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Non Compliance Diabetes Mellitus

Glycemic Control And Medication Compliance In Diabetic Patients In A Pharmacist-managed Clinic In Hong Kong

Glycemic Control And Medication Compliance In Diabetic Patients In A Pharmacist-managed Clinic In Hong Kong

Medication noncompliance has a significant impact on morbidity, mortality, and quality of life in diabetic patients.[ 9 , 10 , 11 ] Problems with compliance may be related to patient demographics, the complexity of the drug regimen, dosage frequency, adverse effects, or some combination of these. The percentage of noncompliant patients was similar between the sexes in this study. However, patients with more education appeared to have better compliance than those with less education. It is commonly believed that elderly patients are less adherent to therapy because of declining cognitive function. This was not the case in this study. There are two possible explanations for this. First, older patients are more likely to have disease progression, leading to increased awareness of the illnesses and better motivation to comply with treatment. Second, older patients in Hong Kong often have support from family members or caretakers. During treatment, diabetic patients may not always understand their disease, and they may forget or misunderstand the instructions given by physicians and pharmacists. Some patients in the study group adjusted the dosage of their medications according to the severity of their hyperglycemic symptoms. Some patients did not even know the purpose of the drugs, while others took their medications at inappropriate times (such as, in the case of acarbose, long before meals). Enhancing patients' medication knowledge could improve compliance. In a study by Raji et al.,[ 12 ] 106 patients with HbA1c concentrations greater than 8.5% were randomly assigned to either intensive or passive education. Patients from both groups were found to have substantial improvement in HbA1c levels; thus, an educational intervention was effective, regardless of its intensity. Continue reading >>

Recommendations For Improving Adherence To Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus Therapy-focus On Optimizing Oral And Non-insulin Therapies

Recommendations For Improving Adherence To Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus Therapy-focus On Optimizing Oral And Non-insulin Therapies

Recommendations for Improving Adherence to Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus Therapy-Focus on Optimizing Oral and Non-Insulin Therapies Supplements > Improving Adherence in the Treatment of Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus: Opportunities for Managed Care Published on: April 20, 2012 Recommendations for Improving Adherence to Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus Therapy-Focus on Optimizing Oral and Non-Insulin Therapies Adherence to therapy in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus is contingent upon a number of variables, including variables specific to the patient, to the provider, and to the treatment. While treatment selection will involve consideration to maximize effectiveness and minimize side effects, the physician must also take into account the priorities and preferences of each individual patient. For some patients, the risk of weight gain may exert a significant influence on adherence, while for others the risk of hypoglycemia or the cost of medications may be more important factors. It is incumbent upon physicians to discuss these issues with patients and to develop a patient-centric treatment plan to achieve optimal adherence and therapeutic outcomes. The nature of the clinical setting can also influence the likelihood of patient adherence to treatment. A multidisciplinary team approach to diabetes management has been shown to improve outcomes and to have a neutral or beneficial effect on costs. The treatment plan itself plays an additional role in the likelihood of a patient adhering to treatment. Less complex treatment regimens with fewer pills are associated with higher rates of adherence, as are fixed-dose combinations for those patients requiring combination therapy. Frequency and timing of dosing are also important aspects of adherence, as once-daily dosing is associated with hi Continue reading >>

Non-adherence In Type 2 Diabetes: Practical Considerations For Interpreting The Literature

Non-adherence In Type 2 Diabetes: Practical Considerations For Interpreting The Literature

Non-adherence in type 2 diabetes: practical considerations for interpreting the literature 1College of Pharmacy and Nutrition, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan 2Leslie Dan Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada Correspondence: David F Blackburn College of Pharmacy and Nutrition, 110 Science Place, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada, S7N 5C9 Te l +1 306 966 2081 Fax +1 306 966 6377 Email [email protected] Author information Copyright and License information Disclaimer Copyright 2013 Blackburn et al, publisher and licensee Dove Medical Press Ltd This is an Open Access article which permits unrestricted noncommercial use, provided the original work is properly cited. This article has been cited by other articles in PMC. The rising prevalence of type 2 diabetes poses a serious threat to human health and the viability of many health care systems around the world. Although several prescription medications can play a vital role in controlling symptoms and preventing complications, non-adherence to these therapies is highly prevalent and has been linked to increases in morbidity, mortality, and health care costs. Although a vast array of significant adherence predictors has been identified, the ability to explain or predict non-adherence with known risk-factors remains poor. Further, the definitions, outcomes, and various measures used in the non-adherence literature can be misleading for the unfamiliar reviewer. In this narrative review, a practical overview of important considerations for interpreting adherence endpoints and measures is discussed. Also, an organizational framework is proposed to consider published adherence interventions. This framework may allow for a unique appreciation into areas of limited knowledge and th Continue reading >>

Diabetics & Non-compliance

Diabetics & Non-compliance

Diabetics can develop high levels of glucose in their bloodstreams. Without proper diet, exercise, regular checkups and monitoring of blood glucose levels, high glucose can lead to several complications, including some that are life-threatening. Despite this danger, health professionals find too many diabetic patients don't follow medical advice for controlling their disease. Video of the Day Medically, noncompliance, also referred to as nonadherence, means not following a physician's recommendations. Typically, diabetics may be directed to follow a specific kind of diet, take prescribed medication and exercise. Physicians and counselors may recommend additional lifestyle changes for the patient's optimal health. Examples of Noncompliance A noncompliant diabetic patient may not check his blood glucose levels regularly. He make take his medication incorrectly or not at all. He may fail to lose weight, stop smoking or exercise. His diet may contain too much fat and too many carbohydrates to control blood glucose levels, and he may not visit his doctor for regular check-ups. Diabetics who are noncompliant do not realize or accept that proper self-care will have a positive effect in the long-term. As a result, they are in danger of developing complications that affect the eyes, kidneys, heart, nerves, feet and more. Over time, uncontrolled diabetes can lead to permanent damage of these areas as well as stroke, heart disease and blindness. Dangers of High Glucose High blood glucose, or hyperglycemia, occurs when the body doesn't have enough insulin or can't use insulin effectively. Hyperglycemia has a major impact on the complications of diabetes. Diabetic ketoacidosis occurs when the body burns fat instead of glucose for energy. It's a serious condition, affecting primarily Continue reading >>

Poor Medication Adherence In Type 2 Diabetes: Recognizing The Scope Of The Problem And Its Key Contributors

Poor Medication Adherence In Type 2 Diabetes: Recognizing The Scope Of The Problem And Its Key Contributors

Poor medication adherence in type 2 diabetes: recognizing the scope of the problem and its key contributors We are experimenting with display styles that make it easier to read articles in PMC. The ePub format uses eBook readers, which have several "ease of reading" features already built in. The ePub format is best viewed in the iBooks reader. You may notice problems with the display of certain parts of an article in other eReaders. Generating an ePub file may take a long time, please be patient. Poor medication adherence in type 2 diabetes: recognizing the scope of the problem and its key contributors At least 45% of patients with type 2 diabetes (T2D) fail to achieve adequate glycemic control (HbA1c <7%). One of the major contributing factors is poor medication adherence. Poor medication adherence in T2D is well documented to be very common and is associated with inadequate glycemic control; increased morbidity and mortality; and increased costs of outpatient care, emergency room visits, hospitalization, and managing complications of diabetes. Poor medication adherence is linked to key nonpatient factors (eg, lack of integrated care in many health care systems and clinical inertia among health care professionals), patient demographic factors (eg, young age, low education level, and low income level), critical patient beliefs about their medications (eg, perceived treatment inefficacy), and perceived patient burden regarding obtaining and taking their medications (eg, treatment complexity, out-of-pocket costs, and hypoglycemia). Specific barriers to medication adherence in T2D, especially those that are potentially modifiable, need to be more clearly identified; strategies that target poor adherence should focus on reducing medication burden and addressing negative m Continue reading >>

Medication Adherence And Determinants Of Non-adherence Among South Indian Diabetes Patients Medi Rk, Mateti Uv, Kanduri Kr, Konda Ss - J Soc Health Diabetes

Medication Adherence And Determinants Of Non-adherence Among South Indian Diabetes Patients Medi Rk, Mateti Uv, Kanduri Kr, Konda Ss - J Soc Health Diabetes

Objectives: The objective of the study is to determine the adherence and determinants of non-adherence among diabetes patients. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional observation study was conducted for a period of six months in both inpatients and outpatients of diabetic clinic at a super speciality hospital. The structured medication adherence questionnaire (MAQ) was administered to the eligible diabetic patients to assess the adherence rate and determinants of non-adherence. Results: During the study period, a total of 140 patients were enrolled. Out of 140 patients, most of them were females (n = 79, 56.57%), than males (n = 61, 43.57%). Among them (n = 49, 35%) patients were in the age group greater than or equal to 61 years followed by (n = 42, 30%) patients between 51-60 years and others. The overall medication adherence rate was found to be 47.85%. The main factors for non-adherence were lack of finance (n = 43, 55.84%), forgetfulness (n = 36, 46.75%), being busy (n = 34, 44.15%), medicines inaccessibility (n = 15, 19.48%) and others. Conclusion: The overall medication adherence rate was found to be unsatisfactory. The main challenging factors affecting medication adherence were lack of finance, forgetfulness, being busy, medicines inaccessibility and side effects of drugs. Keywords:Adherence, determinants, diabetes, India Medi RK, Mateti UV, Kanduri KR, Konda SS. Medication adherence and determinants of non-adherence among south Indian diabetes patients. J Soc Health Diabetes 2015;3:48-51 Medi RK, Mateti UV, Kanduri KR, Konda SS. Medication adherence and determinants of non-adherence among south Indian diabetes patients. J Soc Health Diabetes [serial online] 2015 [cited2018 Mar 28];3:48-51. Available from: Medication adherence is a leading issue and a huge b Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetic Patients Compliance With Drug Therapy And Glycaemic Control

Type 2 Diabetic Patients Compliance With Drug Therapy And Glycaemic Control

Jacek Kasznicki, Agnieszka Gowacka, Jzef Drzewoski Clinic of Internal Diseases with the Diabetology and Clinical Pharmacology Unit, Medical University of d, Poland Type 2 diabetic patients compliance with drug Introduction: It has been shown that despite effective methods of treatment 50% of diabetic patients fail to achieve satisfactory glycaemic control, which leads to accelerated development of complications and in- creased mortality. Clinical experience indicates that no improvement of metabolic control is possible without patient compliance. The aim of our study was to evalu- ate the effects of age, sex, educational background, du- ration of diabetes, dosage regimens of oral antidiabe- tics, insulin therapy, level of patient independence, fami- ly support, co-morbidities, treatment at outpatient dia- betes clinics and patient knowledge of diabetes and its complications on compliance with drug therapy and the maintenance of glycaemic control by patients with type Material and methods: The study enrolled 200 patients (124 women and 76 men) managed at three general wards and four outpatient facilities in the d region. The evaluation was based on a 50-item questionnaire developed specifi- Results: In the study population, the most important fac- tors affecting patient compliance with drug therapy includ- ed: patient knowledge about the treatment of diabetes (P = 0.005; OR, 13.89), insulin therapy (P = 0.027; OR, 0.26) and other peoples support (P = 0.010; OR, 0.14), while the most important factors affecting patient compliance with the recommendations concerning glycaemic control were: age below 65 years (P = 0.027l; OR, 0.35), insulin therapy (P = 0.001; OR, 0.26) and treatment at outpatient diabetes Conclusions: Our study has demonstrated unsatisfactory com- pliance Continue reading >>

Medication Adherence And Factors Associated With Poor Adherence Among Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus Patients On Follow-up At Kenyatta National Hospital, Kenya

Medication Adherence And Factors Associated With Poor Adherence Among Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus Patients On Follow-up At Kenyatta National Hospital, Kenya

Medication adherence and factors associated with poor adherence among type 2 diabetes mellitus patients on follow-up at Kenyatta National Hospital, Kenya Gabriel Waari, Joseph Mutai, Joseph Gikunju The Pan African Medical Journal. 2018;29:82. doi:10.11604/pamj.2018.29.82.12639 "Better health through knowledge sharing and information dissemination " Medication adherence and factors associated with poor adherence among type 2 diabetes mellitus patients on follow-up at Kenyatta National Hospital, Kenya Cite this: The Pan African Medical Journal. 2018;29:82. doi:10.11604/pamj.2018.29.82.12639 Received: 01/05/2017 - Accepted: 08/01/2018 - Published: 29/01/2018 Key words: Medication adherence, glycaemic control, type 2 diabetes Gabriel Waari et al. The Pan African Medical Journal - ISSN 1937-8688. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. Available online at: Corresponding author: Gabriel Waari, School of Public Health, Institute of Tropical Medicine and Infectious Diseases, Jomo Kenyatta University of Agriculture and Technology, Kenya ([email protected]) Medication adherence and factors associated with poor adherence among type 2 diabetes mellitus patients on follow-up at Kenyatta National Hospital, Kenya Gabriel Waari1,&, Joseph Mutai2, Joseph Gikunju3 1School of Public Health, Institute of Tropical Medicine and Infectious Diseases, Jomo Kenyatta University of Agriculture and Technology, Kenya, 2Centre for Public Health Research, Kenya Medical Research Institute, 3Department of Medical Laboratory Science, Institute of Tropical Medicine and Infectious Diseases, Jomo Kenyatta University of Agr Continue reading >>

Effect Of Treatment Non-compliance On Mortality In Patients With Type 1 Diabetes

Effect Of Treatment Non-compliance On Mortality In Patients With Type 1 Diabetes

This study aimed to determine the effect of treatment non-compliance on mortality rates in type 1 diabetes patients. Results showed that mortality was higher in patients who did not follow the prescribed treatment. Approximately 10% of all diabetes mellitus patients have type 1 diabetes as a result of a complete lack of insulin. Insulin is a hormone that is responsible for the regulation of blood sugar levels. Increased blood sugar levels damage body organs which in turn leads to complications such as coronary heart diseases and stroke. People diagnosed with type 1 diabetes are most often managed by insulin therapy (daily injections or use of an insulin pump). Patients with type 1 diabetes need insulin to survive and to prevent complications. Treatment compliance and regular follow-up are essential for the adequate management of diabetes. The present study assessed medication compliance and clinic attendance of patients with type 1 diabetes. Patient data was collected from The Health Improvement Network (THIN) database that employs what is called the Read coding system to record diagnoses and treatment related procedures. Of the 2946 patients included in the study, 867 had a record of treatment non-complicance. Patients who had missed their follow up visits were also more likely to be non-compliant to treatment. The study established that treatment non-compliance was associated with increased overall mortality. In summary, results suggest that mortality is higher in patients who do not follow the prescribed type 1 diabetes treatment. This study is limited by the fact that the use of Read codes is subject to the health care provider's assessment of the patient. The accuracy and consistency of such reporting are not clearly defined. Further research is required to determ Continue reading >>

Sade Pblica - Factors Associated With Therapy Noncompliance In Type-2 Diabetes Patients Factors Associated With Therapy Noncompliance In Type-2 Diabetes Patients

Sade Pblica - Factors Associated With Therapy Noncompliance In Type-2 Diabetes Patients Factors Associated With Therapy Noncompliance In Type-2 Diabetes Patients

Factors associated with therapy noncompliance in type-2 diabetes patients Frecuencia y factores asociados al incumplimiento teraputico en pacientes con diabetes mellitus tipo 2 Lizbeth Hernndez-Ronquillo, MDI; Jos Francisco Tllez-Zenteno, MScII; Juan Garduo-Espinosa, MScIII; Erick Gonzlez-Acevez, MDIII IInstituto Nacional de Perinatologa. Mxico, DF, Mxico IIInstituto Nacional de Ciencias Mdicas y Nutricin Salvador Zubirn. Grupo AFINES, Facultad de Medicina, Universidad Nacional Autnoma de Mxico, Mxico, DF, Mxico IIIInstituto Mexicano del Seguro Social, Mxico, DF, Mxico OBJECTIVE: To identify the frequency and factors associated with therapy noncompliance in type-2 diabetes mellitus patients. MATERIAL AND METHODS: A cross-sectional study was carried out in 79 patients with type-2 diabetes mellitus seen in major hospitals of Mexico City. Patients were visited at home, from March 1998 to August 1999, to measure compliance with prescribed therapy. Complying patients were defined as those taking at least 80% of their pills or 80% of their corresponding insulin dose. The degree of compliance with therapy components (diet, amount of exercise, and keeping appointments) was measured. RESULTS: The average age of study subjects was 59 years (SD 11 years); 73% (n=58) were female subjects. The overall frequency of noncompliance was 39%. Noncompliance rates were: 62% for dietary recommendations, 85% for exercise, 17% for intake of oral hypoglycemic medication, 13% for insulin application, and 3% for appointment keeping. Hypertension plus obesity was the only factor significantly associated with noncompliance (OR 4.58, CI 95% 1.0, 22.4, p=0.02). CONCLUSIONS: The frequency of therapy noncompliance was very high, especially for diet and exercise. The English version of this paper is av Continue reading >>

Adherence To Anti Diabetic Medication Among Patients With Diabetes In Eastern Uganda; A Cross Sectional Study

Adherence To Anti Diabetic Medication Among Patients With Diabetes In Eastern Uganda; A Cross Sectional Study

Bagonza et al.; licensee BioMed Central.2015 Lack of adherence to anti diabetic medication causes suboptimal blood sugar control among patients with diabetes and can lead to treatment failures, accelerated development of complications and increased mortality. This study assessed factors associated with adherence to anti diabetic medication in rural eastern Uganda. A cross sectional study was conducted among 521 patients with diabetes in Iganga and Bugiri hospitals between October 2012 and January 2013. Respondents were patients who were18 years and above and had been on diabetic treatment for not less than a month. Pretested questionnaires were used. Variables that were collected included socio-demographic characteristics, possible barriers to adherence, and self management efforts. Adherence was assessed using self reports. Descriptive and inferential statistics were done to determine adherence to anti diabetic medication and the associated factors. The level of adherence to anti diabetic medication was 83.3% and factors that were independently associated with adherence were; having been on anti diabetic drugs for at least three years (OR = 1.89, 95% CI = 1.11 - 3.22), availability of diabetic drugs (OR = 2.59, 95% CI = 1.54 - 3.70), and having ever had diabetic health education (OR = 4.24, 95% CI =1.15 - 15.60). About four in five patients adhere to anti-diabetic treatment. Strategies aimed at improving anti diabetic drug availability and providing health education could improve adherence. Diabetes mellitusAdherenceMedicationPatients Diabetes Mellitus (DM) is a growing public health problem worldwide with an estimated 177 million people affected in 2003, 221 million by 2010 and is expected to rise to 300 million in 2025 with biggest increases in Asia and Africa [ 1 - Continue reading >>

The Relationship Between Depression And Adherence In Diabetes

The Relationship Between Depression And Adherence In Diabetes

Depression is a common problem among people with either type 1 or type 2 diabetes. It has been consistently associated with poor self-management and health outcomes in diabetes, both cross-sectionally and over time. Research suggests that depression may affect diabetes health outcomes through its relationship to suboptimal treatment adherence. Here we use the term ‘adherence’ to refer to the degree to which patients follow healthcare provider recommendations regarding prescribed medications and diabetes self-management activities. Although previous work often used the term compliance, this has fallen out of favor because of the passive role implied for the patient. Some may prefer the term ‘concordance’ to further emphasize the non-hierarchical nature of the relationship between doctor and patient in developing a self-management plan and the fact that patients must first agree with recommendations before they can be expected to follow them. Regardless of the term used, it is clear that many diabetes patients do not take medications as prescribed and struggle with self-management. It seems plausible that the symptoms of depression (e.g., concentration difficulties, loss of interest, pessimism about the future) would complicate the already difficult task of diabetes self-management for patients. However, the causal nature of this relationship has not been conclusively demonstrated. Furthermore, subclinical depressive symptoms and diabetes-related distress are more common than psychiatric presentations of depression, such as major depressive disorder, and are also consistently related to problems with adherence and glycemic control. Often, these non-psychiatric constructs may be confounded with measures of ‘clinical depression.’ Thus, assessment and treatment o Continue reading >>

Factors Contributing To Non-compliance Among Diabetics Attending Primary Health Centers In The Al Hasa District Of Saudi Arabia

Factors Contributing To Non-compliance Among Diabetics Attending Primary Health Centers In The Al Hasa District Of Saudi Arabia

Factors contributing to non-compliance among diabetics attending primary health centers in the Al Hasa district of Saudi Arabia 2Department of Community Ophthalmology, Faculty of Family Medicine, College of Medicine, King Faisal University, Al Hasa, Saudi Arabia 2Department of Community Ophthalmology, Faculty of Family Medicine, College of Medicine, King Faisal University, Al Hasa, Saudi Arabia Department of Community Ophthalmology, Al Omran Primary Health Care Center, Al Hasa, Saudi Arabia 1Department of Community Ophthalmology, PHC Affairs, Health Directorate, Al Hasa, Saudi Arabia 2Department of Community Ophthalmology, Faculty of Family Medicine, College of Medicine, King Faisal University, Al Hasa, Saudi Arabia 3Department of Community Ophthalmology, King Fahad Hospital, Al Hasa, Saudi Arabia Address for correspondence: Dr. Ataur R. Khan, Department of Ophthalmology, Omran Health Center, Al Omran, Al Hasa, 31982, Saudi Arabia. E-mail: [email protected] Author information Copyright and License information Disclaimer Copyright : Journal of Family and Community Medicine This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 3.0 Unported, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. This article has been cited by other articles in PMC. The purpose of the study was to measure the rate of non-compliance and the factors contributing to non-compliance among the diabetic patients in the Al Hasa region of Saudi Arabia. A cross-sectional survey was conducted in the Al Hasa region during the period of June 2010 to June 2011. Random sampling was carried out for the selection of 535 diabetic patients from three chronic disease centers Continue reading >>

Compliance Of Diabetic Patients With The Prescribed Clinical Regimen Attyia Aa, El Bahnasy Re, Abu Salem Me, Al-batanony Ma, Ahamed Ar - Menoufia Med J

Compliance Of Diabetic Patients With The Prescribed Clinical Regimen Attyia Aa, El Bahnasy Re, Abu Salem Me, Al-batanony Ma, Ahamed Ar - Menoufia Med J

This study aimed at studying the prevalence of noncompliance among diabetic patients in Gharbia governorate in Egypt as well its causes, its effect on glycemic control, and factors affecting it. There is growing evidence suggesting that because of the alarmingly low rates of compliance, increasing the effectiveness of compliance interventions may have a great impact on the health of the population. Promotion of therapeutic compliance is considered an integral component of patient care. It has been shown that despite effective methods of treatment, many diabetic patients fail to achieve satisfactory glycemic control, which leads to accelerated development of complications and increased mortality. A total of 339 diabetic patients who fulfilled the inclusion criteria were recruited in the present study. Compliance to treatment was evaluated during patients visits to health units in Gharbia governorate. Medication compliance was assessed during a personal interview with each patient using a multiple-choice questionnaire. Blood samples were obtained for measurement of glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c). In the study population, the compliance rates were observed to be suboptimal. The most important social factors that significantly affected compliance rates included age, income, and educational level. Among the factors that significantly affected compliance rates were duration of treatment, presence of diseases other than diabetes, and the number of prescribed drugs. Another factor that played an important role was diabetes care costs. The most common reasons for low rates of compliance were forgetfulness and high cost of treatment. An improvement in the compliance level may be achieved through improvement of patients economic levels as well as reduction in the cost of medication. Continue reading >>

Are You A Non-compliant Diabetes Patient?

Are You A Non-compliant Diabetes Patient?

Are You a Non-Compliant Diabetes Patient? I have never met a person with diabetes who doesnt want to live a long and healthy life. However, people with diabetes (PWD) who dont have perfect glucose control or dont follow the exact instructions given to them by their healthcare providers (HCP) are often labeled as non-compliant. I see this all the time in our hospital with the medical students, residents, endocrine fellows, dieticians, CDEs and other faculty and staff. Once a PWD is labeled as non-compliant in the medical records, anyone who reads the note in preparation for a future meeting or consultation has already developed a preconceived notion that this person is a bad patient and doesnt follow the rules. It is a common situation that is pervasive among healthcare professionals in the community and is proven difficult to change or reverse. It also poisons the doctor-patient relationship, which I feel is extremely important for long-term success and satisfaction on both sides of the aisle! Why is it that so many PWD have less than ideal diabetes control and are labeled non-compliant? There are many diverse reasons, ranging from emotional, financial and physical barriers for the patient to uninformed and ignorant healthcare providers and, also, limited access to the best therapies currently available for many, many patients. The non-compliant label also stems from recent information that has emerged from very large databases (administrative claims and pharmacy refill records from large healthcare institutions) that people with type 2 diabetes apparently are not taking or refilling their medications regularly. According to these very accurate sources of prescription and refill information, a PWD is labeled non-adherent if they do not have medication in their possessi Continue reading >>

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