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New Diagnostic Tool Or Intervention For Diabetes

Evidence Into Practice: Evaluating A Child-centred Intervention For Diabetes Medicine Management The Epic Project

Evidence Into Practice: Evaluating A Child-centred Intervention For Diabetes Medicine Management The Epic Project

Evidence into practice: evaluating a child-centred intervention for diabetes medicine management The EPIC Project Noyes et al; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.2010 There is a lack of high quality, child-centred and effective health information to support development of self-care practices and expertise in children with acute and long-term conditions. In type 1 diabetes, clinical guidelines indicate that high-quality, child-centred information underpins achievement of optimal glycaemic control with the aim of minimising acute readmissions and reducing the risk of complications in later life. This paper describes the development of a range of child-centred diabetes information resources and outlines the study design and protocol for a randomized controlled trial to evaluate the information resources in routine practice. The aim of the diabetes information intervention is to improve children and young people's quality of life by increasing self-efficacy in managing their type 1 diabetes. We used published evidence, undertook qualitative research and consulted with children, young people and key stakeholders to design and produce a range of child-centred, age-appropriate children's diabetes diaries, carbohydrate recording sheets, and assembled child-centred, age-appropriate diabetes information packs containing published information in a folder that can be personalized by children and young people with pens and stickers. Resources have been designed for children/young people 6-10; 11-15; and 16-18 years. To evaluate the information resources, we designed a pragmatic randomized controlled trial to assess the effectiveness, cost effectiveness, and implementation in routine practice of individually tailored, age-appropriate diabetes diaries and information packs for children and Continue reading >>

Evidence Based Diabetic Treatment

Evidence Based Diabetic Treatment

Classically, the 3untranslated region (3UTR) is that region in eukaryotic protein-coding genes from the translation termination codon to the polyA signal. It is transcribed as an integral part of the mRNA encoded by the gene. However, there exists another kind of RNA, which consists of the 3UTR alone, without all other elements in mRNA such as 5UTR and coding region. The importance of independent 3UTR RNA (referred as I3UTR) was prompted by results of artificially introducing such RNA species into malignant mammalian cells. Since 1991, we found that the middle part of the 3UTR of the human nuclear factor for interleukin-6 (NF-IL6) or C/EBP gene exerted tumor suppression effect in vivo. Our subsequent studies showed that transfection of C/EBP 3UTR led to down-regulation of several genes favorable for malignancy and to up-regulation of some genes favorable for phenotypic reversion. Also, it was shown that the sequences near the termini of the C/EBP 3UTR were important for its tumor suppression activity. Then, the C/EBP 3UTR was found to directly inhibit the phosphorylation activity of protein kinase CPKC in SMMC-7721, a hepatocarcinoma cell line. Recently, an AU-rich region in the C/EBP 3UTR was found also to be responsible for its tumor suppression. Recently we have also found evidence that the independent C/EBP 3UTR RNA is actually exists in human tissues, such as fetal liver and heart, pregnant uterus, senescent fibroblasts etc. Through 1990s to 2000s, world scientists found several 3UTR RNAs that functioned as artificial independent RNAs in cancer cells and resulted in tumor suppression. Interestingly, majority of genes for these RNAs have promoter-like structures in their 3UTR regions, although the existence of their transcribed products as independent 3UTR RNAs is Continue reading >>

Researchers Devise New Diabetes Diagnostic Tool

Researchers Devise New Diabetes Diagnostic Tool

Follow all of ScienceDaily's latest research news and top science headlines ! Researchers devise new diabetes diagnostic tool Researchers have developed a new test to help diagnoses diabetes, which they say will lead to more effective diagnosis and patient care. The research shows how a genetic test can help doctors to differentiate between type 1 and type 2 diabetes in young adults. Researchers at University of Exeter have developed a new test to help diagnoses diabetes, which they say will lead to more effective diagnosis and patient care. Research published in the journal Diabetes Care, shows how a genetic test can help doctors to differentiate between type 1 and type 2 diabetes in young adults. With rising obesity levels it is sometimes difficult for doctors to distinguish between type 1 diabetes, which requires treatment with insulin injections and type 2 diabetes, which can be controlled through diet and weight loss. The Exeter team has devised a genetic risk score which can help identify people between 20 and 40 who will require insulin treatment. "This will be an important addition to correctly classifying individuals with diabetes and will improve the number of people who get the right treatment when they are first diagnosed, especially people who sit in the overlap between type 1 and type 2 diagnosis," said Dr Richard Oram, National Institute for Health Research Clinical Lecturer and specialist in Diabetes and Nephrology at the University of Exeter Medical School. "There is often no going back once insulin treatment starts. This may save people with Type 2 diabetes from being treated with insulin unnecessarily, but also stop the rare but serious occurrence of people with Type 1 being initially treated with tablets inappropriately and running of the risk of se Continue reading >>

New Diagnostic Tool For Type 1 Diabetes Gets Us Fda Clearance

New Diagnostic Tool For Type 1 Diabetes Gets Us Fda Clearance

Home News New diagnostic tool for type 1 diabetes gets US FDA clearance New diagnostic tool for type 1 diabetes gets US FDA clearance Posted on August 20, 2014 by DiabetesDigest.com Staff in News A new test that can determine if a person has type 1 diabetes and not another type of diabetes has been given the green light in the USA. The countrys Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has cleared the KRONUS Zinc Transporter 8 Autoantibody ELISA assay, a newly developed test distinguishes type 1 diabetes from other kinds of diabetes by detecting for the presence of the ZnT8 antibody in the blood. This antibody is produced by the immune system of many patients with type 1 diabetes, but not those with type 2 or gestational diabetes mellitus. By improving the accuracy of type 1 diabetes diagnosis, it is hoped that cases of the disease will be identified and treated earlier, at a stage where some insulin producing function can be preserved. Early treatment of type 1 diabetes is important in helping to prevent further deterioration of insulin producing cells, said Alberto Gutierrez, director of the Office of In Vitro Diagnostics and Radiological Health in the Center for Devices and Radiological Health at the FDA. This test can help patients get a timely diagnosis and help start the right treatment sooner. The FDAs marketing approval of the ZnT8Ab ELISA assay was based on analysis of a read more Grizzly bears provide new insights into obesity diabetes association (c) Copyright 2008-2015 OmniChannel Health Media. All rights reserved. When you register, we will send you timely reminders about upcoming Twitter chats via email. Simply enter your email address below and click on the "Register Me" button. This field is for validation purposes and should be left unchanged. This iframe con Continue reading >>

A+, New Interventions For Diabetes Treatment: Adults, Children, Research Paper Writing Sample

A+, New Interventions For Diabetes Treatment: Adults, Children, Research Paper Writing Sample

New Interventions for Diabetes Treatment: Adults, Children (Research Paper Sample) Identify a research or evidence-based article that focuses comprehensively on a specific intervention or new diagnostic tool for the treatment of diabetes in adults or children. In a paper of 750-1,000 words, summarize the main idea of the research findings for a specific patient population. Research must include clinical findings that are current, thorough, and relevant to diabetes and the nursing practice. Prepare this assignment according to the APA guidelines found in the APA Style Guide, located in the Student Success Center. An abstract is not required. Based on the summary of research findings identified from the Evidence-Based ProjectPaper on Diabetes that describes a new diagnostic tool or intervention for the treatment of diabetes in adults or children, complete the following components of this assignment: Develop a PowerPoint presentation (a title slide, 6-12 slides, and a reference slide; no larger than 2 MB) that includes the following: 1. A brief summary of the research conducted in the Evidence-Based Project Paper on Diabetes. 2. A descriptive and reflective discussion of how the new tool or intervention may be integrated into practice that is supported by sound research. While APA format is not required for the body of this assignment, solid academic writing is expected, and in-text citations and references should be presented using APA documentation guidelines, which can be found in the APA Style Guide, located in the Student Success Center. You are not required to submit this assignment to Turnitin, unless otherwise directed by your instructor. If so directed, refer to the Student Success Center for directions. Only Word documents can be submitted to Turnitin. I would a Continue reading >>

Incretin Replacement Therapy: A New Treatment Tool For Type 2 Diabetes

Incretin Replacement Therapy: A New Treatment Tool For Type 2 Diabetes

Please confirm that you would like to log out of Medscape.If you log out, you will be required to enter your username and password the next time you visit. Log out Cancel Mokdad AH, Ford ES, Bowman BA, Dietz WH, Vinicor F, Bales VS, Marks JS. Prevalence of obesity, diabetes, and obesity-related health risk factors, 2001. JAMA. 2003;289:76-79. Department of Health and Human Services. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. National Diabetes Fact Sheet. 2005. Available at: Hogan P, Dall T, Nikolov P; American Diabetes Association. Economic costs of diabetes in the US in 2002. Diabetes Care. 2003;26:917-932. Ramlo-Halsted BA, Edelman SV. The natural history of type 2 diabetes: implications for clinical practice. Prim Care. 1999;26:771-789. Dagogo-Jack S. Preventing diabetes-related morbidity and mortality in the primary care setting. J Natl Med Assoc. 2002;94:549-560. UK Prospective Diabetes Study Group. UK Prospective Diabetes Study 16. Overview of 6 years' therapy of type II diabetes: a progressive disease. Diabetes. 1995;44:1249-1258. Knowler WC, Barrett-Connor E, Fowler SE, Hamman RF, Lachin JM, Walker EA, Nathan DM; Diabetes Prevention Program Research Group. Reduction in the incidence of type 2 diabetes with lifestyle intervention or metformin. N Engl J Med. 2002;346:393-403. Expert Panel on Detection, Evaluation, and Treatment of High Blood Cholesterol in Adults. Executive Summary of the Third Report of The National Cholesterol Education Program (NCEP) Expert Panel on Detection, Evaluation, And Treatment of High Blood Cholesterol In Adults (Adult Treatment Panel III). JAMA. 2001;285:2486-2497. Ford ES, Giles WH, Dietz WH. Prevalence of the metabolic syndrome among US adults: findings from the third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. JAMA. 2002;28 Continue reading >>

A1c Recommended As Diagnostic Tool

A1c Recommended As Diagnostic Tool

New recommendations issued by the American Diabetes Association (ADA) call for the addition of the hemoglobin A1C , or A1C, test to the tools currently used to diagnose prediabetes and Type 2 diabetes . According to statistics from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 57 million people in the United States have prediabetes, with 1.6 million newly diagnosed each year, while nearly 24 million people in the country have Type 2 diabetes, 5.7 million of them undiagnosed. The A1C test, which involves having a small amount of blood drawn, looks at the concentration of red blood cells that have glucose molecules attached, reflecting the concentration of glucose in the blood. Because the red blood cells in a blood sample used for an A1c test are a mixture of cells of different ages, the test gives a weighted average of blood glucose control over the previous 23 months. An A1C level of less than 7% is the target for most people who have diabetes. Based on the new recommendations, a result on the A1C of 5.7% to 6.4% would place a persons blood glucose levels in the prediabetes range, while an A1C of 6.5% or higher would indicate diabetes. The A1C test would join the fasting plasma glucose, or FPG, test (which involves measuring the amount of glucose in a persons blood after at least eight hours without food or drink) and the oral glucose tolerance test, or OGTT (which measures a persons blood glucose response to the consumption of a glucose-rich drink after at least eight hours without food or drink) as diagnostic tools for diabetes and prediabetes. According Richard M. Bergenstal, MD, President-Elect of the ADA for medicine and science, We believe that use of the A1C, because it doesnt require fasting, will encourage more people to get tested for Type 2 diabetes and h Continue reading >>

A Newest Diagnostic Tool Or Intervention For Diabetes In Adults Or Children - Article Example

A Newest Diagnostic Tool Or Intervention For Diabetes In Adults Or Children - Article Example

The first step involves implantation of the B-cells which can be done through donor pancreas and molecular genetic engineering which can help in replacing the defective B-cells in diabetic patients. However, certain obstacles are present which include the reduced number of donors, immune reactions and rejections in receiving patients. According to the research, different types of sensors can be utilized for glucose monitoring which include enzymatic sensors and optical sensors and some other sensors which are currently under study. Enzymatic sensors consist of an immobilized enzyme with an electrochemical transducer which will be a part of the artificial pancreas. This sensor will then transmit glucose levels monitored signals to an implanted insulin pump. Some problems that may arise include inflammatory reactions which can reject the sensor or even reduce the glucose levels. A more advanced sensor is optical sensor which is both non-invasive and advanced. With a light beam entering a blood vessel, the glucose concentration in the blood can be detected by the absorption pattern of the infra-red radiations. The obstacles which include interference of other molecules like water or hemoglobin the absorption pattern are being overcome by new methods like Kromoscopy. This analytical method separates the absorption pattern of glucose more efficiently and is a better technique. Implantable insulin pump is the next intervention that completes the artificial pancreas. Insulin pumps release insulin at the right time and correct amounts according to the information relayed by the glucose sensors. Implantable insulin pumps (IIPs) are preferred over the previously used external pumps because they are more reliable and function in a more accurate manner (Jaremko & Rorstad 1998). An Continue reading >>

Evidence Based Diabetes Diagnostic Tool Featured

Evidence Based Diabetes Diagnostic Tool Featured

Diabetes being the major area of concern in is very necessary for the disease to be diagnosed with proper tool to have a clear base of controlling and educating the patients on the ways they can control it. It could be very easy to determine the necessary intervention if it is properly identified. According to the Center for the disease control in America Diabetes is at a very high increase with the number of the affected patients increasing to 18.1 million from 5.6 million between 1998 and 2008. (CDC, 2010). With such an alarming increase the CDC also reports that there is an approximate 7 million people who are undiagnosed. Diabetes is a disease which requires early intervention as it is caused due to increase in insulin level or ineffective level of insulin. If diabetes is not detected at the right time, it can cause destruction to the body systems. With an evidence based diagnostic tolls, the diabetic state will be diagnosed early enough and it will lead to early intervention and better training to the patients. There are two types of diabetes whereby type 1 is diagnosed to children and adult as it is associated with the body failure to perform insulin production function. American association of Diabetes on their report claimed that about 5% of the patients suffering from the diabetes suffer the type 1 diabetes form. Using insulin therapy it can be very easy to treat the patient, and with inclusion of other medical treatments. ( The most common form of Diabetes is type 2. It occurs due to body inability to produce enough insulin and the cell failure to utilize the insulin in the body properly. Failure to utilize insulin properly in the body, leads to the increase in level of glucose in the body which could damage kidney, heart, nerves and eyes. Management of type Continue reading >>

New High-tech Tools To Help Control Diabetes

New High-tech Tools To Help Control Diabetes

This content is selected and controlled by WebMD's editorial staff and is supported by Walgreens. High-Tech Tools to Help You Handle Diabetes By Susan Bernstein, Reviewed by Minesh Khatri, MD on October 14, 2017 Because of your diabetes, you'll want to know about tools that help you track what you eat, what your blood sugar levels are, how much you exercise, and how you feel each day. Some of these include: Smartphone, tablet, or computer apps to log your blood sugar or meals and snacks Devices that test your sugar levels every few minutes "Smart pumps" that give you insulin as your body needs it Texts, calls, or emails that remind you to test or to take your medicine If you notice patterns in your levels over time, the information can help you and your doctor better manage yourdiabetes. To find out more, you or your doctor might use a device called a continuous glucose monitor (CGM) that can test your blood sugar every 5 minutes throughout the day. It tests through tiny fibers on a patch stuck on yourskin. Results are sent wirelessly to a small monitor or insulin pump. The results can help you and your doctor spot spikes after you eat certain foods or work out, or while yousleep, says Robert Vigersky, MD, medical director of Medtronic Diabetes. A continuous glucose monitor doesn't take the place of old-school testing, though. The device's maker says you need at least one finger stick every 12 hours to set the device, and suggests regular testing three to four times a day to make sure the numbers match up. New, "smartinsulinpumps" that can sync with a CGM are great for people withtype 1 diabetes, Vigersky says. "If your sugar goes too low, it will stop aninsulininfusion for 2 hours," he says. Smart pumps can help you avoid dangerous dips in your blood sugar. New smartp Continue reading >>

Unlocking New Diagnostic Tools From Diabetes

Unlocking New Diagnostic Tools From Diabetes

Unlocking New Diagnostic Tools from Diabetes March 27, 2014 Author AG Blogger Categories AG Scientific Blog , AG Scientific Products , Cell Biology , Diabetes and Obesity , Inhibitors , Signaling Pathways Unlocking New Diagnostic Tools from Diabetes In todays modern world, the recent dramatic increase in the number of patients with type 2 diabetes indicates an unchecked global epidemic is at hand. In 2011 the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimated that about 8.3% of the American population (25.8 million people) had diabeteswhile 7 million were unaware of it. [1] Glucose is the fundamental fuel required by the cells in the body and is supplied, in part, through the process of digesting the foods we eat. During digestion, the hormone insulin is released by -cells produced in the Islets of Langerhans in the pancreas. Insulin acts like a cellular key allowing the passage of glucose to move from the bloodstream into the cells of the body. In patients with type 2 diabetes, the amount of insulin produced by -cells is often insufficient because patients simply do not produce enough insulin. Another important hormone of the pancreas is called Glucagon. Glucagon is synthesized and released in -cells also located in the pancreas. When Glucose levels are low, and metabolic fuel is needed to avoid hypoglycemia, Glucagon stimulates the pancreas to release Glucose stored in the body as Glycogen [2]. A closer look at the substances from the intestinal track revealed the presence of two important incretin hormones in the regulation of glucose. These hormones include GIP (gastric inhibitory polypeptide), released from K cells in the duodenum, and GLP-1 (glucagon-like peptide 1), released from L cells from ileum and colon. In the pancreas, both incretins are released i Continue reading >>

New Diagnostic Tool For Type 1 Diabetes Gets Us Fda Clearance

New Diagnostic Tool For Type 1 Diabetes Gets Us Fda Clearance

New diagnostic tool for type 1 diabetes gets US FDA clearance New clues as to how gastric bypass surgery combats type 2 diabetes A new test that can determine if a person has type 1 diabetes and not another type of diabetes has been given the green light in the USA. The country's Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has cleared the KRONUS Zinc Transporter 8 Autoantibody ELISA assay, a newly developed test distinguishes type 1 diabetes from other kinds of diabetes by detecting for the presence of the ZnT8 antibody in the blood. This antibody is produced by the immune system of many patients with type 1 diabetes, but not those with type 2 or gestational diabetes mellitus. By improving the accuracy of type 1 diabetes diagnosis , it is hoped that cases of the disease will be identified and treated earlier, at a stage where some insulin producing function can be preserved. "Early treatment of type 1 diabetes is important in helping to prevent further deterioration of insulin producing cells," said Alberto Gutierrez, director of the Office of In Vitro Diagnostics and Radiological Health in the Center for Devices and Radiological Health at the FDA. "This test can help patients get a timely diagnosis and help start the right treatment sooner." The FDA's marketing approval of the ZnT8Ab ELISA assay was based on analysis of a study of 569 blood samples: 323 from patients diagnosed with type 1 diabetes and 246 from those with other types of diabetes , other autoimmune diseases, and unrelated clinical conditions. The first-of-its-kind test was able to detect the ZnT8 antibody in nearly two thirds (65%) of the type 1 samples, with positive results incorrectly given in less than 2% of the samples from patients with other diseases. Manufacturer KRONUS is a US-based provider of autoimmu Continue reading >>

New Technologies To Advance Self-management Support In Diabetes

New Technologies To Advance Self-management Support In Diabetes

New Technologies to Advance Self-Management Support in Diabetes Lawrence Fisher , PHD, ABPP1 and W. Perry Dickinson , MD2 1Department of Family and Community Medicine, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, California, 2Department of Family Medicine, University of Colorado Health Sciences Center, Aurora, Colorado. Corresponding author: Lawrence Fisher, [email protected] . Author information Copyright and License information Disclaimer Copyright 2011 by the American Diabetes Association. Readers may use this article as long as the work is properly cited, the use is educational and not for profit, and the work is not altered. See for details. See the article " Results of a Successful Telephonic Intervention to Improve Diabetes Control in Urban Adults " in volume 34 onpage2. The article by Walker et al. ( 1 ) in this issue of Diabetes Care highlights how new applications of existing modes of communication and the use of new technologies can improve the delivery of care for patients with diabetes. In this case, care was successfully brought to a poorly controlled patient group using the medium of live telephone calls. New types of technology-based interventions focus on the use of the telephone, Internet, mobile communicators, pagers, web-based programs, and email to assess and monitor patient health status, address symptoms and behaviors, and foster changes in various aspects of disease managementin this case better medication adherence and improved glycemic control. The purpose of these emerging systems is to expand programs of self-management support (SMS), a generic term applied to strategies that provide patients with the information, tools, and support they need to take care of their health problems ( 2 , 3 ). The development and application of a Continue reading >>

New Diagnostic Tool Or Intervention For The Treatment Of Diabetes In Adults - Essay Example

New Diagnostic Tool Or Intervention For The Treatment Of Diabetes In Adults - Essay Example

Additionally, the diet was thought to be good for use in the prevention of the cardiovascular disease, which provides an added bonus to those suffering from type II diabetes, who are contra-indicated for this risk. Summary The study itself is a comparison between two Mediterranean diets and a low-fat diet. Healthy individuals who were thought to be at risk of developing type II diabetes were given advice on how to follow one of the three diets, but were given no indications towards following any kind of physical exercise regime. The trial was non-randomized and consisted of 418 individuals aged between 55 and 80 years, and thus any benefits seen should only be used in practice for those of this age range, although benefits could be seen in those of a younger age bracket. The patients were then asked to attend a follow-up; a median time of 4.0 years after the original dietary advice was given. After this time, the incidence of type II diabetes was at 10.1% within the group whose Mediterranean diet was supplemented with olive oil, 11.0% in those whose diet was supplemented with nuts, and 17.9% in the traditional low-fat diet category. Whilst this may seem high in contrast to the normal prevalence of type II diabetes in the U.S. population (currently standing at 8.3% of the population), it must be noted that within the same age bracket the prevalence is 26.9% (American Diabetes Association, 2011). This suggests that there may be a huge impact on diabetes prevalence in the older population when following such a diet. Interestingly, although type II diabetes is associated with higher weight individuals (Hensrud, 2012), the Mediterranean diets were found to be beneficial in the absence of any change in weight or body mass. Discussion This new intervention could be extremely Continue reading >>

An Evidence-based Medicine Approach To Antihyperglycemic Therapy In Diabetes Mellitus To Overcome Overtreatment

An Evidence-based Medicine Approach To Antihyperglycemic Therapy In Diabetes Mellitus To Overcome Overtreatment

An Evidence-Based Medicine Approach to Antihyperglycemic Therapy in Diabetes Mellitus to Overcome Overtreatment From Division of General Internal Medicine, UT Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas (A.N.M., O.K.N.); and Division of Outcomes & Health Services Research, UT Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas (A.N.M., O.K.N.). From Division of General Internal Medicine, UT Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas (A.N.M., O.K.N.); and Division of Outcomes & Health Services Research, UT Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas (A.N.M., O.K.N.). Overtreatment is pervasive in medicine and leads to potential patient harms and excessive costs in health care. Although evidence-based medicine is often derided as practice by rote algorithmic medicine, the appropriate application of key evidence-based medicine principles in clinical decision making is fundamental to preventing overtreatment and promoting high-value, individualized patient-centered care. Specifically, this article discusses the importance of (1) using absolute rather than relative estimates of benefits to inform treatment decisions; (2) considering the time horizon to benefit of treatments; (3) balancing potential harms and benefits; and (4) using shared decision making by physicians to incorporate the patients values and preferences into treatment decisions. Here, we illustrate the application of these principles to considering the decision of whether or not to recommend intensive glycemic control to patients to minimize microvascular and cardiovascular complications in type 2 diabetes mellitus. Through this lens, this example will illustrate how an evidence-based medicine approach can be used to individualize glycemic goals and prevent overtreatment, and can serve as a template for applying evidence-based medicine to inform t Continue reading >>

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