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Nausea And Diabetes

Diabetes And Nausea

Diabetes And Nausea

Diabetes can be associated with an increased risk of nausea. There are several reasons why a diabetic might have more nausea when compared to those without diabetes. Some things that contribute to nausea in diabetics include the following: Diabetic medications. Some of the injectable medications used in the management of diabetes will increase the risk of nausea. Common injectable diabetic medications include Symlin (pramlintide), Victoza (liraglutide), and Byetta (exenatide). There is some evidence to suggest that the nausea associated with these medications is temporary and will go away the longer you take the medications. Your physician may also try a lesser dose of the medication in the beginning to try and lessen the risk of nausea. Hypoglycemia or Hyperglycemia. Both elevated blood glucose levels (hyperglycemia) and low blood glucose levels (hypoglycemia) carry the risk of developing nausea. In order to reduce the incidence of nausea, you need to check your blood glucose levels on a regular basis and use insulin (or other diabetic medications) to keep your blood sugar within the normal range. Besides medications for blood sugar control, you can avoid the nausea of blood glucose abnormalities, you need to eat a healthy diet and exercise—both surefire ways of controlling the blood sugar levels. One other thing you can do is avoid doing any type of exercise when the environment is too hot or too cold. Drink cold water or electrolyte solution while exercising outdoors in order to maintain adequate hydration and to keep your blood sugars in good control. Diabetic ketoacidosis. One of the signs that you might have diabetic ketoacidosis is the presence of nausea. Diabetic ketoacidosis happens when the blood sugar cannot enter the cells so that the cells of the body mus Continue reading >>

6 Emergency Complications Of Type 2 Diabetes

6 Emergency Complications Of Type 2 Diabetes

People with type 2 diabetes are at increased risk of many serious health problems, including heart attack, stroke, vision loss, and amputation. But by keeping your diabetes in check — that means maintaining good blood sugar control — and knowing how to recognize a problem and what to do about it should one occur, you can prevent many of these serious complications of diabetes. Heart Attack Heart disease and stroke are the top causes of death and disability in people with diabetes. Heart attack symptoms may appear suddenly or be subtle, with only mild pain and discomfort. If you experience any of the following heart attack warning signs, call 911 immediately: Chest discomfort that feels like pressure, squeezing, fullness, or pain in the center of your chest, lasting for a short time or going away and returning Pain elsewhere, including the back, jaw, stomach, or neck; or pain in one or both arms Shortness of breath Nausea or lightheadedness Stroke If you suddenly experience any of the following stroke symptoms, call 911 immediately. As with a heart attack, immediate treatment can be the difference between life and death. Stroke warning signs may include: Sudden numbness or weakness in the face, arm, or leg, especially if it occurs on one side of the body Feeling confused Difficulty walking and talking and lacking coordination Developing a severe headache for no apparent reason Nerve Damage People with diabetes are at increased risk of nerve damage, or diabetic neuropathy, due to uncontrolled high blood sugar. Nerve damage associated with type 2 diabetes can cause a loss of feeling in your feet, which makes you more vulnerable to injury and infection. You may get a blister or cut on your foot that you don't feel and, unless you check your feet regularly, an infection Continue reading >>

Diabetes Mellitus Type 2 In Adults

Diabetes Mellitus Type 2 In Adults

What is it? Diabetes (di-uh-BE-tez) is also called diabetes mellitus (MEL-i-tus). There are three main types of diabetes. You have type 2 diabetes. It may be called non-insulin dependent or adult onset diabetes. With type 2 diabetes, your body has trouble using insulin. Your body may also not make enough insulin. If there is not enough insulin or if it is not working right, sugar will build up in your blood. Type 2 diabetes is more common in overweight people who are older than 40 years and are not active. Type 2 diabetes is also being found more often in children who are overweight. There is no cure for diabetes but you can have a long and active life if your diabetes is controlled. How did I get type 2 diabetes? Insulin (IN-sul-in) is a hormone (a special body chemical) made by your pancreas (PAN-kree-us). The pancreas is an organ that lies behind the stomach. Much of the food you eat is turned into sugar in your stomach. This sugar goes into your blood and travels to the cells of your body to be used for energy. Insulin acts as a "key" to help sugar enter the cells. If there is not enough insulin or if it is not working right, sugar will build up in your blood. With type 2 diabetes, you may have better control of your diabetes with the right diet and exercise. You may also need to take oral medicine (pills) to help your body make more insulin or to use insulin better. You may also need insulin shots. No one knows for sure what causes type 2 diabetes. Type 2 diabetes runs in families. You are more likely to get it if someone else in your family has type 2 diabetes. You are also more likely to get type 2 diabetes if you are overweight. Being overweight makes it harder for your body to use the insulin it makes. This is called insulin resistance. In insulin resistance, y Continue reading >>

Diabetes And The Gastrointestinal Tract

Diabetes And The Gastrointestinal Tract

Gastrointestinal (GI) disorders are common among all people, including those affected by diabetes. At some point in any patient's life, the chances that he or she will develop a GI tract problem, be it peptic ulcer disease, gallstones, irritable bowel syndrome, food poisoning, or some other malady, are extremely high. As many as 75% of patients visiting diabetes clinics will report significant GI symptoms. The entire GI tract can be affected by diabetes from the oral cavity and esophagus to the large bowel and anorectal region. Thus, the symptom complex that may be experienced can vary widely. Common complaints may include dysphagia, early satiety, reflux, constipation, abdominal pain, nausea, vomiting, and diarrhea. Many patients go undiagnosed and under-treated because the GI tract has not been traditionally associated with diabetes and its complications. Both acute and chronic hyperglycemia can lead to specific GI complications. Diabetes is a systemic disease that may affect many organ systems, and the GI tract is no exception. As with other complications of diabetes, the duration of the disorder and poor glycemic control seem to be associated with more severe GI problems. Patients with a history of retinopathy, nephropathy, or neuropathy should be presumed to have GI abnormalities until proven otherwise, and this is best determined by asking a few simple questions. (See "Patient Information".) Many GI complications of diabetes seem to be related to dysfunction of the neurons supplying the enteric nervous system. Just as the nerves in the feet may be affected in peripheral neuropathy, involvement of the intestinal nerves may lead to enteric neuropathy. This is a type of autonomic or "involuntary" neuropathy and may lead to abnormalities in intestinal motility, sensat Continue reading >>

Nausea And Vomiting

Nausea And Vomiting

Tweet Most, if not all of us will be familiar with the feeling of nausea, which is basically the feeling of needing to be sick, felt in the stomach area. Both nausea and vomiting can be a sign of a number of underlying health conditions, including diabetes. When there is an issue that can affect the stomach or gastric system of their body, people can feel sick. Even if it is a fairly tenuous connection, such as angina affecting blood flow, the sufferer may still feel queasy. Causes of nausea Both type 1 diabetes and type 2 diabetes can cause nausea or vomiting in several ways. Hyperglycemia and Hypoglycemia As the blood glucose levels rise and fall, the body's metabolism can get interrupted and confused which can lead to a mixed feeling of nausea. Low blood pressure (Hypotension) Low blood pressure often leads to dizzy spells which, for some people, can induce a feeling of nausea as the world appears to spin around them. Certain medications The side effect of a lot of drugs is a feeling of nausea, and even vomiting. Metformin, the most widely used diabetes drug, is known to have nauseating side effects. Gastroparesis Due to neuropathy, the body may not be able to move food from the stomach or along the intestines. This can cause a back log of food, which can result in sickness. Bezoars Bezoars are stone like formations created from undigested food matter, which can block the gastro-intestinal track and stop food processing and digesting. This can eventually cause nausea and vomiting. When to see your doctor If you are having recurrent or consistent bouts of nausea or vomiting, then it is a good idea to go and see your doctor to get the issue sorted as soon as possible. Keeping a diary of nausea or vomiting episodes and what you ate or were doing beforehand may help the Continue reading >>

Early Symptoms Of Diabetes

Early Symptoms Of Diabetes

How can you tell if you have diabetes? Most early symptoms are from higher-than-normal levels of glucose, a kind of sugar, in your blood. The warning signs can be so mild that you don't notice them. That's especially true of type 2 diabetes. Some people don't find out they have it until they get problems from long-term damage caused by the disease. With type 1 diabetes, the symptoms usually happen quickly, in a matter of days or a few weeks. They're much more severe, too. Both types of diabetes have some of the same telltale warning signs. Hunger and fatigue. Your body converts the food you eat into glucose that your cells use for energy. But your cells need insulin to bring the glucose in. If your body doesn't make enough or any insulin, or if your cells resist the insulin your body makes, the glucose can't get into them and you have no energy. This can make you more hungry and tired than usual. Peeing more often and being thirstier. The average person usually has to pee between four and seven times in 24 hours, but people with diabetes may go a lot more. Why? Normally your body reabsorbs glucose as it passes through your kidneys. But when diabetes pushes your blood sugar up, your kidneys may not be able to bring it all back in. This causes the body to make more urine, and that takes fluids. You'll have to go more often. You might pee out more, too. Because you're peeing so much, you can get very thirsty. When you drink more, you'll also pee more. Dry mouth and itchy skin. Because your body is using fluids to make pee, there's less moisture for other things. You could get dehydrated, and your mouth may feel dry. Dry skin can make you itchy. Blurred vision. Changing fluid levels in your body could make the lenses in your eyes swell up. They change shape and lose their a Continue reading >>

Hyperglycemia In Diabetes

Hyperglycemia In Diabetes

Print Overview High blood sugar (hyperglycemia) affects people who have diabetes. Several factors can contribute to hyperglycemia in people with diabetes, including food and physical activity choices, illness, nondiabetes medications, or skipping or not taking enough glucose-lowering medication. It's important to treat hyperglycemia, because if left untreated, hyperglycemia can become severe and lead to serious complications requiring emergency care, such as a diabetic coma. In the long term, persistent hyperglycemia, even if not severe, can lead to complications affecting your eyes, kidneys, nerves and heart. Symptoms Hyperglycemia doesn't cause symptoms until glucose values are significantly elevated — above 200 milligrams per deciliter (mg/dL), or 11 millimoles per liter (mmol/L). Symptoms of hyperglycemia develop slowly over several days or weeks. The longer blood sugar levels stay high, the more serious the symptoms become. However, some people who've had type 2 diabetes for a long time may not show any symptoms despite elevated blood sugars. Early signs and symptoms Recognizing early symptoms of hyperglycemia can help you treat the condition promptly. Watch for: Frequent urination Increased thirst Blurred vision Fatigue Headache Later signs and symptoms If hyperglycemia goes untreated, it can cause toxic acids (ketones) to build up in your blood and urine (ketoacidosis). Signs and symptoms include: Fruity-smelling breath Nausea and vomiting Shortness of breath Dry mouth Weakness Confusion Coma Abdominal pain When to see a doctor Call 911 or emergency medical assistance if: You're sick and can't keep any food or fluids down, and Your blood glucose levels are persistently above 240 mg/dL (13 mmol/L) and you have ketones in your urine Make an appointment with your Continue reading >>

Vomiting, Nausea, And Diarrhea – Adjusting Your Diabetes Medication

Vomiting, Nausea, And Diarrhea – Adjusting Your Diabetes Medication

Vomiting, nausea, and diarrhea are most commonly caused by bacterial or viral infections sometimes associated with flu-like illness. An essential part of treatment is to stop eating. Since you can certainly survive a few days without eating, this should pose no problem. But if you’re not eating, it makes sense to ask what dose of insulin or ISA you should take. Adjusting Your Diabetes Medication If you’re on one of the medication regimens described in this book, the answer is simple: you take the amount and type of medication that you’d normally take to cover the basal, or fasting, state and skip any doses that are intended to cover meals. If, for example, you ordinarily take detemir or glargine as basal insulin upon arising and at bedtime, and regular or lispro (or aspart or glulisine) insulin before meals, you’d continue the basal insulin and skip the preprandial regular or lispro for those meals you won’t be eating. Similarly, if you take an ISA on arising and/or at bedtime for the fasting state, and again to cover meals, you skip the doses for those meals that you do not plan to eat. In both of the above cases, it’s essential that the medications used for the fasting state continue at their full doses. This is in direct contradiction to traditional “sick day” treatment, but it’s a major reason why patients who carefully follow our regimens should not develop DKA or hyperosmolar coma when they are ill. Of course, if you’re vomiting, you won’t be able to keep down oral medication and this poses yet another problem. Remember, because infection and dehydration may each cause blood sugar to increase, you may need additional coverage for any blood sugar elevation. Such additional coverage should usually take the form of lispro insulin. This is one of Continue reading >>

Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) happens when your blood sugar is high and your insulin level is low. This imbalance in the body causes a build-up of ketones. Ketones are toxic. If DKA isn’t treated, it can lead to diabetic coma and even death. DKA mainly affects people who have type 1 diabetes. But it can also happen with other types of diabetes, including type 2 diabetes and gestational diabetes (during pregnancy). DKA is a very serious condition. If you have diabetes and think you may have DKA, contact your doctor or get to a hospital right away. The first symptoms to appear are usually: frequent urination. The next stage of DKA symptoms include: vomiting (usually more than once) confusion or trouble concentrating a fruity odor on the breath. The main cause of DKA is not enough insulin. A lack of insulin means sugar can’t get into your cells. Your cells need sugar for energy. This causes your body’s glucose levels to rise. To get energy, the body starts to burn fat. This process causes ketones to build up. Ketones can poison the body. High blood glucose levels can also cause you to urinate often. This leads to a lack of fluids in the body (dehydration). DKA can be caused by missing an insulin dose, eating poorly, or feeling stressed. An infection or other illness (such as pneumonia or a urinary tract infection) can also lead to DKA. If you have signs of infection (fever, cough, or sore throat), contact your doctor. You will want to make sure you are getting the right treatment. For some people, DKA may be the first sign that they have diabetes. When you are sick, you need to watch your blood sugar level very closely so that it doesn’t get too high or too low. Ask your doctor what your critical blood sugar level is. Most patients should watch their glucose levels c Continue reading >>

Is Diabetes Causing My Nausea?

Is Diabetes Causing My Nausea?

Nausea comes in many forms. Sometimes it can be mild and short-lived. Other times, it can be severe and last for a long time. For people with diabetes, nausea is a common complaint. It can even be a sign of a life-threatening condition that requires swift medical attention. 5 common causes of nausea Factors related to your diabetes may cause you to feel nausea. Medication Metformin (Glucophage) is one of the more common medications used to treat diabetes. Nausea is a potential side effect for people taking this medication. Taking metformin on an empty stomach may make nausea worse. Injectable medications used to treat diabetes, such as exenatide (Byetta), liraglutide (Victoza), and pramlintide (Symlin), may also cause nausea. The nausea may go away after extended use. Your doctor may also start you on a lower dosage to try to reduce or eliminate nausea. Hypo- and hyperglycemia Hyperglycemia (elevated blood sugar levels) or hypoglycemia (blood sugar levels that are too low) may cause nausea. Check your blood sugar and respond appropriately if you suspect abnormal blood sugar levels. To avoid hypo- and hyperglycemia, stick to your diabetes meal plan, monitor your blood sugar, and take your medication as prescribed. You should also avoid exercising in extreme temperatures and keep cool by drinking cold liquids during outside activities, advises Sheri Colberg, PhD, author, exercise physiologist, and expert on diabetes management. Diabetic ketoacidosis Severe nausea may be a sign of diabetic ketoacidosis. This is a dangerous medical condition that must be treated to avoid coma or even death. Symptoms include: nausea excessive thirst frequent urination abdominal pain weakness or fatigue shortness of breath confusion fruity-scented breath If you suspect diabetic ketoacidosis, Continue reading >>

Aarp's Health Tools

Aarp's Health Tools

There is no cure for gastroparesis, but there are things you can do tocontrol the symptoms. Try eating several small meals during the day instead of three large meals.Avoid lying down after meals. Instead, take a walk or sit. This will help withdigestion. Your doctor may also adjust your insulin dosage or recommend takinginsulin after a meal instead of before eating. People with uncontrolled diabetes have a higher chance of developing pancreatitis .Pancreatitis is a swelling and inflammation of the pancreas, and may causenausea. Vomiting, abdominal pain, and high triglyceride levels often accompanythe nausea. Maintaining a low-fat, healthy diet may help prevent or controlpancreatitis. Avoiding alcohol and smoking may also help. In an attempt to control blood sugars, many diabetics turn to artificialsweeteners and sugar alcohols to minimize their regular sugar intake. However,a common side of added sweeteners like xylitol is nausea, as well as other digestivesymptoms. When someone has more than one serving a day, the side effects may beamplified. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has compileda list of reactions to aspartame that includes nausea. If you have diabetes, nausea can be a sign of something more serious.Knowing the potential causes and how to treat or prevent this uncomfortableside effect is key to keeping your diabetes management on track. Written by: Juliann Schaefferon: Oct 30, 2017 This feature is for informational purposes only and should not be used to replace the care and information received from your health care provider. Please consult a health care professional with any health concerns you may have. Continue reading >>

All About Hypoglycemia (low Blood Sugar)

All About Hypoglycemia (low Blood Sugar)

Hypoglycemia refers to an abnormally low level of sugar, or glucose, in the blood. Hypoglycemia is not a disease in itself, it is a sign of a health problem. The brain uses a lot of energy and needs glucose to function. Because the brain cannot store or manufacture glucose, it needs a continuous supply. Signs of low blood sugar include hunger, trembling, heart racing, nausea, and sweating. Hypoglycemia is commonly linked with diabetes, but many other conditions can also cause low blood sugar. This article will discuss the causes, diagnosis, and treatment of hypoglycemia, and the difference between hypoglycemia and hyperglycemia. We will also look at how to prevent it. Here are some key points about hypoglycemia. More detail is in the main article. Hypoglycemia is not a disease but a symptom of another condition. Early symptoms include hunger, sweating, and trembling. A common cause is diabetes. Alcohol abuse and kidney disorders can also lower blood sugar levels. What is hypoglycemia? Hypoglycemia is a condition where there is not enough glucose, or sugar, in the blood. Levels of blood sugar are below 4 mmol/L (72mg/dL). Adults and children with mild hypoglycemia may experience the following early symptoms: hunger tremor or trembling sweating irritability a pale face heart palpitations accelerated heart rate tingling lips dizziness weakness Severe hypoglycemia is sometimes called diabetic shock. It may involve: concentration problems confusion irrational and disorderly behavior, similar to intoxication inability to eat or drink Complications If a person does not take action when symptoms of hypoclycemia appear, it can lead to: A person who regularly experiences hypoglycemia may become unaware that it is happening. They will not notice the warning signs, and this can lea Continue reading >>

Intractable Nausea And Vomiting Associated With Poor Glycaemic Control In A Patient With Type 1 Diabetes

Intractable Nausea And Vomiting Associated With Poor Glycaemic Control In A Patient With Type 1 Diabetes

Intractable nausea and vomiting associated with poor glycaemic control in a patient with type 1 diabetes Intractable nausea and vomiting associated with poor glycaemic control in a patient with type 1 diabetes BMJ 2016; 354 doi: (Published 17 August 2016) Cite this as: BMJ 2016;354:i4197 S Gururaj Setty,, consultant diabetologist and endocrinologist1, Marie-France Kong,, consultant diabetologist2 1department of diabetes and endocrinology, Northampton General Hospital, Northampton, UK 2department of diabetes and endocrinology, University Hospitals of Leicester NHS Trust, Leicester, UK Correspondence to: S G Setty sowmyagururaj{at}doctors.org.uk A 54 year old woman with type 1 diabetes was referred to the diabetes clinic with a four year history of nausea, early satiety, abdominal pain, and intermittent vomiting. In recent months she had experienced intractable nausea and vomiting, requiring frequent admission to hospital. Her glycaemic control was poor, with blood glucose readings in the high teens and frequent severe hypoglycaemic episodes after meals, when she needed help. She has had diabetes for 45 years, complicated by diabetic retinopathy, peripheral neuropathy, and nephropathy. She has had chronic back pain and depression. She was taking insulin glulisine (quick acting insulin) 15 units with meals and insulin glargine (long acting insulin) 26 units at bedtime. Her other drugs included lansoprazole, atorvastatin, zopiclone, gabapentin, metoclopramide (short term), zomorph, and lactulose. She weighed 68.6 kg and her body mass index was 28 kg/m2. Her blood pressure was 129/78 mm Hg, with no postural drop. Her injection sites were normal and systemic examination unremarkable. Her glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c) was 11.6% (103 mmol/mol), sodium 133 mmol/L (reference rang Continue reading >>

Could You Have Diabetes? 5 Hidden Symptoms Of Diabetes That Could Mean You're Suffering

Could You Have Diabetes? 5 Hidden Symptoms Of Diabetes That Could Mean You're Suffering

Thought the only sign of being diabetic is being overweight? Think again... Around 3.7 million people in the UK have diabetes, yet according to Diabetes UK, around 590,000 suffer - but they don't even know about it. And while diabetes - a lifelong condition - can be successfully managed once it’s diagnosed, delaying that diagnosis puts people at risk of serious complications, including amputation and blindness. This is a key concern for Type 2 diabetes, the type associated with weight which accounts for around 90% of all cases. Type 2 occurs when the body can no longer make enough insulin (a hormone produced by the pancreas which enables us to use sugar/glucose), or the insulin being produced isn’t doing its job properly. Type 1, on the other hand, has absolutely nothing to do with weight or lifestyle and tends to develop during childhood when a fault in the body causes insulin-producing cells to be destroyed. “The symptoms of Type 1 and Type 2 are very similar, however they tend to come on a lot quicker in Type 1, and you can end up very poorly and in hospital if not diagnosed straight away,” says Diabetes UK clinical advisor Libby Dowling. “Type 2 is a little different. A lot of people put the symptoms of Type 2 down to getting older, and the condition can sometimes go undiagnosed for up to 10 years, by which time complications could have started to develop.” [Read more: Diabetes Type 1 and Type 2 - Do you know the difference?] But, aside from increased thirst, needing to be more and tiredness, what are those symptoms? Play Video Play Mute Current Time 0:00 / Duration Time 0:00 Loaded: 0% 0:00 Progress: 0% 0:00 Progress: 0% Stream TypeLIVE Remaining Time -0:00 Playback Rate 1 Chapters Chapters descriptions off, selected Descriptions subtitles off, selected Continue reading >>

Nausea And Vomiting In The Diabetic Patient.

Nausea And Vomiting In The Diabetic Patient.

Abstract The nausea and vomiting that can complicate advanced diabetes is often attributed to impaired gastric motility. Not all patients with diabetic gastropathy show marked abnormality on gastric emptying studies, however. The mechanism remains uncertain, although cases complicated by a bezoar may respond to its removal. Prokinetic drugs may bring a measure of relief, albeit often temporary. Continue reading >>

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