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Newly Diagnosed Diabetics

Children Newly Diagnosed With Type 1 Diabetes - Jdrf

Children Newly Diagnosed With Type 1 Diabetes - Jdrf

A diagnosis of type 1 in the family can be a difficult and traumatic time for everyone involved. Were here to make it just a little bit easier. Information about living with type 1 diabetes Learn about symptoms, the causes of type 1, complications and the difference between type 1 and type 2 diabetes Come to a Discovery Day to meet other families living with type 1, listen to speakers talk about the latest research and find out more about JDRF Read others' stories, connect with people with type 1 online and get support, tips and links to other resources to help manage your child's type 1 Get free information packs and leaflets on coping with diagnosis, type 1 technology, supporting your child at school or university plus much more Download our Type 1 Discovery magazine and get the latest research news, information about JDRF events and stories from people living with type 1. Find online and offline resources, helplines, support groups and practical information to help with diagnosis and management of type 1 Read real-life stories on our blog from people with type 1 on topics from travelling to technology and exercise to emotions One Walks take place all across the country. A family-friendly event for all ages and abilities with the chance to meet other families living with type 1 Will your child conquer this thrilling course to help conquer type 1 diabetes? Suitable for 4-18 year olds and a great day for everyone. Bring a picnic! Schools across the country are raising money to help fund our life changing research. View fun ideas for you to try at school Order your free KIDSAC, which includes Rufus, the bear with type 1 diabetes. He has special patches to show where his injection sites are. The pack also includes a handy kit bag and leaflets and further information to s Continue reading >>

The Best Gifts To Give A Family With A Newly Diagnosed Child With Diabetes

The Best Gifts To Give A Family With A Newly Diagnosed Child With Diabetes

"The overwhelming response was the same: be a shoulder to lean on and a good listener." You know you have really great people in your life when you get a call that goes like this: "Therese, my 13-year-old son’s good friend was just diagnosed with type 1 diabetes. Can you help me understand this disease and what I can offer the family to help them through this difficult time?" She said she thought about giving them a cookbook. This is the typical gift that someone buys for a family with a newly diagnosed child, because they often don't understand diabetes and, honestly, no one truly does unless they or their child has it. It's a chronic illness that is complicated, challenging, confusing, doesn't obey by the rules, has no rhyme-or-reason and is very difficult to grasp. A diabetes cookbook is a thoughtful gift, but maybe more so for someone with type 2 diabetes. Diet and exercise can help reverse the effects of type 2. This isn't the case for type 1 diabetes, as it's an autoimmune disease which destroys the beta cells in the pancreas that produce insulin. I started thinking about what a thoughtful gift would be for someone recently diagnosed with diabetes and went right to the source for some suggestions: one of my favorite type 1 diabetes parenting groups within the diabetes online community on Facebook. The overwhelming response was the same: be a shoulder to lean on and a good listener. Here are some of the other thoughtful ideas and ways you can be a good support system to a family with a newly-diagnosed child: A food scale that has different modes, like weight in grams for carbohydrate counting. These can be expensive, so maybe go in on it with another family. Depending on the age of the child, a teddy bear to hug while getting those first pokes. Different, fun mea Continue reading >>

Newly Diagnosed With Type 2

Newly Diagnosed With Type 2

Tweet The diagnosis experience of people with type 2 diabetes can vary quite significantly. Some people are given a good introduction to what type 2 diabetes is and access to well run diabetes education courses. However, we’re aware that some people newly diagnosed with type 2 diabetes have been given a prescription for tablets and been told to get on with it! Our guide here provides important information as to what type 2 diabetes is and how you can get on top of the condition and start controlling it at an early stage. What is type 2 diabetes? Type 2 diabetes is a condition which develops if your body can no longer respond effectively enough to its own insulin to prevent your blood glucose levels from going too high. The good news is that you can fight back against this and get your body to respond better to insulin. Our Low Carb Program shows you how you can achieve this and, since we launched it in 2015, many thousands of people have improved their ability to control their diabetes. Coming to terms with type 2 diabetes Diabetes can be a tough condition to accept but the good news is that it is a condition which, with a bit of dedication, can be well controlled. It’s fair to say that there are a good number of people with type 2 diabetes that have actually been pleased to have got a diagnosis of type 2 diabetes because it has explained why they were feeling less than well and has given them the chance to take achievable steps to feel better than they have in a long time. The Diabetes Forum has thousands of posts from people with type 2 diabetes and there is no better place to find support and share your experiences. If you are finding the diagnosis of type 2 diabetes to be a shock, or are struggling to come to with your diagnosis, read our guide on accepting a di Continue reading >>

Newly Diagnosed With Type 1 Diabetes

Newly Diagnosed With Type 1 Diabetes

Being diagnosed with type 1 diabetes does change your life. Type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune disease that causes the pancreas to stop producing insulin, a hormone that is necessary to convert food into energy. Suddenly, you're exposed to a whole new world—one that likely includes changing your diet (you may never look at carbs the same way again), taking new medications and learning about insulin and how to administer it to your body. Monitoring your blood glucose levels will eventually become second nature but the idea may seem scary at first. It may help to remember that you are not alone. According to the Joslin Diabetes Foundation, 1.25 million Americans are living with type 1 diabetes--including about 200,000 youth (less than 20 years old) and over a million adults (20 years old and older). With support from your family, friends and healthcare team, you can learn how to cope with diabetes in your everyday life. We're here to help, too. We'll show you simple ways to manage your diabetes, including common treatments and the information you need to stay up-to-date on your condition. We also have the resources, expert advice, delicious recipes and personal stories of inspiration to cheer you on. Unfortunately, there is no cure for type 1 diabetes. You should know that your diabetes will be largely managed by you and that can feel lonely. But your diabetes treatment team, which may include a primary care physician, endocrinologist, dietitian, and certified diabetes educator, will be there to support you every step of the way Add a few key tools, such as educating yourself about your condition and adopting a can-do attitude, and you'll be well prepared to handle whatever comes your way. So be kind to yourself. It's a lot to absorb at first but it will get easier. Deali Continue reading >>

Pardon Our Interruption...

Pardon Our Interruption...

As you were browsing www.apa.org something about your browser made us think you were a bot. There are a few reasons this might happen: You're a power user moving through this website with super-human speed. You've disabled JavaScript in your web browser. A third-party browser plugin, such as Ghostery or NoScript, is preventing JavaScript from running. Additional information is available in this support article. To request an unblock, please fill out the form below and we will review it as soon as possible. You reached this page when attempting to access from 35.226.59.238 on 2017-12-29 16:48:10 UTC. Trace: 9cf65386-27a0-4c27-99ae-9e9edd42b65a via 020cd700-68e4-4328-9c63-287de9f74976 Continue reading >>

Guideline Approach To Therapy In Patients With Newly Diagnosed Type 2 Diabetes

Guideline Approach To Therapy In Patients With Newly Diagnosed Type 2 Diabetes

Both the prevalence and incidence of type 2 diabetes are increasing worldwide in conjunction with increased Westernization of the population's lifestyle. Type 2 diabetes is still a leading cause of cardiovascular disease (CVD), amputation, renal failure, and blindness. The risk for microvascular complications is related to overall glycemic burden over time as measured by A1C (1,2). The UK Prospective Diabetes Study (UKPDS) 10-year follow-up demonstrated a possible effect on CVD as well (3). A meta-analysis of cardiovascular outcome in patients with long disease duration including Action to Control Cardiovascular Risk in Diabetes (ACCORD), Action in Diabetes and Vascular Disease: Preterax and Diamicron MR Controlled Evaluation (ADVANCE), and Veterans Affairs Diabetes Trial (VADT) suggested that in these populations the reduction of ~1% in A1C is associated with a 15% relative reduction in nonfatal myocardial infarction (4). Most antihyperglycemic drugs besides insulin reduce A1C values to similar levels (5) but differ in their safety elements and pathophysiological effect. Thus, there is a need for recommending a drug therapy preference. While the positive effects on prevention of microvascular complications were demonstrated with the various antihyperglycemic drugs (1,2,6,7), several questions are left open regarding this therapy in newly diagnosed type 2 diabetes: What is the comparative effectiveness of antihyperglycemic drugs on other long-term outcomes, i.e., β-cell function and cardiovascular morbidity and mortality? What is the comparative safety of these treatments, and do they differ across subgroups of adults with type 2 diabetes? Should we combine antihyperglycemic drugs at the time of diagnosis according to their pathophysiological effect to address the diff Continue reading >>

Newly Diagnosed With Diabetes

Newly Diagnosed With Diabetes

A comprehensive, curated set of diabetes materials for patients who are newly diagnosed, this collection answers common questions, such as how diabetes will affect one's life, how to monitor blood sugar levels, what to eat, and much more. This booklet provides an overview of the treatment options available for people who have diabetes, and stresses the importance of working with the health care professional and diabetes care team to find the right medicine. Literature is sent in a quantity of 10 per pack. A 3-month diary allows people with diabetes to easily record: blood sugar results before and after each meal and before bedtime; diabetes medicines, carbohydrate intake, activity, and ketone test results (if applicable). Literature is sent in a quantity of 10 per pack. This fact sheet provides an insulin and type 2 diabetes overview for patients. It outlines types of insulin used to manage diabetes and explains to patients how they can work with their health care professional to come up with an insulin plan that works best for them. Continue reading >>

A Pocket Guide For The Patient With Newly Diagnosed Diabetes

A Pocket Guide For The Patient With Newly Diagnosed Diabetes

A pocket guide for the patient with newly diagnosed diabetes Q: I routinely have only a short period of time in which to teach my patients who've been diagnosed with type 2 diabetes, and I sometimes find it difficult to drill down to the basics. Do you have any suggestions for creating a primer on essential facts and skills? A: In today's world of shortened hospital stays, patients with newly diagnosed type 2 diabetes (if admitted at all) are allowed little time to learn important facts and skills to keep themselves healthy and safe at home. Keeping this in mind, a concise care plan, which can be completed in a short period of time, needs to be utilized. This care plan will give your patient the basic information and skills he needs to safely care for himself until he's able to attend a more inclusive diabetes education class. Patients with newly diagnosed type 2 diabetes have a unique set of needs relating to education about their condition. Here's what you need to teach your patient before he's discharged from the hospital: an overview of the prescribed medication, including proper use, peak time, and length of action (Instruction on the proper disposal of sharps is needed if your patient has been prescribed insulin injections.) the purpose of a glucose meter, instruction in its use and care, how often your patient needs to check his blood glucose level, and an understanding of how to record blood glucose levels in a log book for use in care-making decisions his target blood glucose level (as determined by the healthcare provider) and at what level he should call the healthcare provider for glucose excursions an overview of hypoglycemia and hyperglycemia, their causes, and how to recognize, treat, and prevent these conditions basic dietary facts and a copy of his pre Continue reading >>

A D-mom's Tips For Parents Of Newly Diagnosed Type 1 Kids

A D-mom's Tips For Parents Of Newly Diagnosed Type 1 Kids

Today, we welcome Sylvia White from Memphis, TN, who is not only a D-Mom, but also a certified diabetes educator (CDE) and insulin pump trainer (first for Medtronic and now for Tandem Diabetes), plus a registered dietician and licensed counselor. She's also a D-blogger, offering education and support to our online community at her Parenting Diabetes blog. With 10 years of T1D under her belt from all these angles, we're honored to have Sylvia share her great sentiments for parents of newly-diagnosed kids here at the 'Mine: A Letter to New T1D Parents, by Sylvia White Two of my three children are living with type 1 diabetes, and they have recently had their 10-year “Dia-versary.” For those not familiar with the term, it is an anniversary of the diagnosis of diabetes. It isn’t something we necessarily celebrated, but thinking about it made me reflect on how much we have learned and how far we have come over the past decade. Having a child diagnosed with type 1 is a scary and emotional time. I’ve been there twice, and it doesn’t get easier the second time. At the end of 2006, my husband and I were finally getting comfortable with caring for our 12-year-old son who was diagnosed that previous February, when our 6-year-old daughter was diagnosed. Once again we were thrown into the abyss of feeling shocked, worried, and overwhelmed. My children were diagnosed at very different ages emotionally and developmentally. At 12 years old, Josh was able to mostly take care of himself with our help. Sara, on the other hand, was in kindergarten and needed much more hands-on care. I remember the night I checked Sara’s blood sugar with Josh’s meter when she was showing signs of diabetes. Unfortunately, the meter read 354. I still remember that first number from 10 years ago. Continue reading >>

Management Of Newly Diagnosed Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus (t2dm) In Children And Adolescents

Management Of Newly Diagnosed Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus (t2dm) In Children And Adolescents

Abstract Over the past 3 decades, the prevalence of childhood obesity has increased dramatically in North America, ushering in a variety of health problems, including type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), which previously was not typically seen until much later in life. The rapid emergence of childhood T2DM poses challenges to many physicians who find themselves generally ill-equipped to treat adult diseases encountered in children. This clinical practice guideline was developed to provide evidence-based recommendations on managing 10- to 18-year-old patients in whom T2DM has been diagnosed. The American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) convened a Subcommittee on Management of T2DM in Children and Adolescents with the support of the American Diabetes Association, the Pediatric Endocrine Society, the American Academy of Family Physicians, and the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics (formerly the American Dietetic Association). These groups collaborated to develop an evidence report that served as a major source of information for these practice guideline recommendations. The guideline emphasizes the use of management modalities that have been shown to affect clinical outcomes in this pediatric population. Recommendations are made for situations in which either insulin or metformin is the preferred first-line treatment of children and adolescents with T2DM. The recommendations suggest integrating lifestyle modifications (ie, diet and exercise) in concert with medication rather than as an isolated initial treatment approach. Guidelines for frequency of monitoring hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) and finger-stick blood glucose (BG) concentrations are presented. Decisions were made on the basis of a systematic grading of the quality of evidence and strength of recommendation. The clinical practi Continue reading >>

Newly Diagnosed T1d

Newly Diagnosed T1d

TrialNet partners with the Immune Tolerance Network on the EXTEND study which is aiming to preserve insulin production in people newly diagnosed with type 1 diabetes. Please visit www.extendstudy.org for more information. Continue reading >>

Incidence Of Retinal Complications In A Cohort Of Newly Diagnosed Diabetic Patients

Incidence Of Retinal Complications In A Cohort Of Newly Diagnosed Diabetic Patients

Abstract We aimed at estimating the incidence of diabetic retinopathy (DR) and maculopathy (DMP) among newly diagnosed type 1 (t1DM) and type 2 diabetic patients (t2DM) in the United Kingdom primary care system. The incidence of DMP among patients with DR was also estimated. We conducted a cohort study using The Health Improvement Network database. The cohort included 64,983 incident diabetic patients (97.3% were t2DM) aged 1–84 years diagnosed between 2000 and 2007. This cohort was followed from the date of diabetes diagnosis until recording of DR or DMP in two separate follow-ups. Follow-up was censored at 85 years of age, death, or end of 2008. An additional follow-up was conducted from DR to DMP diagnosis using similar censoring reasons. DR and DMP cumulative incidences were calculated as well as incidence rates (IR; cases per 1,000 person-years) per calendar period (2000–2001 and 2006–2007). Follow-up for DR: 9 years after diabetes diagnosis, 28% of t2DM and 24% of t1DM patients had developed DR (7,899 incident DR cases). During the first 2 years with diabetes, the IR was almost 2 times higher in patients diagnosed with diabetes in 2006–2007 (47.7) than among those diagnosed in 2000–2001 (24.5). Follow-up for DMP: 9 years after diabetes diagnosis, 3.6% of t2DM and 4.4% of t2DM patients had developed DMP (912 incident DMP cases). During the first 2 years with diabetes, the IR was three times higher in patients diagnosed with diabetes in 2006–2007 (5.8) than among those diagnosed in 2000–2001 (1.8). Macular oedema occurred in 0.8% of patients. In a cohort of incident diabetes, 28% of patients developed retinopathy and 4% maculopathy within the first 9 years. The 2-year IRs of DR and DMP were higher in patients diagnosed with diabetes during the period 2 Continue reading >>

I Have Diabetes; Now What? – Guidelines For Newly Diagnosed Diabetes Patients

I Have Diabetes; Now What? – Guidelines For Newly Diagnosed Diabetes Patients

There was a time when it was considered not unusual to be diagnosed with Type 2 diabetes at fifty. The poor lifestyle choices, processed diet and nearly thirty years of work-life stress were expected to impact us by that age. These days, people are being diagnosed with type 2 diabetes at forty and with every passing year, the bar is lowered further, with the millennials now being diagnosed in their thirties and even their twenties! While a Diabetes Type 2 diagnosis can be overwhelming, it’s important to know that you aren’t alone. Try to think of this diagnosis as the first step towards learning how to control your blood sugar levels and take charge of your life. Our guidelines for newly diagnosed diabetics will help you navigate your way through all the lifestyle and diet changes you need to make, gain a better understanding of your disease, educate yourself on how to manage it, and how to find the right support you need. I Have Diabetes, Now What ? A new diagnosis of type 2 diabetes is sure to take you on an emotional roller coaster ride. It is completely natural to feel low after your diagnosis. Emotions run amok as you face the reality of future complications like heart disease, kidney failure and vision related problems, all while you grieve for lost health. Diabetes can be a tough condition to accept, so feelings of anger, shock, resentment, betrayal, shame and denial are completely normal. Studies show that it is not uncommon for newly diagnosed diabetics to go through a period of depression. But you can learn to deal with the emotions that come up with a diabetes diagnosis. We are not going to lie to you; you will need to commit to making changes so you can live a better life with diabetes, and that requires work. Since your body is no longer able to respond Continue reading >>

To Those Newly Diagnosed With Diabetes: What We Wish You Knew

To Those Newly Diagnosed With Diabetes: What We Wish You Knew

Home Education and Information To Those Newly Diagnosed with Diabetes: What We Wish You Knew To Those Newly Diagnosed with Diabetes: What We Wish You Knew Posted by Naomi Ruperto On January 8, 2015 In Education and Information When newly diagnosed with diabetes, its natural to feel overwhelmed, scared, uncertain, and confused, asking yourself, What will my life be like now? We asked our friends in the community what is the number one thing they wish someone who was newly diagnosed with diabetes knew. We received over 650 insightful words of wisdom, and gathered 12 of our favorites we hope youll find encouraging. The DOCs attitude and outlook on life is inspirational, and we thank every one of you for being a part of it. What advice do you have for the newly diagnosed? Its totally okay to get frustrated and mad sometimes because of diabetes. Have a good cry. Tell diabetes to go where the sun doesnt shine. We are human. Take a breath and sleep it off. The next day always seems a little better. Dont let people make you feel bad because you get upset over diabetes at times. When that sadness and frustration is the dominant theme in your diabetes care is when those feelings become unhealthy. Amber Rueger Diabetes is a marathon, not a 500 yard dash. There will be good and bad days. Learn to roll with the punches. YOU are in control of your disease, learn about it and be your own advocate. Joanna Wagner Moore 3. Its OK to Feel Scared, Cry, and Ask Questions Its OK, you might feel scared, but its OK. You might want to cry, go ahead and cry. And you might feel alone, but youre not. You might not see it now, but it gets better. Ask your 1,000 questions over and over again. Dont think ahead too much, and take one day at a time. My daughter was 8 when she was diagnosed. It was the Continue reading >>

Don’t Fear Diabetes! Straight Talk For The Newly Diagnosed

Don’t Fear Diabetes! Straight Talk For The Newly Diagnosed

If you’ve recently been diagnosed with diabetes, you may be in shock for a bit…that’s normal. But if you’re afraid or panicked, try not to give in to those feelings or let your imagination run wild. It’s easy to jump to conclusions based on the worst outcomes you’ve heard about or seen within your family or friends, such as amputation and blindness—but the reality, with today’s know-how, is usually nothing like that. Key insight: For most people with well-managed diabetes, the most common complication is…no complication at all! And even though you will have to make some lifestyle changes, you’re not doomed to a lifetime diet of no treats and no carbs. As a diabetes educator, the first thing I do with new patients is to help them face their fears. Doing so not only helps them feel better but may motivate them to take the manageable small steps that will help in so many ways. Let’s get started… WHAT’S GOOD ABOUT A DIAGNOSIS Think of a diagnosis of type 2 diabetes as a bit of good fortune in one way. As many as 40% of people with type 2 diabetes are walking around unaware that they have it, which means the disease is doing damage to their bodies unchecked. With a diagnosis in hand, you’re a step ahead—and you can stay ahead by employing some smart management strategies. Can you look at the glass-half-full side of your diagnosis? Here’s the first benefit: You can take action. I see people every day who amaze me in their ability to take control of their condition rather than the other way around. This means managing your blood glucose…which in turn reduces your risk of getting many diabetes-related complications. And if you do have complications, taking action means tackling those problems head-on and early so they don’t progress. Your dia Continue reading >>

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