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New Diabetes Information

Diabetes Mellitus

Diabetes Mellitus

"Diabetes" redirects here. For other uses, see Diabetes (disambiguation). Diabetes mellitus (DM), commonly referred to as diabetes, is a group of metabolic disorders in which there are high blood sugar levels over a prolonged period.[7] Symptoms of high blood sugar include frequent urination, increased thirst, and increased hunger.[2] If left untreated, diabetes can cause many complications.[2] Acute complications can include diabetic ketoacidosis, hyperosmolar hyperglycemic state, or death.[3] Serious long-term complications include cardiovascular disease, stroke, chronic kidney disease, foot ulcers, and damage to the eyes.[2] Diabetes is due to either the pancreas not producing enough insulin or the cells of the body not responding properly to the insulin produced.[8] There are three main types of diabetes mellitus:[2] Type 1 DM results from the pancreas's failure to produce enough insulin.[2] This form was previously referred to as "insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus" (IDDM) or "juvenile diabetes".[2] The cause is unknown.[2] Type 2 DM begins with insulin resistance, a condition in which cells fail to respond to insulin properly.[2] As the disease progresses a lack of insulin may also develop.[9] This form was previously referred to as "non insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus" (NIDDM) or "adult-onset diabetes".[2] The most common cause is excessive body weight and insufficient exercise.[2] Gestational diabetes is the third main form, and occurs when pregnant women without a previous history of diabetes develop high blood sugar levels.[2] Prevention and treatment involve maintaining a healthy diet, regular physical exercise, a normal body weight, and avoiding use of tobacco.[2] Control of blood pressure and maintaining proper foot care are important for people with t Continue reading >>

Newly Diagnosed With Diabetes

Newly Diagnosed With Diabetes

Save for later Diabetes is a lifelong condition that means your body can't produce enough insulin, or the insulin that is produced doesn't work properly. If untreated, it can cause serious health problems. Find out more Call our helpline on 0345 123 2399 Explaining diabetes © Diabetes UK 2017 A charity registered in England and Wales (no. 215199) and in Scotland (no. SC039136) A company limited by guarantee. Registered in England (no. 339181) Registered office: Wells Lawrence House, 126 Back Church Lane, London, E1 1FH. Continue reading >>

Diabetes Prevention And Management Resources

Diabetes Prevention And Management Resources

General Public, Health Care Providers and Other Health Professionals The American Association of Diabetes Educators (AADE) The AADE is a multi-disciplinary professional membership organization dedicated to improving diabetes care through innovative education, management and support. Practice and patient resources, research, news and publications, and other materials are available at the AADE website. American Association of Diabetes Educators American Diabetes Association (ADA) This organization funds research and delivers services to help prevent diabetes and help those who have diabetes live healthier lives. The ADA website includes basic information about diabetes, diabetes risk tests, information about living with diabetes, among other services. American Diabetes Association American Medical Association (AMA) and Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC): Preventing Type 2 Diabetes: A Guide This guide provides information to help health care providers refer patients with prediabetes to an evidence-based diabetes prevention program. American Medical Association (AMA) and Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC): Preventing Type 2 Diabetes: A Guide Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) – Diabetes Page The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Diabetes page includes basic information about diabetes prevention and control, diabetes programs and initiatives, and data and statistics relating to diabetes in the United States. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Diabetes Centers for Disease Control (CDC) National Diabetes Prevention Program (NDPP) On the CDC NDPP page, people can learn about prediabetes and type 2 diabetes, how to join a CDC-recognized diabetes prevention lifestyle change program to help prevent or delay type 2 diabet Continue reading >>

Diabetes Information Symptoms, Causes And Prevention

Diabetes Information Symptoms, Causes And Prevention

The Risks of Treating Diabetes with Drugs Are FAR Worse than the Disease There is a staggering amount of misinformation on diabetes, a growing epidemic that afflicts more than 29 million people in the United States today. The sad truth is this: it could be your very OWN physician perpetuating this misinformation Most diabetics find themselves in a black hole of helplessness, clueless about how to reverse their condition. The bigger concern is that more than half of those with type 2 diabetes are NOT even aware they have diabetes and 90 percent of those who have a condition known as prediabetes arent aware of their circumstances, either. The latest diabetes statistics 1 echo an increase in diabetes cases, both diagnosed and undiagnosed. By some estimates, diabetes has increased more than 700 percent in the last 50 years! At least 29 million Americans are diagnosed with type 2 diabetes, and another 86 million are prediabetic . Whats hidden behind this medical smokescreen is that type 2 diabetes is completely preventable. The cure lies in a true understanding of the underlying cause (which is impaired insulin and leptin sensitivity) and implementing simple, inexpensive lifestyle adjustments that spell phenomenal benefits to your health. Also known as diabetes mellitus, type 1 diabetes is a chronic health condition traditionally characterized by elevated levels of glucose in your blood, often simply called high blood sugar. Type 1 diabetes dubbed juvenile onset diabetes is the relatively uncommon type, affecting only about 1 in 250 Americans. Occurring in individuals younger than age 20, it has no known cure. Whats most concerning about juvenile diabetes is that, these numbers have been going up steadily right along with type 2 diabetes: for non-Hispanic white youths ages Continue reading >>

New Diabetes Treatment Could Eliminate Need For Insulin Injections

New Diabetes Treatment Could Eliminate Need For Insulin Injections

A cell-based diabetes treatment has been developed by scientists who say it could eliminate the need for those with the condition to inject insulin. The therapy involves a capsule of genetically engineered cells implanted under the skin that automatically release insulin as required. Diabetic mice that were treated with the cells were found to have normal blood sugar levels for several weeks. Scientists said they hope to obtain a clinical trial licence to test the technology in patients within two years. If successful, the treatment would be relevant for all type 1 diabetes patients, as well as those cases of type 2 diabetes that require insulin injections. Martin Fussenegger, who led the research at the ETH university in Basel, said: “By 2040, every tenth human on the planet will suffer from some kind of diabetes, that’s dramatic. We should be able to do a lot better than people measuring their glucose.” Fussenegger said that, if confirmed as safe and effective in humans, diabetes patients could be given an implant that would need to be replaced three times a year rather than injections, which do not perfectly control blood sugar levels, leading to long-term complications including eye, nerve and heart damage. In Britain, about 400,000 people have type 1 diabetes and three million have type 2 diabetes, about 10% of whom need to inject insulin to control the condition. Type 1 diabetes normally begins in childhood and is an autoimmune disease in which the body kills off all its pancreatic beta cells. The cells respond to the body’s fluctuating glucose levels by releasing insulin, which regulates blood sugar. Without beta cells, patients need to monitor glucose and inject insulin as required – typically several times each day. Previously, scientists have attempt Continue reading >>

Top 10 Tips For People Newly Diagnosed With Type 2 Diabetes

Top 10 Tips For People Newly Diagnosed With Type 2 Diabetes

twitter summary: Ten tips for newly diagnosed T2 #diabetes: act NOW for long-term benefits, use healthy eating, exercise, meds + structured blood glucose testing short summary: This article offers ten tips for people newly diagnosed with type 2 diabetes: 1) Know that developing type 2 diabetes does not represent a personal failing; 2) Start to take care of your diabetes as soon as you’re diagnosed (and even better, before, if you know you have prediabetes); 3) Recognize that type 2 diabetes is a progressive disease; 4) Keep in mind that food has a major impact on blood glucose; work to optimize your mealtime choices; 5) Exercise is a powerful and underutilized tool which can increase insulin sensitivity and improve health – use it as much as possible; 6) Use blood glucose testing to identify patterns; 7) Don’t forget that needing to take insulin doesn’t mean you failed; 8) Keep learning and find support; 9) Seek out the services of a Diabetes Educator; and 10) Review our Patient's Guide to Individualizing Therapy at www.diaTribe.org/patientguide. Know that developing type 2 diabetes does not represent a personal failing. It develops through a combination of factors that are still being uncovered and better understood. Lifestyle (food, exercise, stress, sleep) certainly plays a major role, but genetics play a significant role as well. Type 2 diabetes is often described in the media as a result of being overweight, but the relationship is not that simple. Many overweight individuals never get type 2, and some people with type 2 were never overweight. At its core, type 2 involves two physiological issues: resistance to the insulin made by the person’s beta cells and too little insulin production relative to the amount one needs. These problems can lead to high bl Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes: New Guidelines Lower Blood Sugar Control Levels

Type 2 Diabetes: New Guidelines Lower Blood Sugar Control Levels

Type 2 diabetes: New guidelines lower blood sugar control levels The American College of Physicians have now published their new guidelines regarding the desired blood sugar control levels for people with type 2 diabetes. The recommendations aim to change current therapeutic practices, and doctors should aim for a moderate level of blood sugar when treating their patients. Blood sugar control levels should be moderate for people living with type 2 diabetes, according to new guidelines. According to the most recent estimates, almost 30 million people in the United States have type 2 diabetes , which amounts to over 9 percent of the entire U.S. population. Once diagnosed with type 2 diabetes, patients are often advised to take what is known as a glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) test in order to keep blood sugar levels under control. The test averages a person's blood sugar levels over the past 2 or 3 months, with an HbA1c score of 6.5 percent indicating diabetes . But some studies have pointed out that the HbA1c test may currently be overused in the U.S., and they have suggested that such over-testing may lead to over-treating patients with hypoglycemic drugs. These drugs often have a range of side effects, such as gastrointestinal problems, excessively low blood sugar, weight gain, and even congestive heart failure . Additionally, as some researchers have pointed out, "Excessive testing contributes to the growing problem of waste in healthcare and increased patient burden in diabetes management." In this context, the American College of Physicians (ACP) set out to examine the existing guidelines from several organizations and the evidence available in an effort to help physicians make better, more informed decisions about treating people with type 2 diabetes. Their guideline Continue reading >>

Understanding Type 2 Diabetes

Understanding Type 2 Diabetes

Diabetes is a chronic medical condition in which sugar, or glucose, levels build up in your bloodstream. The hormone insulin helps move the sugar from your blood into your cells, which are where the sugar is used for energy. In type 2 diabetes, your body’s cells aren’t able to respond to insulin as well as they should. In later stages of the disease your body may also not produce enough insulin. Uncontrolled type 2 diabetes can lead to chronically high blood sugar levels, causing several symptoms and potentially leading to serious complications. In type 2 diabetes your body isn’t able to effectively use insulin to bring glucose into your cells. This causes your body to rely on alternative energy sources in your tissues, muscles, and organs. This is a chain reaction that can cause a variety of symptoms. Type 2 diabetes can develop slowly. The symptoms may be mild and easy to dismiss at first. The early symptoms may include: constant hunger a lack of energy fatigue weight loss excessive thirst frequent urination dry mouth itchy skin blurry vision As the disease progresses, the symptoms become more severe and potentially dangerous. If your blood sugar levels have been high for a long time, the symptoms can include: yeast infections slow-healing cuts or sores dark patches on your skin foot pain feelings of numbness in your extremities, or neuropathy If you have two or more of these symptoms, you should see your doctor. Without treatment, diabetes can become life-threatening. Diabetes has a powerful effect on your heart. Women with diabetes are twice as likely to have another heart attack after the first one. They’re at quadruple the risk of heart failure when compared to women without diabetes. Diabetes can also lead to complications during pregnancy. Diet is an imp Continue reading >>

Diabetes

Diabetes

Diabetes is a disease in which your blood glucose, or blood sugar, levels are too high. Glucose comes from the foods you eat. Insulin is a hormone that helps the glucose get into your cells to give them energy. With type 1 diabetes, your body does not make insulin. With type 2 diabetes, the more common type, your body does not make or use insulin well. Without enough insulin, the glucose stays in your blood. You can also have prediabetes. This means that your blood sugar is higher than normal but not high enough to be called diabetes. Having prediabetes puts you at a higher risk of getting type 2 diabetes. Over time, having too much glucose in your blood can cause serious problems. It can damage your eyes, kidneys, and nerves. Diabetes can also cause heart disease, stroke and even the need to remove a limb. Pregnant women can also get diabetes, called gestational diabetes. Blood tests can show if you have diabetes. One type of test, the A1C, can also check on how you are managing your diabetes. Exercise, weight control and sticking to your meal plan can help control your diabetes. You should also monitor your blood glucose level and take medicine if prescribed. NIH: National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases Diabetes means your blood glucose, or blood sugar, levels are too high. With type 2 diabetes, the more common type, your body does not make or use insulin well. Insulin is a hormone that helps glucose get into your cells to give them energy. Without insulin, too much glucose stays in your blood. Over time, high blood glucose can lead to serious problems with your heart, eyes, kidneys, nerves, and gums and teeth. You have a higher risk of type 2 diabetes if you are older, have obesity, have a family history of diabetes, or do not exercise. Havin Continue reading >>

New To Type 1 Diabetes? Information For Parents

New To Type 1 Diabetes? Information For Parents

If you’re like most parents who have just been told your child or teen has type 1 diabetes, it is a complete shock. Only about 10 percent of the time do we find a family history of type 1 diabetes. There is more to learn about what causes, prevents and cures type 1 diabetes. In the meantime, we must all work together to help your child live a long and healthy life. And yes, that is a realistic goal. Research studies show that people with type 1 diabetes who aim to keep their blood glucose levels as close to normal as possible can significantly lower the chances of life-threatening complications related to diabetes. What Goes Wrong The diagnosis of type 1 diabetes was made because your child’s level of glucose (sugar) in the blood was above normal. This indicates that the metabolic system of checks and balances in the body is not working. Insulin is not being produced. Insulin is essential to escort the glucose from the foods we eat into cells of the body where it is critically needed to function properly. As a result, glucose builds up in the bloodstream. Your child may still be producing some insulin at this point, but in type 1 diabetes the pancreas loses all ability to produce insulin.The islet cells in the pancreas that produce insulin are gradually all destroyed, a process that we cannot at this point stop. Injections of insulin or an insulin pump are then needed to survive. Click here for more information on type 1 diabetes research at Joslin. Why Not an Insulin Pill? Insulin can’t be given orally because it is a protein and would be digested instead of getting to the bloodstream where it is needed. Just about all of the commercially available insulins now are genetically engineered as human insulin. Insulin comes in a variety of preparations that differ acc Continue reading >>

Diabetes Self-management Education And Support In Type 2 Diabetes: A Joint Position Statement Of The American Diabetes Association, The American Association Of Diabetes Educators, And The Academy Of Nutrition And Dietetics

Diabetes Self-management Education And Support In Type 2 Diabetes: A Joint Position Statement Of The American Diabetes Association, The American Association Of Diabetes Educators, And The Academy Of Nutrition And Dietetics

Diabetes is a chronic disease that requires a person with diabetes to make a multitude of daily self-management decisions and to perform complex care activities. Diabetes self-management education and support (DSME/S) provides the foundation to help people with diabetes to navigate these decisions and activities and has been shown to improve health outcomes (1–7). Diabetes self-management education (DSME) is the process of facilitating the knowledge, skill, and ability necessary for diabetes self-care. Diabetes self-management support (DSMS) refers to the support that is required for implementing and sustaining coping skills and behaviors needed to self-manage on an ongoing basis. (See further definitions in Table 1.) Although different members of the health care team and community can contribute to this process, it is important for health care providers and their practice settings to have the resources and a systematic referral process to ensure that patients with type 2 diabetes receive both DSME and DSMS in a consistent manner. The initial DSME is typically provided by a health professional, whereas ongoing support can be provided by personnel within a practice and a variety of community-based resources. DSME/S programs are designed to address the patient’s health beliefs, cultural needs, current knowledge, physical limitations, emotional concerns, family support, financial status, medical history, health literacy, numeracy, and other factors that influence each person’s ability to meet the challenges of self-management. It is the position of the American Diabetes Association (ADA) that all individuals with diabetes receive DSME/S at diagnosis and as needed thereafter (8). This position statement focuses on the particular needs of individuals with type 2 diabet Continue reading >>

Newly Diagnosed With Diabetes

Newly Diagnosed With Diabetes

Being diagnosed with diabetes can be a shock When newly diagnosed with diabetes, most people find themselves in a state of shock. However, being diagnosed with diabetes doesn't prevent you from leading a 'normal' life. There are stories on the Diabetes Forum from people who have had all sorts of experiences when being diagnosed. Most people receive great care from their GP and healthcare team, although some people report having just been given some tablets and been told to get on with it. If this happens to you, make sure your doctor finds time to discuss your condition with you, or refer you to someone who can answer your questions better than they can. No matter what your experience is when being diagnosed, the Forum is full of people who understand what you are going through because they have lived through it and been in your shoes. Feel free to bring up any topics or questions there and the community will do their best to help you out. If you know the type of diabetes you have, read further guidance related to your diabetes type: There are also guides for those newly diagnosed with LADA , MODY or Diabetes insipidus . You will know that diabetes means that your blood has higher amounts of glucose/sugar in than normal. However, you may have other questions about why this is the case and how diabetes will affect you. Our guide on what is diabetes will help to answer some basic questions. Want to know how diabetes could affect your daily life? Read our guide on having diabetes . The diet you have may depend on your diabetes type. If youve been diagnosed with type 1 diabetes , you will need to be aware of how much carbohydrate is in meal times in order to balance your insulin doses. Many people with diabetes find carbohydrate counting courses to be very helpful, with th Continue reading >>

Special Cells Could Let You Control Your Diabetes With Coffee

Special Cells Could Let You Control Your Diabetes With Coffee

Special cells could let you control your diabetes with coffee Caffeine can trigger engineered cells to release insulin Description:Chevanon Wonganuchitmetha/EyeEm/Getty A cup of coffee after a meal might be enough to keep diabetes under control, thanks to cells that have been engineered to release insulin when they detect caffeine. Type 2 diabetes develops when the body loses its ability to regulate glucose levels in the blood. Some people manage thisby taking frequent pin prick samples to measure their blood sugar levels, and using this information to adjust the supply of insulin from a pump worn against the skin. Meal times are an especially taxing event, as the amount of sugar consumed must be estimated, and an appropriate dose of insulin scheduled. To get around this, Martin Fussenegger, a biotechnologist at ETH Zurich, Switzerland, and his colleagues have developed an alternative thats powered by coffee. The team took human kidney cells and engineered them to produce insulin. They also added a receptor that would trigger the release of this insulin when caffeine was present. They then implanted these cells into 10 mice with type 2 diabetes, and gave them coffee with their meals. Tests revealed this was enough to enable the mice to control their blood sugar levels as well as non-diabetic mice. The risk of accidentally triggering a dose of insulin appears to be small. To my knowledge there are no other significant sources of caffeine in food, says Fussenegger. Even very small trace amounts of caffeine will not trigger the system. Continue reading >>

Spotlight On New Diabetes Treatments

Spotlight On New Diabetes Treatments

Over the years, three diabetes treatments with entirely new modes of action were approved: exenatide injection (Byetta®, for people with type 2 diabetes), pramlintide injection (Symlin®, as an add-on to insulin therapy for people with type 1 or type 2 diabetes) and Sitagliptin (Januvia® also for people with type 2 diabetes). "New is not necessarily better, but these are additional weapons in the armament," says Nora Saul, MS, CDE, RD, LDN, Manager of Education Services at Joslin Diabetes Center. Saul educates Joslin Diabetes Center patients on blood glucose management. Some diabetes medications help the pancreas release more insulin (if you have type 2 diabetes), others help cells use insulin better, and others keep the liver from releasing too much glucose. The three new treatments focus action on hormones called incretins. The two given by injection—Byetta and Symlin—have an added bonus of promoting weight loss. “These three medications led the way for others being added to the list of available diabetes medications. Since then, many other additional medications have been added,” says Saul, “New to the list are Victoza, Bydureon, Tradjenta and Onglyza.” With more options, treatments can be better tailored to an individual. Since type 2 diabetes is progressive, what works for some people for a period of time may lose effectiveness. For example, some people with type 2 diabetes may start treating the chronic disease with oral medications, and then subsequently discover that insulin would give them more control. The following are the five new medical options that enhance blood glucose control for people with type 1 or type 2 diabetes: 1. Exenatide injection (Byetta®) Exenatide injection: is injected twice a day at mealtime is for those with type 2 diabete Continue reading >>

Diabetes Information | Mount Sinai - New York

Diabetes Information | Mount Sinai - New York

Diabetes - type 1; Diabetes - type 2; Diabetes - gestational; Type 1 diabetes; Type 2 diabetes; Gestational diabetes; Diabetes mellitus Diabetes is a chronic disease in which the body cannot regulate the amount of sugar in the blood. Endocrine glands release hormones (chemical messengers) into the bloodstream to be transported to various organs and tissues throughout the body. For instance, the pancreas secretes insulin, which allows the body to regulate levels of sugar in the blood. The thyroid gets instructions from the pituitary to secrete hormones which determine the pace of chemical activity in the body (the more hormone in the bloodstream, the faster the chemical activity; the less hormone, the slower the activity). Diabetes causes an excessive amount of glucose to remain in the blood stream which may cause damage to the blood vessels. Within the eye the damaged vessels may leak blood and fluid into the surrounding tissues and cause vision problems. Islets of Langerhans contain beta cells and are located within the pancreas. Beta cells produce insulin which is needed to metabolize glucose within the body. The pancreas is located behind the liver and is where the hormone insulin is produced. Insulin is used by the body to store and utilize glucose. The catheter at the end of the insulin pump is inserted through a needle into the abdominal fat of a person with diabetes. Dosage instructions are entered into the pumps small computer and the appropriate amount of insulin is then injected into the body in a calculated, controlled manner. In response to high levels of glucose in the blood, the insulin-producing cells in the pancreas secrete the hormone insulin. Type I diabetes occurs when these cells are destroyed by the bodys own immune system. People with diabetes are Continue reading >>

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