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Nausea From Metformin

Using Metformin To Treat Type 2 Diabetes

Using Metformin To Treat Type 2 Diabetes

If your doctor has prescribed Metformin for diabetes or another use, what exactly is this medication and how does it work? What is the best way to take it to reduce side effects? What adverse effects might you experience and why is it important to be aware of these? According to the American Diabetes Association Standards of Care, Metformin, if tolerated, is the preferred initial oral diabetes medication for Type 2 diabetes because it is the most effective. Unlike people with Type 1 diabetes , people with Type 2 diabetes make insulin. The problem is that they are either not making enough insulin or the insulin they do make isn't being used efficiently. Metformin is a weight neutral medication that helps the body use insulin. Weight neutral means that it is not associated with weight gain (or loss) as are many other diabetes medications. Like all medicines, however, Metformin can produce some side effects, some of which it is important to know. Metformin belongs to a class of drugs called biguanides , which are derived from the French lilac. Metformin helps to lower blood sugar by utilizing insulin and reducing insulin resistance (making your body more sensitive to insulin.) Many people with Type 2 diabetes carry excess weightfat cells prevent insulin from doing its job, ultimately causing the cells to become resistant to insulin. When cells become resistant to insulin, insulin is unable to direct sugar from the bloodstream to the cells to use for energy, and instead, the sugar remains in the blood. As a result, the liver responds by making more sugar because it thinks the body needs it for fuel and the pancreas responds by making more insulin. You wind up with chaoshigh blood sugars and high insulin levels. Metformin helps to restore normalcy by increasing insulin sens Continue reading >>

Severity Of Gastrointestinal Side Effects Of Metformin Tablet Compared To Metformin Capsule In Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus Patients

Severity Of Gastrointestinal Side Effects Of Metformin Tablet Compared To Metformin Capsule In Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus Patients

Go to: This prospective interventional study was conducted from June to November 2016 at DM clinics affiliated to Isfahan University of Medical Sciences, Isfahan, Iran. The study obtained approval from the Research Council and Ethics Committee of Isfahan University of Medical Sciences (No. 395013). At first, patients diagnosed with Type 2 DM who were treated by metformin tablet alone or in combination with other oral antidiabetic drugs were invited to participate in the study. Then, the participants were selected by the following criteria. Components if the criteria by which the patients were selected consist of adult (age >18 years), Type 2 DM patients, with 6.5%< hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) <9.5%. Criteria of noninclusion are patients being treated with insulin, had received systemic corticosteroids during recent 3 months, chronic gastroparesis or chronic severe GI symptoms, history of gastric or duodenal ulcers, any inadequately controlled or untreated cardiovascular, hepatic, pulmonary, renal, or neurologic conditions, glomerular filtration rate <50 ml/min, pregnancy or plan of pregnancy. After obtaining written informed consent from the selected patients, the data were recorded in a checklist including demographic information (date of birth, gender), body weight and height, laboratory test results (HbA1c, fasting blood sugar, creatinine), medical and surgical history, and relevant medication history. Furthermore, GI side effects before the study related to metformin tablet including diarrhea, nausea, vomiting, abdominal pain, and bloating were asked and mentioned in the checklist. All included patients received metformin capsule with the same amount of metformin tablet, previously which was kindly provided by Farabi Pharmaceuticals, Isfahan, Iran, on our request which c Continue reading >>

Metformin (oral Route)

Metformin (oral Route)

Precautions Drug information provided by: Micromedex It is very important that your doctor check your progress at regular visits, especially during the first few weeks that you take this medicine. Blood and urine tests may be needed to check for unwanted effects. This medicine may interact with the dye used for an X-ray or CT scan. Your doctor should advise you to stop taking it before you have any medical exams or diagnostic tests that might cause less urine output than usual. You may be advised to start taking the medicine again 48 hours after the exams or tests if your kidney function is tested and found to be normal. Make sure any doctor or dentist who treats you knows that you are using this medicine. You may need to stop using this medicine several days before having surgery or medical tests. It is very important to carefully follow any instructions from your health care team about: Alcohol—Drinking alcohol may cause severe low blood sugar. Discuss this with your health care team. Other medicines—Do not take other medicines unless they have been discussed with your doctor. This especially includes nonprescription medicines such as aspirin, and medicines for appetite control, asthma, colds, cough, hay fever, or sinus problems. Counseling—Other family members need to learn how to prevent side effects or help with side effects if they occur. Also, patients with diabetes may need special counseling about diabetes medicine dosing changes that might occur with lifestyle changes, such as changes in exercise or diet. Counseling on birth control and pregnancy may be needed because of the problems that can occur in pregnancy for patients with diabetes. Travel—Keep a recent prescription and your medical history with you. Be prepared for an emergency as you would norm Continue reading >>

Metformin Side Effects And How To Deal With Them

Metformin Side Effects And How To Deal With Them

Metformin side effects include diabetic neuropathy, brain fog, and digestive issues. You can address them through diet, Vitamin B12, CoQ10, and exercise. Let us understand the drug Metformin in detail and study different forms of metformin, its uses and common metformin side effects along with how to deal with them. Metformin: What Is It Used For? Metformin is an old warhorse in the pharma battle against diabetes. It has been the mainstay in the treatment of Type 2 Diabetes for more than fifty years, often matching or outperforming newer drugs. In fact, many new combination drugs are often created with metformin as one of the main ingredients. Thanks to its long run in the pharmaceutical world, the side effects of Metformin are also well known. The Metformin-PCOS connection has been studied extensively since a majority of health complications associated with PCOS (polycystic ovarian syndrome) are due to hyperinsulinemia (high amounts of insulin in the blood stream). Metformin is known to reduce circulating insulin levels. The use of this drug in women with PCOS has shown highly encouraging results. RELATED: 10 Easy Breakfast Ideas For Diabetics Most Prescribed Names in Metformin Category Include: Fortamet: It is an extended-release formulation that contains metformin hydrochloride. The tablets are designed for once-a-day administration. They deliver either 500 mg or 1000 mg of metformin. The tablet is made using a patented technology called SCOTTM that delivers the active compound slowly and at a constant rate. Glucophage: Glucophage tablets contain metformin hydrochoride. They contain either 500 mg, 850 mg or 1000 mg of the active compound. Glucophage tablets do not contain any special covering and need to be taken multiple times a day until the prescribed dosage is me Continue reading >>

Metformin Side Effects & Weight Loss

Metformin Side Effects & Weight Loss

Metformin is the only prescription medication that is classified as a biguanide. It is used for the management of type 2 diabetes when high blood sugar levels are inadequately controlled by diet and exercise. It may be used along with other antidiabetic medications, such as insulin or glyburide. Metformin decreases the amount of glucose, or sugar, produced by the liver to lower levels in the body. It also leads to a decreased absorption of glucose from the intestines. Furthermore, the drug increases sensitivity to insulin, allowing the body to use it more effectively. Many side effects may occur with the use of this medication. Video of the Day The most frequent side effects of metformin are gastrointestinal. Nausea and vomiting may occur in 7 to 26 percent of individuals, according to The Merck Manuals Online Medical Library. Diarrhea may be seen in up to 53 percent of patients. Abdominal pain and indigestion may also occur in about 6 percent of patients. These side effects are temporary and lessen over several weeks. You should take metformin with meals to avoid these adverse reactions. Chewing gum may also alleviate nausea and stomach pain. The extended release form of metformin causes less gastrointestinal side effects than the immediate release. You should speak with a physician if you experience these side effects and discuss the option of switching to the extended release drug or reducing the dose. Headaches are common side effects that may occur in about 6 percent of individuals, reports the “Drug Information Handbook.” Metformin may also lead to dizziness and lightheadedness in about 5 percent of patients. Weakness may be present in up to 9 percent of individuals. Use caution while driving or performing activities that require alertness until you know how t Continue reading >>

Metformin And Nausea - Want To Quit Taking The Med

Metformin And Nausea - Want To Quit Taking The Med

Metformin and nausea - want to quit taking the med I felt that way about a month ago when I went from 500 to 1000, though I didn't have the vomiting. I was so frustrated. My nurse told me to be sure to take the pills mid-meal and not at the end of my meal, so I started doing that. Peppermints helped with the nausea, and I temporarily cut back a little on complex carbs. It got better after another week or two, but I still find the mint to help if I am feeling a little green. Does your medical clinic have an online messaging system? Mine does, so I can send my doctor a secure message and a nurse will answer if she is out. Metformin causes depletion of vitamin B12 just for starters. Many people complain of GI problems when taking this medication. The dose may be too much for your physiology. Talk with your pharmacist and the doctor. Actos is a cause of bladder cancer so be very aware of this risk. Byetta and Januvia also have very serious side effects. You can learn more by looking up these drugs at rxlist.com. I hope your doctor explained the risks to you as they are required to do so by law. Avoid aspartame and splenda in any products because these interact with the drugs and contribute to problems. Many years ago I tried the regular Metformin and could not tolerate it due to severe diarrhea. My doctor told me never to take it again. When I was in the hospital a few years ago because my sugar was so high, a family practice doctor suggested the extended release Metformin, which came out long after I had tried the regular one. I tried it. I got nauseous and had to increase it very gradually. I now take 1000 mg in the morning and 1000 mg at dinner, always with food, and tolerate it just fine. Talk to your doctor. There are other options. You do not need to be nauseous. The Continue reading >>

Late Developing Nausea With Metformin

Late Developing Nausea With Metformin

Summary: Metformin is an extremely common medication used to control diabetes but it can have side effects. The most serious and extremely rare side effect is lactic acidosis which can be life threatening. Other common side effects include diarrhea, nausea and vomiting. Dear Curtis: Im a type 2 diabetic and Ive been on metformin for 3 months now. Last month I started to get nausea and a heavy type of arm pain. In addition, Im pretty tired every morning. The nausea seemed to pop up about an hour after I took metformin. At first I thought I might be pregnant but my test came back negative. I asked around and it sounds like it could be the metformin causing the stomach problems, but why did it take so long to show up? Also, is there any relationship to metformin and the type of arm pain Im describing? Ill take your problems as you list them. First, the nausea. Yes, it is most likely metformin causing the nausea. In fact, in studies on metformin nearly 26% of patients taking the drug experienced either nausea or vomiting. This was 3 times higher than the control group who took a sugar pill. As far as why it managed to just show up now I dont have a definitive answer. But, let me ask a few things: Were you taking metformin differently before? Were you taking it with food or at a different time of day and then you started experiencing side effects? Did you start taking another drug with metformin even anything over-the-counter? How about your habits? Are you drinking more alcohol now, than before? In short, theres a lot of little things I would need to know to pinpoint why, all of the sudden, youre starting to experience this gastrointestinal side effect of metformin. Finally, many people are just different when it comes to drugs. Some people would have got that side effect Continue reading >>

Fortamet Side Effects Center

Fortamet Side Effects Center

Fortamet (metformin hydrochloride) is an oral diabetes medicine for people with type 2 (non-insulin-dependent) diabetes. Metformin is sometimes used in combination with insulin or other medications, but it is not for treating type 1 diabetes. Fortamet is available in generic form. Common side effects of Fortamet include headache, muscle pain, nausea, vomiting, stomach upset or pain, diarrhea, gas, weakness, or a metallic taste in the mouth. Fortamet does not usually cause low blood sugar (hypoglycemia). Low blood sugar may occur if Fortamet is prescribed with other anti-diabetic medications. Symptoms of low blood sugar include sudden sweating, shaking, fast heartbeat, hunger, blurred vision, dizziness, or tingling hands/feet. Tell your doctor if you experience serious side effects of Fortamet including shortness of breath, swelling or rapid weight gain, fever, body aches, or flu symptoms. Fortamet should be taken once daily. Dosage is individualized based on effectiveness and tolerance. The maximum recommended daily dose is 2500 mg. Hyperglycemia (high blood sugar) may result if you take Fortamet with drugs that raise blood sugar, such as: isoniazid, diuretics (water pills), steroids, phenothiazines, thyroid medicine, birth control pills and other hormones, seizure medicines, and diet pills, or medicines to treat asthma, colds or allergies. Hypoglycemia (low blood sugar) may result if you take Fortamet with drugs that lower blood sugar, such as: alcohol, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), aspirin or other salicylates, sulfa drugs, monoamine oxidase inhibitors (MAOIs), beta-blockers, or probenecid. It may also interact with furosemide, nifedipine, cimetidine or ranitidine, amiloride or triamterene, digoxin, morphine, procainamide, quinidine, trimethoprim, or Continue reading >>

Metformin (glucophage) Side Effects & Complications

Metformin (glucophage) Side Effects & Complications

The fascinating compound called metformin was discovered nearly a century ago. Scientists realized that it could lower blood sugar in an animal model (rabbits) as early as 1929, but it wasn’t until the late 1950s that a French researcher came up with the name Glucophage (roughly translated as glucose eater). The FDA gave metformin (Glucophage) the green light for the treatment of type 2 diabetes in 1994, 36 years after it had been approved for this use in Britain. Uses of Generic Metformin: Glucophage lost its patent protection in the U.S. in 2002 and now most prescriptions are filled with generic metformin. This drug is recognized as a first line treatment to control blood sugar by improving the cells’ response to insulin and reducing the amount of sugar that the liver makes. Unlike some other oral diabetes drugs, it doesn’t lead to weight gain and may even help people get their weight under control. Starting early in 2000, sales of metformin (Glucophage) were challenged by a new class of diabetes drugs. First Avandia and then Actos challenged metformin for leadership in diabetes treatment. Avandia later lost its luster because it was linked to heart attacks and strokes. Sales of this drug are now miniscule because of tight FDA regulations. Actos is coming under increasing scrutiny as well. The drug has been banned in France and Germany because of a link to bladder cancer. The FDA has also required Actos to carry its strictest black box warning about an increased risk of congestive heart failure brought on by the drug. Newer diabetes drugs like liraglutide (Victoza), saxagliptin (Onglyza) and sitagliptin (Januvia) have become very successful. But metformin remains a mainstay of diabetes treatment. It is prescribed on its own or sometimes combined with the newer d Continue reading >>

Relief For Diabetes Stomach Pain

Relief For Diabetes Stomach Pain

Managing diabetes often brings changes in what we eat and the medications we take. You may also notice some changes in how your gut, or gastrointestinal (GI) tract, feels, sounds, and responds. Changes in eating You are likely making changes in eating habits, including more foods rich in fiber, such as fruits, vegetables, and beans. Fiber can be filling without adding unwanted calories, and it can help improve abnormal cholesterol levels. But there may be a few uh-ohs if you rapidly increase the amount you eat. "Gas and bloating are a side effect of fiber," says Judith Wylie-Rosett, Ed.D., R.D., professor of health promotion and nutrition research at Albert Einstein College of Medicine in Bronx, New York. "Increasing your intake gradually may help." She suggests adding legumes, such as beans and lentils, to increase dietary fiber. "Throwing out the water you soak them in and giving them an extra rinse before cooking may also help decrease the gas and bloating," she says. Glucose-lowering meds Several prescription medications used to lower blood glucose levels in type 2 diabetes can stir up your gut. Experts tend to suggest that you start with a low dose and slowly increase it based on your provider's instructions. Metformin Metformin, the typical starting medication in type 2 diabetes to bring blood glucose levels in range, can lead to heartburn, nausea, or diarrhea. Ralph DeFronzo, M.D., professor of medicine and chief of the diabetes division at the University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, says, "I try to use metformin in all of my patients who have type 2 diabetes. When there is a problem, it is diarrhea and abdominal discomfort. There are 5-10 percent of people who just can't tolerate it." Typically, metformin is started at a low dose and increased Continue reading >>

Metformin Side Effects

Metformin Side Effects

For the Consumer Applies to metformin: oral solution, oral tablet, oral tablet extended release Along with its needed effects, metformin may cause some unwanted effects. Although not all of these side effects may occur, if they do occur they may need medical attention. Check with your doctor immediately if any of the following side effects occur while taking metformin: More common Abdominal or stomach discomfort cough or hoarseness decreased appetite diarrhea fast or shallow breathing fever or chills general feeling of discomfort lower back or side pain muscle pain or cramping painful or difficult urination sleepiness Less common Anxiety blurred vision chest discomfort cold sweats coma confusion cool, pale skin depression difficult or labored breathing dizziness fast, irregular, pounding, or racing heartbeat or pulse feeling of warmth headache increased hunger increased sweating nausea nervousness nightmares redness of the face, neck, arms, and occasionally, upper chest seizures shakiness shortness of breath slurred speech tightness in the chest unusual tiredness or weakness Rare Behavior change similar to being drunk difficulty with concentrating drowsiness lack or loss of strength restless sleep unusual sleepiness Some side effects of metformin may occur that usually do not need medical attention. These side effects may go away during treatment as your body adjusts to the medicine. Also, your health care professional may be able to tell you about ways to prevent or reduce some of these side effects. Check with your health care professional if any of the following side effects continue or are bothersome or if you have any questions about them: More common Acid or sour stomach belching bloated excess air or gas in the stomach or intestines full feeling heartburn indiges Continue reading >>

Metformin

Metformin

Metformin may rarely cause a serious, life-threatening condition called lactic acidosis. Tell your doctor if you have kidney disease. Your doctor will probably tell you not to take metformin. Also, tell your doctor if you are over 65 years old and if you have ever had a heart attack; stroke; diabetic ketoacidosis (blood sugar that is high enough to cause severe symptoms and requires emergency medical treatment); a coma; or heart or liver disease. Taking certain other medications with metformin may increase the risk of lactic acidosis. Tell your doctor if you are taking acetazolamide (Diamox), dichlorphenamide (Keveyis), methazolamide, topiramate (Topamax, in Qsymia), or zonisamide (Zonegran). Tell your doctor if you have recently had any of the following conditions, or if you develop them during treatment: serious infection; severe diarrhea, vomiting, or fever; or if you drink much less fluid than usual for any reason. You may have to stop taking metformin until you recover. If you are having surgery, including dental surgery, or any major medical procedure, tell the doctor that you are taking metformin. Also, tell your doctor if you plan to have any x-ray procedure in which dye is injected, especially if you drink or have ever drunk large amounts of alcohol or have or have had liver disease or heart failure. You may need to stop taking metformin before the procedure and wait 48 hours to restart treatment. Your doctor will tell you exactly when you should stop taking metformin and when you should start taking it again. If you experience any of the following symptoms, stop taking metformin and call your doctor immediately: extreme tiredness, weakness, or discomfort; nausea; vomiting; stomach pain; decreased appetite; deep and rapid breathing or shortness of breath; dizzi Continue reading >>

Pcos: Insulin And Metformin

Pcos: Insulin And Metformin

Young women with PCOS often have elevated insulin levels and are more likely to develop diabetes. Metformin is a medication often prescribed for women with PCOS to help prevent diabetes. A lifestyle that includes healthy nutrition and daily exercise is the most important part of a PCOS treatment plan. What is insulin? Insulin is a hormone made by an organ in the body called the pancreas. The food you eat is broken down into simple sugar (glucose) during digestion. Glucose is absorbed into the blood after you eat. Insulin helps glucose enter the cells of the body to be used as energy. If there’s not enough insulin in the body, or if the body can’t use the insulin, sugar levels in the blood become higher. What is insulin resistance? If your body is resistant to insulin, it means you need high levels of insulin to keep your blood sugar normal. Certain medical conditions such as being overweight or having PCOS can cause insulin resistance. Insulin resistance tends to run in families. What can insulin resistance do to me? High insulin levels can cause thickening and darkening of the skin (acanthosis nigricans) on the back of the neck, axilla (under the arms), and groin area. In young women with PCOS, high insulin levels can cause the ovaries to make more androgen hormones such as testosterone. This can cause increased body hair, acne, and irregular or few periods. Having insulin resistance can increase your risk of developing diabetes. How can I lower my insulin levels? You can help lower your insulin levels naturally by eating fewer starches and sugars, and more foods that are high in fiber and low in refined carbohydrates. Low glycemic foods, on the other hand, don’t raise your blood sugar or insulin levels as much as foods that are high in sugar or refined carbohydr Continue reading >>

Metformin Er And Nausea - After Years?

Metformin Er And Nausea - After Years?

Friend T2 since 1991; just got serious about it Jan. '07 I've been on metformin since before there was the generic version -- years and years in other words. I never had any gastric problems with it, even at the very first. Over the past few years, though, I've developed a cyclical problem of waking up at 2:00-4:00 AM, nauseous and sometimes actively sick. Long story short, it's been diagnosed as idiopathic, meaning they don't know what's causing it. It doesn't happen every night, thank GOD, but it goes in cycles. I'll have a few weeks where I'll wake up with it more nights than I don't, then several weeks where it doesn't bother me at all. I haven't been able to associate it with any particular food, specifically or generally. One doctor said it was probably related to peri-menopause and I should just ride it out, that it was probably due to random adrenaline rushes while I was asleep; I checked around online and did see that can be a problem for some women, and it did in fact start around the time I crossed into undeniable peri-menopause , so I toughed it out for awhile without giving it much more thought as to what could be causing it. (I do have an annual appointment with my GYN next month and will ask him about it too.) It came and went. At the end of 2005 I saw a gastroenterologist who did an endoscopy (camera down the gullet) and saw nothing amiss. He did an ultrasound of my gall-bladder area because I was also having stomach pain - again, everything looked okay. I'd been on an proton pump inhibitor once in the past (like Nexium but a different one) and he put me back on it every day. This past fall I had a full abdominal ultrasound from my stomach to my bladder -- nothing seen that would explain it. Then last night, as I was taking my metformin ER (500mg x 4 = Continue reading >>

Side Effects Of Metformin: What You Should Know

Side Effects Of Metformin: What You Should Know

Metformin is a prescription drug used to treat type 2 diabetes. It belongs to a class of medications called biguanides. People with type 2 diabetes have blood sugar (glucose) levels that rise higher than normal. Metformin doesn’t cure diabetes. Instead, it helps lower your blood sugar levels to a safe range. Metformin needs to be taken long-term. This may make you wonder what side effects it can cause. Metformin can cause mild and serious side effects, which are the same in men and women. Here’s what you need to know about these side effects and when you should call your doctor. Find out: Can metformin be used to treat type 1 diabetes? » Metformin causes some common side effects. These can occur when you first start taking metformin, but usually go away over time. Tell your doctor if any of these symptoms are severe or cause a problem for you. The more common side effects of metformin include: heartburn stomach pain nausea or vomiting bloating gas diarrhea constipation weight loss headache unpleasant metallic taste in mouth Lactic acidosis The most serious side effect metformin can cause is lactic acidosis. In fact, metformin has a boxed warning about this risk. A boxed warning is the most severe warning from the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). Lactic acidosis is a rare but serious problem that can occur due to a buildup of metformin in your body. It’s a medical emergency that must be treated right away in the hospital. See Precautions for factors that raise your risk of lactic acidosis. Call your doctor right away if you have any of the following symptoms of lactic acidosis. If you have trouble breathing, call 911 right away or go to the nearest emergency room. extreme tiredness weakness decreased appetite nausea vomiting trouble breathing dizziness lighthea Continue reading >>

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