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Newly Diagnosed Diabetics

Children Newly Diagnosed With Type 1 Diabetes - Jdrf

Children Newly Diagnosed With Type 1 Diabetes - Jdrf

A diagnosis of type 1 in the family can be a difficult and traumatic time for everyone involved. Were here to make it just a little bit easier. Information about living with type 1 diabetes Learn about symptoms, the causes of type 1, complications and the difference between type 1 and type 2 diabetes Come to a Discovery Day to meet other families living with type 1, listen to speakers talk about the latest research and find out more about JDRF Read others' stories, connect with people with type 1 online and get support, tips and links to other resources to help manage your child's type 1 Get free information packs and leaflets on coping with diagnosis, type 1 technology, supporting your child at school or university plus much more Download our Type 1 Discovery magazine and get the latest research news, information about JDRF events and stories from people living with type 1. Find online and offline resources, helplines, support groups and practical information to help with diagnosis and management of type 1 Read real-life stories on our blog from people with type 1 on topics from travelling to technology and exercise to emotions One Walks take place all across the country. A family-friendly event for all ages and abilities with the chance to meet other families living with type 1 Will your child conquer this thrilling course to help conquer type 1 diabetes? Suitable for 4-18 year olds and a great day for everyone. Bring a picnic! Schools across the country are raising money to help fund our life changing research. View fun ideas for you to try at school Order your free KIDSAC, which includes Rufus, the bear with type 1 diabetes. He has special patches to show where his injection sites are. The pack also includes a handy kit bag and leaflets and further information to s Continue reading >>

Just Diagnosed With Diabetes? Here's Help

Just Diagnosed With Diabetes? Here's Help

Hearing the words you have diabetes scares some, upsets others, and overwhelms most. Yes, it's serious, and yes, you'll need to make some adjustments. But diabetes is a disease you can control, says Kim DeCoste, RN, CDE, a spokesperson for the American Association of Diabetes Educators. "An important first step for the newly diagnosed is to realize that you can be a healthy person living with diabetes. A few lifestyle changes can help you manage your blood sugar and feel better day to day. You can lead a very normal, healthy life." Here, six expert-recommended tips to help set you on a path for success: 1. Ignore the horror stories. Tell people you have diabetes and inevitably you hear about so-and-so's great aunt who had her leg amputated or the friend of a friend who almost went blind. True, these are real complications, but our knowledge about preventing them is so much better today, says Robert Henry, MD, president of medicine and science at the American Diabetes Association. Get your information from a reliable source: A good primary care physician or certified diabetes educator will help you best understand the disease, without overloading you with too much at once. You can also do some research on your own—visit the ADA at diabetes.org, or call (800) DIABETES. 2. Walk a little more. It's an easy way to boost physical activity, which lowers blood sugar for two reasons: Research shows that your body uses insulin more efficiently when you exercise, and working out helps you lose weight. Start with the old standards, says Henry: Take the stairs instead of the elevator, park in the farthest spot in the lot, get off the bus a stop early. Eventually work up to 30 minutes 5 days a week. For people with type 2, establishing a regular fitness routine may reduce or even e Continue reading >>

Newly Diagnosed | Diabetes Victoria

Newly Diagnosed | Diabetes Victoria

Find out more information about blood glucose monitoring . What can happen if I dont manage my diabetes? If your blood glucose levels remain high for prolonged periods of time it can lead to problems such as kidney damage, heart attack, stroke and blindness. These are very serious conditions. Managing diabetes well will help reduce these risks. How can I look after my diabetes? 6 steps to good health Ask your GP to refer you to a diabetes educator and dietitian. This can be at the local community health centre or private services. All people with diabetes should visit a dietitian and diabetes educator to learn how to manage their diabetes. The advice you get will be tailored for your needs. They will teach you how to make these changes part of your life. Certainly you will feel better with time Monitor your blood glucose levels regularly and record your results Always take the medications or insulin that has been prescribed for you Your diabetes healthcare team - A lifelong condition like diabetes is best managed by you with the support of a diabetes team, which may include your GP, diabetes educator, dietitian and podiatrist. Depending on your needs, the team may also include medical specialists, an exercise physiologist or counsellor. Membership with Diabetes Victoria gives you the support you need to manage your diabetes Attend one of our education events for people living with type 2 diabetes Call the Diabetes Helpline on 1300 437 386 to speak to a health professional Meet other people with diabetes at one of our support groups Check out some of the resources we have for free and in our online shop Continue reading >>

Free Kit For Children Newly Diagnosed With Type 1 Diabetes

Free Kit For Children Newly Diagnosed With Type 1 Diabetes

Is your child newly diagnosed with Type 1 diabetes? Then you may be interested in a Courage-Wisdom-Hope Kit, providing “help and hugs for families.” To help kids with Type 1 and their loved ones adjust, the kit includes a parent guide, kid’s interactive guide, sibling guide, drawstring bag for a meter and other supplies, and a write-on magnet and pen for keeping track of emergency contacts. While the kit cannot take the place of seeing a health-care provider, it is intended to help fill in some of the blanks. To order your free kit, call (800) DIABETES (342-2383), Monday through Friday, 8:30 AM to 8:00 PM ET, or order the kit online. This blog entry was written by Senior Digital Editor Diane Fennell. Continue reading >>

Patient Education: Diabetes Mellitus Type 2: Treatment (beyond The Basics)

Patient Education: Diabetes Mellitus Type 2: Treatment (beyond The Basics)

TYPE 2 DIABETES OVERVIEW Type 2 diabetes mellitus occurs when the pancreas (an organ in the abdomen) produces insufficient amounts of the hormone insulin and/or the body becomes resistant to normal or even high levels of insulin. This causes high blood sugar (glucose) levels, which can lead to a number of complications if untreated. People with type 2 diabetes require regular monitoring and ongoing treatment to maintain normal or near-normal blood sugar levels. Treatment includes lifestyle adjustments, self-care measures, and medicines, which can minimize the risk of diabetes and cardiovascular (heart-related) complications. This topic review will discuss the treatment of type 2 diabetes. Topics that discuss other aspects of type 2 diabetes are also available: (See "Patient education: Diabetes mellitus type 2: Overview (Beyond the Basics)".) (See "Patient education: Diabetes mellitus type 2: Alcohol, exercise, and medical care (Beyond the Basics)".) TYPE 2 DIABETES TREATMENT GOALS Blood sugar control — The goal of treatment in type 2 diabetes is to keep blood sugar levels at normal or near-normal levels. Careful control of blood sugars can help prevent the long-term effects of poorly controlled blood sugar (diabetic complications of the eye, kidney, nervous system, and cardiovascular system). Home blood sugar testing — In people with type 2 diabetes, home blood sugar testing might be recommended, especially in those who take certain oral diabetes medicines or insulin. Home blood sugar testing is not usually necessary for people who are diet controlled. (See "Patient education: Self-monitoring of blood glucose in diabetes mellitus (Beyond the Basics)".) A normal fasting blood sugar is less than 100 mg/dL (5.6 mmol/L), although some people will have a different goal. Continue reading >>

Newly Diagnosed With Type 2

Newly Diagnosed With Type 2

Tweet The diagnosis experience of people with type 2 diabetes can vary quite significantly. Some people are given a good introduction to what type 2 diabetes is and access to well run diabetes education courses. However, we’re aware that some people newly diagnosed with type 2 diabetes have been given a prescription for tablets and been told to get on with it! Our guide here provides important information as to what type 2 diabetes is and how you can get on top of the condition and start controlling it at an early stage. What is type 2 diabetes? Type 2 diabetes is a condition which develops if your body can no longer respond effectively enough to its own insulin to prevent your blood glucose levels from going too high. The good news is that you can fight back against this and get your body to respond better to insulin. Our Low Carb Program shows you how you can achieve this and, since we launched it in 2015, many thousands of people have improved their ability to control their diabetes. Coming to terms with type 2 diabetes Diabetes can be a tough condition to accept but the good news is that it is a condition which, with a bit of dedication, can be well controlled. It’s fair to say that there are a good number of people with type 2 diabetes that have actually been pleased to have got a diagnosis of type 2 diabetes because it has explained why they were feeling less than well and has given them the chance to take achievable steps to feel better than they have in a long time. The Diabetes Forum has thousands of posts from people with type 2 diabetes and there is no better place to find support and share your experiences. If you are finding the diagnosis of type 2 diabetes to be a shock, or are struggling to come to with your diagnosis, read our guide on accepting a di Continue reading >>

I Have Diabetes; Now What? – Guidelines For Newly Diagnosed Diabetes Patients

I Have Diabetes; Now What? – Guidelines For Newly Diagnosed Diabetes Patients

There was a time when it was considered not unusual to be diagnosed with Type 2 diabetes at fifty. The poor lifestyle choices, processed diet and nearly thirty years of work-life stress were expected to impact us by that age. These days, people are being diagnosed with type 2 diabetes at forty and with every passing year, the bar is lowered further, with the millennials now being diagnosed in their thirties and even their twenties! While a Diabetes Type 2 diagnosis can be overwhelming, it’s important to know that you aren’t alone. Try to think of this diagnosis as the first step towards learning how to control your blood sugar levels and take charge of your life. Our guidelines for newly diagnosed diabetics will help you navigate your way through all the lifestyle and diet changes you need to make, gain a better understanding of your disease, educate yourself on how to manage it, and how to find the right support you need. I Have Diabetes, Now What ? A new diagnosis of type 2 diabetes is sure to take you on an emotional roller coaster ride. It is completely natural to feel low after your diagnosis. Emotions run amok as you face the reality of future complications like heart disease, kidney failure and vision related problems, all while you grieve for lost health. Diabetes can be a tough condition to accept, so feelings of anger, shock, resentment, betrayal, shame and denial are completely normal. Studies show that it is not uncommon for newly diagnosed diabetics to go through a period of depression. But you can learn to deal with the emotions that come up with a diabetes diagnosis. We are not going to lie to you; you will need to commit to making changes so you can live a better life with diabetes, and that requires work. Since your body is no longer able to respond Continue reading >>

The Patient With Newly Diagnosed Diabetes

The Patient With Newly Diagnosed Diabetes

Professional Reference articles are written by UK doctors and are based on research evidence, UK and European Guidelines. They are designed for health professionals to use. You may find the Diabetes (Diabetes Mellitus) article more useful, or one of our other health articles. The initial management of someone who has just been diagnosed as having diabetes mellitus can have a big effect on the course of the illness. It is essential to establish a clear understanding of the disease, the benefits of all aspects of management and to allay unnecessary fears and myths quickly. See also the separate Management of Type 1 Diabetes and Management of Type 2 Diabetes articles. Assessment Indications for hospital referral at initial presentation include: Children and young people presenting with suspected diabetes should always be referred urgently, on the same day, for admission to hospital for initiation of insulin therapy. Adults who are clearly unwell, or who have ketones in their urine, or who have a blood glucose level greater than 25.0 mmol/L, should also be referred urgently for admission to hospital on the same day. Those who present with diabetic ketoacidosis or hyperosmolar hyperglycaemic state will require immediate treatment in hospital. Young adults (aged under 30 years) should also be referred to a specialist diabetes team. Clinical examination and investigations Measure height and weight, and calculate body mass index (BMI). Urinalysis: ketones and proteinuria. Arrange midstream specimen of urine (MSU) if protein is present. Identify any long-term complications of diabetes already present: Cardiovascular assessment, including smoking status, blood pressure, lipids and ECG. Examine feet for diabetic complications, including cardiovascular disease, diabetic neuropathy Continue reading >>

Diabetesvoicejune 2013 €¢ Volume 58 €¢ Issue 2 35

Diabetesvoicejune 2013 €¢ Volume 58 €¢ Issue 2 35

CliniCal Care guidelines for type 2 diabetes - designed to help newly diagnosed children and adolescents Warren Lee and Stuart Brink Type 2 diabetes, which previously was not typically seen until much later in life, accounts for 8% to 45% of new childhood diabetes in the USA according to the TODAY study,1 with a disproportionate representation in ethnic minorities and occurring most commonly among those USA, has recently published a set of guidelines on the treatment of type 2 diabetes in children and adolescents (28 Jan 2013) in cooperation with the Pediatric Endocrine Society and the American Diabetes Association.2 The AAP guidelines recognise how the di- agnosis of type 2 diabetes in children and adolescents has become a threat in many communities and because the problem is too formidable for pediat- ric endocrinologists to address alone, the guidelines call for general pediatric treatment and care. With considerable weight, the guidelines advise: ‘At any point at which a clinician feels he or she is not adequately trained or is uncertain about treatment, a referral to a between 10 and 19 years of age. This trend is also occurring internationally. The American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP), an organisation representing the interests of general pediatrician and pediatric subspecialists in the the prevalence of childhood obesity has increased dramatically worldwide with potentially dire consequences to the health of chil- dren and to their future. Drs. Warren lee of Singapore and Stuart Brink of the uSa introduce the new american academy of Pediatrics guidelines for newly diagnosed type 2 diabetes in children and ado- lescents, explaining how the evidence-based recommendations are essential for all physicians involved in the care of children. clinical care pediatri Continue reading >>

To Those Newly Diagnosed With Diabetes: What We Wish You Knew

To Those Newly Diagnosed With Diabetes: What We Wish You Knew

Home Education and Information To Those Newly Diagnosed with Diabetes: What We Wish You Knew To Those Newly Diagnosed with Diabetes: What We Wish You Knew Posted by Naomi Ruperto On January 8, 2015 In Education and Information When newly diagnosed with diabetes, its natural to feel overwhelmed, scared, uncertain, and confused, asking yourself, What will my life be like now? We asked our friends in the community what is the number one thing they wish someone who was newly diagnosed with diabetes knew. We received over 650 insightful words of wisdom, and gathered 12 of our favorites we hope youll find encouraging. The DOCs attitude and outlook on life is inspirational, and we thank every one of you for being a part of it. What advice do you have for the newly diagnosed? Its totally okay to get frustrated and mad sometimes because of diabetes. Have a good cry. Tell diabetes to go where the sun doesnt shine. We are human. Take a breath and sleep it off. The next day always seems a little better. Dont let people make you feel bad because you get upset over diabetes at times. When that sadness and frustration is the dominant theme in your diabetes care is when those feelings become unhealthy. Amber Rueger Diabetes is a marathon, not a 500 yard dash. There will be good and bad days. Learn to roll with the punches. YOU are in control of your disease, learn about it and be your own advocate. Joanna Wagner Moore 3. Its OK to Feel Scared, Cry, and Ask Questions Its OK, you might feel scared, but its OK. You might want to cry, go ahead and cry. And you might feel alone, but youre not. You might not see it now, but it gets better. Ask your 1,000 questions over and over again. Dont think ahead too much, and take one day at a time. My daughter was 8 when she was diagnosed. It was the Continue reading >>

Case Study 1: Patient With Newly Diagnosed Type 1 Diabetes

Case Study 1: Patient With Newly Diagnosed Type 1 Diabetes

Case Study 1: Patient with Newly Diagnosed Type 1 Diabetes Authors: Author: Zachary T. Bloomgarden, MD This activity is intended for physicians and pharmacists. This article reviews the physiologic consequences of diabetes mellitus and presents evidence that supports the benefits of aggressive intervention to achieve glycemic control. Real-life clinical scenarios will be presented to illustrate the practical clinical applications of insulin preparations in patients with diabetes. On completion of this continuing medical education offering, participants will be able to: Describe the physiologic consequences of diabetes mellitus. Outline the importance of maintaining glycemic control in reducing the risk of diabetic complications. Detail specific clinical applications of insulin therapy to achieve both basal and meal-related glycemic control. Manage a patient's glycemic status by continuously refining the therapeutic approach. Disclosure: Zachary T. Bloomgarden, MD, has disclosed that he receives research grant support from Hoechst Marion Roussel, Novartis, and TCPI Inc. He has consulting agreements with Hoechst Marion Roussel, Novartis, Parke-Davis, Bristol-Myers Squibb Company, Novo Nordisk, Pfizer Inc., Eli Lilly and Company, Takeda, and GlaxoSmithKline. Medical Education Collaborative, a nonprofit education organization, is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) to provide continuing medical education for physicians. Medical Education Collaborative designates this educational activity for a maximum of 1 hour in Category 1 credit towards the AMA Physician's Recognition Award. Each physician should claim only those hours of credit that he/she actually spent in the educational activity. Medical Education Collaborative, Inc. has Continue reading >>

Newly Diagnosed With Type 1 Diabetes

Newly Diagnosed With Type 1 Diabetes

Being diagnosed with type 1 diabetes does change your life. Type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune disease that causes the pancreas to stop producing insulin, a hormone that is necessary to convert food into energy. Suddenly, you're exposed to a whole new world—one that likely includes changing your diet (you may never look at carbs the same way again), taking new medications and learning about insulin and how to administer it to your body. Monitoring your blood glucose levels will eventually become second nature but the idea may seem scary at first. It may help to remember that you are not alone. According to the Joslin Diabetes Foundation, 1.25 million Americans are living with type 1 diabetes--including about 200,000 youth (less than 20 years old) and over a million adults (20 years old and older). With support from your family, friends and healthcare team, you can learn how to cope with diabetes in your everyday life. We're here to help, too. We'll show you simple ways to manage your diabetes, including common treatments and the information you need to stay up-to-date on your condition. We also have the resources, expert advice, delicious recipes and personal stories of inspiration to cheer you on. Unfortunately, there is no cure for type 1 diabetes. You should know that your diabetes will be largely managed by you and that can feel lonely. But your diabetes treatment team, which may include a primary care physician, endocrinologist, dietitian, and certified diabetes educator, will be there to support you every step of the way Add a few key tools, such as educating yourself about your condition and adopting a can-do attitude, and you'll be well prepared to handle whatever comes your way. So be kind to yourself. It's a lot to absorb at first but it will get easier. Deali Continue reading >>

Newly Diagnosed - Diabetes Ireland : Diabetes Ireland

Newly Diagnosed - Diabetes Ireland : Diabetes Ireland

When newly diagnosed with type 2 diabetes it can be overwhelming. Understanding what is happening in the body when a person has diabetes can help make sense of the advice your diabetes care team will provide you with. Diabetes is a long term condition where the amount of glucose in the blood is too high because the body cannot use it efficiently for energy. To use glucose for energy, your body needs insulin. Type 1 diabetes occurs when the pancreas completely stops producing insulin. This occurs most frequently in children and young people. Type 2 diabetes occurs when the body is making some insulin but not enough to meet the bodys needs or when the insulin produced does not work efficiently (insulin resistance). When insulin is not present or does not work efficiently, glucose cannot get in to the cells and builds up in the bloodstream. There is no cure for diabetes, but it can be managed. Balancing the carbohydrate foods (sugars and starches) you eat with physical activity and medicine (if prescribed) can keep your blood glucose in a healthy range. As you get older, your pancreas which produces insulin may not be working as efficiently as it did when you were younger Type 2 diabetes may be more common in your family Your may have had diabetes during a pregnancy or a baby that weighed over 10lbs Continue reading >>

Diabetes - Tips For Caregivers Of Newly Diagnosed Diabetes Patients | Edgepark Medical Supplies

Diabetes - Tips For Caregivers Of Newly Diagnosed Diabetes Patients | Edgepark Medical Supplies

:Diabetes - Tips for caregivers of newly diagnosed diabetes patients How can I help? Tips for caregivers of newly diagnosed diabetes patients A diabetes diagnosis brings lifestyle changes for both the patient and their caregiver. Caring for a child may be instinctual, but how do you provide the right amount, and best kind of, support to an adult who is adjusting to diabetes treatment compliance? Learn If youve never cared for, or known, someone with diabetes, the learning curve may be steep, and somewhat overwhelming. The good news is that there is a wealth of information available from health care professionals and organizations to help get you up to speed and answer your questions. Diabetes.org is one of the best resources for patients and their families. Sponsored by the American Diabetes Association , this website can point you to information, books, online communities and support groups. Take a Deep Breath If you or your loved one is feeling overwhelmed by all the lifestyle changes they will have to make, know that it will take time to learn new routines and make decisions based on doctors recommendations. Take a step back and talk about each change as it comes along. Armed with the knowledge youve gained from researching diabetes, you can help your loved one understand not only what changes have to be made, but why they are important, and how they will make them feel better. Acknowledge their feelings and listen to their questions, fears and concerns as you work through new routines such as glucose testing, a new diet and need for exercise. Support Without Pushing It can be a fine line between being helpful and pestering, as you work through the lifestyle changes that diabetes brings. Your loved one knows what they have to do. Ask what you can do to support and h Continue reading >>

A Longitudinal Study Of Interactions Between Health Professionals And People With Newly Diagnosed Diabetes

A Longitudinal Study Of Interactions Between Health Professionals And People With Newly Diagnosed Diabetes

A Longitudinal Study of Interactions Between Health Professionals and People With Newly Diagnosed Diabetes 1Department of Primary Health Care and General Practice, University of Otago, Wellington, New Zealand 2Faculty of Medical and Health Sciences, The University of Auckland, Auckland, New Zealand 3School of Social and Cultural Studies, Victoria University of Wellington, Wellington, New Zealand CORRESPONDING AUTHOR: Anthony Dowell, MBChB, Department of Primary Health Care and General Practice, University of Otago, Wellington, PO Box 7343, Wellington 6242, New Zealand, tony.dowell{at}otago.ac.nz PURPOSE We undertook a study to observe in detail the primary care interactions and communications of patients with newly diagnosed diabetes over time. In addition, we sought to identify key points in the process where miscommunication might occur. METHODS All health interactions of 32 patients with newly diagnosed type 2 diabetes were recorded and tracked as they moved through the New Zealand health care system for a period of approximately 6 months. Data included video recordings of patient interactions with the health professionals involved in their care (eg, general practitioners, nurses, dietitians). We analyzed data with ethnography and interaction analysis. RESULTS Challenges to effective communication in diabetes care were identified. Although clinicians showed high levels of technical knowledge and general communication skill, initial consultations were often driven by biomedical explanations out of context from patient experience. There was a perception of time pressure, but considerable time was spent with patients by health professionals repeating information that may not be relevant to patient need. Health professionals had little knowledge of what disciplines othe Continue reading >>

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