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New Diabetes Information

Type 2 Diabetes

Type 2 Diabetes

Print Overview Type 2 diabetes, once known as adult-onset or noninsulin-dependent diabetes, is a chronic condition that affects the way your body metabolizes sugar (glucose), your body's important source of fuel. With type 2 diabetes, your body either resists the effects of insulin — a hormone that regulates the movement of sugar into your cells — or doesn't produce enough insulin to maintain a normal glucose level. More common in adults, type 2 diabetes increasingly affects children as childhood obesity increases. There's no cure for type 2 diabetes, but you may be able to manage the condition by eating well, exercising and maintaining a healthy weight. If diet and exercise aren't enough to manage your blood sugar well, you also may need diabetes medications or insulin therapy. Symptoms Signs and symptoms of type 2 diabetes often develop slowly. In fact, you can have type 2 diabetes for years and not know it. Look for: Increased thirst and frequent urination. Excess sugar building up in your bloodstream causes fluid to be pulled from the tissues. This may leave you thirsty. As a result, you may drink — and urinate — more than usual. Increased hunger. Without enough insulin to move sugar into your cells, your muscles and organs become depleted of energy. This triggers intense hunger. Weight loss. Despite eating more than usual to relieve hunger, you may lose weight. Without the ability to metabolize glucose, the body uses alternative fuels stored in muscle and fat. Calories are lost as excess glucose is released in the urine. Fatigue. If your cells are deprived of sugar, you may become tired and irritable. Blurred vision. If your blood sugar is too high, fluid may be pulled from the lenses of your eyes. This may affect your ability to focus. Slow-healing sores o Continue reading >>

Diabetes Diet, Eating, & Physical Activity

Diabetes Diet, Eating, & Physical Activity

Nutrition and physical activity are important parts of a healthy lifestyle when you have diabetes. Along with other benefits, following a healthy meal plan and being active can help you keep your blood glucose level, also called blood sugar, in your target range. To manage your blood glucose, you need to balance what you eat and drink with physical activity and diabetes medicine, if you take any. What you choose to eat, how much you eat, and when you eat are all important in keeping your blood glucose level in the range that your health care team recommends. Becoming more active and making changes in what you eat and drink can seem challenging at first. You may find it easier to start with small changes and get help from your family, friends, and health care team. Eating well and being physically active most days of the week can help you keep your blood glucose level, blood pressure, and cholesterol in your target ranges prevent or delay diabetes problems feel good and have more energy What foods can I eat if I have diabetes? You may worry that having diabetes means going without foods you enjoy. The good news is that you can still eat your favorite foods, but you might need to eat smaller portions or enjoy them less often. Your health care team will help create a diabetes meal plan for you that meets your needs and likes. The key to eating with diabetes is to eat a variety of healthy foods from all food groups, in the amounts your meal plan outlines. The food groups are vegetables nonstarchy: includes broccoli, carrots, greens, peppers, and tomatoes starchy: includes potatoes, corn, and green peas fruits—includes oranges, melon, berries, apples, bananas, and grapes grains—at least half of your grains for the day should be whole grains includes wheat, rice, oats, co Continue reading >>

Understanding Type 2 Diabetes

Understanding Type 2 Diabetes

Diabetes is a chronic medical condition in which sugar, or glucose, levels build up in your bloodstream. The hormone insulin helps move the sugar from your blood into your cells, which are where the sugar is used for energy. In type 2 diabetes, your body’s cells aren’t able to respond to insulin as well as they should. In later stages of the disease your body may also not produce enough insulin. Uncontrolled type 2 diabetes can lead to chronically high blood sugar levels, causing several symptoms and potentially leading to serious complications. In type 2 diabetes your body isn’t able to effectively use insulin to bring glucose into your cells. This causes your body to rely on alternative energy sources in your tissues, muscles, and organs. This is a chain reaction that can cause a variety of symptoms. Type 2 diabetes can develop slowly. The symptoms may be mild and easy to dismiss at first. The early symptoms may include: constant hunger a lack of energy fatigue weight loss excessive thirst frequent urination dry mouth itchy skin blurry vision As the disease progresses, the symptoms become more severe and potentially dangerous. If your blood sugar levels have been high for a long time, the symptoms can include: yeast infections slow-healing cuts or sores dark patches on your skin foot pain feelings of numbness in your extremities, or neuropathy If you have two or more of these symptoms, you should see your doctor. Without treatment, diabetes can become life-threatening. Diabetes has a powerful effect on your heart. Women with diabetes are twice as likely to have another heart attack after the first one. They’re at quadruple the risk of heart failure when compared to women without diabetes. Diabetes can also lead to complications during pregnancy. Diet is an imp Continue reading >>

Newly Diagnosed

Newly Diagnosed

Being newly diagnosed with diabetes can be confusing and overwhelming with all the new things you have to learn and understand. This page provides a synopsis of the most important information and answers to commonly asked questions. What is Diabetes? Find out about diabetes: the terminology, symptoms, diagnosis and goals of treatment. Learn how the body keeps the blood sugar in balance. Types of Diabetes There are many type of diabetes. Learn more about your type of diabetes or look at the classification table to see a comprehensive list. Insulin given by injection is the central treatment for type 1 diabetes. There are fast acting and long acting insulin formulations. It is important to understand when to use these different formulations and the concepts behind choosing the right insulin dose. There is one other injected medication for type 1 diabetes, Symlin, that may be given in addition to insulin. The treatment for type 2 diabetes may be a simple as lifestyle changes (diet, exercise and weight management) with one or two pills to many different pills and/or insulin or other injected medications. Your medical team will help you decide the best choices for you. Find out if the treatment is working Blood sugar monitoring lets you know if the treatment plan is working and you are achieving the goals of therapy. And keeping a logbook helps everyone review and assess the results. Eating a healthy and balanced diet is another important part of living with diabetes. The first think you need to understand is which foods have sugar and starch (carbohydrates). When the blood sugar is uncontrolled When your blood sugar is too high or too low, you need to understand the symptoms and what to do. Some situations require urgent medical attention. When your blood sugar is not contr Continue reading >>

New To Type 1 Diabetes? Information For Parents

New To Type 1 Diabetes? Information For Parents

If you’re like most parents who have just been told your child or teen has type 1 diabetes, it is a complete shock. Only about 10 percent of the time do we find a family history of type 1 diabetes. There is more to learn about what causes, prevents and cures type 1 diabetes. In the meantime, we must all work together to help your child live a long and healthy life. And yes, that is a realistic goal. Research studies show that people with type 1 diabetes who aim to keep their blood glucose levels as close to normal as possible can significantly lower the chances of life-threatening complications related to diabetes. What Goes Wrong The diagnosis of type 1 diabetes was made because your child’s level of glucose (sugar) in the blood was above normal. This indicates that the metabolic system of checks and balances in the body is not working. Insulin is not being produced. Insulin is essential to escort the glucose from the foods we eat into cells of the body where it is critically needed to function properly. As a result, glucose builds up in the bloodstream. Your child may still be producing some insulin at this point, but in type 1 diabetes the pancreas loses all ability to produce insulin.The islet cells in the pancreas that produce insulin are gradually all destroyed, a process that we cannot at this point stop. Injections of insulin or an insulin pump are then needed to survive. Click here for more information on type 1 diabetes research at Joslin. Why Not an Insulin Pill? Insulin can’t be given orally because it is a protein and would be digested instead of getting to the bloodstream where it is needed. Just about all of the commercially available insulins now are genetically engineered as human insulin. Insulin comes in a variety of preparations that differ acc Continue reading >>

The Patient With Newly Diagnosed Diabetes

The Patient With Newly Diagnosed Diabetes

Professional Reference articles are written by UK doctors and are based on research evidence, UK and European Guidelines. They are designed for health professionals to use. You may find the Diabetes (Diabetes Mellitus) article more useful, or one of our other health articles. The initial management of someone who has just been diagnosed as having diabetes mellitus can have a big effect on the course of the illness. It is essential to establish a clear understanding of the disease, the benefits of all aspects of management and to allay unnecessary fears and myths quickly. See also the separate Management of Type 1 Diabetes and Management of Type 2 Diabetes articles. Assessment Indications for hospital referral at initial presentation include: Children and young people presenting with suspected diabetes should always be referred urgently, on the same day, for admission to hospital for initiation of insulin therapy. Adults who are clearly unwell, or who have ketones in their urine, or who have a blood glucose level greater than 25.0 mmol/L, should also be referred urgently for admission to hospital on the same day. Those who present with diabetic ketoacidosis or hyperosmolar hyperglycaemic state will require immediate treatment in hospital. Young adults (aged under 30 years) should also be referred to a specialist diabetes team. Clinical examination and investigations Measure height and weight, and calculate body mass index (BMI). Urinalysis: ketones and proteinuria. Arrange midstream specimen of urine (MSU) if protein is present. Identify any long-term complications of diabetes already present: Cardiovascular assessment, including smoking status, blood pressure, lipids and ECG. Examine feet for diabetic complications, including cardiovascular disease, diabetic neuropathy Continue reading >>

New Diabetes Treatment Could Eliminate Need For Insulin Injections

New Diabetes Treatment Could Eliminate Need For Insulin Injections

A cell-based diabetes treatment has been developed by scientists who say it could eliminate the need for those with the condition to inject insulin. The therapy involves a capsule of genetically engineered cells implanted under the skin that automatically release insulin as required. Diabetic mice that were treated with the cells were found to have normal blood sugar levels for several weeks. Scientists said they hope to obtain a clinical trial licence to test the technology in patients within two years. If successful, the treatment would be relevant for all type 1 diabetes patients, as well as those cases of type 2 diabetes that require insulin injections. Martin Fussenegger, who led the research at the ETH university in Basel, said: “By 2040, every tenth human on the planet will suffer from some kind of diabetes, that’s dramatic. We should be able to do a lot better than people measuring their glucose.” Fussenegger said that, if confirmed as safe and effective in humans, diabetes patients could be given an implant that would need to be replaced three times a year rather than injections, which do not perfectly control blood sugar levels, leading to long-term complications including eye, nerve and heart damage. In Britain, about 400,000 people have type 1 diabetes and three million have type 2 diabetes, about 10% of whom need to inject insulin to control the condition. Type 1 diabetes normally begins in childhood and is an autoimmune disease in which the body kills off all its pancreatic beta cells. The cells respond to the body’s fluctuating glucose levels by releasing insulin, which regulates blood sugar. Without beta cells, patients need to monitor glucose and inject insulin as required – typically several times each day. Previously, scientists have attempt Continue reading >>

Newly Diagnosed With Diabetes

Newly Diagnosed With Diabetes

Save for later Diabetes is a lifelong condition that means your body can't produce enough insulin, or the insulin that is produced doesn't work properly. If untreated, it can cause serious health problems. Find out more Call our helpline on 0345 123 2399 Explaining diabetes © Diabetes UK 2017 A charity registered in England and Wales (no. 215199) and in Scotland (no. SC039136) A company limited by guarantee. Registered in England (no. 339181) Registered office: Wells Lawrence House, 126 Back Church Lane, London, E1 1FH. Continue reading >>

Diabetes Prevention And Management Resources

Diabetes Prevention And Management Resources

General Public, Health Care Providers and Other Health Professionals The American Association of Diabetes Educators (AADE) The AADE is a multi-disciplinary professional membership organization dedicated to improving diabetes care through innovative education, management and support. Practice and patient resources, research, news and publications, and other materials are available at the AADE website. American Association of Diabetes Educators American Diabetes Association (ADA) This organization funds research and delivers services to help prevent diabetes and help those who have diabetes live healthier lives. The ADA website includes basic information about diabetes, diabetes risk tests, information about living with diabetes, among other services. American Diabetes Association American Medical Association (AMA) and Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC): Preventing Type 2 Diabetes: A Guide This guide provides information to help health care providers refer patients with prediabetes to an evidence-based diabetes prevention program. American Medical Association (AMA) and Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC): Preventing Type 2 Diabetes: A Guide Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) – Diabetes Page The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Diabetes page includes basic information about diabetes prevention and control, diabetes programs and initiatives, and data and statistics relating to diabetes in the United States. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Diabetes Centers for Disease Control (CDC) National Diabetes Prevention Program (NDPP) On the CDC NDPP page, people can learn about prediabetes and type 2 diabetes, how to join a CDC-recognized diabetes prevention lifestyle change program to help prevent or delay type 2 diabet Continue reading >>

The Johns Hopkins Patient Guide To Diabetes | Helping Patients And Their Families

The Johns Hopkins Patient Guide To Diabetes | Helping Patients And Their Families

There is a lot of medical terminology related todiabetes. In this section you can look up any terms that may be unfamiliar. The website also has links to the glossary in text. Living with diabetes can sometimes be overwhelming.This section focuses on practical informationabout diabetes.Experts in various fields related to diabetes willgive advice about day-to-day living.These topics will change regularly, so check back often to meet our new experts! Which celebrity did you NOT know has diabetes? Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes: New Guidelines Lower Blood Sugar Control Levels

Type 2 Diabetes: New Guidelines Lower Blood Sugar Control Levels

Type 2 diabetes: New guidelines lower blood sugar control levels The American College of Physicians have now published their new guidelines regarding the desired blood sugar control levels for people with type 2 diabetes. The recommendations aim to change current therapeutic practices, and doctors should aim for a moderate level of blood sugar when treating their patients. Blood sugar control levels should be moderate for people living with type 2 diabetes, according to new guidelines. According to the most recent estimates, almost 30 million people in the United States have type 2 diabetes , which amounts to over 9 percent of the entire U.S. population. Once diagnosed with type 2 diabetes, patients are often advised to take what is known as a glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) test in order to keep blood sugar levels under control. The test averages a person's blood sugar levels over the past 2 or 3 months, with an HbA1c score of 6.5 percent indicating diabetes . But some studies have pointed out that the HbA1c test may currently be overused in the U.S., and they have suggested that such over-testing may lead to over-treating patients with hypoglycemic drugs. These drugs often have a range of side effects, such as gastrointestinal problems, excessively low blood sugar, weight gain, and even congestive heart failure . Additionally, as some researchers have pointed out, "Excessive testing contributes to the growing problem of waste in healthcare and increased patient burden in diabetes management." In this context, the American College of Physicians (ACP) set out to examine the existing guidelines from several organizations and the evidence available in an effort to help physicians make better, more informed decisions about treating people with type 2 diabetes. Their guideline Continue reading >>

Scientists Discover A New Way To Treat Type 2 Diabetes

Scientists Discover A New Way To Treat Type 2 Diabetes

Medication currently being used to treat obesity is also proving to have significant health benefits for patients with type 2 diabetes. A new study published today in Molecular Metabolism explains how this therapeutic benefit for type 2 diabetes is achieved by acting in our brain. Scientists from the University of Aberdeen Rowett Institute, in collaboration with teams from the Universities of Cambridge and Michigan, have discovered that the medication Lorcaserin acts in the brain to improve type 2 diabetes by modifying the activity of neurones that help to regulate blood glucose levels. Lorcaserin is prescribed to help patients lose weight and works by regulating how hungry we feel. However, researchers have discovered that as well as doing this, the drug can also reduce glucose levels in the body and increase the body's cells sensitivity to insulin. When the body fails to produce enough insulin or the body's cells fail to react to insulin this leads to Type 2 diabetes meaning that glucose remains in the blood rather than being used as fuel for energy. Professor Lora Heisler, who is leading the Aberdeen team, explains: "Current medications for type 2 diabetes improve symptoms of this disease by acting in the body. We have discovered that this obesity drug, lorcaserin, acts in the brain to improve type 2 diabetes. "Lorcaserin targets important brain hormones called pro-opiomelanocortin (POMC) peptides, which are responsible for regulating appetite. So as well as sending messages telling us we are full and no longer need to eat, leading to weight loss, the POMC hormones also activate a different brain circuit that helps keep our blood glucose in check. "This discovery is important because type 2 diabetes is an incredibly prevalent disease in the modern world and new treat Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Diabetes Prevention

Diabetes And Diabetes Prevention

Diabetes is a chronic disease in which blood sugar (glucose) levels are above normal. The rate of new cases of diagnosed diabetes in the United States has begun to fall, but the numbers are still very high. The New York State Department of Health (NYSDOH) is working to reverse the diabetes epidemic in New York State by focusing on diabetes prevention, identifying people with prediabetes, and collecting data on prevalence of diabetes to help improve the health of all people with diabetes. Diabetes in New York State 1.6 million New Yorkers (10.0%) have diabetes The percentage of New York State adults who have diabetes increased from 6.3% in 2000 to 10% in 2014 Diabetes in the United States 29.1 million Americans have diabetes Diabetes is the 7th leading cause of death in the United States The total estimated cost of diagnosed diabetes in 2012 is $245 billion For more information, visit: Prediabetes Before people develop diabetes, they almost always have prediabetes first. Prediabetes is a condition where a person's blood sugar level is higher than normal but not high enough yet to be diagnosed as diabetes. Prediabetes affects 86 million people in the United States (4.5 million New Yorkers), and 90% of the people with diabetes do not know they have it. Without lifestyle changes, 15-30% of people with prediabetes will develop type 2 diabetes within 5 years. People with pre-diabetes are also at increased risk for developing type 2 diabetes, and for having heart disease and stroke. The good news is that people can prevent or delay type 2 diabetes by: Participating in a CDC-recognized diabetes prevention lifestyle change program (NDPP) to learn skills and get resources to help make healthy changes Losing small amounts of weight (5 to 7 percent of total body weight) Making heal Continue reading >>

The 5 'new' Types Of Diabetes, Explained

The 5 'new' Types Of Diabetes, Explained

Credit: Bochkarev Photography/Shutterstock Diabetes just got a little more complicated, or clearer, depending on your perspective. Researchers in Scandinavia have proposed classifying diabetes as five types of disease, rather than two types, according to a new study. But what are these different types, and why did the researchers make this decision? Having diabetes means that a person's blood sugar (glucose) levels are too high. It's an increasingly common disease; about 30 million people in the U.S. have diabetes, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. In people with type 1 diabetes , which most often appears in childhood, the body cannot make insulin a hormone that helps glucose get into cells. This condition occurs because the body's immune system attacks the cells in the pancreas that make insulin. In type 2 diabetes , the body does not make or use insulin well. Often, this condition begins with insulin resistance, which means cells aren't responding to insulin, even though the body is still making the hormone. The condition often occurs in middle-age or older adults and is thought to be related to lifestyle factors and obesity . But in the new study , which was published yesterday (March 1) in the journal The Lancet Diabetes & Endocrinologyl, researchers found that diabetes patients in Sweden and Finland fell into five clusters. One of the clusters was similar to type 1 diabetes, while the other four clusters were "subtypes" of type 2. Three of the clusters were considered severe forms of the disease, while two clusters were considered mild forms. [ 5 Diets That Fight Diseases ] Dr. Kathleen Wyne, an endocrinologist at The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center, who was not involved with the study, said that the new classification could Continue reading >>

Diabetes Information Symptoms, Causes And Prevention

Diabetes Information Symptoms, Causes And Prevention

The Risks of Treating Diabetes with Drugs Are FAR Worse than the Disease There is a staggering amount of misinformation on diabetes, a growing epidemic that afflicts more than 29 million people in the United States today. The sad truth is this: it could be your very OWN physician perpetuating this misinformation Most diabetics find themselves in a black hole of helplessness, clueless about how to reverse their condition. The bigger concern is that more than half of those with type 2 diabetes are NOT even aware they have diabetes and 90 percent of those who have a condition known as prediabetes arent aware of their circumstances, either. The latest diabetes statistics 1 echo an increase in diabetes cases, both diagnosed and undiagnosed. By some estimates, diabetes has increased more than 700 percent in the last 50 years! At least 29 million Americans are diagnosed with type 2 diabetes, and another 86 million are prediabetic . Whats hidden behind this medical smokescreen is that type 2 diabetes is completely preventable. The cure lies in a true understanding of the underlying cause (which is impaired insulin and leptin sensitivity) and implementing simple, inexpensive lifestyle adjustments that spell phenomenal benefits to your health. Also known as diabetes mellitus, type 1 diabetes is a chronic health condition traditionally characterized by elevated levels of glucose in your blood, often simply called high blood sugar. Type 1 diabetes dubbed juvenile onset diabetes is the relatively uncommon type, affecting only about 1 in 250 Americans. Occurring in individuals younger than age 20, it has no known cure. Whats most concerning about juvenile diabetes is that, these numbers have been going up steadily right along with type 2 diabetes: for non-Hispanic white youths ages Continue reading >>

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