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Needleless Diabetes Testing

Diabetics Can Now Test Their Blood Sugar Levels With A Mobile Device

Diabetics Can Now Test Their Blood Sugar Levels With A Mobile Device

People living with diabetes have to prick their fingers to check their blood sugar levels anywhere from one to seven times a day. But now, there’s a better way to monitor blood sugar. This week, the US Food and Drug Administration approved the first at-home, needleless system for continuously monitoring glucose for people with diabetes. The system, called FreeStyle Libre Flash, and manufactured by the DC-based Abbott Laboratories, allows users to forgo finger-pricking for up to 10 days at a time. The Flash is essentially a small, circular plastic sensor that sits on top of the skin and detects blood sugar from a small wire that goes under the skin beneath the sensor. People can insert themselves using an applicator that works sort of like a rubber stamp. Once people have applied the sensor on their arms, they can wave a mobile device a little smaller than a smartphone in front of it to read glucose levels. It takes about 12 hours for the wire to become adjusted to the person’s body, but afterward the device takes continuous data that tracks blood sugar over time for over a week. Afterward, you peel the sensor off slowly, and apply a new one. Ideally, this would encourage people with diabetes to check their blood sugar more routinely, Jared Watkin, senior vice president of Abbott’s Diabetes Care unit, told Reuters. Often, people will forgo checking their sugar levels as often as they should because finger pricking can be such a nuisance. Right now it’s only marketed for adults, but the company hopes to receive approval for children under 18 as well. Abbott already has one needle-free blood sugar monitoring system available for the public called the FreeStyle Libre Pro. However, users have to make a special trip to the doctor’s office to have the wire placed und Continue reading >>

New Patch Replaces Blood Test For Glucose Monitoring

New Patch Replaces Blood Test For Glucose Monitoring

New Patch Replaces Blood Test for Glucose Monitoring Diabetics may soon be able to pass on the traditional finger prick blood test to monitor their glucose levels. A team from the University of Bath has developed a non-invasive adhesive patch that draws glucose out from fluid between cells across hair follicles that are individually accessed through an array of miniature sensors using a small electric current. A non-invasivethat is, needle-lessmethod to monitor blood sugar has proven a difficult goal to attain, Richard Guy, a professor from the Department of Pharmacy & Pharmacology, said in a statement. The closest that has been achieved has required either at least a single-point calibration with a classic 'finger-stick, or the implantation of a pre-calibrated sensor via a single needle insertion. The monitor developed at Bath promises a truly calibration-free approach, an essential contribution in the fight to combat the ever-increasing global incidence of diabetes. With the patch, glucose is collected in small reservoirs. Measurements can be taken every 10 to 15 minutes over the course of several hours. The test is advantageous to other wearable sensors because it can operate on a small area over an individual hair folliclesignificantly reducing the inter-skin and intra-skin variability in glucose extraction and increasing the accuracy of the measurements taken so that calibration through a blood sample is not necessary. The specific architecture of our array permits calibration-free operation, and it has the further benefit of allowing realization with a variety of materials in combination, Adelina Ilie, PhD, from the Department of Physics, said in a statement. We utilized graphene as one of the components as it brings important advantages: specifically, it is stro Continue reading >>

Diabetes Skin Patch Could Abolish Finger-prick Tests

Diabetes Skin Patch Could Abolish Finger-prick Tests

Diabetes skin patch could abolish finger-prick tests Finger-prick tests for blood glucose monitoring may soon be a thing of the past, thanks to scientists who have developed an adhesive skin patch that measures glucose levels every 1015 minutes. Researchers have created an adhesive skin patch that can monitor glucose levels without pricking the skin. Created by researchers from the University of Bath in the United Kingdom, the novel patch has proven to be a feasible noninvasive strategy for blood glucose monitoring in tests of both pig and human skin. Study co-author Prof. Richard Guy, of the Department of Pharmacy & Pharmacology, and colleagues recently reported their findings in the journal Nature Nanotechnology. It is estimated that around 30.3 million people in the United States are living with diabetes , and there are around 1.5 million new cases diagnosed every year. Type 2 diabetes is the most common form of diabetes, accounting for 9095 percent of all cases; it arises when the body is no longer able to use insulin effectively, or it fails to produce enough of the hormone, causing blood glucose levels to become too high. To manage the condition effectively, people with diabetes need to monitor their blood glucose levels regularly. This involves the use of a blood glucose meter, which tests a drop of blood released through a needle prick of the finger. The frequency of blood glucose testing depends on the type of diabetes a person has and the type of medication they are using, but daily testing which may be up to 10 times per day for people with type 1 diabetes is common. This form of testing can be a burden for people with diabetes; research has shown that a fear of pain and needles, the cost of blood test strips, and the inconvenience of the self-monitoring pro Continue reading >>

Imagine Living A Healthier Life With Glucowise™

Imagine Living A Healthier Life With Glucowise™

We are developing a new non-invasive glucose monitor that will help you take control of your life. (Caution: GlucoWise is still under development and not available for public testing. If you are interested please use the "Get involved" signup form on this page. Due to the overwhelming demand we are unable to respond to individual emails - we are focused on getting the device to the market quickly). Glucowise™ is a non-invasive, 100% pain-free device that makes traditional blood sampling a thing of the past. Our unique sensor technology will allow you to monitor blood glucose levels without the need to pierce your skin. Simple yet highly reliable, Glucowise™ will exceed industry standards for self-monitoring blood glucose accuracy. You will be able to sample as often as you like and wherever you like, ensuring you avoid sudden hypoglycemic events. Our App and Smart Cloud technology delivers personalised advice and alerts, helping you to fully manage your condition. Intelligent analytics will use your current and historical data to calculate and forecast immediate trends in your blood glucose levels, allowing you to adjust your food or medication intake according to your activities or how you are feeling. Glucowise™ will offer unlimited testing without the need for costly consumables, so you can test as often as you like without having to worry about the cost or pain. The compact design will offer you high levels of privacy. It will take no more than 10 seconds to provide a simple, fast and highly discrete testing experience – anytime, anywhere. The data can then sent wirelessly and securely to your smartphone or tablet. Take control There are many situations whereby conventional testing is challenging. Often people with diabetes will unnecessarily expose themselv Continue reading >>

Gsm Based Needleless Blood Glucose Monitoring System

Gsm Based Needleless Blood Glucose Monitoring System

Department of Bio-Medical Engineering, Bharath University, Chennai, Tamil Nadu, India Citation: Mohi-ud-din Q (2017) GSM based Needleless Blood Glucose Monitoring System. J Bioengineer & Biomedical Sci 7: 231. doi: 10.4172/2155-9538.1000231 Copyright: © 2017 Mohi-ud-din Q. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited. Visit for more related articles at Journal of Bioengineering & Biomedical Science Abstract Diabetes is one of the leading non communicable diseases affecting public health. Though it is termed as a deficiency rather than a disease, uncontrolled diabetes will lead to complications resulting in renal failure/liver failure/ heart-attack/loss of sight or foot problems leading to amputation if not diagnosed, monitored and treated on time. In order to avoid these complications blood glucose level should be periodically monitored. Conventional methods used for this purpose uses sharp needle which leads to loss of blood and has a risk of infections to the patients. In order to overcome such problems, a non-invasive glucose monitoring system is necessary. In this study, we propose a design, a cost effective and non-invasive glucose monitoring device using near infrared spectroscopy techniques. In addition, GSM module attached to this device will enable wireless data sharing facility. The results can therefore also be transmitted easily to the doctor for examination. The results obtained can also be stored for future records and also to analyse variations in blood glucose level and adjustment of dosage of medicine. The current study shows that our device has accuracy level equiva Continue reading >>

New Device Would Allow Blood-free Monitoring Of Blood Sugar Levels

New Device Would Allow Blood-free Monitoring Of Blood Sugar Levels

April 10, 2018 / 9:04 PM / Updated 4 hours ago New device would allow blood-free monitoring of blood sugar levels (Reuters Health) - A new device applied to the skin could allow people with diabetes to monitor their blood sugar levels without the need for finger sticks or other blood sampling. The technology has the potential to become the first needle-free approach - and that includes avoiding completely a finger-stick calibration - to monitor blood sugar levels over the course of a day, Dr. Adelina Ilie from University of Bath, UK told Reuters Health by email. People with diabetes have to monitor their blood glucose level regularly, and there is currently no way to do that without drawing a drop of blood. Ilies team has developed a device that can measure glucose in the fluid just below the skin, called the interstitial fluid. When tested in two healthy human volunteers, the device provided glucose results that closely matched levels measured in the blood, researchers reported in Nature Nanotechnology. The researchers stress that the device needs further development before it becomes a wearable, simple, blood-free way to measure blood sugar levels. Nevertheless, Ilie said, This finding is important, not only for type 1 diabetics, who absolutely need to monitor their (blood sugar) levels accurately and frequently every day, but also for the very large, and rapidly increasing, numbers of type 2 diabetics for whom a device such as ours would enable them to keep their blood sugar concentration within the normal range in a very convenient, completely non-invasive, and user-friendly manner. SOURCE: go.nature.com/2EBTs2K Nature Nanotechnology, online April 9, 2018. Continue reading >>

Clinical Trial Tests Tattoo Sensor As Needleless Glucose Monitor For Diabetes Patients

Clinical Trial Tests Tattoo Sensor As Needleless Glucose Monitor For Diabetes Patients

Clinical Trial Tests Tattoo Sensor as Needleless Glucose Monitor for Diabetes Patients Dr. Edward Chao is the principal investigator of a phase I clinical trial testing the accuracy of a needleless glucose monitor developed by University of California San Diego Jacobs School of Engineering researchers that adheres to the skin like a temporary tattoo to read blood sugar levels. For Angela Valdez, being diagnosed with diabetes was an awakening. The disorder ran in her family, but she didnt think it would happen to her. And when it did, she acted by modifying her diet and physical activity. She was doing everything rightalmost. I dont handle monitoring my diabetes as I should, said Valdez. I have the diet down a lot better now and I take my medication as I should, but the finger pricking is a struggle for me. I only test if I feel bad. If I dont feel my blood sugar level is high, and Im taking the pill every day, I think Im alright. Which is really bad thinking, but the pin prick is terrifying. Valdez is one of 29 million people living with diabetes in the United States for whom monitoring their blood glucose (blood sugar) level is an integral component of managing their condition. Understanding how a patients sugar levels ebb and flow over the course of time can guide medication regimens and suggest changes that may improve quality of life, perhaps even save it. Unfortunately, like Valdez, many patients with diabetes do not track their blood glucose regularly. According to Dr. Edward Chao, associate clinical professor of medicine at University of California San Diego School of Medicine and a physician at VA San Diego Healthcare System, one quarter of persons receiving insulin treatment infrequently or never test their blood glucose. Another 65 percent of patients who use Continue reading >>

Diabetes: Blood Sugar Patch Without Needles

Diabetes: Blood Sugar Patch Without Needles

New Needle-Less Patch Could Help Measure Blood Sugar Levels for People with Diabetes Written by Ginger Vieira on April 12, 2018 The new patch would eliminate finger pricks for blood sugar measurements, but the device still has a lot of hurdles to clear before it can be available. For decades, diabetes management has consisted of daily finger pricks to measure your blood sugar. Prior to the groundbreaking invention of the glucometer in 1968 , people with diabetes used daily urine samples to get generalized estimates of their blood glucose range. The information was so delayed and so vague, it was barely helpful. Today, glucometers that provide results within five seconds are common. Continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) that provides blood sugar readings directly to your smartphone every five minutes have become mainstream. But all of this technology still requires daily finger pricks as well as a weekly insertion via a sharp needle of a new sensor for CGM. Researchers and scientists at the University of Bath in the United Kingdom are trying to change that. Theyve been developing a needle-less patch that measures and monitors blood sugar levels. The closest that has been achieved has required either at least a single-point calibration with a classic finger-stick or the implantation of a pre-calibrated sensor via a single needle insertion, explained Richard Guy, a professor in the universitys department of pharmacy and pharmacology, in a press release . Instead, the monitoring patch system developed at the University of Bath is promising a calibration-free and finger-prick-free technology. The patch, which would enable a person to take readings of their blood sugar every 10 to 15 minutes over the course of several hours, doesnt actually pierce the skin. Instead, it draws g Continue reading >>

Apple’s Needleless Blood Sugar Tracker Has An Uphill Battle In Front Of It

Apple’s Needleless Blood Sugar Tracker Has An Uphill Battle In Front Of It

Rumors are flying that Apple is developing some kind of wearable that would continuously track the user’s blood sugar without breaking their skin. For people with diabetes, this would be a huge improvement over the somewhat invasive or downright painful options they currently rely on. But experts warn that if the rumors are true, Apple will be facing a scientific and technological battlefield littered with decades of other companies’ failures. If Apple is chasing a needleless blood sugar monitor, it wouldn’t be that surprising. (Apple declined to comment.) After all, the market would be massive. About 30 million Americans have diabetes, a disease caused when there’s too much sugar, or glucose, in the blood. People with diabetes have to carefully titrate their food intake, or even inject the hormone insulin in order to keep their blood sugar from spiking or dropping to dangerous levels. So regularly measuring blood glucose is key. Right now, it’s also unpleasant. People with diabetes have to prick their fingers to draw blood, or wear a monitor that inserts a tiny tube beneath their skin to continuously measure glucose in the fluid between cells (the same fluid that spills out when you pop a blister). So a needleless device — preferably one that continuously monitors glucose levels and spits them out in real time — would be a huge upgrade. “That is the holy grail,” says Eric Topol, the director of the Scripps Translational Science Institute who also sits on the board of glucose monitor manufacturer Dexcom. And that’s why so many before Apple have made the attempt. Google tried to develop a contact lens to detect glucose in tears, but ever since pharmaceutical giant Novartis licensed the technology in 2014, the project’s gone quiet. (A spokesperson fo Continue reading >>

Graphene Skin Patch Measures Blood Sugar Without A Needle

Graphene Skin Patch Measures Blood Sugar Without A Needle

Researchers in the UK have developed a skin patch that measures bloodsugar levels without the prick of a needle by pulling fluid out from between hair follicles. The technology could be used for both type 1 and type 2 diabetes patients. Diabetes is a major global health problem, with the World Health Organization stating 422 million were affected worldwide in 2014. The disease occurs either when the pancreas does not produce insulin (type 1 diabetes) or the body is not able to use its insulin properly (type 2 diabetes), which raises blood glucose levels. Diabetics rely on pricking their skin with a needle daily in order to monitor their blood sugar levels. Researchers at the University of Bath have now developed a needle-free approach for blood sugar testing suitable for both type 1 and type 2 diabetes. The technology measures glucose levels in the interstitial fluid, which is found in between skin cells. A patchplaced on theskinapplies a small electric field to pull the interstitial fluid up along hair follicles and into the device.Within the patch, the enzyme glucose oxidase the same used for finger-pricking glucose testing reacts with the glucose to produce hydrogen peroxide, which is detected by a graphene sensor. The whole process yields a blood glucose measurement within 15 minutes. The skin patch can offer a high level of accuracy by individually measuring each hair follicle.This decreases the variability of measurements and removes theneed to calibrate the patch with a finger-prick sample. This new technology would be competing with a variety of needle-free glucose monitoring devices that are already in development. For example, GlucoSense, based in London, is developing a device that can obtain measurements in less than 30 seconds . Integrity Applications, an Continue reading >>

Researchers Develop Needleless Glucose Monitoring Device

Researchers Develop Needleless Glucose Monitoring Device

Researchers Develop Needleless Glucose Monitoring Device A new, non-invasive method for continuously monitoring blood sugar levels may replace the conventional pinpricking glucose monitoring, according to a novel proof-of-concept study. If development proceeds as we believe, this will be the first truly needle-less approach to continuous glucose monitoring, using a simple, flexible,disposablebut environmentally friendlyonce-a-day device, Richard Guy, PhD, MA, a professor of pharmaceutical sciences at the University of Bath, and a lead author of the study, told MD Magazine. While patients with diabetes often require blood sugar monitoring throughout the day, which requires them to prick themselves to check levels before meals, after exercise, and at other intervalsup to 10 times a day for some patients. However, a survey by the American Diabetes Association showed that many, possibly even half, of patients do not actually check their glucose. William H. Polonsky, PhD, CDE, a clinical psychologist and diabetes educator, suggests some reasons are emotionalit may make patients feel like their diabetes controls their lives, or they may feel bad about themselves if the levels arent where they should be. It also may make it more difficult to keep their diabetes private and invite questions from loved ones. It can be inconvenient, and sometimes even painful. There have been previous attempts at non-invasive glucose monitoring before, but those that used transdermal attempts have required a needle prick test for calibration, and the patches themselves sometimes caused skin irritation. The researchers realized that they might be able to solve both problems if they just miniaturized the patch and targeted the measurements. We realized that each of these problems could be solved b Continue reading >>

The Fda Has Approved A Blood Sugar Monitor That Doesn’t Require A Finger Prick

The Fda Has Approved A Blood Sugar Monitor That Doesn’t Require A Finger Prick

Further proof the U.S. Food and Drug Administration has been warming up to modern technology — it has just approved the first continuous blood sugar monitor that doesn’t require the user to prick themselves over and over for a blood sample. Today, the FDA cleared Abbot’s FreeStyle Libre Flash Glucose Monitoring System, a device that uses a small sensor wire inserted under the skin to determine glucose levels in adult diabetics. Another wand-like device is then waved over the sensor to measure and give a readout of those glucose levels. This is a milestone move for the FDA as diabetes affects nearly 30 million people in the United States who currently have to test their blood sugar by pricking themselves several times throughout the day and every time they eat. However, the idea for a prickless blood sugar monitor isn’t new. Tech companies have increasingly shown an interest in the massive diabetics market over the past few years. Apple is rumored to be working on such a device and its CEO Tim Cook has even been spotted wearing a possible prototype that could connect to the Apple Watch. Other companies endeavor to build something similar, including Glucowise, which has a device still under development. However, it seems it’s not so easy to create a needleless blood sugar detector. Google tried to build a contact lens that could detect glucose but it seems the project has gone nowhere since drug company Novartis licensed the tech in 2014. Another FDA-approved device for glucose monitoring without the prick called the GlucoWatch was approved in the early 2000’s, but consumers found it cumbersome and it happened to cause a bad rash in some. But there’s new hope today that the Freestyle monitor has worked out all the kinks. The device is intended for those 18 a Continue reading >>

To Mark World Diabetes Day, Israeli Company Promotes Needle-free Glucose Test

To Mark World Diabetes Day, Israeli Company Promotes Needle-free Glucose Test

To mark World Diabetes Day, the Israeli medical company Cnoga Medical is promoting its new, pain-free way to monitor blood glucose levels with the aim of easing the significant discomfort of patients who suffer from diabetes and who must track their sugar levels using a finger-pricking glucose meter a number of times a day. Cnoga Medical‘s non-invasive glucometer “uses a camera to provide optical diagnosis of blood glucose level by observing changing color shades of the user’s finger,” the company said in a statement, released ahead of World Diabetes Day marked annually on November 14 to honor Canadian Dr. Frederick Banting, the co-discoverer of insulin, who was born on November 14, 1891. SEE ALSO: Betalin Aims To End Insulin Injections By Treating Type 1 Diabetes With Cell Transplants Cnoga says the device, launched last year and already approved for use in a number of countries worldwide including Italy, Brazil and China, “offers accurate blood glucose results that are comparable to those of a fingerprick,” but without the needles. “It learns to correlate the user’s optical skin-tone characteristics with camera readings,” after a short training period, after which it “operates quickly, accurately, making tracking and compliance easier patients living with diabetes.” “An array of light-emitting-diodes (LED) shines light in wavelengths from visual to infrared through the fingertip. As the light waves pass through the fingertip, some of it is absorbed and the reflected light signal is changed. A camera sensor detects the changes in the light signal in real time. Using patented algorithms and a vast amount of data, the device analyzes the correlation between the signal and bio parameters to yield the glucose level in the blood,” the company descr Continue reading >>

Australian Research Looks At Alternatives To Blood Glucose Testing

Australian Research Looks At Alternatives To Blood Glucose Testing

Professor Paul Dastoor is leading the way in diabetes research as he and his team work to develop a low-cost, saliva-based glucose test which could make blood tests a thing of the past for people living with diabetes. The needle free test integrates biosensors or chemical signatures into printed transistors and detects concentrations of glucose that is up to 100 times more sensitive than current blood sensors. Professor Dastoor from the University of Newcastle says the most futuristic way it would work is that it could allow people to print their own sensor on an inkjet printer at home. “You would get a cartridge potentially that you could print on a little piece of plastic, cut it out and lick it. I expect it will plug into a low-cost reader,” he said, estimating the cost of each device to be less than a cent. Ultimately Professor Dastoor and his team hope the device would send the glucose reading to the person’s mobile phone. “Where we are now then, is having the ability to create a really low-cost sensor that we can print enormous quantities of which would be sensitive to glucose in your saliva,” he said. “The creation of the non-invasive test for diabetes has been described as the Holy Grail in diabetes research for decades,” Professor Dastoor said. Other non-invasive tests among the current methods being developed for people living with diabetes include tattoos, sensors and breathalysers. Diabetes NSW ambassador and General Manager of the Australian Technology Park in Sydney, Duncan Reid has had type 1 diabetes for 29 years and says non-invasive testing would be life-changing for people with diabetes who are at work and school. “This sounds like a great way to test blood glucose levels, particularly for people at work or even children at school wher Continue reading >>

Fda Approves First Blood Sugar Monitor Without Finger Pricks

Fda Approves First Blood Sugar Monitor Without Finger Pricks

FDA approves first blood sugar monitor without finger pricks The FDA has approved a device from Abbott that continuously monitors diabetics’ blood sugar levels without requiring backup finger prick tests. .S. regulators have approved the first continuous blood sugar monitor for diabetics that doesn’t need backup finger prick tests. Current models require users to test a drop of blood twice daily to calibrate, or adjust, the monitor. The pain of finger sticks and the cost of testing supplies discourage many people from keeping close tabs on their blood sugar, which is needed to manage insulin use and adjust what they eat. Abbott’s new FreeStyle Libre Flash Glucose Monitoring System , approved Wednesday by the Food and Drug Administration, uses a small sensor attached to the upper arm. Patients wave a reader device over it to see the current blood sugar level and changes over the past eight hours. Most of the 30 million Americans with diabetes use standard glucose meters, which require multiple finger pricks each day and only show current sugar level. More-accurate continuous glucose monitoring devices are used by about 345,000 Americans. Sign up for our Morning Rounds newsletter But most don’t do the finger pricks to calibrate them and may get inaccurate readings, said Dr. Timothy Bailey, who helped test FreeStyle Libre. “We’re able to lower blood sugar safely” with this technology, said Bailey, director of the Advanced Metabolic Care and Research Institute in California. He receives consulting fees from various diabetes device makers. Too-high blood sugar levels can damage organs and lead to heart attacks, strokes, blindness and amputations. Very low blood sugar can cause seizures, confusion and loss of consciousness. Abbott’s device was approved for ad Continue reading >>

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