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Nightmares And Type 2 Diabetes

Link Between Sleep & Diabetes: Everything You Need To Know

Link Between Sleep & Diabetes: Everything You Need To Know

According to National Sleep Foundation, 63% of American population do not get enough daily sleep. Do you also know that most people who suffer from diabetes often have poor sleeping habits? This includes irregular sleeping schedule, difficulty falling asleep and staying asleep. And although little has been mentioned about caregivers and parents of diabetes patients, they are more likely to acquire poor sleeping habits and have a higher tendency to suffer from sleeping problems and consequently develop Type 2 diabetes themselves. So if you have diabetes or are currently caring for someone who has diabetes, this article will educate you more about how sleeping disorders can affect your health and how you can get better sleep. This article will cover the following topics: Relationship Between Sleep and Diabetes Your health and sleep go hand in hand. When you do not sleep enough, your body does not get the needed time to repair. As a result, you tend to be unfocused and irritable, and you suddenly have the urge to eat. If this scenario sounds too familiar to you, maybe you should rethink about the relationship between sleep and your diabetes. The Missing Link — Hormones Sleep plays a crucial role in restoring our body cells. Under healthy conditions, after eating, the pancreas secretes insulin to signal fat cells and muscles to absorb the glucose from food to be used for energy creation and prevents the body from using fat as energy source. This chain of reaction causes the blood glucose levels to resume normal. And to prevent the individual from feeling hungry, the body produces the hormone leptin to depresses the appetite. However, when it comes to diabetes individuals, the muscle and fat cells fails to respond to insulin. This causes a high glucose level in the bloodst Continue reading >>

Nighttime Hypoglycemia

Nighttime Hypoglycemia

An episode of low blood glucose occurring at night. During sleep, the body’s energy needs fall, and consequently the liver pumps out less glucose, the body’s fuel. In people without diabetes, the pancreas responds to the liver’s lowered glucose production by secreting less insulin, and in this way, a balance is maintained. In people with Type 1 diabetes, this balance is harder to maintain since the pancreas no longer secretes insulin. Instead, a person must inject just enough insulin — but not too much — before bedtime to maintain a normal nighttime blood glucose level. A number of things can throw off the balance. Injecting too much insulin or injecting the right amount at the wrong time can lower blood glucose more than desired. Eating less food than usual during the day or eating the evening meal or snack at a different time than usual can affect blood sugar during the night. Exercising more than usual during the day can also cause low blood glucose at night. Many of the classic signs of low blood glucose — including shakiness, light-headedness, dizziness, confusion, rapid heartbeat, irritability, and extreme hunger — can occur during the day or at night. Nighttime hypoglycemia has also been known to cause night sweats, headache, restless sleep, and nightmares. Nighttime hypoglycemia is a common problem among people who control their blood glucose intensively through multiple injections of insulin during the day. In the Diabetes Control and Complications Trial, a study that evaluated the benefits and risks of “tight” blood glucose control, people on tight control regimens were three times more likely to have an episode of hypoglycemia than those on standard regimens, and more than half of these episodes occurred while people were sleeping. Although Continue reading >>

High Blood Sugar And Nightmares??

High Blood Sugar And Nightmares??

Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community Find support, ask questions and share your experiences. Join the community For the last couple of days I have struggled to get my BG down. It's my own fault I know why it's happened, how to stop it. Anyway, I corrected before bed, but still went to sleep with high BG with an alarm a couple of hours later to test and correct again if need be. But what I have noticed, is that when I go to sleep with high BG, I get really bad nightmares! With really complicated plots and then I wake up and can't get back to sleep. That can happen. For any reason, be it hi or low BS. I know I hardly dream anymore and no idea why. I find I have very strange dreams if my BS is high or low at somepoint in the night - I could go to bed with a BS of 6, have a fantasticly odd dream, and wake up in the morning knowing my BS will be high and find it is! I wouldn't say they were nightmares just really odd...............but may be thats just me! If my BS is pretty level all through the night I wake feeling I didn't dream or if I did nothing amazing. I just must be knackered all the time. I rarely remember dreams. I often have crazy dreams but never thought about any connection to my BS - will think about it next time! Is it possible it's the other way around though? i.e. the scary dream triggers adrenalin and a glucose dump which makes you high?? Is it possible it's the other way around though? i.e. the scary dream triggers adrenalin and a glucose dump which makes you high?? Almost certainly, I had a bad dream a few weeks ago and my wife woke me up, I went to bed in the late 5's and woke in the 9's, usually my bg levels won't fluctuate much more than 0.5 - 1.0mmol/l when asleep. I did think about it, and before I was diagnosed I used to dream a lot, and w Continue reading >>

I Struggled With The Side Effects Of Non-insulin Drugs

I Struggled With The Side Effects Of Non-insulin Drugs

I Struggled With the Side Effects of Non-Insulin Drugs I Struggled With the Side Effects of Non-Insulin Drugs Leila Finn, 46, an artist in Atlanta, was diagnosed with prediabetes six years ago. Though she made a point to lose weight, she still developed type 2 diabetes. She struggled with the side effects of medication after medication, until starting insulin. Along the way she developed a love of exercise and is now a certified personal trainer who helps other people with type 2 diabetes. Leila says she had nightmares when taking metformin, and Byetta made her feel nauseated.(LEILA FINN) About six years ago, when I was 40, I had sinus surgery. Around the same time, I started having some problems. I was really thirsty and I was peeing a lot, so I mentioned it to my doctor. She tested me and I was just shy of being diabetic, a condition known as prediabetes. I was shocked. I'd never really thought about having diabetes. I didn't know anything about it and I didn't know what it meant. I just knew it meant you could get really sick. Then my doctor told me I could do a lot with diet and exercise. I thought, Whew! I'd started running in my 30s and I was a regular runner at that point. I'd just done my first 10K the summer before, and I'd done a little bit of biking. For the first year or so, diet and exercise did help control my blood sugar. My doctor had put me on the Atkins diet for the first couple of weeks, then had me go to a nutritionist, and told me to lose five pounds in that first month. I wasn't grossly overweightI weighed 187 pounds and was 5 feet 5 inches tall. However, I'd gained a few pounds every year when I was in my 30s, and I was having a really hard time losing it. After I was diagnosed with prediabetes, I started watching my carbs and the weight just cam Continue reading >>

Nightmares And Diabetes | Diabetic Connect

Nightmares And Diabetes | Diabetic Connect

I have been having terrible nightmares which started after I was diagnosed with diabetes. I don't take anything to sleep and I take my last insulin shot at least 5 hours before I go to bed. I was curious if anyone else has or had this problem? My nighmares are recurrent and very vivid. I also have these nightmares if I nap during the day. Any thoughts? Thanks, Angie I have been having recurring terrifying Nightmares. Anytime my blood sugar drops low while I sleep they occur. I believe that my right brain takes some control over my left side when this happens because of the vivid real images that do not make sense, but are expansive and memorable! I do not understand much of how it works, but I do understand 'Parallel' and 'Serial' port effects of the brain explained by a Doctor who The studied the brains of schizophrenic and stroke survivors. I have no idea, but I do believe my nightmares are have some of the effects described by Dr. Jill Bolte Taylor. Me to have worse nightmares aftr diagnosing ma dibetic.i am just 24 year old having dibetic for past 1.5 yrs nd I am controling by xercise nd diet. But on yst night (6-7-14). I had our tradional rice food ( I from kerala india , rice with curry is our traditional fud ) during night ( I used to skip those fuds max as part if ma diet ) . .nd had v bad nightmares like u mentioned. I slept only 1.5 hr. .I gussd I gone psychic im new the site but i thought i was the only one with these mess up problem i was diagnosed in 2011 at the age of 17 before i was diagnosed i have these nightmare that seems life like .but i couldnt move or speak then something scared me it felt like something was sitting on my chest nd then my heart was beating fast when i woke up i couldnt breath im tired of living like this Last week I got a couple o Continue reading >>

Nightmare And Abnormal Dreams: Rare Side Effects Of Metformin?

Nightmare And Abnormal Dreams: Rare Side Effects Of Metformin?

Nightmare and Abnormal Dreams: Rare Side Effects of Metformin? Theo Audi Yanto ,1 Ian Huang ,2 Felicia Nathania Kosasih ,2 and Nata Pratama Hardjo Lugito 1 1Internal Medicine Department, Faculty of Medicine, Universitas Pelita Harapan, Jalan Jendral Sudirman Boulevard No. 20, Lippo Karawaci, Tangerang, Banten 15811, Indonesia 2Faculty of Medicine, Universitas Pelita Harapan, Jalan Jendral Sudirman Boulevard No. 20, Lippo Karawaci, Tangerang, Banten 15811, Indonesia Correspondence should be addressed to Ian Huang Received 18 October 2017; Accepted 19 December 2017; Published 17 January 2018 Copyright 2018 Theo Audi Yanto et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License , which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. Background. Metformin is widely known as an antidiabetic agent which has significant gastrointestinal side effects, but nightmares and abnormal dreams as its adverse reactions are not well reported. Case Presentation. Herein we present a case of 56-year-old male patient with no known history of recurrent nightmares and sleep disorder, experiencing nightmare and abnormal dreams directly after consumption of 750 mg extended release metformin. He reported his dream as an unpleasant experience which awakened him at night with negative feelings. The nightmare only lasted for a night, but his dreams every night thereafter seemed abnormal. The dreams were vivid and indescribable. The disappearance and occurrence of abnormal dreams ensued soon after the drug was discontinued and rechallenged. The case was assessed using Naranjo Adverse Drug Reaction (ADR) probability scale and resulted as probable causality. Conclusion. Metformin might be the Continue reading >>

Nightmares & Metformin

Nightmares & Metformin

Registration is fast, simple and absolutely free so please,join our community todayto contribute and support the site. This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies. Hi people. Question for you. My doctor has upped my dosage of Metformin 500mg from 2 tablets daily to 3 tablets daily. I asked her what possible side effects could arise from this, if any. She said I could be "gassy" but that wasn't really a big problem as I deal with that as a side effect of them anyway. She said if I had any serious side effects to contact her. Since upping my tabs to 3 a day I've had seriously graphic nightmares that are infact horrifying me even when I'm awake; they are not the ones easily forgetful - you know what I mean, we've all had those from time to time. Does anyone else have horrific nightmares when they have upped their dosage of Metformin and if so, does it go away, or do I need to see the doctor again? I want to do anything to help maintain my diabetes but I don't want to become a psycho in the process :laugh: Any help would be most appreciated. Thanks. I've been taking Metformin along with insulin and have never had any problems with nightmares. But.......I'm only on them twice a day. Give it a few weeks and see if anything changes. Nope, never had nightmares from metformin. I get diahhrea once in awhile. I'd follow Karen's suggestion and give it a week or so if you can handle it. If not I'd make a phone call. Hope they go away--I hate nightmares. Is this a known side effect of Metformin?? I've awakened with night terrors ever since roughly the time I started it. For years.... I have to use a sleep helper to get me through these nights. Is this a known side effect of Metformin?? I've awakened with night terrors ever since roughly the time I started it. For yea Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes

Type 2 Diabetes

Whether you have type 2 diabetes, are a caregiver or loved one of a person with type 2 diabetes, or just want to learn more, the following page provides an overview of type 2 diabetes. New to type 2 diabetes? Check out “Starting Point: Type 2 Diabetes Basics” below, which answers some of the basic questions about type 2 diabetes: what is type 2 diabetes, what are its symptoms, how is it treated, and many more! Want to learn a bit more? See our “Helpful Links” page below, which provides links to diaTribe articles focused on type 2 diabetes. These pages provide helpful tips for living with type 2 diabetes, drug and device overviews, information about diabetes complications, nutrition and food resources, and some extra pages we hope you’ll find useful! Starting Point: Type 2 Diabetes Basics Who is at risk of developing type 2 diabetes? What is the risk of developing type 2 diabetes if it runs in the family? What is type 2 diabetes and prediabetes? Behind type 2 diabetes is a disease where the body’s cells have trouble responding to insulin – this is called insulin resistance. Insulin is a hormone needed to store the energy found in food into the body’s cells. In prediabetes, insulin resistance starts growing and the beta cells in the pancreas that release insulin will try to make even more insulin to make up for the body’s insensitivity. This can go on for a long time without any symptoms. Over time, though, the beta cells in the pancreas will fatigue and will no longer be able to produce enough insulin – this is called “beta burnout.” Once there is not enough insulin, blood sugars will start to rise above normal. Prediabetes causes people to have higher-than-normal blood sugars (and an increased risk for heart disease and stroke). Left unnoticed or Continue reading >>

Type 2 (non-insulin-dependent) Diabetes Mellitus. New Genetics For Oldnightmares.

Type 2 (non-insulin-dependent) Diabetes Mellitus. New Genetics For Oldnightmares.

Type 2 (non-insulin-dependent) diabetes mellitus. New genetics for oldnightmares. (1)Diabetes Research Laboratories, Radcliffe Infirmary, Oxford, UK. In the last five years, genetic markers for a large number of diseases have been localised using linkage analysis of DNA polymorphisms in affected families. Thesite of the genetic defect or defects leading to Type 2 (non-insulin-dependent)diabetes mellitus, a common illness with a major genetic component, remainsunknown. This is due, at least in part, to the lack of large well-defined Type 2 diabetic pedigrees suitable for linkage analysis. There are several features ofthe disease which make large pedigrees difficult to find. The late age of onsetof most probands means that informative older generations are often dead, whilethere is difficulty in detecting disease in younger generations. The diagnosticcriteria for diabetes are, as yet, dependent on an arbitrary cut-off along acontinuum of plasma glucose. The high prevalence of the disease may also produce problems as, in any given family, diabetogenic genes may be contributed by morethan one parent. Varieties of the disease with a well-defined inheritance, suchas maturity onset diabetes of youth, are more suitable for linkage analysis butmight be due to defects at a different gene locus. Despite these difficulties,once large well-defined pedigrees have been found, linkage analysis using bothcandidate genes and random highly polymorphic markers is the strategy most likelyto find genetic markers for the disease. Continue reading >>

Awakening From Sleep And Hypoglycemia In Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus

Awakening From Sleep And Hypoglycemia In Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus

Citation: Gabriely I, Shamoon H (2007) Awakening from Sleep and Hypoglycemia in Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus. PLoS Med 4(2): e99. Published: February 27, 2007 Copyright: © 2007 Gabriely and Shamoon. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited. Funding: Supported in part by the following National Institutes of Health grants: DK62463 (HS), DK20541 (HS), RR017313 (IG), and M01-RR12248. Competing interests: The authors have declared that no competing interests exist. Abbreviations: HAAF, hypoglycemia-associated autonomic failure; T1DM, type 1 diabetes mellitus Impaired Counterregulation of Hypoglycemia in Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus The Diabetes Control and Complications Trial in type 1 diabetes (T1DM) unequivocally showed the benefits of good glycemic control in preventing the complications of diabetes. Despite the treatment advances of the past decade, today iatrogenic hypoglycemia remains the major impediment to the appropriate control of blood glucose [1]. While imperfect insulin replacement places the patient at increased risk for frequent hypoglycemia, patients with T1DM also suffer from compromised counterregulatory responses to hypoglycemia [2]. The responses of all three main counterregulatory hormones normally responsible for rapid reversal of hypoglycemia are severely disrupted in T1DM. First, a decrease in plasma glucose cannot turn off endogenous insulin secretion (which is either insignificant or absent). Second, glucagon release during hypoglycemia is impaired soon after onset of diabetes. Third, epinephrine release during hypoglycemia becomes progressively defective in T1DM; i Continue reading >>

5 Nightmares You Don't Know Until You're Diabetic

5 Nightmares You Don't Know Until You're Diabetic

Hey, remember when everybody was freaking out about Ebola, because of an outbreak that killed more than 10,000 people? Well, diabetes kills 1.5 million people a year worldwide, more than 200,000 of them in the U.S. And you're probably never more than a few dozen feet away from someone who has it -- there are 30 million diabetics in the U.S. alone. In other words, for something most people consider too boring to even think about, the scale of the epidemic is mind-boggling. The U.S. alone spends an astonishing quarter of a trillion dollars a year fighting it. Or to put it another way, diabetes sucks a thousand bucks out of every single man, woman and child in America, every year. We previously debunked the myth that sugar causes diabetes, and when we talked to someone with one variety of the disease, we learned about the parts of the experience you never hear about. He says ... 5 The Disease And The Treatment Can Both Send You To The Emergency Room Comstock/Stockbyte/Getty Images Our diabetic, Zach, once woke up in the middle of the night starving, his legs feeling near-paralyzed. His memory of the incident is hazy, but the next thing he knew, he was on a kitchen chair wearing only his boxers with an empty jar of raspberry jam on the table -- he'd eaten nearly the entire thing with his bare hands like fucking Winnie the Pooh. Oh, bother. When he tested his blood sugar, it was 45 (the normal level is between 80 and 100). Anything below 70 is hypoglycemia, yet even after eating an entire jar of what is essentially pure sugar, his blood sugar level was still near emergency levels. If we're being completely honest, it's remarkable that he ever even woke up to eat that jam. By all rights he should've died in his bed. So this shit can get serious, is what we're saying. "Wait," Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Sleep: How High Blood Sugar Steals Sleep Time

Diabetes And Sleep: How High Blood Sugar Steals Sleep Time

It’s probably far from obvious, but your diabetes could be the reason that you’re having trouble sleeping. Type 2 diabetes affects nearly 30 million Americans—and the numbers are growing. Though most of us are aware that the disease has a serious impact on a person’s diet and blood sugar, fewer are familiar with the many related health woes that diabetes can cause—and how they can negatively impact sleep. Take a closer look at the surprisingly intricate relationship between diabetes and sleep—plus how people with the condition can get a better night’s rest. Diabetes and Sleep: A Vicious Cycle? The relationship between diabetes and sleep is complicated, and experts still have a lot to learn about how the whole thing works. What they do know? How much sleep you get could play a role in whether you develop type 2 diabetes in the first place. First, there’s the growing connection between sleep and obesity. Being overweight is a major risk factor for type 2 diabetes. (Believe it or not, up to 90% of people who are diagnosed with the disease are also obese.) What’s more, evidence shows that there are several ways that skimping on sleep could lead to weight gain: When you’re zonked, you don’t have the energy to exercise. Research suggests that people who stay up late spend more time sitting than people who wake up early. Feeling tired means you’re less likely to make healthy food choices, too. When you’re exhausted, pizza or takeout just feel easier (and more tempting) than a big kale salad. Staying up late means more time to eat. People who stay up into the wee hours at night have been found to eat 550 more calories than those who go to bed early. Lack of sleep messes with your hormones. Sleep deprivation causes your body to pump out more of the stre Continue reading >>

Nightmares.

Nightmares.

does anybody else get horrendous nightmares when they are running a little higher than usual? I am running a bit high at the moment because of my monthly (sorry guys) and I am having the sort of bad dreams that Stephen King would wake up screaming at. I have noticed this happening before when my bgl has been high. Am I the only weirdo that experiences this? You must not lose faith in humanity. Humanity is an ocean; if a few drops of the ocean are dirty, the ocean does not become dirty. I only have nightmares when low. When Im high I dream about drinking everything in site which wakes me up to test! I was posting a new thread about nightmares when I saw yours. Yes, I have nightmares when I'm high--they are so bad I fall out of bed. My doctors are becoming suspicious of my husband because I have so many bruises in strange places. I'll admit I let my BGL get to high. The highest has been 9.9 and after that it was high at about 8. I haven't been checking as regularly as I should. It could have been higher and I wouldn't know it, but I'd sure feel it. It does not help at all that I'm having hot flashes and I'm constantly hot all the time. I've been keeping the thermostat at 60 degress--which makes everyone else freeze. I would spend my time in my bedroom when I'm so hot, but it's 80 degrees even with 3 fans running--plus the AC set at 60. All the registers are shut except the one in DH and my room and it's still hot!! Does anyone know why this might be? If I put any more fans in here it will be like a wind tunnel--plus I have to turn the TV up and practically blast it to hear it over the fans. I still only catch 1/2 the dialogue on most shows. I try to eat a better snack before bed, (like an apple with peanut butter), but the endo gave me all kinds of grief about when and h Continue reading >>

Metformin And Sleep Disorders

Metformin And Sleep Disorders

Go to: Abstract Metformin is a widely used anti-diabetic drug. Deterioration of sleep is an important unwanted side effect of metformin. Here, the authors review and present the details on metformin and sleep problem. Keywords: Metformin, sleep disorders, side effect Go to: Diabetes mellitus is a common endocrine disorder. Millions of patients have to use anti-diabetic drugs. A widely used oral anti-diabetic drug is metformin (C4H11N5 · HCl). Under fasting conditions, about 50 % bioavailability of metformin has been observed.[1] After ingestion, metformin is slowly absorbed and reaches its peak level in blood in 1-3 hours, and its elimination half-life is about 1.5-6 hours.[1] The main route of metformin elimination is tubular secretion.[1] Metformin use results in decreased hepatic glucose production and decreased intestinal absorption of glucose.[1] In addition, metformin can help improve insulin sensitivity via increasing peripheral glucose uptake and utilization.[1] Similar to other drugs, adverse effects of metformin are reported. These can result in poor compliance of the diabetic patient,[1] causing an irregular intake of the drug.[1] Apart from the well known ill effects of hypoglycemia and diarrhea, other unwanted effects of metformin have also been observed. The effect of metformin on sleep is interesting. Here, the authors review and present the details on metformin and sleep problem. Go to: METFORMIN – INDUCED INSOMNIA Metformin – induced insomnia is widely mentioned in old and obese diabetic patients who have been diagnosed with diabetes mellitus recently and prescribed with metformin. The development of insomnia can be seen within a few days after starting metformin. This is an interesting unwanted effect that is not quoted in other antidiabetic drugs Continue reading >>

Low Blood Sugar Nightmares | I Am A Type 1 Diabetic

Low Blood Sugar Nightmares | I Am A Type 1 Diabetic

Balancing Life While Living with Type One Diabetes Itis veryapparent that low blood sugar levels are the worse but the ones in the middle of the night are even worse. I am not the type who usually wakes up when these lows occur, like many other people seem to do. This causes an even bigger issue in my own life. I have dropped so low that I have spasmsorseizures in the middle of the night, without even knowing! Last night, I was awoken by my boyfriend at 4:30am. Apparently I had woken him up. My body had been seizing, causing him to wake up, and he immediately knew my blood sugar was extremely low. This isnt the first time, so he knew he had to run and get me glucosetablets, a glass of juice and hope that I would snap out of it. I tend to be mean and aggressivein my state of comatose, or extremely low blood sugar. I do not remember anything that occurredduring that state either. According to my boyfriend, it took about a half hour for me to come back to my normal state. I had been arguing with him and refusing to check my blood sugar level. After having a glucosetablet, a glass of juice and going back into consciousness, I was finally able to check my own blood sugar level. I was 47 mg/dL. Wow what couldmy sugar levelhave been at when I was out of it?!? This is my current basal rate (or amount of insulin I receive each hour from my insulin pump). Adjustments have been now made, so I no longer have extreme lows in the morning! Now that I am aware of what happened in the middle of the night, I need to think about what to do so it doesnt happen again. I need to lower the amount of insulin (basal)I receive throughout the night, I need set an alarm and actually wake up at 2am to check my blood sugar level and I need to thank my boyfriend for being the greatest and helping me Continue reading >>

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