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Non Diabetic Neuropathy

Neuropathy Associated With Nondiabetic Obesity (s36.006)

Neuropathy Associated With Nondiabetic Obesity (s36.006)

April 08, 2014; 82 (10 Supplement) April 30, 2014 Neuropathy Associated with Nondiabetic Obesity (S36.006) J. Singleton, Eric Volckmann, Timothy Graham, Albert Smith Neuropathy Associated with Nondiabetic Obesity (S36.006) J. Singleton, Eric Volckmann, Timothy Graham, Albert Smith Neurology Apr 2014, 82 (10 Supplement) S36.006; OBJECTIVE: To measure nerve function and distal neuropathy prevalence in nondiabetic obese patients.BACKGROUND: Distal symmetric peripheral neuropathy (DSP) affects 5-9% of the US population. Though diabetes is the most common recognized cause, human epidemiology and animal studies have demonstrated a link between features of metabolic syndrome, particularly obesity and hypertriglyceridemia, independent of glucose control.DESIGN/METHODS: 21 non-diabetic obese patients referred for Roux en Y bariatric surgery (BarP) were compared with age matched lean controls (N=51). Each participant underwent the Utah Early Neuropathy Scale (UENS) to detect asymptomatic neuropathy. This validated exam scale focuses on early sensory loss and contains subscales for timed 128 Hz vibration at the great toe, and distribution of sensory loss to pin. Each participant had BMI calculated, blood pressure measured and blood drawn for fasting glucose and lipids. Each was offered an ankle skin biopsy for IENFD and confocal corneal microscopy.RESULTS: Mean age was 45.0 for obese participants and 44.3 for controls. BarP had significantly higher BMI (44.3 +/-5.2 vs. 26.4 +/-6.3) and triglycerides (152.1 +/-62.3 vs.107.3 +/-62.4) but other metabolic features were similar. Mean UENS total score and pin score were significantly higher for BarP, and averaged vibration time was significantly shorter (10.5 +/-4.1 seconds vs. 16.3 +/-4.4 seconds, P<0.0001). Overall 7/21 (33%) BarP me Continue reading >>

Peripheral Neuropathy

Peripheral Neuropathy

Print Overview Peripheral neuropathy, a result of damage to your peripheral nerves, often causes weakness, numbness and pain, usually in your hands and feet. It can also affect other areas of your body. Your peripheral nervous system sends information from your brain and spinal cord (central nervous system) to the rest of your body. Peripheral neuropathy can result from traumatic injuries, infections, metabolic problems, inherited causes and exposure to toxins. One of the most common causes is diabetes mellitus. People with peripheral neuropathy generally describe the pain as stabbing, burning or tingling. In many cases, symptoms improve, especially if caused by a treatable condition. Medications can reduce the pain of peripheral neuropathy. Symptoms Every nerve in your peripheral system has a specific function, so symptoms depend on the type of nerves affected. Nerves are classified into: Sensory nerves that receive sensation, such as temperature, pain, vibration or touch, from the skin Motor nerves that control muscle movement Autonomic nerves that control functions such as blood pressure, heart rate, digestion and bladder Signs and symptoms of peripheral neuropathy might include: Gradual onset of numbness, prickling or tingling in your feet or hands, which can spread upward into your legs and arms Sharp, jabbing, throbbing, freezing or burning pain Extreme sensitivity to touch Lack of coordination and falling Muscle weakness or paralysis if motor nerves are affected If autonomic nerves are affected, signs and symptoms might include: Heat intolerance and altered sweating Bowel, bladder or digestive problems Changes in blood pressure, causing dizziness or lightheadedness Peripheral neuropathy can affect one nerve (mononeuropathy), two or more nerves in different areas Continue reading >>

Peripheral Neuropathy Has Causes Other Than Diabetes

Peripheral Neuropathy Has Causes Other Than Diabetes

Peripheral neuropathy has causes other than diabetes DEAR DOCTOR K: I have peripheral neuropathy. I know that people with diabetes often get neuropathy, but I'm not diabetic. What else can cause this condition? And what can I do about it? DEAR READER: Neuropathy is a medical term that means nerve damage. The type of nerve damage that people with diabetes get involves specific nerve fibers in all nerves, particularly the nerves that travel to the legs and feet. (There are other conditions in which a single nerve leading to the legs and feet is pinched, causing pain. An example is what is often called a "slipped disk" or "herniated disk" in the lower part of the spine). The symptoms of peripheral neuropathy include numbness and tingling. Some cases cause burning, shooting or stabbing pain. When the doctor does a physical examination and touches your feet and lower legs with something as light as a feather (like some cotton), you may not feel it. However, you will feel it if the cotton touches your skin in the thigh or elsewhere in the body. You may also lose sensation to a pinprick in the lower legs and feet, but not the rest of you. Diabetes is the most common cause of peripheral neuropathy. But neuropathy can result from other causes as well. These include: -- Hypothyroidism. In this condition, the thyroid gland does not produce enough thyroid hormone. -- Amyloidosis, a disease in which an abnormal protein accumulates in the body. -- Vitamin deficiencies, particularly vitamin B1, B12 and folate deficiency. -- Infection with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). -- Critical illness, particularly if you develop a severe inflammatory response to infection. -- Guillain-Barre syndrome. This uncommon autoimmune disorder damages the peripheral nerves. Get a daily summary of the Continue reading >>

Peripheral Neuropathy Fact Sheet

Peripheral Neuropathy Fact Sheet

What is peripheral neuropathy? How are the peripheral neuropathies classified? What are the symptoms of peripheral nerve damage? What causes peripheral neuropathy? How is peripheral neuropathy diagnosed? What treatments are available? What research is being done? Where can I get more information? What is peripheral neuropathy? An estimated 20 million people in the United States have some form of peripheral neuropathy, a condition that develops as a result of damage to the peripheral nervous system — the vast communications network that transmits information between the central nervous system (the brain and spinal cord) and every other part of the body. (Neuropathy means nerve disease or damage.) Symptoms can range from numbness or tingling, to pricking sensations (paresthesia), or muscle weakness. Areas of the body may become abnormally sensitive leading to an exaggeratedly intense or distorted experience of touch (allodynia). In such cases, pain may occur in response to a stimulus that does not normally provoke pain. Severe symptoms may include burning pain (especially at night), muscle wasting, paralysis, or organ or gland dysfunction. Damage to nerves that supply internal organs may impair digestion, sweating, sexual function, and urination. In the most extreme cases, breathing may become difficult, or organ failure may occur. Peripheral nerves send sensory information back to the brain and spinal cord, such as a message that the feet are cold. Peripheral nerves also carry signals from the brain and spinal cord to the muscles to generate movement. Damage to the peripheral nervous system interferes with these vital connections. Like static on a telephone line, peripheral neuropathy distorts and sometimes interrupts messages between the brain and spinal cord and the Continue reading >>

Is There A Difference Between Diabetic Neuropathy And Non-diabetic Neuropathy

Is There A Difference Between Diabetic Neuropathy And Non-diabetic Neuropathy

Is there any difference between Diabetic Neuropathy and other forms of Neuropathy? The reason I decided to write this article is because I've had many people question the difference. I've even had several people tell me that when they went to their doctor complaining about neuropathy symptoms, the doctor took a blood test and dismissed it as neuropathy because their blood sugars weren't high. The term neuropathy has been strongly associated with Diabetes. Diabetes is a major cause of peripheral neuropathy. Current estimates say that 60-70% of people with diabetes have mild to severe neuropathy. Neuropathy is nerve damage. Nerve cells are vulnerable to damage from disease or anything that impairs the bodys ability to turn nutrients into energy, to process waste products, to circulate oxygen or to make cellular repair. Diabetes does create the nerve cells vulnerable to damage, but there are many ways in which nerves can get damaged. What are the different ways that someone will get neuropathy? Diabetic neuropathy is a result of prolonged elevated levels of blood glucose. Chemotherapy Neuropathy is caused by damage that is done by the drugs that are attempting to destroy the cancer cells. Alcoholic neuropathy - Alcohol use creates vitamin deficiencies that can lead to nerve damage. Medications certain drugs have possible side effects of nerve damage (neuropathy). The biggest known drug is the anti-cholesterol drugs since it blocks cholesterol which the nerves need to repair themselves. It can create deficiencies that contribute to nerve damage. Autoimmune Disorders these are disorders where the body attacks its own cells. If it attacks nerve cells it will create neuropathy. Bacterial and Viral Infections Viruses can attack nerve cells. Bacterial and viral infections can c Continue reading >>

Types Of Diabetic Neuropathy

Types Of Diabetic Neuropathy

Diabetic neuropathy can be broken into several types. This is because we have different kinds of nerves in our bodies that serve different functions. Your symptoms and treatments depend on which type of diabetic neuropathy you have. There are four types of diabetic neuropathy: Peripheral diabetic neuropathy goes by various names: peripheral diabetic nerve pain and distal polyneuropathy. In this Patient Guide, we’ll refer to it as peripheral diabetic neuropathy, or simply peripheral neuropathy. Peripheral neuropathy is the most common form of neuropathy caused by diabetes. It affects nerves leading to your extremities—to your feet, legs, hands, and arms. The nerves going to your feet are the longest in your body: after they branch off the spinal cord in the lumbar region (low back), they have to go all the way down your legs and into the feet—quite a distance. Because the nerves leading to your feet are so long, it’s most often these nerves that are damaged; there’s more of them to be damaged. This nerve damage can lead to the foot problems often associated with diabetes, including foot deformities, infections, ulcers, and amputations. The article on diabetic neuropathy symptoms will help you learn more about the specific symptoms associated with peripheral diabetic neuropathy. Proximal neuropathy can also be called diabetic amyotrophy. That myo in the word means muscle, so this is a form of neuropathy that can cause muscle weakness. It specifically affects the muscles in the upper part of your leg(s), buttocks, and hips. Sometimes, proximal neuropathy can also involve nerve pain, especially pain that shoots from the low back and down the leg. The technical medical term for that is radiculopathy, although most people refer to it as sciatica. If there’s also s Continue reading >>

Diabetic And Non-diabetic Lumbosacral Radiculoplexus Neuropathy Bhanushali Mj, Muley Sa Neurol India

Diabetic And Non-diabetic Lumbosacral Radiculoplexus Neuropathy Bhanushali Mj, Muley Sa Neurol India

Background: Lumbosacral radiculoplexus neuropathy (LRPN) originally described in diabetic patients is a distinct clinical condition characterized by debilitating pain, weakness and atrophy most commonly affecting the proximal thigh muscles asymmetrically. The syndrome is usually monophasic and preceded by significant weight loss (at least more than 10 lbs). Though a self-limited condition, recovery is gradual with some residual weakness. Recent advances and research has provided new insights in the pathogenesis and thereby management of this syndrome. In this paper, we review the clinical and diagnostic features as well as discuss recent insights and treatment strategies along with our experience in the management of patients with diabetic and non-diabetic LRPN. Materials and Methods: Literature in English published between 1953 and 2008 was searched in the MEDLINE and Pubmed database, maintained by the US National library of medicine and National institutes of health, using key words of diabetic amyotrophy, lumbosacral radiculoplexus neuropathy, diabetic proximal neuropathy, diabetic radiculopathy and diabetic lumbosacral plexopathy. In addition, literature reported in various textbooks on peripheral neuropathy was reviewed as well. Observation: The diagnosis relies mostly on clinical suspicion and characteristic electromyographic findings. The exact pathogenesis of the illness remains unknown, but there seems to be a component of immune-mediated inflammatory microvasculitis which causes secondary ischemia of the lumbosacral plexus. This has prompted a trial of immunosuppressive agents (like steroids) with an attempt to alter the course of the illness. A few reports have noted that immunosuppression when instituted early in the course of the illness (within three mont Continue reading >>

Peripheral Neuropathy

Peripheral Neuropathy

What is peripheral neuropathy? Peripheral neuropathy is disorder of nerve(s) apart from the brain and spinal cord. Patients with peripheral neuropathy may have tingling, numbness, unusual sensations, weakness, or burning pain in the affected area. Oftentimes, the symptoms are symmetrical and involve both hands and feet. Because the symptoms are often present in the areas covered by gloves or stockings, peripheral neuropathy is often described as having a “glove and stocking” distribution of symptoms. Peripheral neuropathy can involve different nerve types, including motor, sensory, and autonomic nerves. Peripheral neuropathy can also be categorized by the size of the nerve fibers involved, large or small. Neuropathy can present with many differing symptoms, including numbness, pain of different types, weakness, or loss of balance, depending on the type of nerve involved. Because the autonomic nerves control bodily functions that we do not consciously think of, such as heart rate, digestion, and emptying of the bowel and bladder, autonomic neuropathy manifests with symptoms affecting the loss of control of these functions. Symptoms may include problems with blood pressure, voiding, passage of stools (diarrhea, or constipation), heart rate, or sweating. Cranial neuropathy is similar to peripheral neuropathy, except that the cranial nerves are involved. Any of the cranial nerves can be involved. One of the more common causes of cranial neuropathy is loss of blood flow from the optic artery to the optic nerve, causing ischemic optic neuropathy. Amyloidosis is one of the more common causes of this rare disorder. Specific nerves can be involved in neuropathy. When a specific nerve is involved, the symptoms are limited to the distribution of that nerve. The most commonly i Continue reading >>

Assessment Of The Prevalence Of Small Fiber Peripheral Neuropathy Among Non-diabetic Obese Patients (neurobisite)

Assessment Of The Prevalence Of Small Fiber Peripheral Neuropathy Among Non-diabetic Obese Patients (neurobisite)

Obesity is associated with significant comorbidities including type 2 diabetes (insulin resistance), heart disease, stroke, hypertension, sleep apnea syndrome, dyslipidemia, cancer, hepatobiliary diseases, orthopedic complications and psychosocial impact 1 . Peripheral neuropathy is a known complication in the type I and II diabetes and glucose intolerance and metabolic syndrome in 2. Outside of diabetes (type I and II) that are associated with cardiovascular risk high vascular, presence of metabolic syndrome constitutes in itself a well demonstrated vascular risk factor. Its definition requires the presence of three elements from the following 5: abdominal obesity (high waist circumference), high blood pressure, high fasting blood sugar, high triglycerides and / low HDL-cholesterol 3. This peripheral neuropathy predominantly affects sensory fibers of small poorly myelinated diameter (A fibers and C) and autonomous sensory fibers and is called small fiber neuropathy 4. The cardinal sign of NAION is the presence of neuropathic pain but abnormalities in physical examination are often absent and conventional electromyography is faulted to make the diagnosis. These small fibers are also constituent of the autonomic nervous system and causes damage autonomic dysfunction that can manifest the cardiovascular system (hypotension, cardiac conduction disorders), digestive, sweat, sphincter. neuropathy of the diagnosis of small fibers is suggested clinically by the presence of neuropathic pain often contrasting with a normal clinical examination. The confirmation is based on electrophysiology with various techniques and quantification of intra-epidermal nerve fibers. To determine the prevalence of a small fiber peripheral neuropathy in nondiabetic obese patients, by measuring ski Continue reading >>

Non-diabetic Neuropathy Symptoms

Non-diabetic Neuropathy Symptoms

Neuropathy, also known as peripheral neuropathy, is a condition that causes numbness, pain, tingling and weakness, usually in the hands and feet. It may occur episodically or progress gradually over years. According to the Neuropathy Association (NA), 30 percent of cases evolve from diabetes, 30 percent from unknown causes and 40 percent from infections, autoimmune disorders, genetic factors, nutrient imbalances, tumors or toxins. Symptoms of neuropathy vary depending on type of neuropathy and which nerves are affected. Video of the Day Neuropathy causes damage to fibers that affect physical sensation, which causes nerve pain, tingling and numbness. Sensory damage may reduce a person's ability to determine the position of his joints and suffer from poor coordination. According to the University of Maryland Medical Center (UMMC), sensation symptoms frequently start within the feet and gradually progress toward the body's center as neuropathy worsens. Though sensory symptoms are common among diabetes-related neuropathy, it affects other forms as well. When neuropathy causes damage to fibers that affect a person's muscles, it can lead to physical weakness, loss of dexterity and reduced muscle mass. Muscle cramping or twitching, trouble swallowing or breathing, paralysis of affected body parts and reduced muscle control may also occur. According to the UMMC, these symptoms often lead to tripping, resultant injuries and difficulty executing tasks that require dexterity, such as buttoning a shirt, writing and opening jars and doors. Reduced nerve function in the hands may cause people to drop objects frequently. When leg muscles are weakened, people may struggle to run or walk or observe a sense of "heaviness" in the legs. Normally simple tasks such as climbing stairs may bec Continue reading >>

Any 1 Successfully Treated For Non-diabetic Peripheral Neuropathy? - Survivalist Forum

Any 1 Successfully Treated For Non-diabetic Peripheral Neuropathy? - Survivalist Forum

Any 1 successfully treated for NON-diabetic Peripheral Neuropathy? So, I have had steady, slow worsening of peripheral neuropathy in my feet and lower legs. started about 5 - 6 years ago. I have been tested for diabetes and am negative. I was tested back in '07 with one neurologist and was told it was a nerve problem in my back, I've had two SI (Sacro-Illiac) Joint disfunction (the Illiac twisted and locked out of place) injuries and one Inward Disc Bulge between the T - 9 & T - 10. I also had a severe, nearly fatal, Staph infection in my knee back in '05 that I had emergency surgery on and ended up with crappy insurance that didn't pay for a full term of anti-biotic IV treatments. Fast forward to last summer; I went to another neurologist who coinscidentally used to work in the same office I had the original tests in, that did a preliminary test and said it couldnt be from my back. So, here I sit, with the neuropathy progressively getting worse: my feet are completely numb, i can drive a needle through them and it doesnt hurt and at times I have sensations of someone hitting the top of my foot with a peice of rebar AND at the same time passing a blow-torch across the same area. Other times i get stabbing pains or pinching pains that will bring me up off my chair. Sometimes these pains cycle over 20 - 30 minutes to the longest, every 20-40 seconds for 12 hours. I currently am being treated for moderate to severe Fibromyalgia (if you don't believe in its existance, thats cool, nothing to see here) and arthritis. I take generic Neurontin (gabapentin), Flexaril, and Vicodin to help me function through the day and Adderal to help some with the serious fatigue and brain fog. AND.... I am not on disability! I do what I can working two part time jobs. My question is, have any Continue reading >>

Non-diabetic Lumbosacral Radiculoplexus Neuropathy: Natural History, Outcome And Comparison With The Diabetic Variety

Non-diabetic Lumbosacral Radiculoplexus Neuropathy: Natural History, Outcome And Comparison With The Diabetic Variety

Diabetic lumbosacral radiculoplexus neuropathy (DLSRPN) (other names include diabetic amyotrophy) is well recognized, unlike the non-diabetic lumbosacral radiculoplexus neuropathy (LSRPN), which has received less attention. Our objective was to characterize the natural history and outcome of LSRPN and to assess whether it is similar to the diabetic variety in its symptoms, course, electrophysiological features, quantitative sensory and autonomic findings, and the underlying pathophysiology. We studied 57 patients with LSRPN and 33 patients with DLSRPN. We found that the age of onset, course, kind and distribution of symptoms and impairments, laboratory findings and outcomes are essentially alike. Both disorders are a lumbosacral plexus neuropathy associated with weight loss, often beginning focally or asymmetrically in the thigh or leg but usually progressing to involve the initially unaffected segment and the contralateral side. Both have prolonged morbidity due to pain, paralysis, autonomic involvement and sensory loss. In biopsied distal LSRPN nerves, we found changes similar to those found in DLSRPNalterations typical of ischaemic injury and of microvasculitis. The long-term outcome was determined in 42 LSRPN patients: two had become diabetic, seven had relapsed and only three had recovered completely, although all had improved. We conclude that: (i) LSRPN is a subacute, asymmetrical, painful and debilitating neuropathy of the lower limbs associated with weight loss, and we think it is under-recognized; (ii) recovery from the long-term impairments of LSRPN is usually delayed and incomplete and only a small minority of patients develop diabetes mellitus; (iii) LSRPN mirrors the diabetic variety in its clinical features, course, pathological findings (ischaemic injur Continue reading >>

Fact_sheet_painful_peripheral_neuropathy

Fact_sheet_painful_peripheral_neuropathy

Reviewed by Nick Christelis, MBBCH, FRCA, FFPMRCA, FANZCA, FFPMANZCA Co-chair, International Neuromodulation Society Public Education, Outreach, and Website Committee, 2016 - Director and Co-Founder Victoria Pain Specialists, Richmond, Australia This article is intended for patients, caregivers, and the general public, as well as doctors and medical specialists. It has three sections. The first defines neuropathy . The second gives a broad overview of neuropathic pain . The final section concerns painful peripheral neuropathy , a common neurological complaint, its causes, diagnosis and treatment. Neuropathy is a condition that results from damage to, or dysfunction of, the nervous system. Most often, the damage exists in the peripheral nervous system, which lies beyond the spine and brain, although brain injury, such as stroke, can also result in neuropathic symptoms. The symptoms of neuropathy depend on the underlying nerves whose function has been affected. Neuropathy that damages sensory nerves can cause numbness, weakness and stabbing or burning pain symptoms that may worsen if not treated early. If there has also been damage to the type of nerves that convey the sense of touch, vibration, and temperature, patients may experience tingling, numbness, or the sense of wearing an invisible glove or sock over their hands or feet. If there is damage to motor nerves that control stability and movement, patients may have a lack of coordination, weakness, or cramping. Finally, if the autonomic nerves that regulate internal organ function have also been damaged, patients may experience a reduction in saliva, tears, perspiration, or other organ or gland dysfunction. Neuropathy is a leading cause of chronic pain, which persists for three months or more. About 8% of people who Continue reading >>

What Is Peripheral Neuropathy?

What Is Peripheral Neuropathy?

Peripheral neuropathy refers to a problem with the peripheral nerves. These nerves send messages from the central nervous system, the brain and the spinal cord to the rest of the body. The peripheral nerves tell the body when, for example, the hands are cold. It can lead to tingling, prickling, numbness, and muscle weakness in various parts of the body. Peripheral neuropathy can affect a range of different nerves, so it can impact a variety of locations in different ways. It can affect a single nerve, or several nerves at the same time. It is also associated with a number of different underlying medical conditions. Sometimes there is no identifiable cause. It affects some 20 million people in the United States (U.S.). Here are some key points about peripheral neuropathy. More detail is in the main article. Neuropathy is a common complication of a number of different medical conditions. It can involve the autonomic nerves, the motor nerves, and the sensory nerves. Sometimes it affects a single nerve or nerve set, for example, in Bell's Palsy, which affects a facial nerve. Physical trauma, repetitive injury, infection, metabolic problems, and exposure to toxins and some drugs are all possible causes. Treatment Treatment either targets the underlying cause, or it aims to provide symptomatic pain relief and prevent further damage. In the case of diabetic neuropathy, addressing high blood sugars can prevent further nerve damage. For toxic causes, removing the exposure to a suspected toxin, or stopping a drug, can halt further nerve damage. Medications can relieve pain and reduce burning, numbness, and tingling. Drug treatment for neuropathic pain Medications that may help include: Opioid painkillers come with warnings about safety risks. Doctors can also prescribe skin patch Continue reading >>

Neuropathy Symptoms And Treatment

Neuropathy Symptoms And Treatment

Neuropathy is a common disorder that stems from damage to the peripheral nerves, especially those that branch out through the arms, legs, fingers and toes. Neuropathy symptoms include weakness, numbness, tingling, and burning or painful sensations. Diabetes is a frequent cause of neuropathy, but peripheral neuropathy can also be due to toxic trauma (such as from chemotherapy) or mechanical injury, as with carpal tunnel syndrome. It can be caused by putting pressure on nerves, such as the prolonged use of crutches, or even by sitting in the same position for too long. Disorders such as atherosclerosis , autoimmunity, advanced kidney disease and hypothyroidism may also be to blame, as well as certain drugs or environmental toxins. What is the conventional neuropathy treatment? Conventional treatments include tricyclic antidepressants such as amitriptyline (Elavil, Endep) and imipramine (Tofranil). These drugs act on the central nervous system and may reduce pain independent of their action as antidepressants (do not expect immediate results; it usually takes a few weeks for them to bring relief). Common side effects include drowsiness, dry mouth, urinary retention and dizziness. Anti-seizure medications such as phenytoin (Dilantin), carbamazepine (tegretol) and gabapentin (Neurontin) are also used effectively for peripheral neuropathy. If neuropathic pain is due to compression of a nerve by a tumor or a ruptured disc, surgery may be recommended. What neuropathy treatment and natural remedies does Dr. Weil recommend? Your first step should be a general medical checkup to determine if an underlying disease or injury is the cause of your neuropathy symptoms, and if so, to determine its nature. Your doctor should do complete blood work and may refer you to a neurologist who Continue reading >>

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