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Nfpa 1582 Diabetes

Diabetes Management And Hypoglycemia In Safety Sensitive Jobs

Diabetes Management And Hypoglycemia In Safety Sensitive Jobs

Diabetes Management and Hypoglycemia in Safety Sensitive Jobs 1Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, National University of Singapore, Yong Loo Lin School of Medicine, Singapore. 2Khoo Teck Puat Hospital, Diabetes Center, Singapore. 1Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, National University of Singapore, Yong Loo Lin School of Medicine, Singapore. 1Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, National University of Singapore, Yong Loo Lin School of Medicine, Singapore. 2Khoo Teck Puat Hospital, Diabetes Center, Singapore. Correspondence to: See-Muah LEE. Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, National University of Singapore, Yong Loo Lin School of Medicine, Khoo Teck Puat Hospital, Diabetes Center, 16, Medical Drive MD3 117-597, Singapore. Tel: +6565166707, Fax: +6567791489, [email protected]_haum_eeS Received 2010 Dec 8; Accepted 2011 Jan 19. Copyright 2011 by Safety and Health at Work ([email protected]) This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial License ( ), which permits unrestricted non-commercial use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. This article has been cited by other articles in PMC. The majority of people diagnosed with diabetes mellitus are in the working age group in developing countries. The interrelationship of diabetes and work, that is, diabetes affecting work and work affecting diabetes, becomes an important issue for these people. Therapeutic options for the diabetic worker have been developed, and currently include various insulins, insulin sensitizers and secretagogues, incretin mimetics and enhancers, and alpha glucosidase inhibitors. Hypoglycemia and hypoglycaemic unawareness are important and unwanted treatment s Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Worker Safety

Diabetes And Worker Safety

Anti-discrimination laws protect people with diabetes. Workers with diabetes can request reasonable accommodations to perform their job more effectively. Certain industries, such as law enforcement and transportation, have guidance and standards to determine whether workers with diabetes can perform a job. Diabetes has been called an epidemic in America. A 2014 report from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimates that 29.1 million people in the United States almost 10 percent of the population have the disorder. Of those, 8.1 million are undiagnosed. The seventh leading cause of death in the nation, diabetes can lead to heart disease, stroke, kidney disease, vision problems and lower limb amputation if not controlled. So what are the implications for worker safety? The blood of a person with diabetes has too much glucose, resulting in possible health issues. In people with type 1 diabetes, the pancreas makes little or no insulin, which is needed to turn sugar and other food into energy. With type 2 diabetes the most common type the body improperly uses insulin, leading to abnormal blood glucose levels. Concerns about worker safety focus mainly on hypoglycemia, a state of low blood glucose. Symptoms of hypoglycemia range from hunger and dizziness to confusion and unconsciousness. In contrast, hyperglycemia occurs when blood glucose is high because the body has too little insulin or is improperly using insulin, resulting in symptoms such as hunger, thirst and frequent urination. Left untreated, hyperglycemia can lead to diabetic coma. When sugar gets very high, it can affect their cognitive abilities, it can affect vision, said Dr. Daniel Samo, member of the American College of Occupational and Environmental Medicine board of directors and medical directo Continue reading >>

Cdc - Fire Fighter Fatality Investigation And Prevention Program: Fire Fighter Fatality Investigation Report F2012-20

Cdc - Fire Fighter Fatality Investigation And Prevention Program: Fire Fighter Fatality Investigation Report F2012-20

Death in the Line of Duty...A summary of a NIOSH fire fighter fatality investigation On January 9, 2012, a 63-year-old male volunteer fire fighter (the FF) was dispatched at 0633 hours to a motor vehicle crash involving three vehicles with possible entrapment. At the scene, the FF operated the pumper as crew members utilized a handline to wash the fuel away from the vehicles. A short while later the Chief found the FF collapsed on the elevated pump platform. Crew members pulled the FF from the pumper to the ground, assessed him, and found him to be unresponsive, not breathing, and without a pulse. An ambulance was requested as cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) was begun (0705 hours). A paramedic ambulance arrived 15 minutes later and began advanced life support. The FF was transported to the local hospitals emergency department (ED) arriving at 0749 hours. Inside the ED, cardiac resuscitation efforts continued for an additional 6 minutes when the FF was pronounced dead. The death certificate, completed by the county coroner, listed acute myocardial infarction due to thrombosis of the left main coronary artery due to atherosclerotic coronary artery disease with cardiomegaly (830) grams as the cause of death. The autopsy report, completed by a pathologist, listed acute myocardial infarction as the cause of death and strenuous activity during rescue procedures as a contributing factor. Given the FFs history of underlying coronary heart disease (CHD), NIOSH investigators concluded that the physical stress of responding to the call and performing driver/operator duties triggered his heart attack and subsequent sudden cardiac death. NIOSH investigators offer the following recommendations to address safety and health issues and prevent similar incidents in the future. Provi Continue reading >>

Lifescanwellnesscenters.com

Lifescanwellnesscenters.com

Experts consider police officers and firefighters to have the highest risk for heart disease, pulmonary disease and cancer of any occupation. With the ever increasing extreme physical requirements, high stress environments, and chaotic schedules police and fire departments must look towards new methods of prevention and intervention to protect the health and ensure the longevity ofyour most valuable assetsyour employees. Exclusively designed to meet the unique needs of public safety departments, Life Scan offers an annual occupational health, wellness, and fitness evaluation that focuses on early detection and prevention. We will assist your department in complying with OSHA and state guidelines as well as NFPA medical standards. We will assist you in consistently controlling your medical clearance rates and to ensure long-term healthy employees. Our unique approachthat allows us to successfully identify virtually every disease and we will help you in achieveyour personal and departmental health and wellness initiatives and going beyond. The Life Scan Wellness Program is an integrated medical approach to firefighter and police officer exams that combines an annual physical with life-saving, early detection testing for major diseases such as heart disease, stroke, cancer, diabetes, and aneurysms before they reach a catastrophic level. It provides your firefighter with a thorough assessment of their health as well as recommendations for achieving and maintaining long term wellbeing and managing medical risks. Each Life Scan exam has the added value benefit of ultrasound imaging assessments of the internal organs, heart,and vascular system as well as cardiac and pulmonary testing, extensive laboratory blood profiles, infectious disease testing, diet and nutritional analys Continue reading >>

Ifsta Chapter 2 Flashcards | Quizlet

Ifsta Chapter 2 Flashcards | Quizlet

Year that Type II diabetes no longer prohibited a person from being hired as a FF NFPA 1582 previously prohibited a person with type II diabetes from being hired as a FF Any agent, condition, or experience that causes stress Program to help employees and their families with work or personal problems Standard on Fire Department Infection Control Program Standard on Comprehensive Occupation Medical Program for Fire Departments Standard on the Rehabilitation Process for members During Emergency Operations and Training Exercises Standard on Selection, Care, and Maintenance of Protective Ensembles for Structural Fire Fighting and Proximity Fire Fighting Standard on Open-Circuit SCBA for Emergency Services Standard on Protective Ensembles for Structural Fire Fighting and Proximity Fire Fighting What is the most comprehensive NFPA standard dealing with FF safety and health? NFPA 1500 (Standard on Fire Department and Occupational Safety and Health Program) To promote safety throughout the fire service Written plan that analyzes the exposure to hazards, implements appropriate risk management techniques, and establishes criteria for monitoring their effectiveness Allowing firefighters to rest, rehydrate, and recover during an incident What NFPA standard prohibits any FF under the infuence of drugs or alcohol from participating in fire department operations? What is the goal of critical incident stress management (CISM)? To provide counseling for personnel involved in highly stressful incidents Purpose of Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) To ensure that workplaces are free from hazards that can cause serious injury or death Level of care that all persons should receive; care that does not meet this standard is considered inadequate The National Fallen Firefight Continue reading >>

Nfpa 1582 Blood Pressure Garlic Vs Jar Minced Fresh

Nfpa 1582 Blood Pressure Garlic Vs Jar Minced Fresh

One in three Americans have high blood pressure, according to the National Heart Lung and Blood Institute. Tinnitus Treatment Solutions vary in style and technology level. If you have high blood pressure is 130/80 is important to eat for blood pressure is the excitement of a zealot. Cover and let it steep for about 15 minutes. low blood calcium and high blood phosphorus leading to softened bones. 6 Natural Ways to Lower Blood Pressure Help your heart with the right foods, exercises and more By Karen Asp Making fruits and vegetables part of a lifestyle that includes regular physical activity as well as a diet low in saturated fat and cholesterol can work wonders for you when it comes to maintain a healthy blood pressure. Half Marathon, presented by Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and the Jimmy Fund, will be held on Sunday, October 11. But it does have an ancient background - and indirectly raises what could be an important issue to address if you are experiencing ringing in your ears (left or right or both!). This quiz is for adults. Does malta guiness lower blood pressure during pregnancy? Are blood pressure readings higher or lower after eating? Please tell us which questions below are the same as this one: Does donating blood lower your high blood pressure? Nfpa 1582 Blood Pressure Garlic Vs Jar Minced Fresh Filed Under: bloodpressure pantura-project Follow Dr If your magnesium level is too low your blood vessels will Vitamin D is a negative inhibitor of your bodys renin-angiotensin system Either one can cause low birth weight or premature delivery of the baby. How does potassium of celery help lower blood pressure? The issue of reducing sodium in cells of the body is not the single reason of why eating celery can help lower BP. Nfpa 1582 Blood Pressure Garlic Vs Jar Mi Continue reading >>

Diabetic Firefighters

Diabetic Firefighters

l33t speak - Substituting characters for letters in an effort to represent a word or phrase. (example: M*****ive) Distribution of another persons personal information, regardless of whether or not said information is public knowledge and whether or not an individual has permission to post said personal information Racist, sexual, hate type defamatory, religious, political, or sexual commentary. Posts must be on-topic, non-disruptive and relevant to the firefighting community. Post only in a mature and responsible way that contributes to the discussion at hand. Posting relevant information, helpful suggestions and/or constructive criticism is a great way to contribute to the community. Post in the correct forum and have clear titles for your threads. Please post in English or provide a translation. There are moderators and admins who handle these forums with care, do not resort to self-help, instead please utilize the reporting option. Be mature and responsible for yourself and your posts. If you are offended by another member utilize the reporting option. All reported posts will be addressed and dealt with as deemed appropriate by Firehouse.com staff. Effective immediately, the following moderation process will take effect. User(s) whose posts are determined by Firehouse.com staff to be in violation of any of the rules above will EARN the following reprimand(s) in the moderation process: 2. A Final Warning will be issued if a user is found to be in violation a second time. 3. A 3-day suspension will be issued if the user continues to break the forum rules. 4. A 45-day suspension will be issued if the user is found to be a habitual rule breaker. 5. Habitual rule breakers that have exhausted all of the above will receive a permanent life-time ban that will be strictly en Continue reading >>

Denver Fire Fighters

Denver Fire Fighters

Sign-up for newsletter & email updates Kaiser-Permanente Colorado, in collaboration with the City of Denver, has agreed to provide the following screening tests for fire suppression based on the additional health risks we have as well as requirements specified by the National Fire Protection Agency. This is not considered an occupational health physical and no information from this examination will be shared with the Department without written consent. Yearly health maintenance examination with primary care physician (PCP). Yearly fasting cholesterol profile, fasting blood sugar, complete blood count, urinalysis, liver test and kidney function test. Heavy metal screening if member has concerns about exposure or symptoms suggesting heavy metal exposure. HIV and Hepatitis C screening (if member requests or as indicated by CDC guidelines). Appropriate immunizations as recommended by PCP. 1 baseline ECGif member has hypertension or diabetes this may occur more frequently. Stress test with or without imaging shall be performed when clinically indicated by history or symptoms or once every 5 years in members with moderate to high Framingham risk score. Standard Kaiser Permanente cancer screening protocols for colon, prostate, cervical, and breast cancer. Recommend that all members complete PHQ-9, CAGE-AID, and Epworth-sleep screen prior to PCP visit to review results with PCP All services will be provided to the members in the HMO and the Kaiser Triple Option at $0 copay if they use a Kaiser provider. Due to federal regulations around qualified HDHP plans, some services provided will not be covered at 100% (for example, a stress test will cost approximately $400). Other services that are available and will be covered at the appropriate schedule of benefits: Continue reading >>

Type 1 Diabetes In The Fire Service?

Type 1 Diabetes In The Fire Service?

Being diabetic, I am a Fire Explorer, and I have been diabetic since 8 months old. Is there any advice that can help me to get hired either on an ambulance or a fire department? Permalink Reply by Jim Conrad on May 28, 2013 at 12:03am We have no policy against diabetics in the dept. But I know a private pilot who is diabetic, he just has to keep it under perfect control. Permalink Reply by Timothy John Dodson on May 28, 2013 at 12:12am There is no reason why you cannot get hired by a Fire/Rescue/EMS agency, as long as your DM is under control. I have worked with several EMT's/FF's who were diabetic and they functioned just fine. Don't let it stop you from realizing your goal. Permalink Reply by Ben Peirce on May 28, 2013 at 1:06am Thank you! The reason I ask is because my friend that works in a hospital has a friend who is diabetic and an ER Tech who got a job on an ambulance as an EMT and 6 months later got a letter from California saying that she had to resign, because she was not allowed to have an ambulance license and shouldn't have been able to get one in the first place,and can't be a firefighter. She tried to fight it in court and still was denied. Permalink Reply by FETC on May 28, 2013 at 7:50am Ben good question and to be honest it all depends on the agency you are looking to work for. Depends ifthey useamedical standard, and if they do does the standard havepre-disposed medical conditions that would disqualify you in a pre-employment medical screening. Some places use the DOT medical standard like a truck driver or an ariline pilot. Where I work we use the NFPA 1582 Part A standard for new hires and NFPA 1582Part B standard for re-current annual physicals. Then againI know many fire and EMS departments in the United States thatprovide no physicals what so e Continue reading >>

The Number-one Killer Of Firefighters: Cardiovascular Disease

The Number-one Killer Of Firefighters: Cardiovascular Disease

The Number-One Killer of Firefighters: Cardiovascular Disease Do you have an annual physical? What if we told you that youre probably already being tested to determine if you have a high risk for developing significant cardiovascular disease? What is your health care provider doing with the information? Firefighters = Elevated Stress Hormone Levels Its the jobalmost every aspect of our jobs teaches us to respond chemically to perform physically: fight or flight hormones. Fortunately, those hormones do make us perform better, faster, stronger. But theres a downside. Those hormones also are catabolicthey break us downand they adversely affect the insulin, master metabolic hormone. Stress hormones appear to affect insulin! You lack energy. Its getting harder to exercise, and when you do, youre not recovering. Youve been sick more and youre getting fat around the middle. Insulin resistance (IR) and the problems associated with it represent the single most important public health problem we face. About 30% of all Americans have insulin resistance. This silent killer is related to lipid (fat) metabolism disorders. In almost all cases, without lifestyle modification and medical treatment, IR will develop into type-2 diabetes mellitus, heart disease or hypertension, which may predispose you to stroke and other very serious problems. Insulin is a hormone made and released by beta cells of the pancreas, with many functions related to your metabolism. When you eat food, especially carbs, your blood sugar level increases. A normally functioning pancreas releases insulin in response to higher sugar levels in your blood. Insulin is your cells gatekeeper; it allows sugar to enter the cell, and without it, glucose cant enter cells to be used as fuel. Your body, particularly the brain, Continue reading >>

Realworld Training And Consulting

Realworld Training And Consulting

The IAFF Human Relations Conference will take place January 22-24, 2012 at the Lake Buena Vista Hotel, Lake Buena Vista, FL. Linda Willing will be presenting workshop sessions at this conference. Go to www.iaff.org for more information. The International Association of Women in Fire and Emergency Services will host a conference in Tampa, FL February 8-10, 2012. Go to i-women for more information. Fire-Rescue International is scheduled for August 1-4, 2012 in Denver, CO. Linda Willing will be presenting three workshops at this conference. Go to www.iafc.org for more information. Now available! On the Line: Women Firefighters Tell Their Stories by Linda F. Willing. This book features interviews with over 35 women firefighters from the United States and Canada. The book is available from major online booksellers, and signed copies may be ordered here . Hazing has been in the news again lately: the death of the college band member in Florida, the suicide of a young Army private in Afghanistan. Criminal charges have been filed in both cases. A Pentagon spokesman said that the Army has a "zero tolerance" attitude toward hazing, although did admit that it occasionally occurred within specific groups. In the Army as an organization, he said, "We treat each other with respect and dignity, or we go home." Such strong statements from the top down are important, and would be echoed by most fire service leaders. But do they reflect the reality of the world at the shift and station levels? If hazing is clearly unacceptable at an organizational level, why does it continue to occur at all? To put the best face on hazing is to see it as a rite of passage. You're new in the group, and you are made to endure a series of tests or humiliating acts to prove your worthiness. Once the tests h Continue reading >>

Nfpa 1582 - Not A Return To Work Standard

Nfpa 1582 - Not A Return To Work Standard

NFPA 1582 - not a return to work standard In my passion for law and medicine as a practitioner of both professions, I often see individuals injured on the job arriving in my medical clinic for a return to work evaluation, most notably firefighters. Many times they are accompanied with the instructions from the department to use NFPA 1582 as the medical standard for the injured firefighters return to work. I will tell you in my humble opinion, this is not the standard to use for the reasons to follow. NFPA 1582 is an entry level standard for use by medical professionals to screen your new firefighter candidates if adopted by your jurisdiction as the standard. For entry level candidates there are numerous medical conditions that will prevent their hiring in your department ranging from heart disease, endocrine problems, respiratory compromise and similar medical conditions. A department and their medical providers, need to become well versed (almost at an expert level) as to the medical conditions that will preclude a candidate from the hiring process. Possible discrimination - As our firefighters age, they will develop numerous medical conditions that may inhibit their performance on the fire ground and possibly create health and safety problems for them and their partner firefighters. Using the NFPA 1582 standard to judge their medical fitness can be interpreted as a form of discrimination against the affected firefighter. A quick explanation for this is found under the American With Disabilities Act of 1990 (ADA) prohibiting discrimination and ensures equal opportunity for persons with disabilities in employment, State and local government services, public accommodations, commercial facilities, and transportation including your fire department. An example is a firefig Continue reading >>

Diabetic Firefighters: Spot It And Fix It

Diabetic Firefighters: Spot It And Fix It

You are a paramedic on a crew doing a standby at a room-and-contents fire. After about 30 minutes, the fire is under control and you are setting up a small rehab area. Suddenly you notice some commotion as one of the younger firefighters is being escorted over to you. He seems to be fighting the other firefighters a bit as they do so. Paul is a 19-year-old college student who has been with the department for three years, joining as a junior firefighter while in high school. He comes from a firefighting family — his father, two brothers and grandfather are all active members. His crew puts him on the stretcher and informs you that he started acting weird, stumbling around, not able to do any of the typical tasks that he has gotten to be quite good at. They say he was acting drunk but everyone knows he is not a drinker. You start to assess him and find his vitals within expected limits — his heart rate is a bit elevated at 120 but nothing out of the ordinary for someone who just finished fire duties. He is certainly altered and a bit combative, definitely out of the ordinary for Paul, an easy-going guy with a long firefighting career in front of him. A few of his crew are hanging nearby but his best friend comes closer to you while you are running through some differential diagnoses. "Um, I think you should check his sugar." "OK, but why?" you ask. His friend seems reluctant to say more. "Look, if you know something that will help me treat Paul, you need to tell me," you advise him. Finally his friend states, "Paul was diagnosed with diabetes six months ago. He swore everyone to secrecy because he thought it would prevent him from being a firefighter. He takes insulin at every meal and at night." You check his blood glucose and it is 37 mg/dL, quite low. An IV and som Continue reading >>

Can You Be A Firefighter If You Have Diabetes?

Can You Be A Firefighter If You Have Diabetes?

Question we received last week from Brian in Bronx, NY. How can I become a firefighter with diabetes? Can someone handle the stress of the job? In this article, we will explore how one can pursue a career as a firefighter with diabetes. We have already looked at the likelihood of getting a job as a law enforcement officer, air traffic controller, a long distance truck driver, and an EMS/Paramedic with diabetes. We have also looked at whether or not one can be in the military with diabetes. Let us now look at the rules and regulations for becoming a firefighter with diabetes. There are many variables that affect whether or not one can become a firefighter with diabetes. These can be overcome. The main factor that affects it is the control that you have over your diabetes, as we have seen with many other careers and diabetes. One can join a local volunteer fire department or even a paid reserve if one has diabetes that is controlled. If you have Type 1 diabetes, you can work with an insulin pump and/or a continuous glucose monitor (CGM) to help avoid trending low blood sugars and achieve better control so that you can pass your yearly physicals and practice safety on the job. As one of our reader’s pointed out: it would be worth noting that different departments will have different requirements. It is important to check with your doctor and the department to make sure you are able to serve as a firefighter. There are also many other ways people can support their local fire department, including assisting with non-operational tasks such as fire prevention education, fundraising, administration, etc. People can check with their local department about support functions that may be available. A career as a firefighter, or any of the other careers that requires one to manage Continue reading >>

Nfpa 1582 And The Training Officer

Nfpa 1582 And The Training Officer

A question for training officers and chief officers do you have a medical/physical evaluation program and a physical abilities test in your department providing bi-annual (or annual) testing for your firefighters? If not, why not? Almost 50% of firefighter deaths are caused by a preventable disease such as heart disease and cardiac arrest. Is this one of the responsibilities of the Training Division or department to implement and manage? What do your firefighters do on a daily basis and how do you test their capacity for doing work? Using your departments job description, job analysis and essential elements of the job is the foundation for continuing medical evaluations and abilities testing. There are two distinct processes in play to determine the fitness of your firefighters. The first is the entry standards of a CPAT and using the NFPA 1582 guidelines as a basis for new entry level firefighters. The second, for your established firefighters or one returning from an injury or disability is an entirely different process which we will discuss later in this article. Entry Level Firefighters Preplacement. There are usually no issues with a Physical Abilities test for entry level firefighters as it is generally a pass/fail proposition and the Training Division may administer this portion of the entry test in some form or fashion. Many fire departments are now using the CPAT testing model with good results. If not using the CPAT, then your physical abilities test should test the essential functions of the job and not use a Combat Challenge or other similar competitive process. Failure of this physical abilities test automatically disqualifies the candidate. Candidate Medical Physical After the offer of employment by the department, the candidate is sent to a qualified med Continue reading >>

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