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Natural Remedies For Diabetes And High Blood Pressure

Top 10 Natural Foods To Control High Blood Pressure

Top 10 Natural Foods To Control High Blood Pressure

17th May is globally celebrated as World Hypertension Day. Its a day dedicated towards understanding this silent killer better. High BP is one of the biggest health risks that faces the global population today. Some would say it's almost an epidemic. High blood pressure can cause countless problems like diabetes, stroke, heart disease, kidney failure and even death! Hypertension is an unusual condition which has almost no symptoms. The only way to catch it is to get your blood pressure checked regularly. If studies are to be believed, only one-third of all people know they suffer from high blood pressure. Blood pressure is measured in 'millimetres of mercury' (mm Hg) and is written as two separate numbers. The first number or the systolic number measures the pressure inside the arteries when heart muscles contract. The second number measures the pressure in the arteries when the muscle is resting between heartbeats. How high should your blood pressure be? According to the American Heart Association, 120/80 is considered to be the normal limit. The range between 120/80 - 140/90 is referred to as 'pre-hypertension' and anything over 140/90 should be addressed. It's important to note that one reading does not indicate that you suffer from high blood pressure. The numbers need to be steady overtime. Possible Causes for High Blood Pressure While the exact cause of hypertension remains unknown, a few facts have been identified by health experts are: excess consumption of salt, lack of exercise, an unhealthy diet and genetic predisposition. Other factors that increase the odds are: cigarette smoking, binge drinking, obesity and stress. A recent study pointed out that processed or canned food and drinks might also be contributing to this increase. How to Control High Blood Pres Continue reading >>

Got Diabetes And High Blood Pressure? 9 Diet Tips

Got Diabetes And High Blood Pressure? 9 Diet Tips

Two out of three people with diabetes also have high blood pressure. Keeping your diet in check -- counting carbs, limiting sugar, eating less salt -- is key. You can still eat well and manage your conditions with these easy tips. Since you have high blood pressure, you should get no more than 1,500 milligrams of sodium per day. That's less than a teaspoon. So retrain taste buds. Instead of reaching for the saltshaker, flavor food with citrus zest, garlic, rosemary, ginger, jalapeno peppers, oregano, or cumin. Cooking at home also helps. “If you’re eating something from a bag or box or off a restaurant menu, chances are you’re getting too much sodium,” says Janet Bond Brill, PhD, RD, author of Blood Pressure Down. To get in the habit of having a balanced diet, “visualize your plate as a clock,” says Amber L. Taylor, MD, who directs The Diabetes Center at Mercy Medical Center in Baltimore. Fill half your plate with fruits and vegetables. A quarter gets lean protein like baked fish, beans, or chicken. The last quarter holds grains, preferably whole, like brown rice. You’ll still need to count carbohydrates and make sure you're not getting too much sodium. Caffeine can raise your blood sugar and blood pressure. If you have higher blood sugar or blood pressure after drinking coffee, “limit your caffeine intake to 200 milligrams -- about 2 cups of coffee -- a day,” says Torey Jones Armul, RD, a spokeswoman for the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. Skip the French press or espresso and choose coffee made with a paper filter. The paper soaks up an oily compound in coffee beans called cafestol, which can hike up cholesterol. You can also consider switching to decaf. “Some research suggests it can reduce blood sugar,” Armul says. Continue reading >>

Treating High Blood Pressure And Diabetes

Treating High Blood Pressure And Diabetes

People with diabetes have an increased chance of developing high blood pressure, also known as hypertension. In fact, hypertension is twice as likely in people with diabetes as it is in people who don’t have diabetes. Almost 24 million people in the United States have diabetes — that’s about 8 percent of the entire population. And up to 60 percent of people with diabetes also have hypertension. Almost one-third of all those with high blood pressure and diabetes are unaware that they have hypertension, and 43 percent of those with diabetes who have high blood pressure go untreated. People with diabetes “are at higher risk for vascular disease, coronary artery disease, and cerebral vascular disease, which results in heart attacks and strokes," says Curtis Rimmerman, MD, staff cardiologist and echocardiographer at the Cleveland Clinic in Cleveland. "Oftentimes high blood pressure has a genetic component. Either way, controlling risk factors is important. There are [people with diabetes] who lead very healthy lifestyles and don't develop high blood pressure. But there's a tendency to be more overweight and more sedentary and have higher cholesterol levels, too." Gaining Control of Both Conditions It's very important to control hypertension because, like diabetes, it can lead to other health complications. If your blood travels through vessels with extra force due to hypertension, your heart must work harder and, as a result, your risks of cardiovascular diseases increase. The American Diabetes Association recommends aiming for blood pressure that's less than 130/80 mmHg (millimeters of mercury) if you have diabetes. “The lower the better," Dr. Rimmerman says. The Best Medicines for High Blood Pressure and Diabetes Having diabetes may also impact which hypertension Continue reading >>

Diabetes And High Blood Pressure

Diabetes And High Blood Pressure

If you have diabetes you should aim to keep your blood pressure well controlled. Having high blood pressure (hypertension) is one of several risk factors that can increase your chance of developing heart disease, a stroke and some other complications. Treatment includes a change in lifestyle risk factors where these can be improved. Many people with diabetes need to take medication to lower their blood pressure. How common is high blood pressure in people with diabetes? In the UK, about half of all people aged over 65, and about 1 in 4 of all middle-aged adults, have high blood pressure (hypertension). It is less common in younger adults. High blood pressure is more common in people with diabetes. Around 3 in 10 people with type 1 diabetes and around 8 in 10 people with type 2 diabetes develop high blood pressure at some stage. People with diabetes are more at risk of developing high blood pressure if they: Are of African-Caribbean origin. Are from the Indian sub-continent. Have a family history of high blood pressure. Have certain lifestyle factors - for example, those who: Are overweight. Eat a lot of salt. Do not eat much fruit and vegetables. Do not take much exercise. Drink a lot of alcohol. What is high blood pressure? This is not as simple to answer as it may seem. In general, the higher the blood pressure, the greater the risk to health. Depending on various factors, the level at which blood pressure is said to be high (hypertension) can vary from person to person. The cut-off point for blood pressure that is said to be high is 140/80 mm Hg or above for people with diabetes and 130/80 mm Hg for those with diabetes and complications (for example, kidney disease). These are lower than the cut-off point for people who do not have diabetes. Note: high blood pressure Continue reading >>

What Are Natural Treatments For Hypertension?

What Are Natural Treatments For Hypertension?

With time, treatment and lifestyle changes, your blood pressure (BP) may decrease to a healthier level and improve your chronic hypertension. You may need to have regular follow-up appointments with your healthcare provider to check your blood pressure and your condition. People with stage I hypertension are usually checked every two months. Those with stage II hypertension may need to be checked every month. If your BP gets very high, you will need help and treatment right away. There are several alternative treatments for pulmonary hypertension. Eating nutritious meals daily and getting a sufficient amount of rest will help with problems of fatigue. Oftentimes, even modest amounts of activity are still too much for some people with pulmonary hypertension. However, it is still important to get some form of physical activity in order to extend the quality of your life. Consult with your doctor about what kind of exercise is best for you. Other forms of alternative treatment for pulmonary hypertension include steering clear of stress, smoking, birth control pills, environments where the altitude is above 8,000 feet, and actions that lower your blood pressures, such resting in a sauna or hot tub or taking extended hot baths and showers. Many people take medicine to lower their blood pressure, but there are natural ways to bring it down even more, says Dr. Pina LoGiudice, a natural medicine expert and Dr. Oz Show guest. Watch the video to learn about drug-free remedies for high blood pressure. The Video Cloud video was not found. Blood pressure is a measurement of the pressure as the heart pumps and blood flows in the arteries. Cardiovascular exercise will help to strengthen the heart, slow down heart rate, and decrease pressure in the arteries. Additional tips include: Ma Continue reading >>

6 Best Tips To Lower Blood Pressure When You Have Diabetes

6 Best Tips To Lower Blood Pressure When You Have Diabetes

If you have diabetes, you’ve probably already started counting carbs and exercising more to keep your blood sugar stable. But you may be neglecting another, often silent problem that can go hand-in-hand with diabetes: high blood pressure. Also known as hypertension, the condition occurs in as many as two-thirds of people with diabetes. If you have both conditions and either is out of control, your risk of blood vessel damage increases, heightening the likelihood of complications like heart attack, stroke or kidney failure. If both conditions are unmanaged, the risk is even greater. Here are six suggestions to help keep your blood pressure in check. RELATED: Have Diabetes? Why You Need to Know Your Blood Pressure Numbers 1. Get up and move Exercise is an important part of any healthy lifestyle. It strengthens the heart and makes it pump more efficiently, so it is particularly critical if you have hypertension. To improve cardiovascular health and maintain your weight, try to get 150 minutes each week of aerobic activity. You want to spread this over at least three days, with no more than two consecutive days without exercise. This can include walking, cycling and swimming. 2. Eat fresh, natural foods If you find yourself struggling to figure out which foods in the grocery aisles have too much sodium, here’s a good tip to follow: Food in its natural state is best. Skip over processed foods and opt for fresh fruits and vegetables, whole grains and lean meats. 3. Reduce salt If you are planning to start a low-sodium diet (no more than 1,500 mg per day), the first step is to get rid of the salt shaker. In its place, use salt-free herbs, spices and other seasonings. It’s also important to watch for hidden sodium in the foods you eat. The following items are typically hi Continue reading >>

23 Natural Home Remedies To Lower High Blood Pressure (hypertension)

23 Natural Home Remedies To Lower High Blood Pressure (hypertension)

Now what? What exactly is hypertension? What caused this? There are many ways you can naturally lower high blood pressure. It can be modified by consistent diet, exercise and other lifestyle changes. According to the CDC, 29.1% of adults in the United States suffer from chronic high blood pressure (hypertension). Hypertension is one of the “silent killer diseases.” A silent killer is a disease that produces minor or no obvious symptoms, but can cause death if not taken care of. Other examples of silent killers are diabetes, heart disease, cancer, mesothelioma, obstructive sleep apnea, chronic viruses (Hepatitis B and C). Hypertension, if not treated, can lead to heart disease. Heart disease is the number one silent killer disease. According to the American Hearth Association (AHA), cardiovascular disease is the leading global cause of death today, which accounts for 17.3 millions death per year. What is High Blood Pressure (Hypertension)? Your blood pressure rises when your heart is forced to work extra hard. It can be raised temporarily and exasperated by anxiety and other stress factors. The medical term for chronic high blood pressure is hypertension. Hypertension can lead to damage of the heart or to the vascular system. It is important to keep your pressure within a normal range so that your entire body can efficiently receive fresh oxygenated blood. Every organ of the body needs oxygen in order to survive. Blood is pumped out of the heart and into the arteries. The blood then carries oxygen throughout the entire body. The deoxygenated blood returns to the heart to get re-oxygenated, and the cycle continues. When the arteries of the heart become damaged, they are not as flexible. This could be caused by plaque blockage, cholesterol build-up, or scarring. Untrea Continue reading >>

32 Home Remedies For Diabetes

32 Home Remedies For Diabetes

Each day in the United States, some 18 million people with diabetes walk a tightrope between too little sugar in the bloodstream and too much. Too little, which may come from a complication of medication, and they may quickly be overcome by dizziness, fatigue, headache, sweating, trembling, and, in severe cases, loss of consciousness and coma. Too much, which can happen after eating too much, especially if the person is older and overweight, and the person may experience weakness, fatigue, excessive thirst, labored breathing, and loss of consciousness. If diabetes is poorly controlled or left untreated, it may lead to blindness, kidney disease, blood vessel damage, infection, heart disease, nerve damage, high blood pressure, stroke, limb amputation, and coma. Because the initial symptoms (fatigue, weakness, frequent urination) are usually mild, about 30 percent of all people with diabetes do not realize that they have the disease. And that can have tragic consequences, because with early diagnosis and treatment, the chances of living a long and productive life are higher than if the disease creeps along until irreversible damage occurs. If you'd like some proof that diabetes is a disease you can live well with, consider the accomplishments of these prolific people with diabetes: jazz musician Dizzy Gillespie, singer Ella Fitzgerald, actress Mary Tyler Moore, and baseball Hall-of-Famer Jim "Catfish" Hunter. Even before treatment was as sophisticated as it is today, author Ernest Hemingway and inventor Thomas Edison, both of whom had diabetes, managed to leave their marks on the world. If you are one of the lucky ones whose diabetes has been diagnosed by a doctor, you probably have some idea of what has gone awry in your body. Basically, the disorder stems from a malfunct Continue reading >>

10 Ways To Control High Blood Pressure Without Medication

10 Ways To Control High Blood Pressure Without Medication

By making these 10 lifestyle changes, you can lower your blood pressure and reduce your risk of heart disease. If you've been diagnosed with high blood pressure, you might be worried about taking medication to bring your numbers down. Lifestyle plays an important role in treating your high blood pressure. If you successfully control your blood pressure with a healthy lifestyle, you might avoid, delay or reduce the need for medication. Here are 10 lifestyle changes you can make to lower your blood pressure and keep it down. 1. Lose extra pounds and watch your waistline Blood pressure often increases as weight increases. Being overweight also can cause disrupted breathing while you sleep (sleep apnea), which further raises your blood pressure. Weight loss is one of the most effective lifestyle changes for controlling blood pressure. Losing just 10 pounds (4.5 kilograms) can help reduce your blood pressure. Besides shedding pounds, you generally should also keep an eye on your waistline. Carrying too much weight around your waist can put you at greater risk of high blood pressure. In general: Men are at risk if their waist measurement is greater than 40 inches (102 centimeters). Women are at risk if their waist measurement is greater than 35 inches (89 centimeters). These numbers vary among ethnic groups. Ask your doctor about a healthy waist measurement for you. 2. Exercise regularly Regular physical activity — at least 30 minutes most days of the week — can lower your blood pressure by 4 to 9 millimeters of mercury (mm Hg). It's important to be consistent because if you stop exercising, your blood pressure can rise again. If you have slightly high blood pressure (prehypertension), exercise can help you avoid developing full-blown hypertension. If you already have hyp Continue reading >>

Herbs To Lower Blood Pressure

Herbs To Lower Blood Pressure

Many adults around the world deal with hypertension, also called high blood pressure. There are ways to treat the condition, including lifestyle changes or medications. If you’re thinking of trying herbs for medical reasons, whether it’s the whole herb or a supplement, speak to your doctor first. Some herbs, especially in large quantities, may produce undesirable side effects or interfere with other medications. Read on to learn more about herbs and the research surrounding them. Basil is a delicious herb that goes well in a variety of foods. It also might help lower your blood pressure. Extract of basil has been shown to lower blood pressure, although only briefly. Adding fresh basil to your diet is easy and certainly can’t hurt. Keep a small pot of the herb in your kitchen garden and add the fresh leaves to pastas, soups, salads, and casseroles. Cinnamon is another tasty seasoning that requires little effort to include in your daily diet, and it may bring your blood pressure numbers down. Consuming cinnamon every day may lower blood pressure in people with diabetes, according to a paper in the Journal of Clinical Nutrition. Include more cinnamon in your diet by sprinkling it on your breakfast cereal, oatmeal, and even in your coffee. At dinner, cinnamon enhances the flavor of stir-fries, curries, and stews. Cardamom is a seasoning that comes from India and is often used in South Asian cuisine. A study investigating the health effects of cardamom found that participants saw significant reductions in their blood pressure readings after taking daily cardamom for several months. You can include cardamom seeds or powder in spice rubs, soups and stews, and even baked goods for a special flavor and a positive health benefit. Read more: The health potential of cardamom Continue reading >>

Top 10 Effective Home Remedies For High Blood Pressue

Top 10 Effective Home Remedies For High Blood Pressue

High blood pressure is a common condition. It is estimated that nearly 40% of the world’s population suffers from blood pressure related disorders. High blood pressure is a risk factor for coronary heart disease, hemorrhagic stroke and ischaemia. Most of us believe that conditions such as high blood pressure are only caused with the passing of age, or as a result of other medical conditions like pregnancy or otherwise. The reality is different. There are other reasons that can bring about an increase in your blood pressure levels. I Am Just 25; Do I Have To Worry About Blood Pressure? This is a question many pose today, and the answer is a big yes! High blood pressure is more prevalent in adults above 35. However, today’s unhealthy diets and eating habits, combined with an inactive lifestyle and busy schedules can result in high blood pressure affecting teens and even adolescents. What Does High BP Lead To? High blood pressure can lead to a host of other medical conditions. High blood pressure increases the strain on the heart muscle and the pressure in the arteries. Due to this, a patient suffering from high blood pressure is susceptible to diseases that affect the arteries and suffers from hypertensive heart disease. Types of BP: High blood pressure, sometimes also referred to as hypertension, is a chronic disease that affects the blood pressure in the arteries. High blood pressure is generally characterized into two basic types, primary hypertension and secondary hypertension. 95% of cases in adult hypertension are categorized as primary. After the diagnosis of high blood pressure, a healthy lifestyle and home remedies can reduce your stress, discomfort and symptoms associated with high blood pressure. Are Home Remedies Effective for High Blood Pressure? If you o Continue reading >>

7 Simple Ways To Naturally Lower High Blood Pressure

7 Simple Ways To Naturally Lower High Blood Pressure

In the Black community, high blood pressure (HBP), also known as hypertension, is a common health condition to say the least. In fact, more than 40 percent of African Americans have HBP, according to the American Heart Association. Whether it’s a close relative or friend, if you’re African American, there’s a good chance that you know someone with HBP. Unfortunately, it’s considered the norm, but it doesn’t have to be that way at all. Higher rates of obesity and diabetes and plain ole genetics put African Americans at a higher risk for HBP. Not to be taken lightly, HBP that’s left untreated can lead to a stroke. If you take medication to help control your blood pressure, then by all means, continue following your doctor’s orders, but perhaps – just perhaps – the best medicine is a new, healthy lifestyle. The following suggestions can not only lower your blood pressure but reduce your need for medication. Keep reading to find out what they are. 1. Lose weight. Only do so if you’re overweight or obese. Need some convincing? Essentially, the more weight you lose, the better your blood pressure. Also, if you’re already taking medication(s) to treat your HBP, losing weight will help make those medications more effective. Join the conversation and share this story 2. Exercise often. We all know how chaotic life can be at times, but it’s important to squeeze in at least 30 minutes of physical activity every day or every other day. Exercising regularly can lower your blood pressure as much as 4-9 millimeters of mercury (mm Hg). 3. Change your diet. This means avoiding salty foods, including potato chips, French fries, pretzels, lunch meat and pasta sauce. Boosting your potassium intake and eating more fresh fruits and vegetables and low-fat dairy product Continue reading >>

20 Ways To Lower Your Blood Pressure Naturally

20 Ways To Lower Your Blood Pressure Naturally

What is high blood pressure? Nearly half of Americans have high blood pressure, according to new guidelines from the American Heart Association (AHA) and the American College of Cardiology. The guidelines, published in Hypertension, lower the threshold for what's considered high blood pressure from 140/80 mmHg to 130/80 mmHg. (Anything under 120/80 mmHg is considered normal blood pressure.) That change means about 14% more U.S. adults have high blood pressure than previously thought–and are now likely wondering how to lower their blood pressure. High blood pressure, also called hypertension, can be caused by lifestyle factors or by genetics—or, usually, a combination of both. It can be dangerous if left untreated, raising your risk for heart attack and stroke. For people who aren't able to bring their levels down naturally, blood pressure medication may be necessary. Of the 14% of Americans now considered to have high blood pressure, around one in five will need to be treated with meds, according to the AHA. But if your high blood pressure is a result of unhealthy habits, making some simple changes may help reduce—or even eliminate—your need for prescription drugs. With your doctor’s okay, give these home remedies for high blood pressure a try and see if they work for you. Continue reading >>

Blood Pressure Guidelines | 130 Is The New “high”

Blood Pressure Guidelines | 130 Is The New “high”

New blood pressure guidelines In newly published blood pressure guidelines,1 the American Heart Association, the American College of Cardiology, and nine other health organizations have agreed that high blood pressure, or hypertension, is now defined as 130 and higher for systolic blood pressure, or 80 and higher for diastolic blood pressure. It is a major change from the old definition of 140/90 and higher, and the first update to U.S. guidelines on blood pressure detection and treatment since 2003. “…definitely an improvement” “These new guidelines are definitely an improvement. As we have taught at the Pritikin Longevity Center for the last four decades, dramatic increases in heart attack and stroke risk do not begin with blood pressure readings of 140/90. They begin at much lower readings like 130/80,” states Seth Marquit, MD, Medical Director at Pritikin. In an American Heart Association news release, Paul K. Whelton, MD, lead author of the new guidelines, noted the dangers of blood pressure levels between 130-139/80-89: “You’ve already doubled your risk of cardiovascular complications compared to those with a normal level of blood pressure. We want to be straight with people – if you already have a doubling of risk, you need to know about it. It doesn’t mean you need medication, but it’s a yellow light that you need to be lowering your blood pressure, mainly with non-drug approaches.” The non-drug approaches recommended by Dr. Whelton and co-authors of the new guidelines are lifestyle-based, and include: Losing excess weight Launching a healthier diet, particularly one like the Pritikin Eating Plan that is plant-based and lowers sodium intake Exercising daily Drinking less alcohol Lowering stress “Lifestyle changes as the first line of ther Continue reading >>

Natural Remedies For High Blood Pressure

Natural Remedies For High Blood Pressure

What Is High Blood Pressure? High blood pressure is a moderately common health condition that happens when the force of your blood pushing against your arteries is high enough that it eventually causes heart problems and disease. Blood pressure is determined by the amount of blood that your heart is pumping compared to the resistance to blood flow in your arteries. Treating High Blood Pressure Holistically One of the simplest and most effective ways to lower blood pressure is to improve your diet. Improving your diet and increasing your daily exercise can help naturally and safely reduce blood pressure. You can also try combining that approach with taking a few herbal and nutritional supplements that can help treat high blood pressure. We’ve included 12 natural ways to help lower blood pressure without having to resort to prescription medications. 1. Reduce Stress The American Heart Association (AHA) reports that although stress isn’t a direct cause of heart disease, it’s a major contributing factor to higher blood pressure and reduced overall wellness. Check out our article here on reducing anxiety to get some easy natural ways you can help lower your blood pressure. Try to evaluate your priorities and cut out some of your excess activities. Also you can try deep breathing exercises, meditating, and yoga to help keep your life stress-free. 2. Eat Healthy Eating healthy is important to reducing high blood pressure and preventing hypertension. The National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute recommends a diet with plenty of fresh vegetables, fruits, fat-free and low-fat dairy, whole grains, fish, poultry, and beans. They also recommended to limit sodium, sweets, sugary beverages and red meat. 3. Exercise Regularly Keeping to a regiment of daily physical activity, clas Continue reading >>

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