes, inject within 15 minutes before you eat a meal. If you have type 2 diabetes, inject within 15 minutes before or after starting your meal. Do not mix NovoLog® Mix 70/30 with other insulin products or use in an insulin pump. Know the type and strength of your insulin. Do not change your insulin type unless your health care provider tells you to. Check your blood sugar levels. Ask your health care provider what your blood sugar levels should be and when you should check them. Do not reuse or share your needles or syringes with other people. You may give other people a serious infection, or get a serious infection from them. What should I avoid while taking NovoLog® Mix 70/30? Do not drive or operate heavy machinery, until you know how NovoLog® Mix 70/30 affects you. Do not drink alcohol or use medicines that contain alcohol. What are the possible side effects of NovoLog® Mix 70/30? Serious side effects can lead to death, includin Continue reading >>

Insulin Chart

Insulin Chart

Onset of action - time period after injection that insulin will begin to work Duration of action - length of time after injection that insulin will have a measurable effect Peak effect - time after injection when insulin will have its greatest activity (effect) NOTE: Pharmacokinetic parameters are affected by age, kidney function, liver function, concomitant medications, medical conditions, and other variables. Because of this, parameters may vary widely among patients. In the U.S., most insulins cost > $150 a vial/pens with one exception; Walmart sells Novolin R, Novolin N, and Novolin 70/30 for $25 a vial * For use in HumaPen Luxura HD and HumaPen Memoir See Inhaled insulin for a complete review of Afrezza Afrezza comes in a sealed foil package with 2 blister cards inside Each blister card has 5 rows of 3 cartridges Before use, cartridge and inhaler should be at room temperature for 10 minutes Inhaler should be thrown away after 15 days Sealed foil package is good until expiration date Sealed blister cards + strips - use within 10 days SoloStar is compatible with all BD pen needles Apidra is a premeal (also called prandial) insulin Inject Apidra within 15 minutes before a meal or within 20 minutes after starting a meal Apidra is compatible with some insulin pumps UNPUNCTURED, REFRIGERATED (Vials and Pens) Inject Fiasp at the start of a meal or within 20 minutes after starting a meal KwikPen is compatible with all BD pen needles Inject Humalog within 15 minutes before a meal or immediately after a meal Humalog is compatible with some insulin pumps HumaPen Luxura HD is a reusable pen that allows dosing in 0.5 unit increments HumaPen Memoir records the time, date, and dose of the last 16 injections UNPUNCTURED, REFRIGERATED (Vials, Pens, Cartridges) UNPUNCTURED, ROOM TE Continue reading >>

Novolog Mix 70/30

Novolog Mix 70/30

Generic Name: insulin aspart Dosage Form: injection, suspension Indications and Usage for Novolog Mix 70/30 Novolog Mix 70/30 is a mixture of insulin aspart protamine and insulin aspart indicated to improve glycemic control in patients with diabetes mellitus. Limitations of Use: Novolog Mix 70/30 Dosage and Administration Important Administration Information Dosage Information Dosage Adjustment Due to Drug Interactions Dosage Forms and Strengths Novolog Mix 70/30 is 100 units per mL (U-100), 70% insulin aspart protamine and 30% insulin aspart, is available as a white and cloudy injectable suspension: Contraindications Novolog Mix 70/30 is contraindicated Warnings and Precautions Never Share Novolog Mix 70/30 FlexPen Between Patients Novolog Mix 70/30 FlexPen should never be shared between patients, even if the needle is changed. Patients using Novolog Mix 70/30 vials must never share needles or syringes with another person. Sharing poses a risk for transmission of blood-borne pathogens. Hyperglycemia or Hypoglycemia with Changes in Insulin Regimen Changes in insulin strength, manufacturer, type, or method of administration may affect glycemic control and predispose to hypoglycemia [see Warnings and Precautions (5.3)]or hyperglycemia. These changes should be made cautiously and only under close medical supervision, and the frequency of blood glucose monitoring should be increased. For patients with type 2 diabetes, dosage adjustments of concomitant anti-diabetic products may be needed. Hypoglycemia Hypoglycemia is the most common adverse effect of all insulin therapies, including Novolog Mix 70/30. Severe hypoglycemia can cause seizures, may lead to unconsciousness, may be life threatening or cause death. Hypoglycemia can impair concentration ability and reaction time; t Continue reading >>

Humulin70/30, Novolin 70/30 (insulin Isophane Human/insulin Regular Human) Dosing, Indications, Interactions, Adverse Effects, And More

Humulin70/30, Novolin 70/30 (insulin Isophane Human/insulin Regular Human) Dosing, Indications, Interactions, Adverse Effects, And More

insulin isophane human/insulin regular human Ketones moderate or less: 0.5 U/kg/day SC Typically, 50-75% of total daily dose is given as intermediate- or long-acting insulin May use this combination product if the dosage ratio of NPH (isophane) to regular is 2:1 Suggested guidelines for beginning dose; adjust according to blood glucose levels Initial dose: 0.5-1 units/kg/day in divided doses Typically, 50-75% of total daily dose is given as intermediate- or long-acting insulin May use this combination product if the dosage ratio of NPH (isophane) to regular is 2:1 Ratio of regular insulin to NPH (isophane) insulin 1:2 Administer within 15 min before a meal or immediately after a meal Store unopened vials/pens refrigerated; do not freeze Opened (in-use) product may be stored at ambient room temperature (below 86F [30C]) and away from heat and light Dosage of human insulin, which is always expressed in USP units, must be based on the results of blood and urine glucose tests and must be carefully individualized to optimal effect Dose adjustments should be based on regular blood glucose testing (See Dosage Adjustment Strategies) Adjust to achieve appropriate glucose control Look for consistent pattern in blood sugars for >3 days Compare blood glucose for same time each day For each time of day: calculate blood glucose range Consider eating and activity patterns during day If all blood sugars are high (within 2.75 mmol/L [50 mg/dL]): correct morning fasting blood glucose 1st Many sliding scales exist to determine exact insulin dose based on frequent blood glucose monitoring - Commonly written for q4hr blood glucose test - Sliding scale coverage usually begins after blood glucose >11 mmol/L (200 mg/dL) - If coverage is needed q4hr x 24 hr, then base insulin dose is adjusted Continue reading >>

Insulin Therapy For Type 2 Diabetes: Rescue, Augmentation, And Replacement Of Beta-cell Function

Insulin Therapy For Type 2 Diabetes: Rescue, Augmentation, And Replacement Of Beta-cell Function

Type 2 diabetes is characterized by progressive beta-cell failure. Indications for exogenous insulin therapy in patients with this condition include acute illness or surgery, pregnancy, glucose toxicity, contraindications to or failure to achieve goals with oral antidiabetic medications, and a need for flexible therapy. Augmentation therapy with basal insulin is useful if some beta-cell function remains. Replacement therapy with basal-bolus insulin is required for beta-cell exhaustion. Rescue therapy using replacement regimens for several weeks may reverse glucose toxicity. Replacement insulin therapy should mimic normal release patterns. Basal insulin, using long-acting insulins (i.e., neutral protamine Hagedorn [NPH], ultralente, glargine) is injected once or twice a day and continued on sick days. Bolus (or mealtime) insulin, using short-acting or rapid-acting insulins (i.e., regular, aspart, lispro) covers mealtime carbohydrates and corrects the current glucose level. The starting dose of 0.15 units per kg per day for augmentation or 0.5 units per kg per day for replacement can be increased several times as needed. About 50 to 60 percent of the total daily insulin requirement should be a basal type, and 40 to 50 percent should be a bolus type. The mealtime dose is the sum of the corrective dose plus the anticipated requirements for the meal and exercise. Adjustments should be made systematically, starting with the fasting, then the preprandial and, finally, the postprandial glucose levels. Basal therapy with glargine insulin provides similar to lower A1C levels with less hypoglycemia than NPH insulin. Insulin aspart and insulin lispro provide similar A1C levels and quality of life, but lower postprandial glucose levels than regular insulin. Twenty-seven percent of p Continue reading >>

Information For Owners Of Canine's With Diabetes Mellitus

Information For Owners Of Canine's With Diabetes Mellitus

Diabetes in animals is very similar to that of humans. Therefore this page may contain links that are about humans or other animals. Background Information about Insulin When we eat, our bodies break food down into organic compounds, one of which is glucose. The cells of our bodies use glucose as a source of energy for movement, growth, repair, and other functions. But before the cells can use glucose, it must move from the bloodstream into the individual cells. This process requires insulin. Insulin is produced by the beta cells in the islets of Langerhans in the pancreas. When glucose enters our blood, the pancreas should automatically produce the right amount of insulin to move glucose into our cells. Canines with type 1 diabetes produce no insulin. Felines with type 2 diabetes do not always produce enough insulin. (Felines can be type 1 or 2 and Canines are always type 1) Insulin Tips: - NPH cannot be mixed with any Lente (L or U) insulin, they are chemically incompatible. - Insulin does not have to be refrigerated if kept at a moderate temp., although it is recommended. - Do not give cold injections, it could cause discomfort. - Popular opinion is to dispose of opened insulin after 30 days or 100 sticks. - To prevent abscesses, infections, and discomfort, only use syringes once. - Rotation of injection sites is recommended. - It is best to feed before the injection to make sure the animal eats. (generally 30 min. before) - Human insulins are shorter acting than animal insulins of the same type. - Never shake "cloudy" insulins. Roll the bottle between the palms of your hands. Duration and Peak Times for the Most Common Insulins There are more than 20 types of insulin products available in four basic forms, each with a different time of onset and duration of action. Continue reading >>

Pre-mixed Insulin

Pre-mixed Insulin

Pre-mixed insulin requires only one injection. Pre-mixed insulin may be right for you if you're older, have vision trouble, or are just starting insulin therapy. Pre-mixed insulins are usually prescribed for patients needing a simple insulin treatment plan, and sliding scale therapy. You may be in this category if you: Have diminished vision or trouble with dexterity Are just starting insulin therapy NPH insulin may be mixed with both rapid-acting insulin analogs and fast-acting human Regular insulin. These mixtures include various combinations: In the United States, rapid-acting insulin, Lyspro (humalog) is mixed with NPH in a 50:50 (50% NPH and 50% insulin Lyspro) and 75:25 (75% NPH and 25% insulin Lyspro) ratio. Insulin/Aspart (Novolog) combinations also are available as 70:30 mixtures (70% NPH, 30% insulin aspart). The traditional NPH ratio of Regular pre-mixed insulin 70:30 (70% NPH, 30% Regular) is still available. These insulins are available as vials, and as insulin pens. The disadvantage is that NPH, which has a relatively unpredictable action, is the only long-acting insulin that can be used. Also, when the doses in a mixture is increased or decreased, the amount both of the short acting insulin and long-acting insulin changes, which increases the risk of both high and low blood sugars. Mixtures also don’t allow a separate correction to be made for high blood sugars. (You may wonder why there are NO pre-mixed insulins using Lantus and detemir. This is because insulin glargine (Lantus®) and detemir (Levemir®) cannot be mixed in the same syringe with other insulins!) Pre-mixed insulins are usually prescribed for patients needing a simple insulin treatment plan, and sliding scale therapy. You may be in this category if you: Are older, with regular meal and ac Continue reading >>

Taking Novolog Mix 70/30 (insulin Aspart Protamine And Insulin Aspart Injectable Suspension) 100 U/ml

Taking Novolog Mix 70/30 (insulin Aspart Protamine And Insulin Aspart Injectable Suspension) 100 U/ml

Do not share your NovoLog Mix 70/30 FlexPen with other people, even if the needle has been changed. Do not share needles or syringes with another person. You may give other people a serious infection, or get a serious infection from them. your blood sugar is too low (hypoglycemia) or you are allergic to any of its ingredients. Before taking NovoLog Mix 70/30, tell your healthcare provider about all your medical conditions including, if you are: pregnant, planning to become pregnant, or are breastfeeding. taking new prescription or over-the-counter medicines, including supplements. Talk to your health care provider about how to manage low blood sugar Read the Instructions for Use and take exactly as directed. NovoLog Mix 70/30 starts acting fast. If you have type 1 diabetes, inject within 15 minutes before you eat a meal. If you have type 2 diabetes, inject within 15 minutes before or after starting your meal. Do not mix NovoLog Mix 70/30 with other insulin products or use in an insulin pump. Know the type and strength of your insulin.Do not change your insulin type unless your health care provider tells you to. Check your blood sugar levels.Ask your health care provider what your blood sugar levels should be and when you should check them. Do not reuse or share your needles or syringes with other people. You may give other people a serious infection, or get a serious infection from them. Do not share your NovoLog Mix 70/30 FlexPen with other people, even if the needle has been changed. Do not share needles or syringes with another person. You may give other people a serious infection, or get a serious infection from them. your blood sugar is too low (hypoglycemia) or you are allergic to any of its ingredients. Before taking NovoLog Mix 70/30, tell your healthcare provi Continue reading >>

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