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Non Prescription Diabetic Dog Food

Feeding Dogs With Diabetes

Feeding Dogs With Diabetes

Diabetes mellitus is one of the most common hormonal diseases affecting dogs. Most affected dogs have Type 1 diabetes, meaning that their condition is not caused by a poor diet or being overweight, but usually by an abnormal autoimmune response that destroys the pancreatic cells responsible for manufacturing insulin. Insulin moves glucose, a type of sugar, out of the bloodstream and into cells where it can be used for energy. Without enough insulin in the body, blood sugar levels rise to dangerous heights while cells essentially starve. Type 1 diabetes cannot be cured, but it can be successfully managed in most canine patients with twice daily insulin injections paired with an appropriate diet and lifestyle. Treating a dog with diabetes is a balancing act. Many things affect blood sugar levels, including the amount and type of food eaten, exercise, stress, hormonal fluctuations, and more. A healthy pancreas can alter the amount of insulin it secretes from one minute to the next, but when we give insulin injections to dogs we cannot make these types of fine adjustments. Therefore, a consistent routine is vital to keeping diabetic dogs healthy. Here are things to keep in mind: Dog should be fed the same amount and type of food roughly every 12 hours. Insulin injections should be given immediately after meals so the dog’s dose can be lowered if he eats less than normal. Dogs should be exercised in the same way at the same time each day. Stressful situations should be avoided. Intact female dogs should be spayed to prevent the hormonal changes associated with the reproductive cycle. Close communication between veterinarian and owner is essential to designing a protocol that is convenient enough to be followed day in and day out while still meeting the dog’s medical need Continue reading >>

Diabetic Dog Food

Diabetic Dog Food

You have probably seen the television commercial talking about the dangers of diabetes for humans, but did you know that dogs can get diabetes too? For many dogs, diabetes is a lifelong condition that requires daily treatment with insulin injections or other medications. Although diabetes is a serious and often chronic disease, it can be managed and, with proper treatment, your dog can live a long and happy life. Keep reading to learn more about how diabetes affects dogs, what kind of dietary changes might be beneficial, and recommended brands of diabetic dog food. Understanding Diabetes Mellitus in Dogs Diabetes mellitus is a very common condition in humans, especially considering the obesity epidemic that is running rampant through the Western world. Canine diabetes, as it is often called, may not be quite so common but it is still a major concern. Diabetes is a condition that occurs when a dog’s body is unable to produce or adequately utilize the hormone insulin. Here’s what happens with diabetes: When your dog eats food, his digestive system begins to digest it, breaking it down into various components such as glucose for energy. As the food is broken down, the glucose enters your dog’s bloodstream which will transport it throughout the body for storage or to be used for energy. When glucose enters your dog’s bloodstream, it triggers the pancreas to start producing insulin – the purpose of insulin is to help regulate the dog’s blood sugar level, keeping it from skyrocketing too high or dropping too low. If the dog’s body doesn’t produce enough insulin, or if his cells become resistant to its effects, it can lead to dangerously high blood sugar levels. While high blood sugar levels may not sound like a big deal, they can actually be very dangerous – Continue reading >>

Homemade Dog Food For Diabetic Dogs

Homemade Dog Food For Diabetic Dogs

Ruby became sick in August of 2008. He was urinating a lot, had increased water consumption, and looked thinner than normal. He ended up in a veterinary hospital where he was diagnosed with diabetes, diabetic ketoacidosis, and pancreatitis. Ketoacidosis can be a life-threatening complication for those suffering from diabetes. It occurs due to a lack of insulin which the body responds to by burning fat for fuel and producing ketones. High levels of ketones can poison the body. Simply put, Ruby was quite ill. In an attempt to comfort Ruby, I would crawl into his hospital kennel, hold him, and sing to him. ‘You Are My Sunshine’ was on regular rotation. Perhaps I did less singing and more pleading and praying. Either way, after a week in the hospital I was able to take my sunshine home. It was a challenge to convince Ruby that getting two insulin shots a day was actually a good thing. I had success after following some great advice: use his food as a reward for receiving the shot. I started by putting his full food bowl on the counter while prepping his shot. Like any food-motivated dog, movement of his food bowl commands his attention. But then the approaching needle would make him run away. After he ran away, I would put his food bowl in the cupboard. That movement of his bowl would bring him back again. Round and round we went until he realized the simple equation of food bowl on counter + shot in dog = food bowl on floor + full dog belly. See, Ruby, insulin shots are a great thing! Now he rushes each injection along so he can eat. The hospital sent us home with a few samples of diabetic dog food. I sought advice from Ruby’s vet on both packaged and homemade diabetic dog food. Dr. Old Vet was quite ambivalent and offered little to no opinion or advice. His disinter Continue reading >>

Dog Food For Dogs With Diabetes: What You Need To Know

Dog Food For Dogs With Diabetes: What You Need To Know

Canine diabetes is a serious lifelong condition in dogs, thus it must be well managed by pet parents who wish to keep their dogs happy and healthy for as long as possible. Although nobody can guarantee that our dogs won’t develop diabetes, there’s a certain dog food for dogs with diabetes that can help with the condition. There is no one ideal diet plan for diabetic dogs and each individual canine’s needs and health have to be taken into consideration. When it comes to dogs with diabetes, some things to consider are: the weight of your dog the severity of the condition choice of dog food for diabetic dogs EXTENSIVE BREAKDOWN: What is the Best Holistic Dog Food Brand? Dog Food for Dogs with Diabetes: What You Need to Know The main thing is to keep your diabetic dog’s blood sugar levels even throughout the day; consistency is key in managing diabetes in dogs. There’s no point getting expensive prescription dog food for dogs with diabetes if they turn their noses up at it. However, if you feed your pet commercial dog food you may have to consider introducing a higher quality brand to help manage your canine’s diabetes condition more efficiently. With high quality dog food brands, it’s easier to distinguish and find better quality ingredients, and these brands are usually made in the USA and can be more trusted. We’ve previously written about overweight dogs, and have an eBook on that as well (which you can download by subscribing below), but there is no single dog food or diet plan for a diabetic dog that will suit all pets. The first few months after your dog has been diagnosed with diabetes will involve lots of trial and error to get the right diet and feeding schedule. The most important thing is that your dog eats something, so shop around and find the Continue reading >>

Diet Tips For A Diabetic Dog

Diet Tips For A Diabetic Dog

Once a dog is diagnosed with diabetes they usually remain diabetic. While there are feeding and dietary strategies that can help keep their glucose levels low and well-controlled, they will usually require insulin injections lifelong. An excellent diet choice for a diabetic dog is a meat-based high protein food that is moderately fat and carbohydrate restricted. Carbohydrates, if included, should be low glycemic (for example, barley or sorghum). Ideally, at least 30 to 40% of the calories in your diabetic dog's food would come from protein and less than 30% of calories would come from fat and carbohydrates each. Further dietary fat restriction may be necessary if your diabetic dog has pancreatitis or blood fat elevations. Options to consider include Nature's Variety Instinct, Wysong, and Halo. Several studies indicate that high or moderately high–fiber diets may help some diabetics by minimizing their post–eating blood sugar fluctuations. While this is true for SOME dogs, a clear clinical benefit has not been shown for the majority of diabetic dogs. Sometimes high fiber diets will cause inappropriate weight loss (in a thin diabetic) and should be avoided. High fiber diets may also be associated with undesirable intestinal side effects such as decreased appetite (due to poor palatability), flatulence and diarrhea or constipation. If your dog is very overweight or obese and in need of weight loss, you might consider a diet with higher fiber to aid in weight loss. Instead of changing to a high fiber diet formulation (which often contains inferior ingredients), you can also consider adding supplemental fiber to your dog's regular diabetic food in order to increase the overall fiber content while still maintaining a high quality food. To best control your diabetic dog's Continue reading >>

Best Diabetic Dog Food

Best Diabetic Dog Food

When a human is diagnosed with diabetes, the doctor gives an extensive list of foods that can be consumed and foods that cannot be consumed. The same is the case with dogs, since the basic nature of the disease remains the same. Requirements of dogs are different from our own. They have a certain set of foods that they can safely consume, while there are other foodstuffs that are harmful for them. The point of saying this is to tell you that it is very important to take sensible and logical decisions if you have a diabetic dog, and that going with your gut instinct (while it may work sometimes for some people) is best avoided. Consult the vet to find out how your pet's current diet can be modified or changed to suit, and gradually improve, his current health condition. It is important that you do not blindly follow a human diabetic diet plan for your dog. There have been cases where this has led to undesirable results. So, let us start by figuring out what a dog needs which his sugar levels have risen above normal... Carbohydrates (Starch and Fibers) Fats (Trans fats, Cholesterol, Saturated fats) Calcium and Vitamins (A, C and E) Proteins, Magnesium and Iron Carbohydrates (Sugars) Fats (Polyunsaturated and Monounsaturated) Sodium Potassium If you are well versed with the routine of making homemade dog food, then you will find no difficulty in preparing dog food with healthy choices. If you are not, then there are a few dos and don'ts that you need to keep in mind. The biggest advantage of preparing homemade food for your diabetic dog is that you will be feeding him/her healthy and unprocessed food. You may also consider a raw diet after consulting with your vet. While preparing homemade dog food recipes, healthy and low fat meat sources, like skinless and reduced fat tu Continue reading >>

5 Best Dog Foods For Diabetic Dogs

5 Best Dog Foods For Diabetic Dogs

Unfortunately, dogs can suffer from a number of the same health problems that people do. One of the most common and serious examples is canine diabetes — a disease characterized by improper pancreas function. Without a healthy pancreas, your dog will have trouble regulating his blood sugar levels. Left untreated, diabetes can cause very serious complications and even death. So, you’ll always want to work with your vet to keep your dog as healthy as possible and feed him a food that provides the kind of nutrition a diabetic dog needs. Quick Picks: Best Diabetic Dog Food Our Rating Price Orijen Regional Red $$$$$ Merrick Grain-Free Dog Food $$$ Solid Gold High Protein Recipe $$$ Nutrisca Chicken and Chickpea Recipe $$$$ Wellness CORE Grain Free $$$$ Continue reading for more in-depth reviews What Is Doggie Diabetes? For the most part, diabetes affects dogs and humans in similar ways. When food is eaten, it is broken down by the body into its constituent parts — primarily fats, proteins and sugars (glucose). A little while later, the pancreas releases a hormone called insulin; insulin helps the body process the glucose. However, sometimes the pancreas stops producing insulin or the body’s cells fail to respond to it in the proper way. The former problem is referred to as Type I diabetes, while the latter is known as Type II diabetes. Both types are very serious and ultimately manifest in a relatively similar way: The body cannot process glucose properly. Type I diabetes — the most common form to occur in dogs – is thought to occur when an autoimmune disease attacks the insulin-producing cells in the pancreas. No one knows exactly why this occurs, although there does appear to be a strong genetic link. Type II diabetes, on the other hand, is often associated wit Continue reading >>

Feeding The Diabetic Dog Non-prescription Food (border Collie, Vet, Science, Diet) - Dogs - - City-data Forum

Feeding The Diabetic Dog Non-prescription Food (border Collie, Vet, Science, Diet) - Dogs - - City-data Forum

Feeding the Diabetic Dog Non-Prescription Food (border collie, vet, science, diet) Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account , you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads. View detailed profile ( Advanced ) or search We have a 10 year old pug who eats Science Diet W/D dog food and gets insulin twice a day. He's done fine with the W/D and though it's quite expensive, he's a pug, so a bag goes a good long way. We accidentally ran out last weekend and since our regular vet was closed, we tried to buy it from PetsMart (the vet section). They won't sell it without our vet calling their vet (and charging us for the time, of course). Which is ridiculous on the face of it anyway..you'd think they'd just need a prescription. Anyway..does anyone know of people feeding their diabetic dogs regular dog food? We feed our border collie and Great Pyrenees, "Taste of the Wild" which is a very good quality grain-free food (Science Diet W/D on the other hand has lots of grain products in it). Human diabetics eat normal food...how about dogs. When we ask the vet about it we get the "Science Diet is best" line. Any why not...they're making a nice profit on it. Continue reading >>

Top 5 Best Dog Foods For Diabetic Dogs

Top 5 Best Dog Foods For Diabetic Dogs

Depending on your dog's breed, there are a number of unique health concerns to be wary of. One often overlooked condition that can plague dogs of any size is canine diabetes. It's very similar to the human counterpart and affects 1 out of every 200 dogs. Essentially, the condition affects the pancreas. As a result, your dog can't produce enough insulin to keep up with the amount of glucose in the body. This can lead to hyperglycemia, or excess glucose. Canine diabetes can affect your dog for a number of reasons. It's more prominent in certain breeds and age groups. Some dogs are even predisposed to the condition due to genetics. It can also be caused by a poor diet. If left untreated, diabetes can lead to a host of further complications, so it's important that you be proactive with your dog's health. As an owner, it's your responsibility to supply your canine companion with a proper diet. Diabetes is not a death sentence. Dogs can live a completely healthy life as long as they have the support and nutrition they need. Here are some of the best foods for diabetic dogs. 5 Recommended Dog Foods for Diabetic Dogs 1. Wellness CORE Natural Grain Free Dry Dog Food This dog food from Wellness Core is designed to provide your dog with plenty of protein. It contains healthy amounts of turkey and chicken to give your dog fuel to thrive. What makes the food great for diabetic dogs is its absence of unhealthy fillers. There are no harmful carbohydrates like corn or soy. It's also free of artificial additives and questionable meat byproducts. Instead, the kibble is chock full of antioxidants, nutrients, and probiotics. The inclusion of spinach, kale, sweet potatoes, and other forms of fiber help to keep glucose levels in check. 2. Orijen Original Dry Dog Food This food from Orijen is Continue reading >>

Diabetic Dog Food

Diabetic Dog Food

The following items represent some of The Dog Food Advisor’s most frequently asked questions about diabetic dog food. Where can I get suggestions for specific dog foods for my diabetic dog? Diabetes is a serious condition and can be life threatening. The food you select can play a crucial role in your dog’s treatment. Consult your dog’s veterinarian first for specific product recommendations. What kinds of foods make the best candidates for my diabetic dog? Public information regarding canine diabetes and diet appears to be somewhat limited. To help keep blood sugar stable, one should look for foods that contain moderate dietary fiber and a low-glycemic index. How much fiber should a diabetic dog consume? Although higher dietary fiber was initially believed to be beneficial, recent studies have suggested there may be no real advantage to high fiber diets compared to the moderate type associated with most commercial foods.1 What is the glycemic index? The glycemic index is a scientific measure of how easily a particular food can be converted to blood glucose (sugar). Dog foods with a low glycemic index exhibit less of a tendency to raise a dog’s blood glucose (sugar) level than others. What type of dog foods have a lower glycemic index? In general, dog foods with the lowest carbohydrate content exhibit a lower glycemic index. Since most kibbles are carbohydrate based, low-carb canned foods should be given serious consideration when selecting candidates for diabetic pets. Footnotes Continue reading >>

Top 10 Diabetic Dog Food Brands For 2018, (consumer Rated)

Top 10 Diabetic Dog Food Brands For 2018, (consumer Rated)

Nowadays, most, if not all people are busy with their jobs or study, so they barely have time to look for their dogs; therefore, preparing healthy meals for them is a challenging task to be achieved especially if the dog has a serious health issue like diabetes. Some dogs can be more prone to gain weight than others. Even a little extra weight can impact the pets quality of life and relationship with family because that extra weight can reduce play time, impact mobility and affect the lifelong general health of your dog. Weight problems can be successfully managed through changes in your dogs diet. [ctt template=7 link=j1eJ2 via=no ]\In the following post, we will be providing you with the 2018 Top 10 Diabetic Dog Food Brands that will help you take care of your diabetic dog.\[/ctt] These brands are considered to be the best non prescription diabetic dog foodaccording to customer ratings, and in terms of nutritional ingredients, stock availability, and of course the price range i.e. no more than 100$. In classifying this low glycemic dog food list, we consulted several studies to get insights about the criteria that must be found in the diabetic dog diet, particularly the foods found in the supermarkets that most people buy just because its expensive and claimed to be the best. The followingbrands are, according to amazon.com , the best ranked brands in terms of costumers evaluation, which means that they got a large feedback from consumers like yourself, even veterinarians. That is why we decided to put them in this small specific list asThe Top 10 Best Diabetic Dog Food Brands for 2017 . Continue reading >>

Diet And Diabetes

Diet And Diabetes

Finding the right diet for a diabetic dog is a key part of managing this disease. Article by Mary Straus and CJ Puotinen, published in the Contents Introduction Customizing the Diet Textbook Recipes Prescription Diets Non-Prescription Dry and Canned Foods Low-Carb Raw Diets Also see these related articles: Sunny (photo above) was so weak he could hardly stand when his now-owner picked him up to foster. He was quickly diagnosed with diabetes and stabilized. Today, at age 12 and on a raw diet, he looks and feels GREAT . Introduction As discussed in Canine Diabetes, WDJ May 2012, dogs with this disease require blood sugar monitoring, daily insulin injections, carefully planned meals, and scheduled exercise. Fortunately, most cases can be managed at home, and once their medication and diet are stabilized, affected dogs live just as long and actively as other dogs. The most important factor in choosing a diet for a dog with diabetes is that he likes the food and eats it willingly every day. We'll say it again: There is no single “best” diet for dogs with diabetes. Most diabetic dogs do fine on a diet formulated for adult maintenance. And most do not require a high-fiber prescription diet. However, it is important to maintain consistent carbohydrate levels, and a diet moderately low in fat may be safest. The nutritional needs of any concurrent disease should take precedence. Dogs with diabetes can thrive on diets that are dry or canned, prescription, frozen raw, home-prepared (cooked or raw), and combinations of any of these. See the examples that follow for a variety of feeding plans that have worked well for diabetic dogs and their caregivers. For best results, dogs should be fed the same type and quantity of food every 12 hours just before or after their insulin inject Continue reading >>

Best Dog Food For Diabetic Dogs

Best Dog Food For Diabetic Dogs

Receiving a diagnosis that your dog is diabetic can feel overwhelming for many dog lovers. While diabetes is not curable, it is treatable. With proper diagnosis and treatment, diabetic dogs can have lifespans similar to those of non-diabetic dogs. The time of greatest risk is during the first six months of treatment, when insulin therapy is introduced and the dog’s glucose levels are being regulated. Diabetic dogs do have a higher risk of death from concurrent diseases such as kidney disease, liver and/or pancreatic disorders, or infections. However, once a diabetic dog’s condition becomes stabilized, there is no reason why the dog cannot live a long, healthy and happy life while eating a diabetic dog food. (For a full discussion of diabetes in dogs, complications, and related health disorders, we recommend reading “Managing Diabetes in Dogs,” by CJ Puotinen and Mary Straus [updated February 19, 2016]. We also recommend this glossary with terms associated with diabetes mellitus.) Background for diabetes mellitus in dogs Diabetes is common in dogs and it’s increasing. It’s currently estimated to affect 1 in 160 dogs. (Another source estimates 1 in 200 dogs.) The medical term for diabetes is diabetes mellitus . It is caused by either a decreased production of insulin or decreased functioning of the insulin. Insulin is a hormone produced by the pancreas that helps glucose move from the blood stream into the cells of the body where it can be used for energy. There are several different types of diabetes. In Type 1, the pancreas is unable to produce insulin (or produce enough insulin). Type 2 is often linked to diet and obesity. Type 2 is the form that is most common in humans. This is also the form most often seen in cats. The third kind of diabetes is gestation Continue reading >>

Do I Need A Prescription Dog Diabetes Diet?

Do I Need A Prescription Dog Diabetes Diet?

If your dog is diagnosed with diabetes, a stringent new diet will be a critical part of your pet's treatment plan. For some dogs, a prescription diet may be necessary in order to keep your pet's glucose levels stabilized. Find out more here. If your dog has been diagnosed with diabetes, you are most likely aware of the important role diet plays in your dog’s treatment plan. Along with regularly administered insulin, a consistent diet helps to keep your dog’s glucose levels stable, and while not all dogs require a prescription dog diabetes diet, some most definitely will. Diet and Feeding for a Diabetic Dog Diabetes can cause your dog to lose weight, so they may need to put on a few pounds. After diagnosis, the first dietary step is to make sure your pet is at a healthy weight. More likely, however, your dog will need to lose some weight. Obesity can be problematic for dogs with diabetes, since extra fat creates a resistance to the insulin your dog needs. Fiber-rich diets can be helpful, since they will keep your dog feeling full. Once your dog’s weight is stabilized, you should feed them a balanced diet that covers all their nutritional needs. This will help them to maintain their weight. In general, the most important aspect of a diabetic dog’s diet is consistency -- it’s vital to feed your dog at the same time each day. Ideally, your dog will have two evenly spaced out meals every day. This prevents glucose levels from spiking or falling throughout the day. A diet that’s high in fiber and carbohydrates is generally recommended, since that helps maintain stable glucose levels. Sometimes even with a careful and consistent diet, your dog will still experience hyperglycemia, and in that situation, a prescription diet may be necessary in order to keep your pet Continue reading >>

Does Your Dog Need Diabetic Dog Food?

Does Your Dog Need Diabetic Dog Food?

How do we keep this site running? This post may contain affiliate links — the cost is the same to you, but we get a referral fee. Compensation does not affect rankings. Thanks! Diabetes is a well-known illness in humans, but it is also found in dogs. One out of every two hundred dogs will be diagnosed with canine diabetes at some point. But don’t treat your dog like you would a human because they have a different version of the illness that shares some similarities with human diabetes, but works differently. Dogs that have diabetes have problems producing the right amount of insulin for their body. A dog’s body burns sugar for energy. When it does not have the right amount of sugar, it might start burning fat so that it can maintain the energy level. This can cause the release of too many ketones (by-products of metabolized fats). These ketones can lead to serious incidents of hypoglycemia and even death. Causes of Diabetes in Dogs There are numerous things that can cause diabetes in dogs. Factors such as age, gender, breed and diet may increase the risk of diabetes. However, even if a dog does not fall into any of the categories that are well-known for putting a dog at risk for diabetes, please keep in mind that there may be unknown factors at play. So, dogs that don’t fall into the category that would generally be considered to be to be at risk for diabetes should not be assumed to be impossible to end up with the disease. Breed Though mixed breed dogs commonly have canine diabetes more frequently than pure bred dogs, there are some specific pure bred breeds that are known for having diabetes. These breeds include, but are not limited to golden retrievers, German shepherds, miniature schnauzers, Keeshonds and poodles. Age Though it is unclear when dogs specifi Continue reading >>

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