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New Diabetes Medications List

New Diabetes Products For 2017: Lancing Devices And Diabetes Drugs

New Diabetes Products For 2017: Lancing Devices And Diabetes Drugs

For the last year, Diabetes Self-Management has been following all the new innovations and products aimed at helping to improve the lives of those living with diabetes. From the latest glucometers and monitoring systems to insulin pumps, pens, and treatments, several major advancements made their impact on the diabetes community in 2016. When selecting some of the new products, we first talked to Gary Scheiner, MS, CDE, clinical director of Integrated Diabetes Services of Wynnewood, Pennsylvania. Scheiner, known as the MacGyver of diabetes products, has lived with Type 1 diabetes for more than 30 years. He tries out new products before recommending them to patients. “It’s important to see new products from the user’s point of view, not just from the [health-care practitioner’s] side of things,” said Scheiner. In 2016, the pace of innovation continued to race ahead with unbelievable technology right out of a Star Trek episode. The growing use of smartphone technology and mobile applications has led to better access to blood glucose readings, general health information, and much more. Read on to learn about the newest products. We guarantee you there’s something here for everyone, whether you live with Type 1 or Type 2 diabetes. In this installment, we look at lancing devices and diabetes drugs that have recently hit the market. Lancing devices Motivated to help a friend with Type 2 diabetes, bioengineer Christopher Jacobs, PhD, developed a new lancing device, called Genteel, to reduce the pain of pricking fingertips. “I was moved by his distress, compelled by our friendship, and undone by the irresistible siren song that lies at the heart of every engineering challenge,” said Jacobs. For 10 years, Jacobs studied the limitations of current devices and the Continue reading >>

Three New Treatment Options For Type 2 Diabetes Recommended By Nice

Three New Treatment Options For Type 2 Diabetes Recommended By Nice

The drugs will help to control blood sugar in those patients who cannot take more commonly prescribed medicines meaning their condition remains stable for longer. An estimated 31,000 people may be eligible for the three recommended treatments: canagliflozin (Invokana), dapagliflozin (Forxiga) and empagliflozin (Jardiance). The three drugs can all be used on their own if a person can’t use metformin, sulfonylurea or pioglitazone, and diet and exercise alone isn’t controlling their blood glucose levels. In the UK, almost 3.5 million people who have been diagnosed with diabetes and it’s estimated that about 90% of adults with the condition have type 2 diabetes. Type 2 diabetes causes elevated blood sugar levels which damages blood vessels leading to increased risk of heart attack, stroke and limb amputation. Sugar levels rise because their body doesn’t produce enough insulin – the hormone which controls the amount of glucose in blood – or their body doesn’t use insulin effectively. Professor Carole Longson, director of the NICE Centre for Health Technology Evaluation, said: “Type 2 diabetes is long-term condition that has a serious impact on people who live with it, and the treatments given should be tailored for the individual. “For many people whose blood glucose levels aren’t controlled by diet and exercise alone, metformin is the first drug treatment that they’ll be offered. But some people may experience nausea and diarrhoea, and they may not be able to take it if they have kidney damage. For people who can’t take a sulfonylurea or pioglitazone, then the three drugs recommended in this guidance can be considered. This is as an alternative to the separate group of drugs called dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4) inhibitors. “The committee agreed th Continue reading >>

Glucose-lowering Medicines For Type 2 Diabetes

Glucose-lowering Medicines For Type 2 Diabetes

Background There is an increasing array of medicines available to improve blood glucose control in type 2 diabetes. Finding the best com-bination for an individual patient requires an assessment of the patient’s characteristics and understanding the mechanism of action for each drug. Objective/s The aim of this article is to provide a rational approach for choosing between the various blood glucose-lowering medicines available for treatment of patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. Discussion Metformin is the first choice of glucose-lowering medicines for most patients with type 2 diabetes. Sulphonylureas have proven benefits in long-term trials. Insulin is required in patients with symptoms of insulin deficiency. Glucagon-like peptide 1 agonists and sodium-glucose co-transporter 2 inhibitors provide some assistance in weight loss as well as improving blood glucose con-trol. Dipeptidyl peptidase 4 inhibitors provide an alternative to metformin and sulphonylureas, especially when side effects of those drugs limit their use. Re-assessing blood glucose control after an appropriate trial period before deciding on continuing use is appropriate. In recent years, pharmacological options for treating type 2 diabetes have expanded substantially. The place of metformin as the drug of first choice is unquestioned. Sulphonylureas have a long history and their use is supported by outcome data from the UK Prospective Diabetes Study (UKPDS).1 Choosing agents other than metformin or sulphonylureas is more difficult, apart from the use of insulin in patients who are clearly insulin-deficient. Most pharmacological options will reduce glycosylated haemoglobin (HbA1c) by 0.5–1.0%, on average, either as monotherapy, compared to placebo, or in addition to metformin and or a sulphonylure Continue reading >>

Diabetes Medication Recommendations | Caring.com

Diabetes Medication Recommendations | Caring.com

How to Help a Diabetic Follow Medication Recommendations By Sarah Henry , Caring.com senior editor | Last updated: Feb 06, 2018 Here's how you can help someone benefit the most from diabetes medications: To emphasize the importance of taking meds, have a professional explain -- to you and the person in your care -- why a medication is prescribed, how it works, how often it needs to be taken, and a time frame for when improvements should be seen. Ask about any potential side effects or medical interactions and any symptoms that warrant seeking medical advice. Find out, too, if a prescribed pill should be taken with or without food or fluid. Should it be taken before or after eating, and should it be chewed or swallowed? People with type 2 diabetes also need to know how food, exercise, stress, or illness can affect how a medication works. A patient's doctor, nurse practitioner, and pharmacist are all potential resources for getting the answers to these questions. Make sure the person in your care has a written record of the dosage, timing, and potential side effects of his medications from his doctor, nurse, or pharmacist, as it's easy to forget complicated instructions over time. You and any other caregivers should also keep a copy of this information. If the patient is vision-impaired, have him carry a small tape recorder to doctor's appointments or visits to the pharmacist to record the medication directions he needs. Juggling multiple medications can be confusing, so keep an up-to-date medication list in a convenient location at the patient's home and jot down details such as drugs prescribed, when they should be taken, and the dosage. (The American Society of Consultant Pharmacists Research and Education Foundation offers a downloadable sample medication record form Continue reading >>

Drug Office - Information On Diabetic Medications

Drug Office - Information On Diabetic Medications

Diabetes is a group of diseases marked by high levels of blood glucose resulting from deficiency in insulin production, insulin action, or both. It is a major chronic disease in Hong Kong. Diabetes may lead to various complications and it is also the major cause of death. Studies showed that patients on appropriate treatment with satisfactory control may reduce the risk of developing complications by 50 to 70%. Therefore, patients should follow the guidance from healthcare professionals and receive long term therapy, in order to stabilize their blood glucose level and reduce the occurrence of complications. As either high or low blood glucose level can lead to serious health consequences, and different drugs used in diabetes have their unique properties, patients should strictly follow the dosing guidance given by doctor. Most of the drugs used in diabetes are prescription medicines and can only be sold by a registered pharmacy under the supervision of a pharmacist. They can be classified into two categories, namely insulin injection and antidiabetic drugs Insulin injection lowers blood glucose level by supplementing the insulin of diabetic patients. Insulin injection can be used in both Type I and Type II diabetes. The injection will usually be used with antidiabetic drugs when treating Type II diabetes. Insulin should not be taken orally as it would be destroyed in the stomach. Currently, only injection forms of insulin are available in Hong Kong. Insulin injection is usually classified by its duration of efficacy: Very short-acting: to be injected 15 minutes before meal or with meal; short-acting: to be injected 30 minutes before meal. Inspect your medication every time before use. It should be clear and colourless. Do not use if it becomes cloudy. Just before use, Continue reading >>

Oral Diabetes Medications Summary Chart

Oral Diabetes Medications Summary Chart

What Oral Medications Are Available for Type 2 Diabetes? Type 2 diabetes results when the body is unable to produce the amount of insulin it needs to convert food into energy or when it is unable to use insulin appropriately. Sometimes the body is actually producing more insulin than is needed by a person to keep blood glucose in a normal range. Yet blood glucose remains high, because the body's cells are resistant to the effects of insulin. Physicians and scientists believe that type 2 diabetes is caused by many factors, including insufficient insulin and insulin resistance. They increasingly believe that the relative contribution each factor makes toward causing diabetes varies from person to person. It is important to know the name of your diabetes medicine (or medicines), how it is taken, the reasons for taking it and possible side-effects. Diabetes Pills How to Take How They Work Side Effects Of Note Biguanides Metformin (Glucophage) Metformin liquid ( Riomet) Metformin extended release (Glucophage XR, Fortamet, Glumetza) Metformin: usually taken twice a day with breakfast and evening meal. Metformin extended release: usually taken once a day in the morning. Decreases amount of glucose released from liver. Bloating, gas, diarrhea, upset stomach, loss of appetite (usually within the first few weeks of starting). Take with food to minimize symptoms. Metformin is not likely to cause low blood glucose. In rare cases, lactic acidosis may occur in people with abnormal kidney or liver function. Always tell healthcare providers that it may need to be stopped when you are having a dye study or surgical procedure. Sulfonylureas Glimepiride (Amaryl) Glyburide (Diabeta, Micronase) Glipizide (Glucotrol, Glucotrol XL) Micronized glyburide (Glynase) Take with a meal once or twice Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetic Medication List And Guide

Type 2 Diabetic Medication List And Guide

While there are way too many type 2 diabetes medications to list in a single article, I will briefly describe some of the most common ones as well as their generic names and brand names in parenthesis. What you’ll find is that the generic terms within the same category of medications often have similar roots, which makes it easier to remember some of them. Sometimes insurance companies won’t cover the particular medication you’d like, but will cover another medication in that same class that may work very similarly. Sulfonylureas What are they called? The most commonly used sulfonylureas used today are: Glipizide (Glucotrol), Glyburide (Micronase, Glynase, Diabeta), and Glimepiride (Amaryl). How do they work? Sulfonylureas are some of the oldest diabetic medications. They work by stimulating the beta-cells in the pancreas to produce more insulin. They are taken 1-2 times daily with meals and work to lower blood sugar independently of food intake. For example, they will lower blood glucose regardless of the meal eaten or if a meal is skipped, which makes them more likely to cause hypoglycemia. Both fasting and post-meal blood glucose are targeted in these meds and the average A1c reduction with the addition of sulfonylureas is 1.5-2%. Advantages The main advantage of sulfonylureas is that they are very inexpensive, taken orally, covered by nearly all (if not all) insurance companies. Disadvantages Sulfonylureas can cause weight gain and hypoglycemia. Additionally, they may be linked with ischemic preconditioning, which may lead to heart disease or cardiac events over time. And they generally stop working effectively over time. Biguanides What are they called? There is only one medication in this class and that is glucophage (Metformin). How do they work? Glucophage Continue reading >>

Side Effects Soar For Newer Classes Of Diabetes Drugs

Side Effects Soar For Newer Classes Of Diabetes Drugs

A list of the newer classes of Type 2 diabetes drugs reads like alphabet soup: GLP-1, DPP-4, SLGT2. But the list of possible side effects carries a much more somber tone: pancreatitis, pancreatic cancer, urinary infections, thyroid cancer, gastrointestinal issues, and renal and gallbladder problems. In a groundbreaking report, AdverseEvents (AE), a California-based company that analyzes post-market side effect data, reveals the real-world problems with these newer drugs. “The only way to fully review a drug’s safety is to track and monitor side effects as the general population begins utilizing the drugs on an ongoing basis, in real-world circumstances,” Brian Overstreet, CEO of AdverseEvents, said in a statement. While it’s hard to argue with the data – real people reporting real side effects to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) – the report is sure to face scrutiny. The primary point of controversy? Whether these drugs are or are not linked to pancreatic cancer. The report says yes. Are These Drugs Safe? Metformin is considered the most efficient and inexpensive first line of treatment for Type 2 diabetes, but its effectiveness often diminishes after a few years. At that point, doctors will add one or more medications to keep blood sugar under control. Glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor (GLP-1) agonists and dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4) inhibitors both affect levels of the incretin hormone, which helps to control blood sugar. Sodium-glucose co-transporter 2 (SGLT2) inhibitor (glucuretics) block glucose reabsorption and instead release it into the urine. In its report, “The Comparative Safety of Type 2 Diabetes Medications,” AdverseEvents analyzed data on 11 medications in three classes of drugs through March 28. AE used data from the FDA’s A Continue reading >>

For Adults With Type 2 Diabetes, In Addition To Diet And Exercise. See More.

For Adults With Type 2 Diabetes, In Addition To Diet And Exercise. See More.

Your browser does not support the video tag. Who should not take FARXIGA? are allergic to dapagliflozin or any of the ingredients in FARXIGA. Symptoms of a serious allergic reaction may include skin rash, raised red patches on your skin (hives), swelling of the face, lips, tongue, and throat that may cause difficulty in breathing or swallowing. If you have any of these symptoms, stop taking FARXIGA and contact your healthcare provider or go to the nearest hospital emergency room right away have severe kidney problems or are on dialysis. Your healthcare provider should do blood tests to check how well your kidneys are working before and during your treatment with FARXIGA What are the possible side effects of FARXIGA? Dehydration (the loss of body water and salt), which may cause you to feel dizzy, faint, lightheaded, or weak, especially when you stand up (orthostatic hypotension). You may be at a higher risk of dehydration if you have low blood pressure; take medicines to lower your blood pressure, including water pills (diuretics); are 65 years of age or older; are on a low salt diet, or have kidney problems Ketoacidosis occurred in people with type 1 and type 2 diabetes during treatment with FARXIGA. Ketoacidosis is a serious condition which may require hospitalization and may lead to death. Symptoms may include nausea, tiredness, vomiting, trouble breathing, and abdominal pain. If you get any of these symptoms, stop taking FARXIGA and call your healthcare provider right away. If possible, check for ketones in your urine or blood, even if your blood sugar is less than 250 mg/dL Kidney problems. Sudden kidney injury occurred in people taking FARXIGA. Talk to your doctor right away if you reduce the amount you eat or drink, or if you lose liquids; for example, from vomit Continue reading >>

Diabetes Drugs

Diabetes Drugs

XIAFLEX® is a prescription medicine used to treat adults with Dupuytren's contracture when a "cord" can be felt. It is not known if XIAFLEX® is safe and effective in children under the age of 18. Do not receive XIAFLEX® if you have had an allergic reaction to collagenase clostridium histolyticum or any of the ingredients in XIAFLEX®, or to any other collagenase product. See the end of the Medication Guide for a complete list of ingredients in XIAFLEX®. XIAFLEX® can cause serious side effects, including: Tendon rupture or ligament damage. Receiving an injection of XIAFLEX® may cause damage to a tendon or ligament in your hand and cause it to break or weaken. This could require surgery to fix the damaged tendon or ligament. Call your healthcare provider right away if you have trouble bending your injected finger (towards the wrist) after the swelling goes down or you have problems using your treated hand after your follow-up visit Nerve injury or other serious injury of the hand. Call your healthcare provider right away if you get numbness, tingling, increased pain, or tears in the skin (laceration) in your treated finger or hand after your injection or after your follow-up visit Hypersensitivity reactions, including anaphylaxis. Severe allergic reactions can happen in people who receive XIAFLEX® because it contains foreign proteins. Call your healthcare provider right away if you have any of these symptoms of an allergic reaction after an injection of XIAFLEX®: hives swollen face breathing trouble chest pain low blood pressure dizziness or fainting Increased chance of bleeding. Bleeding or bruising at the injection site can happen in people who receive XIAFLEX®. Talk to your healthcare provider if you have a problem with your blood clotting. XIAFLEX® may not b Continue reading >>

Medications For Diabetes

Medications For Diabetes

In type 1 diabetes, insulin is usually started right away, since the pancreas is no longer producing insulin. In type 2 diabetes, if making the appropriate lifestyle changes doesn't bring the sugar levels close to target within a reasonable timeframe, medication will be prescribed to further lower blood sugar levels. The insulin that people with diabetes use today is a man-made protein that is structurally identical or close to identical to the insulin normally made by the pancreas. Insulins are classified by their duration of action - some work immediately and others lower blood sugar over longer periods of time. All insulins must be injected into subcutaneous tissue (the fat just under the skin surface) where they are absorbed into the blood stream. They are administered using a syringe, a pen device, or an insulin pump. In some situations, insulin can also be given intravenously, but this is typically only for patients admitted to a hospital. Medications for type 2 diabetes There are many types of medications used to treat type 2 diabetes. Here is a list of medications that are available and commonly used in Canada: acarbose (Glucobay®) alogliptin (Nesina®) canagliflozin (Invokana®) dapagliflozin (Forxiga®) exenatide (Byetta®) gliclazide (Diamicron®, Diamicron® MR, generics) glimepiride (Amaryl®, generics) glyburide (Diabeta®, generics) insulin (various) linagliptin (Trajenta®) liraglutide (Victoza®) metformin (Glucophage®, Glumetza®, generics) metformin - rosiglitazone (Avandamet®) nateglinide (Starlix®) pioglitazone (Actos®, generics) repaglinide (Gluconorm®) rosiglitazone (Avandia®) saxagliptin (Onglyza®) sitagliptin (Januvia®) sitagliptin - metformin (Janumet®) tolbutamide (generics) You may have to try different types of medication before fi Continue reading >>

Injectable Type 2 Diabetes Medications List

Injectable Type 2 Diabetes Medications List

What is diabetes mellitus? Diabetes mellitus is a chronic condition that leads to high levels of blood glucose because the body cannot produce enough insulin or it becomes resistant to it. There are 2 forms of diabetes mellitus, type 1 diabetes (T1D) and type 2 diabetes (T2D). In the United States, 90% of patients are suffering from T2D. Patients with T1D require injectable insulin to control their levels of blood sugar because they cannot produce insulin naturally. On the other hand, patients with T2D can usually manage their condition through oral diabetes drugs, proper diet and regular exercise. In some cases, type 2 diabetic patients may take injectable diabetes medication to help them manage their levels of blood sugar. It is important to control blood sugar levels so as to prevent the risk of long-term diabetes complications. Injectable type 2 diabetes medications Injectable diabetes medications are usually prescribed when oral diabetes medications fail to control the level of blood sugar in type 2 diabetic patients. Injectable drugs that are used by type 2 diabetic patients could either be insulin-based or non-insulin injectables, such as Amylin. Injectable insulin is usually the last treatment to be prescribed to patients with T2D, and is only added when oral diabetes drugs like metformin or non-insulin injections fail to work. Here is the list of injectable type 2 diabetes drugs. Adlyxin Adlyxin is a once daily injectable diabetic drug that is usually prescribed together with diet and exercise program. Adlyxin is a new injectable drug in a class of drugs called GLP-1 or glucagon like peptide 1. Adlyxin should be used to control the levels of blood sugar in type 2 diabetic people and not those with T1D. The common side effects of Adlyxin include: Diarrhea; Dizzi Continue reading >>

Drug Interactions With Diabetes

Drug Interactions With Diabetes

Patients with diabetes often receive many other medications in addition to their oral or injectable diabetes agents. If confronted with a loss of glycemic control, providers should investigate whether or not concomitant drug therapy may be contributing. This is of particular consideration when starting a new medication or increasing dosages. The theorized mechanisms for these interactions include decreased peripheral insulin sensitivity, decreased insulin secretion and/or increased gluconeogenesis. This article summarizes information on a core group of medications to be suspected in cases of decreased glycemic control. Corticosteroids The route of administration and the dose are factors that determine the impact of this class on blood glucose. Lower risk is associated with inhaled and topical formulations vs. oral formulations. The effect on blood glucose may be dramatic and prolonged, requiring dose increases in diabetes medications to achieve glycemic control during concomitant therapy. Atypical antipsychotics These medications have been frequently reported to be associated with significant increases in weight, diabetes (even diabetic ketoacidosis) and may have an adverse effect on lipids. The weight gain appears to be rapid, within the first few months of therapy, but may not plateau for as long as one year after treatment initiation. The increase in weight is widely variable (2 to 10 kg) and is reportedly due to an increase in body fat, suggesting insulin resistance as the mechanism. The relative risk of hyperglycemia and weight gain varies between agents within this class. Clozapine (Clozaril, Novartis) and olanzepine (Zyprexa, Eli Lilly) appear to be ranked highest. Switching patients to the lowest risk agents aripiprazole (Abilify, Otsuka America/Bristol-Myers Sq Continue reading >>

List Of Medications Available For Diabetes

List Of Medications Available For Diabetes

Diabetes is a disorder of blood sugar levels. There are two main types of diabetes, plus rarer forms such as diabetes that can happen during pregnancy, known as gestational diabetes. Type 1 diabetes results in high blood sugar levels because the body stops producing insulin, the hormone that regulates sugar levels. Type 2 diabetes leads to high blood sugars because the insulin in the body does not work effectively. The broad differences in treatment between the two types are: Type 1 diabetes is treated with insulin injection. Careful diet and activity planning is needed to avoid complications of treatment. Type 2 diabetes is treated with lifestyle measures, drugs taken by mouth, and sometimes also insulin if the other treatments fail. Medications for type 1 diabetes Treatment for type 1 diabetes is always with insulin, to replace the body's absent insulin and keep blood sugar levels under control. Insulin treatments Insulin is usually given by injection - by patients themselves, injecting it under the skin, or if hospitalized, sometimes directly into the blood. It is also available as a powder that patients can breathe in. Insulin injections vary by how quickly they act, their peak action, and how long they last. The aim is to mimic how the body would produce insulin throughout the day and in relation to energy intake. 1. Rapid-acting injections take effect within 5 to 15 minutes but last for a shorter time of 3 to 5 hours: Insulin lispro (Humalog) Insulin aspart (NovoLog) Insulin glulisine (Apidra) 2. Short-acting injections take effect from between 30 minutes and 1 hour, and last for 6 to 8 hours: Regular insulin (Humulin R and Novolin R) 3. Intermediate-acting injections take effect after about 2 hours, and last for 18 to 26 hours: Insulin isophane, also called NPH i Continue reading >>

Gluten And Medications

Gluten And Medications

A source of information for gluten free drugs Some drug companies have been telling people that someof the drugs that they manufacture contain gluten. When I investigated their claims itappears that the reason they are blatantly claiming that their drugs arecontaminated is because they have used a sugar alcohol as an excipient. Sugar alcohols are not truly sugars or alcoholsrather they are carbohydrates that provide a source of calories. The sugar alcohols are naturally foundin a number of fruits and vegetables and may be extracted from many sourcesincluding any starch, including wheat.During the manufacturing process they are completely refined leavingbehind no gluten proteins similar to making table sugar. The mostly widely used sugar alcoholsused in prescription drug manufacturing are mannitol and xylitol. Both of the products are usedeither as sweeteners in liquid drug products or as bulking agents in the soliddosage forms. The sugar alcohols are used in many diabeticproducts as well as in many health foods such as nutrition bars. Any person who consumes one of the sugaralcohols in significant quantities can experience gastrointestinal disturbancesand diarrhea which may mimic symptoms celiac patients may suffer after beingexposed to gluten. National celiac organizations such as the GlutenIntolerance Group of North America consider mannitol to be safe for use inceliac patients. Additionally, ifyou go to the Celiac.Com website dated 11/29/07 you will find a list of itemssafe for the celiac patient to consume.On that list you will also find both mannitol and xylitol as well as thefollowing sugar alcohols sorbitol, maltitol, Continue reading >>

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