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New Benefits Of Metformin

Metformin Hcl

Metformin Hcl

Uses Metformin is used with a proper diet and exercise program and possibly with other medications to control high blood sugar. It is used in patients with type 2 diabetes. Controlling high blood sugar helps prevent kidney damage, blindness, nerve problems, loss of limbs, and sexual function problems. Proper control of diabetes may also lessen your risk of a heart attack or stroke. Metformin works by helping to restore your body's proper response to the insulin you naturally produce. It also decreases the amount of sugar that your liver makes and that your stomach/intestines absorb. How to use Metformin HCL Read the Patient Information Leaflet if available from your pharmacist before you start taking metformin and each time you get a refill. If you have any questions, consult your doctor or pharmacist. Take this medication by mouth as directed by your doctor, usually 1-3 times a day with meals. Drink plenty of fluids while taking this medication unless otherwise directed by your doctor. The dosage is based on your medical condition, response to treatment, and other medications you may be taking. Be sure to tell your doctor and pharmacist about all the products you use (including prescription drugs, nonprescription drugs, and herbal products). To reduce your risk of side effects (such as upset stomach), your doctor may direct you to start this medication at a low dose and gradually increase your dose. Follow your doctor's instructions carefully. Take this medication regularly in order to get the most benefit from it. Remember to use it at the same times each day. If you are already taking another diabetes drug (such as chlorpropamide), follow your doctor's directions carefully for stopping/continuing the old drug and starting metformin. Check your blood sugar regularly a Continue reading >>

Metformin Diabetes Drug Could Extend Lifespan

Metformin Diabetes Drug Could Extend Lifespan

Metformin is approved in the US as a treatment for type 2 diabetes. A new study by Cardiff University, UK, involving over 180,000 people, reveals that the drug could also increase the lifespan of those individuals who are non-diabetics. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), there are around 29.1 million people in the US with diabetes, equating to 9.3% of the population. Type 2 diabetes accounts for 90-95% of diabetes cases and is usually associated with older age, obesity and physical inactivity, family history of type 2 diabetes or a personal history of gestational diabetes. Type 2 diabetes is preventable through healthful eating, regular physical activity and weight loss. It can be controlled with these same activities, but insulin or oral medication also may be necessary. Metformin (metformin hydrochloride) is an oral biguanide antidiabetic medicine to treat type 2 diabetes, a condition in which the body does not use insulin normally and, therefore, cannot control the amount of sugar in the blood. Metformin helps to control the amount of glucose (sugar) in your blood, it decreases the amount of glucose you absorb from your food and the amount of glucose made by your liver. Metformin also increases your body's response to insulin, a natural substance that controls the amount of glucose in the blood. The objective of the study, published in leading diabetes journal Diabetes, Obesity and Metabolism, was to compare all-cause mortality in diabetic patients treated with either sulphonylurea or metformin with matched individuals without diabetes including age, gender, same general practice, smoking status and clinical status criteria. The data is from the Clinical Practice Research Datalink (CPRD), which encompasses clinically rich, pseudonymize Continue reading >>

The Multiple Benefits Of Metformin

The Multiple Benefits Of Metformin

Metformin (brand name "Glucophage") has been used in the treatment of type II diabetes for the past 40 years.1 This drug counteracts many of the underlying factors that result in the manifestation of this insidious disease. Metformin also produces helpful side benefits that can protect against the lethal complications of type II diabetes. Frequently prescribed anti-diabetic drugs fail to address the fundamental causes of type II diabetes and can induce serious side effects. Type II diabetes affects between 16 to 19 million Americans. About 75% of type II diabetics will die from a cardiovascular-related disease. Conventional doctors often prescribe drugs for the purpose of lowering blood sugar levels. These drugs do not adequately address the multiple underlying pathologies associated with the type II diabetic state. Type II diabetes is characterized by cellular insulin resistence. The result is excess accumulation of glucose in the bloodstream as cells become resistant to the effects of insulin. Type II diabetes is characterized by cellular insulin resistence. The result is excess accumulation of glucose in the bloodstream because cells become resistant to the effects of insulin and fail to take up glucose As the type II diabetic condition progresses, many people gain weight and develop more fat cells.2 Treating type II diabetes with insulin-enhancing therapy increases the risk of cardiovascular complications, induces weight gain, and fails to correct the underlying cause of the disease. Many type II diabetics produce too much insulin in a futile attempt to drive glucose into insulin-resistant cells. When doctors prescribe insulin-enhancing drugs to these type II diabetics, a temporarily reduction of serum glucose may occur, but the long-term effects of this excess insu Continue reading >>

An Old-line Diabetes Drug May Have New Uses Against Diseases Of Aging

An Old-line Diabetes Drug May Have New Uses Against Diseases Of Aging

Just over a year ago, Catherine Price decided to start taking one of the cheapest, safest, oldest, most widely prescribed drugs for Type 2 diabetes. So much metformin is taken in the United States — some 72 million prescriptions were written for it in 2013 — that a recent study found higher trace levels of it (presumably from the urine of people taking it) in Lake Michigan than of any other drug, including caffeine. But Price, a science and medical reporter in Oakland, Calif., doesn’t have Type 2 diabetes. She has Type 1, the far less common form of the disease, which requires lifelong treatment with insulin, to compensate for her body’s failure to produce enough of the hormone. However, she had read studies indicating that metformin combined with insulin might help Type 1 diabetics, too. Moreover, the drug was being studied in clinical trials as a way to lower the risk of cancer, heart disease and dementia — not just for diabetics, but for everyone. For Price, there was yet another possible benefit — as a treatment for polycystic ovary syndrome, an endocrine disorder that doctors thought might explain the difficulty she and her husband had had conceiving. Sure enough, a month and a half after she had started taking metformin pills and even as she was enjoying the benefits of better blood-sugar control, Price became pregnant, eventually giving birth to a girl. “I’m still taking metformin along with my insulin,” said Price, 36, who was diagnosed with Type 1 diabetes 14 years ago. “I remember eating Mexican food one night, which can be a potential disaster for people with diabetes because of the carbs, but I noticed I needed only two-thirds to a half of the insulin I normally needed.” Synthesized in the 1920s, metformin was first approved for treatme Continue reading >>

Forget The Blood Of Teens. This Pill Promises To Extend Life For A Nickel A Pop

Forget The Blood Of Teens. This Pill Promises To Extend Life For A Nickel A Pop

Nir Barzilai has a plan. It’s a really big plan that might one day change medicine and health care as we know it. Its promise: extending our years of healthy, disease-free living by decades. And Barzilai knows about the science of aging. He is, after all, the director of the Institute for Aging Research at the Albert Einstein College of Medicine in the Bronx. And, as such, he usually talks about his plan with the caution of a seasoned researcher. Usually. Truth is, Barzilai is known among his colleagues for his excitability—one author says he could pass as the older brother of Austin Powers—and sometimes he can’t help himself. Like the time he referred to his plan—which, among other things, would demonstrate that human aging can be slowed with a cheap pill—as “history-making.” In 2015, he stood outside of the offices of the Food and Drug Administration, flanked by a number of distinguished researchers on aging, and likened the plan to a journey to “the promised land.” Last spring, Barzilai traveled to the Vatican to discuss the plan at a conference on cellular therapies. It was the second time he’d been invited to the conference, which is a pretty big deal in the medical world. At the last one, in 2013, he appeared alongside a dwarf from Ecuador, a member of a community of dwarfs whose near immunity to diabetes and cancer has attracted the keen interest of researchers. The 2016 conference featured a number of the world’s top cancer scientists and included addresses from Pope Francis and Joe Biden. That Barzilai was invited was a sign not only of his prominence in his field but also of how far aging research, once relegated to the periphery of mainstream science, has come in recent years. That progress has been spurred by huge investments from Sil Continue reading >>

The Many Benefits Of Metformin | Empoweryourhealth.org

The Many Benefits Of Metformin | Empoweryourhealth.org

Metformin (also known by the brand names Glucophage®, Glucophae XR®, Glumetza®, Fortamet® and Riomet®) is one of the most popular drugs available for the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus, a form of diabetes in which the body is unable to use insulin efficiently, often leading to less insulin production over time. Introduced in the United Kingdom in 1958, Canada in 1972 and the United States in 1995, metformin is now believed to be the most widely prescribed antidiabetic drug in the world. Originating in a common plant native to the eastern part of the U.S. called French lilac or goat’s plant, metformin has been used to treat many conditions, including tuberculosis, rheumatism and bladder problems. Seminole Indians are said to have used the root, which contains the natural insecticide rotenone, to stun fish for easy harvesting. Other reported uses have included pouring a brew made from the roots on garden plants to kill insects. And at one time, this plant was fed to goats as it was thought to improve milk production, thus the name goat’s rue. What researchers have learned in the past several years is that metformin has many other positive benefits beyond controlling blood glucose levels with very low risk of causing hypoglycemia (low blood sugar). One major effect of metformin is a decrease in the production and release of glucose from the liver. When used in combination with antidiabetic drug sulfonylurea or insulin, metformin also can help minimize the weight gain frequently associated with these medications. It can lower LDL (bad) cholesterol, lower blood fat levels and reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease. And when taken by individuals treated intensively with sulphonylureas, a class of oral medications that control blood sugar levels in patients Continue reading >>

Possible New Benefit For Metformin Users

Possible New Benefit For Metformin Users

Join the fight against diabetes on Facebook Many people with type 2 diabetes take the drug metformin to control their blood sugar levels. But now, new research suggests that his drug may also benefit type 1 diabetics, by slowing down the progression of heart disease. This research comes out of Newcastle University and was recently published in Cardiovascular Diabetology . To conduct the trial, researchers gave 23 people between the ages of 19 and 64 metformin for eight weeks. They measured the stem cells in each patient's blood, and also grew stem cells in test tubes to observe their behavior. For contrast, nine other participants between the same age range took standard insulin treatments and were monitored as well. All participants in the clinical trial had been living with type 1 diabetes for up to 23 years and had no current evidence of heart disease. When University researchers analyzed data from this clinical trial, they discovered that metformin increases vascular stem cells. This can help diabetic patients repair their own damaged blood vessels. Our research is an exciting step forward, said Dr. Jolanta Weaver , senior lecturer in diabetes medicine at Newcastle University, who led both the clinical trial and subsequent analysis. It may have positive clinical implications for patients with increased risk of cardiovascular disease by improving their treatment options. Heart disease runs rampant among diabetic patients, accounting for over half of all diabetes deaths. Dr. Weaver believes her team's findings could revolutionize treatment and care for people with type 1 diabetes. As she said in a press release , We have shown that all our patients in the study had their insulin doses reduced after taking metformin and have not suffered any serious adverse effect. So Continue reading >>

Beyond Diabetes, Metformin May Prove To Be A ‘wonder Drug’

Beyond Diabetes, Metformin May Prove To Be A ‘wonder Drug’

In the past 2 decades, metformin has become a mainstay of type 2 diabetes management and is now the recommended first-line drug for treating the disease in the United States and worldwide. Available in the United States since 1995, metformin is an attractive therapy for clinicians and patients alike. Studies have found the agent to be safe and effective, and at about $4 for a 1-month supply of the generic, that option is affordable at a time when many prescription drugs are being priced out of reach for some patients. “Metformin is the first drug of choice, by all standards,” Oluwaranti Akiyode, PharmD, RPh, BCPS, CDE, professor and clinical pharmacist at Howard University School of Pharmacy, told Endocrine Today. “It’s a rarity that all experts agree on something. It is time-tested, proven, has good efficacy, a good safety profile and it’s cheap. Metformin has been around long before it came to the United States. That’s why I find it amazing that we only have one drug in that class.” New research is suggesting that metformin may hold promise in treating or preventing a whole host of conditions in patients with and without type 2 diabetes. Studies show metformin may be cardioprotective in patients with diabetes and beneficial in the presence of stable congestive heart failure. The agent also may help to increase pregnancy rate in polycystic ovary syndrome, provide breast and prostate cancer benefits, and offer neuroprotection that may reduce dementia and stroke risk, Akiyode said. Nir Barzilai, MD, an endocrinologist and director of the Institute for Aging Research at the Albert Einstein College of Medicine, said he hopes to work with the FDA to conduct an NIH/American Federation for Aging Research metformin trial later this year — Targeting Aging with M Continue reading >>

Metformin: New Benefits (and Risks) For This Old Diabetes Drug

Metformin: New Benefits (and Risks) For This Old Diabetes Drug

If type 2 diabetes is part of your life—whether you have the condition or are at risk of developing it—you’ve probably heard of a drug called metformin. Perhaps your doctor has told you about it, has recently started you on it or has been prescribing it to you for years to keep your blood sugar under control. It’s no newbie. Metformin has been available by prescription in the US for more than 20 years and in Europe for more than 40 years. US doctors write nearly 60 million prescriptions a year. It’s recommended as the go-to-first prescription for people with diabetes by the American Diabetes Association, the American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists and the American College of Physicians. Yet, in many ways, metformin remains a mystery. We know broadly but still not exactly, how it works. Even more surprising, new health benefits—and side effects—keep popping up. In fact, we’ve only recently learned that metformin might protect the heart, fight cancer and even boost longevity. On the other hand, it can, rarely, lead to a potentially fatal side effect, and it can even make a common diabetes complication worse. It’s time to take a closer look at metformin. MEDIEVAL FLOWER REMEDY, MODERN DRUG In medieval times, herbalists prescribed Galega officinalis—the bloom of the French lilac, also known as goat’s rue and Italian fitch—for patients with what we now recognize as diabetes. In the 1950s, medical researchers identified a compound in the lilac, metformin, that appeared to reliably and safely reduce high blood sugar. Metformin became widely available in Europe in the 1970s and was approved by the US Food and Drug Administration in 1995 to treat type 2 diabetes. Some combination prescriptions include metformin with other prescription medication Continue reading >>

Metabolic Holy Grail?

Metabolic Holy Grail?

Top scientists agree that metformin is an antiaging drug … Is Metformin the Treatment with metformin mimics some of the benefits of calorie restriction By Will Block M etformin is an oral antidiabetic drug used for the treatment of type-2 diabetes, a metabolic disorder characterized by high blood glucose, insulin resistance, and relative insulin deficiency (even though insulin levels are higher than normal). It is also used for metabolic syndrome and glucose intolerance, prediabetic conditions. Metformin was introduced in Europe in 1958, and Canada in 1972. However, it was not until 1995 that the FDA got around to approving it in the United States. Falsely conflating it with the drug phenformin,* the FDA deemed that metformin research and clinical experience performed and gathered outside the US was substandard. In truth, metformin is much safer than phenformin, as the data show.1 “If the same criteria were used for older people as are used for younger people, nearly every senior citizen would be diagnosed as diabetic.” Plus, then as now, the FDA moaned that it had been “hobbled” by budgetary considerations. Compared to the National Institutes of Health’s budget ($31.3 billion requested for this fiscal year vs. $4.9 billion for the FDA), the FDA claims it doesn’t have enough to afford the regulatory work required for speedy approval.† Despite the retardation of its acceptance, metformin is now believed to be the most widely prescribed antidiabetic drug in the world and in the United States alone, more than 48 million prescriptions were filled in 2010 for its generic formulations. * Phenformin had been withdrawn in 1976 due to the stupidity of certain doctors who continued to prescribe it in the face of abnormal liver or kidney function. See ref. #2. † Continue reading >>

Metformin May Promote Anti-aging

Metformin May Promote Anti-aging

Metformin, a drug that has been widely used to treat diabetes, is being tested on humans for it's anti-aging properties. Researchers believe that Metformin, a drug that already has been widely used to treat diabetes for about 60 years, may have a large number of additional health benefits. It is now being tested on humans for its anti-aging properties. Nir Barzilai, MD, director of the Institute for Aging Research at Albert Einstein College of Medicine, is currently engaged in a clinical study and assessment of metformin for endurance, to analyze how it may impact metabolic and cellular processes correlated with the development of age-related conditions. These conditions include inflammation, oxidative, diminished autophagy, cell senescence and apoptosis. Experts are reviewing whether metrformin use can possibly improve gene expression profile in older adults with damaged glucose tolerance to that of younger individuals. "We want to change the habit of treating very accumulating diseases with accumulating therapy for the elderly." Barzilia told Medical Economics. "We would rather prevent aging and by that prevent the onset of multiple diseases," she added. According to lead researcher, Craig Currey of Cardiff University, metformin has already been demonstrated to offer benefits against cancer and cardiovascular disease . A 2014 research study has already divulged that patients cured with metroformin, rather than sulphonylureas, had longer lifespans, and recommended that metroformin may also be an aid to patients without diabetes. Metformin increases the number of oxygen molecules released into a cell, which appears to boost robustness and longevity. It works by suppressing glucose production in the liver and increasing insulin sensitivity, therefore benefitting patients Continue reading >>

5 Surprising Potential Benefits Of Metformin

5 Surprising Potential Benefits Of Metformin

Metformin, used mainly as a type 2 diabetes treatment is one of the most commonly prescribed drugs. It is inexpensive, very safe, and often the recommended first-line treatment for insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes. Metformin works by helping the body better utilize it’s own insulin and helps stop the liver from releasing glucose into the bloodstream. Aside from helping with blood sugar management, there are other potential benefits from taking metformin: May help prevent or treat cancer. In one study, patients with breast cancer seemed to benefit from taking metformin over those not taking metformin for their diabetes and even over those without diabetes. A seven study analysis found that women taking metformin for 3 years cut their breast cancer risk by 25 percent. In another study, the risk of getting pancreatic cancer was 62 percent lower in those taking metformin than in those not taking metformin. Yet another study indicated that metformin users with pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors got a significantly lowered risk of their cancer progression. Promotes good gut bacteria growth. A recent study published in the ADA’s Diabetes Care journal found that metformin does seem to change gut microbiota in a favorable direction. It appears to do this by enabling the growth of mucin-degrading A. muciniphila and several short chain fatty acid-producing microbiota. May help protect from glaucoma. A study published last year in JAMA Ophalmology showed that the use of metformin and not any other diabetes medications was linked to a reduced risk of open-angle glaucoma even after taking into account diabetes management and other variables. The University of Michigan Kellogg Eye Center website states that “The study revealed that patients prescribed the highest amount of m Continue reading >>

Metformin: New Preparations And Nonglycemic Benefits

Metformin: New Preparations And Nonglycemic Benefits

Abstract Metformin has been widely used for over 5 decades. New preparations have been developed for possible enhancement of efficiency, tolerability, and pleiotropic nonglycemic effects. Extended-release metformin has contributed to adherence and improved gastrointestinal tolerability. Delayed-release metformin acts in the lower gastrointestinal tract and exerts glucose-lowering effects at lower plasma metformin levels, which might suggest use of this biguanide in patients with chronic kidney disease. Metformin is also known to have numerous nonglycemic effects. Results of the UK Prospective Diabetes Study indicate improvements in cardiovascular outcome and reduced total mortality independent of glycemic control. Anticancer effects of metformin have been discussed and many clinical trials are on-going. Metformin is noted for its beneficial effects on lifespan extension and on disorders due to increased insulin resistance. Further investigations, including randomized control trials in nondiabetic individuals, are required to demonstrate the nonglycemic effects of metformin. Notes This work was supported by Scientific Research Grants from the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science, and Technology of Japan. Nobuya Inagaki received research grants from Astellas Pharma Inc., Taisho Toyama Pharmaceutical Co., Ltd., Mitsubishi Tanabe Pharma Corporation, Takeda Pharmaceutical Company Ltd., Daiichi Sankyo Company, Ltd., MSD, Sanofi, Dainippon Sumitomo Pharma Co., Ltd., Kyowa Hakko Kirin Co., Ltd., Eli Lilly Japan K.K., Shiratori Pharmaceutical Co., Ltd., Ono Pharmaceutical Co., Ltd., JT, Pfizer, Nippon Boehringer Ingelheim Co., Ltd., Sanwa Kagaku Kenkyusho Co., Ltd., Kissei Pharmaceutical Co., Ltd., and Japan Diabetes Foundation. Yoshihito Fujita declares no conflict o Continue reading >>

Beyond Diabetes: Fight Cancer, Aging, Dysbiosis

Beyond Diabetes: Fight Cancer, Aging, Dysbiosis

Metformin is a standard anti-diabetic drug, taken by millions since 1957. It is currently being prescribed to over 150 million individuals worldwide. R R Contents Metformin was discovered in 1922. R It is one of the few miracle drugs that has ever been created. Many of the benefits metformin seems to have is through increasing production of butyrate and HDAC inhibition, in butyrate deprived diabetes patients. Metformin is a biguanide derived from the plant Galega officinalis. R G. officinalis is rich in guanidine, which has helped create other biguanides. R Other biguanides have been used for diabetes, such as phenformin and buformin, but they are commonly associated with lactic acidosis. R Metformin is notorious for the treatment of pre-diabetes, type 1 and type 2 diabetes. R It lowers blood sugar/suppress glucose production in liver. R It can lower hemoglobin A1c levels. R It doesn’t help diabetic retinopathy. R It increases cortisol regeneration (by 11-beta-HSD1). R Metformin also inhibits oxLDL-increased LOX-1 expression and oxLDL-collapsed AKT/eNOS levels (probably via SIRT1 and AMPK). R 2. Protects The Heart and Lungs Metformin can lower the risk of heart disease. R It helps chronic heart failure (by improving VE/VCO2 slope). R It also attenuates lung fibrosis development (suppressing NOX4). R Metformin can increase the bioavailability of nitric oxide, decrease the formation of AGEs, intercellular cell adhesion molecules (ICAMs) & vascular cell adhesion molecules (VCAMs). R 3. Improves The Gut Microbiome Metformin improves gut microbiota. R It increases intestinal glucose uptake and lactate production, increases GLP-1 concentrations, serotonin, and histamine and increases the bile acid pool within the intestine, and alters the microbiome. R Metformin can increas Continue reading >>

Can Metformin Help With Weight Loss?

Can Metformin Help With Weight Loss?

Metformin is a drug prescribed to manage blood sugar levels in people with type 2 diabetes. You may have heard that metformin can also help you lose weight. But is it true? The answer is a resounding maybe. Here’s what you should know about what metformin can do for weight loss, as well as why your doctor may prescribe it for you. According to research, metformin can help some people lose weight. However, it’s not clear why metformin may cause weight loss. One theory is that it may prompt you to eat less by reducing your appetite. It may also change the way your body uses and stores fat. Although studies have shown that metformin may help with weight loss, the drug is not a quick-fix solution. According to one long-term study, the weight loss from metformin tends to occur gradually over one to two years. The amount of weight lost also varies from person to person. In the study, the average amount of weight lost after two or more years was four to seven pounds. Taking the drug without following other healthy habits may not lead to weight loss. Individuals who follow a healthy diet and exercise while taking metformin tend to lose the most weight. This may be because metformin is thought to boost how many calories you burn during exercise. If you don’t exercise, you likely won’t have this benefit. In addition, any weight loss you have may only last as long as you take the medication. That means if you stop taking metformin, there’s a good chance you will return to your original weight. And even while you’re still taking the drug, you may slowly gain back any weight you’ve lost. In other words, metformin may not be the magic diet pill some people have been waiting for. It has been shown to reduce weight in some, but not others. One of the benefits of metformin Continue reading >>

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