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New Diabetes Medications List

New Injectables For Diabetes: Shots That Aren’t Insulin Are Becoming Popular Among Diabetics

New Injectables For Diabetes: Shots That Aren’t Insulin Are Becoming Popular Among Diabetics

No, it’s not insulin. New injections for diabetes may change the way we manage adult-onset diabetes. Approval of a new once-a-week injection called Bydureon is an exciting new option for blood sugar control. This new class of injectables may be popular for several reasons, not the least of which is they also result in weight loss. Yippee! Though it sounds straight out of outer space, these drugs are called incretin mimetics, meaning they mimic the incretin hormones that tell your body to release insulin after eating. These drugs work in very cool ways by enhancing insulin secretion, slowing stomach emptying, reducing food intake, and promoting proliferation of β-cells (cells that make insulin). Byetta (exenatide) was the first in this class and is used to improve blood sugar control in adults with type 2 diabetes. The most interesting part is that exenatide is an amino acid isolated from the salivary gland venom of the Gila monster. There are now three choices in this class: Byetta, Victoza and the newly approved Bydureon. All three may be used with other oral diabetes medicines. All three are used to treat adult onset diabetes and all three result in weight loss, a nice bonus. So how are Byetta, Victoza and the new Bydureon different? Byetta (exenatide) is injected twice a day before your morning and evening meal. Victoza (liraglutide) is given once a day instead of twice a day (like Byetta). The just-approved Bydureon is an extended release form Byetta (exenatide). Bydureon is attractive because it is a once-weekly injection. While all of them may cause some nausea/vomiting, this is higher with Byetta and was the most common adverse event associated with Byetta. The nausea/vomiting decreases in frequency and severity over time. Reports of pancreatitis have dogged a Continue reading >>

Faa Accepted Medications

Faa Accepted Medications

The FAA has not published an official list of approved drugs. The following list of FAA accepted medications is the most accurate and complete information available on the listed date. This "master list" was developed by Pilot Medical Solutions through communication with the FAA. Medications included in this list are approved only for the condition listed on a case by case basis. Some medications listed may not be approved for a given individual and medications not listed may also be acceptable to the FAA. To assure FAA medical eligibility call 800-699-4457 for a free consultation. Hold Cntrl+F keys or Cmd+F to find any drug or condition listed on this page. Acne - Most antibiotics are acceptable to the FAA. Pilots should wait 48 hours after the initial dose to assure no adverse side effects occur. Accutane (Isotretinoin) is also approved with the restriction "NOT VALID FOR NIGHT FLYING" on the medical. ADD - See Attention Deficit Disorder Arrhythmia (heart) - Some commonly prescribed drugs such as Tikosyn (Dofetilide) are not approved by the FAA. The following anti-arrhythmic medications are approved on a case by case basis and subject to a complete cardiovascular evaluation. Betapace (Sotalol) Calan (Verapamil) Cordarone, Pacerone (Amiodarone-up to 200 mg per day for A-Fib only) Lanoxin (Digoxin) Multaq (Dronedarone) Requires extensive cardiovascular work-up. Norpace (Disopyramide) Rythmol (Propafenone) Tambocor (Flecainide Acetate) MORE Allergy, Antihistamine, Cold & Decongestants - Sudafed is approved by the FAA provided it is not combined with an antihistamine. Allegra (Fexofenadine), Astelin (Azelastine), Dymista (Azelastine HCl / Fluticasone propionate), Claritin (Loratadine) and Clarinex (Desloratadine) are acceptable to the FAA provided no adverse effects are e Continue reading >>

A Comprehensive Review Of The Fda-approved Labels Of Diabetes Drugs: Indications, Safety, And Emerging Cardiovascular Safety Data

A Comprehensive Review Of The Fda-approved Labels Of Diabetes Drugs: Indications, Safety, And Emerging Cardiovascular Safety Data

1. Introduction Approximately 30 million American children and adults have type 1 or type 2 diabetes mellitus and the incidence keeps increasing (T1DM or T2DM).1 Major complications of diabetes include hypertension, dyslipidemia, cardiovascular disease (CVD), stroke, blindness, kidney disease, and amputation.2 In 2012 the estimated annual cost of diabetes in the U.S. was $245 billion mainly due to expenses related to management of diabetic complications.3 Therefore, achieving optimal glycemic control in patients with diabetes is critical.4,5 However, it is estimated that only 30% of adult patients with T1DM, 17% of adolescents with T1DM, and 50% of adults with any type of diabetes achieve optimal glycemic control with current management.6 Therefore, there is a need for effective and safe medications that can improve the management of diabetes and decrease complications. The physicians refer to the drug labels as an important source of information to prescribe medications to improve glycemic control of diabetes. Furthermore, in 2008, FDA published a Guidance for Industry recommending that new drug applications (NDAs) for diabetes should include evidence that the therapy does not increase the risk of cardiovascular events.7 Given the significant burden of diabetes and the importance of drug labels to guide physicians in the management of diabetes, we undertook this study to evaluate all FDA-approved medications for the treatment diabetes. The aims of this research were to (1) overview the different classes of medications that are FDA approved for use in patients with type 1 and type 2 diabetes, (2) examine the different indications for pediatric patients versus adults with diabetes, (3) review adverse events and warnings and precautions per class of drugs, and (4) investi Continue reading >>

Diabetes Drugs

Diabetes Drugs

Tweet There are a number of different types of diabetes drugs - with some having similar ways of acting. Drugs which act similarly to each other are put into the same class of drugs. Below is a list of the most common diabetes drug classes, an A-Z of all diabetes drugs, how they work, who they are for and which medications fall into these drug classes. Jump to the treatment you’re interested in: Biguanides / Metformin Sulphonylureas Meglitinides / Prandial glucose regulator / Glinides Alpha-glucosidase inhibitors Thiazolidinedione / Glitazones DPP-4 inhibitors / Gliptins Incretin mimetics / GLP-1 analogues Amylin analogues A to Z of diabetes drugs Insulin Insulin is a hormone which helps to regulate blood sugar. A number of different types of insulin are available as medication, with some insulins acting for as long as a day and others acting for only a few hours. However, insulin is prescribed for people with type 1 diabetes and for people with type 2 diabetes who have not responded so well on oral medication (tablets). Read more on insulin Biguanides / Metformin The only available diabetes medication in the biguanides class of drugs is metformin. Biguanides prevent the liver from producing glucose and helps to improve the body’s sensitivity towards insulin. Metformin is commonly used as a first line treatment for type 2 diabetes and may occasionally be prescribed, in combination with insulin, for people with type 1 diabetes. Read more on metformin Sulphonylureas Sulphonylureas are the class of antidiabetic drug for type 2 diabetes that tends to include those drugs which end in ‘ide’. The following drugs are all in the sulphonylureas class (branded names in brackets): Glibenclamide –also known as Glyburide (Daonil) Glipizide (Glucotrol) Gliquidone (Glurenorm) Continue reading >>

Gluten And Medications

Gluten And Medications

A source of information for gluten free drugs Some drug companies have been telling people that someof the drugs that they manufacture contain gluten. When I investigated their claims itappears that the reason they are blatantly claiming that their drugs arecontaminated is because they have used a sugar alcohol as an excipient. Sugar alcohols are not truly sugars or alcoholsrather they are carbohydrates that provide a source of calories. The sugar alcohols are naturally foundin a number of fruits and vegetables and may be extracted from many sourcesincluding any starch, including wheat.During the manufacturing process they are completely refined leavingbehind no gluten proteins similar to making table sugar. The mostly widely used sugar alcoholsused in prescription drug manufacturing are mannitol and xylitol. Both of the products are usedeither as sweeteners in liquid drug products or as bulking agents in the soliddosage forms. The sugar alcohols are used in many diabeticproducts as well as in many health foods such as nutrition bars. Any person who consumes one of the sugaralcohols in significant quantities can experience gastrointestinal disturbancesand diarrhea which may mimic symptoms celiac patients may suffer after beingexposed to gluten. National celiac organizations such as the GlutenIntolerance Group of North America consider mannitol to be safe for use inceliac patients. Additionally, ifyou go to the Celiac.Com website dated 11/29/07 you will find a list of itemssafe for the celiac patient to consume.On that list you will also find both mannitol and xylitol as well as thefollowing sugar alcohols sorbitol, maltitol, Continue reading >>

Comprehensive List Of Diabetes Medications

Comprehensive List Of Diabetes Medications

Understanding Type 1 and Type 2 Diabetes Diabetes occurs when your body no longer makes or uses insulin as it’s intended to. Insulin is a naturally occurring substance in the body, but some people don’t make enough of it or their cells become insulin resistant. Diabetic patients must manage higher than normal blood sugar (or glucose) levels in the body. Diabetes is classified into two types (Type 1 and Type 2). Diabetics of both types require medicines to normalize blood glucose levels. If the doctor says you’re diabetic, he or she will prescribe drugs for Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes. It’s good to know about the universe of treatment options diabetics have today. Here’s a comprehensive list of available diabetes medications along with links to Type 1 and Type 2 Diabetes medication prices that will help you save up to 90% off U.S. retail prices. You may also find our Cheat Sheet helpful: 12 Ways to Save Money on Your Diabetes Medications [Cheat Sheet] Type 1 Diabetes Medications Short-Action Insulin Brand names: Novolin and Humulin (regular insulin) are two commonly prescribed, short-acting drugs your doctor may prescribe. Rapid-Action Insulin Brand names: Levemir FlexPen and NovoLog Flexpen are two commonly prescribed rapid action insulins. Brand name: Humalog Pen (insulin lispro) Brand name: Apidra (insulin glulisine) Intermediate-Action Insulin Brand name: Novolin N and Humulin N Pen (insulin isophane) are two intermediate-action insulins your doctor may prescribe. Long-Action Insulin Brand name Tresiba (insulin degludec) Brand name Levemir Flexpen (insulin detemir) Brand name Lantus Vials (insulin glargine) Brand name Toujeo (insulin glargine) Combination Medications Insulin Brand name: Ryzodeg Brand name: NovoLog Mix 70/30 Brand name: Novolin 70/30 Brand na Continue reading >>

Approved Medications

Approved Medications

From June 2014, for all new Long Term Illness Scheme patients, the HSE is changing how medications are approved under the scheme. The HSE has developed Core Lists for each of the Prescribed LTI conditions, showing the medication groups that are automatically approved for each condition. This is being done, for new LTI patients only, to ensure that the LTI Scheme is working in the same way in all areas, for all patients. The Core Lists were developed following detailed consultation with Medical Officers, HSE Pharmacists and HSE Medicines Management Programme.. The HSE is satisfied that all medicines that should be necessary for the treatment of each primary LTI condition are provided on these Core Lists. Patients, General Practitioners and Community Pharmacists can view the approved medication lists for each condition below: In conjunction with the Medicines Management Programme, the core lists have been reviewed and uploaded effective 1st September, 2016. For people joining the LTI Scheme from September 2014, medicines on these lists are now automatically approved for each of the LTI conditions. This will make it much clearer for patients and health professionals what types of medicines are included in the LTI scheme for each condition, and will reduce the amount of administration for patients and healthcare professionals in adding medication to a patients LTI book. Where a patient has LTI eligibility and are prescribed an item on the core list for their condition, it will no longer be necessary to get approval on each occasion that a medicine is changed. Where a medicine or product has been prescribed by a hospitals doctor or team, and is not on the automatic approval list, an appeal for a product to be added to the patients individually approved requirements can be c Continue reading >>

Drug Interactions Of Medications Commonly Used In Diabetes

Drug Interactions Of Medications Commonly Used In Diabetes

When patients are diagnosed with diabetes, a large number of medications become appropriate therapy. These include medications for dyslipidemia, hypertension, antiplatelet therapy, and glycemic control. So many medications can be overwhelming, and it is imperative that patients are thoroughly educated about their drug regimen. Patients have many concerns when multiple medications are started, including prescribing errors, the cost of medications, and possible adverse effects. Significantly, 58% of patients worry that they will be given medications that have drug interactions that will adversely affect their health.1 These worries are not unfounded given that several highly publicized drugs have been withdrawn from the U.S. market in the past several years because of adverse effects from drug interactions. Terfenadine, mibefradil, and cisapride have all been withdrawn from the market specifically because of drug-drug interactions. When terfenadine or cisapride were given with a strong inhibitor of their metabolism, torsades de pointes, a life-threatening drug-induced ventricular arrhythmia associated with QT prolongation, could occur.2 Cisapride, for gastroparesis or gastrointestinal reflux disease, and mibefradil, for hypertension, were prescribed for many patients with diabetes. An adverse drug interaction is defined as an interaction between one or more coadministered medications that results in the alteration of the effectiveness or toxicity of any of the coadministered medications. Drug interactions can be caused by prescription and over-the-counter medications, herbal products or vitamins, foods, diseases, and genetics (family history). The true incidence of drug interactions is unknown because many are not reported, do not result in significant harm to patients, o Continue reading >>

Best Treatments For Type 2 Diabetes

Best Treatments For Type 2 Diabetes

At-a-glance Six classes of oral medicines (and 12 individual drugs) are now available to help the 25.8 million people in the U.S. with type 2 diabetes control their blood sugar when diet and lifestyle changes are not enough. Our evaluation of these medicines found the following: Newer drugs are no better. Two drugs from a class called the sulfonylureas and a drug named metformin have been around for more than a decade and work just as well as newer medicines. Indeed, several of the newer drugs, such as Januvia and Onglyza, are less effective than the older medications. Newer drugs are no safer. All diabetes pills have the potential to cause adverse effects, both minor and serious. The drugs’ safety and side effect “profiles” may be the most important factor in your choice. The newer drugs are more expensive. The newer diabetes medicines cost many times more than the older drugs. Taking more than one diabetes drug is often necessary. Many people with diabetes do not get enough blood sugar control from one medicine. Two or more may be necessary. However, taking more than one diabetes drug raises the risk of adverse effects and increases costs. Taking effectiveness, safety, adverse effects, dosing, and cost into consideration, we have chosen the following as Consumer Reports Best Buy Drugs if your doctor and you have decided that you need medicine to control your diabetes: Metformin and Metformin Sustained-Release — alone or with glipizide or glimepiride Glipizide and Glipizide Sustained-Release — alone or with metformin Glimepiride — alone or with metformin These medicines are available as low-cost generics, costing from $4 to $35 a month. If you have been diagnosed with diabetes, we recommend that you try metformin first unless it's inappropriate for your hea Continue reading >>

New Diabetes Products For 2017: Lancing Devices And Diabetes Drugs

New Diabetes Products For 2017: Lancing Devices And Diabetes Drugs

For the last year, Diabetes Self-Management has been following all the new innovations and products aimed at helping to improve the lives of those living with diabetes. From the latest glucometers and monitoring systems to insulin pumps, pens, and treatments, several major advancements made their impact on the diabetes community in 2016. When selecting some of the new products, we first talked to Gary Scheiner, MS, CDE, clinical director of Integrated Diabetes Services of Wynnewood, Pennsylvania. Scheiner, known as the MacGyver of diabetes products, has lived with Type 1 diabetes for more than 30 years. He tries out new products before recommending them to patients. “It’s important to see new products from the user’s point of view, not just from the [health-care practitioner’s] side of things,” said Scheiner. In 2016, the pace of innovation continued to race ahead with unbelievable technology right out of a Star Trek episode. The growing use of smartphone technology and mobile applications has led to better access to blood glucose readings, general health information, and much more. Read on to learn about the newest products. We guarantee you there’s something here for everyone, whether you live with Type 1 or Type 2 diabetes. In this installment, we look at lancing devices and diabetes drugs that have recently hit the market. Lancing devices Motivated to help a friend with Type 2 diabetes, bioengineer Christopher Jacobs, PhD, developed a new lancing device, called Genteel, to reduce the pain of pricking fingertips. “I was moved by his distress, compelled by our friendship, and undone by the irresistible siren song that lies at the heart of every engineering challenge,” said Jacobs. For 10 years, Jacobs studied the limitations of current devices and the Continue reading >>

Treatment

Treatment

Treatment for diabetes aims to keep your blood glucose levels as normal as possible and control your symptoms to prevent health problems developing later in life. If you've been diagnosed with type 2 diabetes, your GP will be able to explain your condition in detail and help you understand your treatment. They'll also closely monitor your condition to identify any health problems that may occur. If there are any problems, you may be referred to a hospital-based diabetes care team. Making lifestyle changes If you're diagnosed with type 2 diabetes, you'll need to look after your health very carefully for the rest of your life. This may seem daunting, but your diabetes care team will be able to give you support and advice about all aspects of your treatment. After being diagnosed with type 2 diabetes, or if you're at risk of developing the condition, the first step is to look at your diet and lifestyle and make any necessary changes. Three major areas that you'll need to look closely at are: You may be able to keep your blood glucose at a safe and healthy level without the need for other types of treatment. Lifestyle changes Diet Increasing the amount of fibre in your diet and reducing your sugar and fat intake, particularly saturated fat, can help prevent type 2 diabetes, as well as manage the condition if you already have it. You should: increase your consumption of high-fibre foods, such as wholegrain bread and cereals, beans and lentils, and fruit and vegetables choose foods that are low in fat – replace butter, ghee and coconut oil with low-fat spreads and vegetable oil choose skimmed and semi-skimmed milk, and low-fat yoghurts eat fish and lean meat rather than fatty or processed meat, such as sausages and burgers grill, bake, poach or steam food instead of frying Continue reading >>

For Adults With Type 2 Diabetes, In Addition To Diet And Exercise. See More.

For Adults With Type 2 Diabetes, In Addition To Diet And Exercise. See More.

Your browser does not support the video tag. Who should not take FARXIGA? are allergic to dapagliflozin or any of the ingredients in FARXIGA. Symptoms of a serious allergic reaction may include skin rash, raised red patches on your skin (hives), swelling of the face, lips, tongue, and throat that may cause difficulty in breathing or swallowing. If you have any of these symptoms, stop taking FARXIGA and contact your healthcare provider or go to the nearest hospital emergency room right away have severe kidney problems or are on dialysis. Your healthcare provider should do blood tests to check how well your kidneys are working before and during your treatment with FARXIGA What are the possible side effects of FARXIGA? Dehydration (the loss of body water and salt), which may cause you to feel dizzy, faint, lightheaded, or weak, especially when you stand up (orthostatic hypotension). You may be at a higher risk of dehydration if you have low blood pressure; take medicines to lower your blood pressure, including water pills (diuretics); are 65 years of age or older; are on a low salt diet, or have kidney problems Ketoacidosis occurred in people with type 1 and type 2 diabetes during treatment with FARXIGA. Ketoacidosis is a serious condition which may require hospitalization and may lead to death. Symptoms may include nausea, tiredness, vomiting, trouble breathing, and abdominal pain. If you get any of these symptoms, stop taking FARXIGA and call your healthcare provider right away. If possible, check for ketones in your urine or blood, even if your blood sugar is less than 250 mg/dL Kidney problems. Sudden kidney injury occurred in people taking FARXIGA. Talk to your doctor right away if you reduce the amount you eat or drink, or if you lose liquids; for example, from vomit Continue reading >>

Diabetes Medication Recommendations | Caring.com

Diabetes Medication Recommendations | Caring.com

How to Help a Diabetic Follow Medication Recommendations By Sarah Henry , Caring.com senior editor | Last updated: Feb 06, 2018 Here's how you can help someone benefit the most from diabetes medications: To emphasize the importance of taking meds, have a professional explain -- to you and the person in your care -- why a medication is prescribed, how it works, how often it needs to be taken, and a time frame for when improvements should be seen. Ask about any potential side effects or medical interactions and any symptoms that warrant seeking medical advice. Find out, too, if a prescribed pill should be taken with or without food or fluid. Should it be taken before or after eating, and should it be chewed or swallowed? People with type 2 diabetes also need to know how food, exercise, stress, or illness can affect how a medication works. A patient's doctor, nurse practitioner, and pharmacist are all potential resources for getting the answers to these questions. Make sure the person in your care has a written record of the dosage, timing, and potential side effects of his medications from his doctor, nurse, or pharmacist, as it's easy to forget complicated instructions over time. You and any other caregivers should also keep a copy of this information. If the patient is vision-impaired, have him carry a small tape recorder to doctor's appointments or visits to the pharmacist to record the medication directions he needs. Juggling multiple medications can be confusing, so keep an up-to-date medication list in a convenient location at the patient's home and jot down details such as drugs prescribed, when they should be taken, and the dosage. (The American Society of Consultant Pharmacists Research and Education Foundation offers a downloadable sample medication record form Continue reading >>

If Diabetes Medications Make You Tired, Read This:

If Diabetes Medications Make You Tired, Read This:

Harvard has finally taken interest in a study performed on diabetics (called ACCORD). I say finally because the study was published two years ago and it showed us something very important: Some people with type II diabetes should not be given too many medications at once. In ACCORD, People who were trying to be good, who did what their doctor ordered when prescribed an aggressive regimen of diabetes medications, were at higher risk of dying than those who didn’t comply or were treated less aggressively. For the past two years, most medical policy leaders have ignored these findings, claiming the study was flawed. Shame on them. It’s about time diabetes specialists take this issue seriously. What they admitted at the May meeting of the American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists was that the finding that patients on more aggressive treatment died more often than those who didn’t get the aggressive treatment was the opposite of what they expected and “nobody saw it coming.” (Are you getting tired of hearing that?) The patients who were more likely to die were those who started out with higher A1c numbers and had such bad diabetes that as many as four medications failed to push their numbers under 7.0. (A1c is a measure of blood sugar control, normal numbers are under 5.7, over 8.0 indicates poor control of diabetes). They’re not sure why people died, in fact, they’re still calling it a mystery (see reference, below). But it’s not really that mysterious if you think about it from a whole-person perspective. When diabetes is so bad that a person has to take multiple medications, it’s not “genetic” or “hereditary.” It’s because years of bad eating habits and lack of exercise has damaged their tissues at a cellular level. No pill on Earth can Continue reading >>

Diabetes Medications

Diabetes Medications

The main aim of treatment for diabetes is to reduce your risk of developing complications by keeping your blood glucose (sugar) levels at reasonable levels. If your doctor gives you tablets for diabetes, make sure you understand the right time to take them and any special instructions about timing around meals. For these medications to work correctly, it is important to take them as prescribed. Ask your doctor, nurse or pharmacist if you are unsure. Medicines for type 2 diabetes There are various medicines that are used to treat type 2 diabetes, such as: Metformin Sulphonylureas (example, gliclazide, glipizide, glibenclamide) Acarbose Pioglitazone Insulin Metformin Metformin works by improving your body's response to the insulin you naturally make. It also reduces the amount of sugar that your liver makes and that your stomach/intestines absorb. Metformin is prescribed in people with type 2 diabetes whose blood glucose levels cannot be lowered with diet, exercise and other lifestyle changes. Sulphonylureas Sulphonylureas work by making your pancreas produce more insulin. They are prescribed in people with type 2 diabetes whose blood glucose levels cannot be lowered with metformin. There are several tablets in this group. They include: Gliclazide also known as Glizon or Apo-Gliclazide Glipizide also known as Minidiab Glibenclamide also known as Gliben or Apo-Glibenclamide Pioglitazone This is an insulin sensitiser which helps reduce insulin resistance in your body. Pioglitazone is prescribed in people with type 2 diabetes whose blood glucose levels cannot be lowered with metformin and sulphonylureas. Acarbose Acarbose reduces the rise in blood glucose levels after a meal by delaying the breakdown and absorption of carbohydrates in the stomach. Acarbose is prescribed in p Continue reading >>

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