diabetestalk.net

National Diabetes Week 2017 Australia

Welcome To Dfa Diabetes Week 2017

Welcome To Dfa Diabetes Week 2017

Welcome to DFA’s National Diabetes Week! National Diabetes Week 2017 kicks off today. Diabetic Foot Australia will highlight the growing burden of foot disease in people with diabetes throughout this week. DFA provides you with special updates that include the release of new information for our key stakeholders: patients, health professionals, researchers and industry. We’ve got a big week in store! Today we re-release our popular ‘Canberra’ infographic as a reminder of the scale & seriousness of the threat posed by Diabetic Foot Disease to the people of Australia. The infographic highlights some alarming statistics in light of recent Australian research: Total number of Australians with diabetic foot disease has increased from 300,000 to 380,000 people We now know that 4 people die daily as a result of diabetic foot disease Hospitalisations have increased hugely – previously there were 500-600 people in hospital each night, now nearly 1000 people are in hospital each night – which is the total capacity of Canberra’s hospitals We now know that the conservative cost of hospitalisations is approximately $1 million dollars PER DAY. Click HERE to download the updated infographic for free! To support our health professionals & researchers around the country we continue to drive our “What’s New in DFU” event series. These events offer the fantastic opportunity to learn more about the latest cutting edge research, treatments, technologies and practice in diabetic foot disease During Diabetes Week, DFA are delighted to also offer a 25% discount off our upcoming Queensland ‘What’s New’ Events. These events offer the fantastic opportunity to learn more about the latest cutting edge research, treatments, technologies and practice in diabetic foot disease. Continue reading >>

National Diabetes Week 2017

National Diabetes Week 2017

You're invited to participate in National Diabetes Week 2017 by helping to promote public awareness of all types of diabetes. More than 100,000 Queenslanders have type 2 diabetes but don't know it. Often, type 2 remains hidden for ten years or more and in many cases a diagnosis is made only after serious health complications begin to appear. In almost 60 per cent of cases, being informed about your risk of diabetes enables you to slow its advance. Early diagnosis can prevent the onset of serious diabetes-related complications that might otherwise lead to blindness, kidney disease or lower limb amputations. In clinical circles, this National Diabetes Week we will also be raising awareness about the sudden onset of type 1 diabetes and the danger that deadly diabetic keto-acidosis may result. We hope this National Diabetes Week will increase awareness about all types of diabetes. Queenslanders can join the campaign by using our type 2 diabetes risk assessment tool. Our key messages for National Diabetes Week 2017 are: There are more than 100,000 Queenslanders already living with diabetes who don't know it. Anyone can develop diabetes - you don't have to be old and you don't have to be overweight. Ways you can support National Diabetes Week: Raise awareness through social media using the hashtag #NDW17. Access our sociel media collateral The social media collateral includes four Western-based, #NDW2017 themed videos that you can use on your social media platforms, or embed in your website. We hope you will use the #NDW2017 Facebook cover on your Facebook throughout the week. We have several gifs that you can use either as standalone posts or alongside tweets and posts provided. Please participate in our #gogreenandgive fundraising campaign by wearing green and raising funds Continue reading >>

National Diabetes Week: 4,400 Reasons To Take Diabetes Seriously

National Diabetes Week: 4,400 Reasons To Take Diabetes Seriously

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples are about three times more likely to have diabetes , 10 times more likely to be admitted for diabetic foot complications and about 30 times more likely to have diabetes related lower limb amputations than non-Indigenous people (Australian Atlas of Health Care Variation). Key facts There are more than 4,400 amputations every year in Australia as a result of diabetes Every year there are 10,000 hospital admissions in Australia for diabetes-related foot ulcers – many of these admissions end with people having a limb, or part of a limb, amputated. People with diabetes hospitalised for lower limb amputation have longer stays in hospital than other diabetes-related complications. The average length of stay is around 24 days. Diabetic foot disease costs Australia around $875 million every single year. 85% of diabetes-related amputations are preventable if problems are detected early and managed appropriately. Diabetes Australia CEO A/Professor Greg Johnson revealed the worrying statistic at the launch of National Diabetes Week in Melbourne today. “Australia’s health system is struggling to manage the growing burden of chronic disease, most notably type 2 diabetes, and the fact that there are more than 4,400 diabetes-related amputations in Australia every year as a result of diabetes underlines how critical this issue is,” A/Professor Johnson said. “To put that in perspective – today around 12 people will undergo a diabetes-related amputation. Tomorrow – 12 more amputations. “Experts estimate that spending on diabetes-related amputations, and other costs related to diabetic foot disease, costs Australia around $875 million every single year. “Worryingly, surveys show that the general public underestimates the serio Continue reading >>

National Diabetes Week

National Diabetes Week

National Diabetes Week 2017 Our partner organisation Diabetic Foot Australia has prepared some relevant material and will be updating you on new information about the growing burden of foot disease in people with diabetes throughout all week. Click HERE to read updates Today they re-release a popular ‘Canberra’ infographic as a reminder of the scale & seriousness of the threat posed by Diabetic Foot Disease to the people of Australia. The infographic highlights some alarming statistics in light of recent Australian research: Total number of Australians with diabetic foot disease has increased from 300,000 to 380,000 people We now know that 4 people die daily as a result of diabetic foot disease Hospitalisations have increased hugely – previously there were 500-600 people in hospital each night, now nearly 1000 people are in hospital each night – which is the total capacity of Canberra’s hospitals We now know that the conservativecost of hospitalisations is approximately $1 million dollars PER DAY. ClickHERE to download the updated infographic for free! If you would like to support Diabetic Foot Australia on their fight to eliminate Diabetic Foot Disease please consider supporting their upcoming events listed below. ‘What’s New in DFU’ Queensland events in July Join Diabetic Foot Australia and its international experts Dr Sicco Bus (NL), Dr Peter Lazzarini, Dr John Bingley, Ms Fiona Murray, Mr Jason Warnock in locations at Townsville and Brisbane! Following on from our 2016 successful series of ‘What’s New in DFU’ evenings,Diabetic Foot Australia is hitting the road in July with not one – but two – ‘What’s New in DFU’ Queensland events. Join theirTownsvilleand Brisbane events to be updated on the latest cutting edge research, treatments, t Continue reading >>

All About Australia’s National Diabetes Week

All About Australia’s National Diabetes Week

Do you, a family member or another loved one live with diabetes? Diabetes is a common problem affecting countless people in Australia and throughout the world. From early onset diabetes to Type 2 development, this is a disease that can significantly impact a person’s life. More and more people are also at a very high risk for developing Type 2 Diabetes. This can come due to being overweight or obese, lacking a regular exercise program or even just due to genetics. However, many people may not even be aware they’re at-risk. Even worse, many people could be in the pre-diabetes stage with no idea that they could develop the disease. All of these problems are precisely what makes Diabetes Australia such an important organisation throughout the country. And this is showcased in their annual National Diabetes Week, which is set to take place July 12-18 of this year. About National Diabetes Week National Diabetes Week is the flagship opportunity for the Diabetes Australia organisation to raise overall awareness. First established in 1984, the organisation was founded to serve as the advocates for all people affected by and at risk for all types of diabetes. The overall goal of Diabetes Australia is to help reduce the impact of diabetes. This comes through advocacy, research support and public awareness to raise perception and understanding of the disease. Diabetes can affect people of all ages. The primary focus areas for diabetes research and understanding include the following: Type 1 (Juvenile) Diabetes Type 2 Diabetes Gestational Diabetes At-Risk Populations for Developing Diabetes Other Forms of the Disease Part of what makes National Diabetes Week so important is spreading the word in educating people about all aspects of the disease. This includes raising awareness Continue reading >>

National Diabetes Week 2017 -

National Diabetes Week 2017 -

“It’s About Time” for National Diabetes Week It is National Diabetes Week from 9-15 July and Diabetes Australia’s "It’s About Time" campaign aims to raise awareness about the importance of early detection and early treatment for all types of diabetes. Too many Australians are being diagnosed with diabetes too late. The is true for both type 1 diabetes and type 2 diabetes. The delay in diagnosis is putting many people at risk of major life threatening health problems. “It’s About Time” we detected all types of diabetes earlier and save lives. “It’s About Time” we knew the early signs of type 1 diabetes Knowing the early signs of type 1 diabetes This National Diabetes Week we want to raise awareness about the importance of early detection of type 1 diabetes and help people to better understand the early symptoms of the condition. Every year around 640 Australians end up very sick and in hospital with dangerous high blood glucose levels because the early signs and symptoms of type 1 diabetes are not recognised in time. Failure to recognise the early symptoms of type 1 diabetes such as severe fatigue, thirst, increased visits to the toilet and weight loss can lead to diabetes ketoacidosis (DKA). This is an acute complication which can be life threatening and often requires hospitalisation. Every year around 640 people who are newly diagnosed with type 1 diabetes only learn they’ve got type 1 diabetes after presenting to hospital with DKA. If not diagnosed in time, type 1 diabetes can be fatal. Everyone should know the early signs – the 4 T’s of Type 1 diabetes. Find out more about type 1 diabetes here. What are the 4Ts The 4Ts are the early warning signs of type 1 diabetes. They are: Thirsty - are they really thirsty and unable to quench that thi Continue reading >>

Diabetes Week 2017 – Dfa Guides You Through This Year’s Research In Diabetic Foot Disease

Diabetes Week 2017 – Dfa Guides You Through This Year’s Research In Diabetic Foot Disease

Keeping track of what’s out there and finding the time to read it seems a near impossible job at times. So DFA is “guiding you through” the most important scientific & clinical developments in diabetic foot disease between Diabetes Week 2016 and 2017. The last twelve months have seen various interesting developments, both scientifically and clinically, in the field of diabetic foot disease. In this “DFA Guides you through” document, we describe the most important developments in epidemiology, prevention, footwear and offloading, peripheral artery disease, infection and wound healing interventions. We look forward to further advancements in diabetic foot disease research and treatment in 2017 and 2018 that may contribute to ending avoidable amputations in a generation. For those who cannot wait until our next yearly overview, register now for the 2017 Diabetic Foot Australia National Conference in September! After two successful conferences at the Liverpool Hospital in 2013 and 2015, this is the third in the Australian Diabetic Foot Conference series. We are bringing some of the globe’s most renowned researchers and clinicians in the fields of diabetes and foot disease to the Gold Coast, to cover the latest research, from bench-top to bedside. The conference offers unique content for everyone, from people working every day at the coalface of the disease to researchers studying the solutions of the future. Just metres from the beachfront, you’ll enjoy a spectacular scientific and social program. Plenary lectures and workshops reflect our 2017 theme and logo: wound infection, vascular surgery, multi-disciplinary treatment and biomechanics. Current ticket pricing is available until Midnight 03 AUG, choose from a selection of 2 day and 1 day options. Click here Continue reading >>

“it’s About Time” We Knew The Early Signs Of Type 1 Diabetes

“it’s About Time” We Knew The Early Signs Of Type 1 Diabetes

“It’s About Time” for National Diabetes Week It is National Diabetes Week from 9-15 July and Diabetes Australia’s "It’s About Time" campaign aims to raise awareness about the importance of early detection and early treatment for all types of diabetes. Too many Australians are being diagnosed with diabetes too late. The is true for both type 1 diabetes and type 2 diabetes. The delay in diagnosis is putting many people at risk of major life threatening health problems. “It’s About Time” we detected all types of diabetes earlier and save lives. Too many Australians are diagnosed with type 1 diabetes too late, over 600 people end up in hospital emergency rooms each year very sick, and then find out they have type 1 diabetes. Find out more here Up to 500,000 Australians may have silent , undiagnosed type 2 diabetes. They may have type 2 diabetes for up to seven years before it is diagnosed. During this time type 2 diabetes may be damaging their blood vessels and nerves and causing vision loss, amputations, heart attacks, stroke and kidney damage. Find out more here Diabetes Australia needs your help to support the campaign and spread the word. Ways to support our “It’s About Time” campaign Share our videos which you can download here Share social media tiles and posts Download the type 1 diabetes and type 2 diabetes posters and display them in your workplace or community Use the hashtags #itsabouttime #ndw2017 Write to your local MP and tell them what it is like to live with diabetes or to care for someone with diabetes Donate to Diabetes Australia here and fund important diabetes research National Diabetes Week July 9-15 2017 www.diabetesaustralia.com.au/itsabouttime Continue reading >>

National Diabetes Week 2017

National Diabetes Week 2017

The clock is ticking… There are about 100,000 Western Australians unknowingly living with type 2 diabetes. Many people live up to seven years with the condition – and develop at least one serious complication – before being diagnosed. Meanwhile, one in five people end up in hospital with diabetes ketoacidosis after they fail to recognise the early symptoms of type 1 diabetes such as fatigue, thirst and weight loss. National Diabetes Week is just around the corner from July 9-15 and this year’s theme is It’s About Time. Diabetes WA is striving for greater awareness of symptoms, earlier diagnosis and better long-term health outcomes for every person at risk of developing or already living with diabetes. It’s about time Western Australians prioritised their health. Watch this space for updates on the campaign and events taking place in your area. Continue reading >>

Welcome To Dfa’s National Diabetes Week!

Welcome To Dfa’s National Diabetes Week!

National Diabetes Week 2016 kicks off today. Diabetic Foot Australia will highlight the growing burden of foot disease in people with diabetes throughout this week. DFA provides you with special daily updates that include the release of new information for our key stakeholders: patients, health professionals, researchers and industry. We’ve got a big week in store! As today marks the first day of National Diabetes Week, we release an updated version of our popular ‘Canberra’ infographic. The infographic highlights some alarming new statistics in light of recent Australian research: Total number of Australians with diabetic foot disease has increased from 300,000 to 380,000 people We now know that 4 people die daily as a result of diabetic foot disease Hospitalisations have increased hugely – previously there were 500-600 people in hospital each night, now nearly 1000 people are in hospital each night – which is the total capacity of Canberra’s hospitals We now know that the conservative cost of hospitalisations is approximately $1 million dollars PER DAY Click HERE to download the updated infographic for free! Continue reading >>

National Diabetes Week

National Diabetes Week

Did you know that as a result of poor diet and lack of exercise, around 2 million Australians are at risk of developing diabetes? Diabetes is a serious condition that inhibits your ability to produce the insulin that your body needs to convert glucose into energy. This means you end up with unhealthy levels of glucose in your blood, which can lead to health complications including increased risk of heart attack, stroke, kidney disease, limb amputation, depression and blindness. The two main types of diabetes are Type 1 and Type 2, and both are on the increase in Australia. Type 2 diabetes is largely due to the growing obesity epidemic. Poor diet and reduced physical activity are putting an estimated 2 million Australians at risk of developing the condition. Who organises National Diabetes Week? Diabetes Australia is the national body for people affected by diabetes. Their mission is to work with health professionals, educators, researchers and healthcare providers to minimise the impact of diabetes on the community. In collaboration with other diabetes organisations, Diabetes Australia provides practical assistance, information and subsidised products to more than one million Australians diagnosed with diabetes. They also work to raise awareness, promote prevention through early detection and advocate for better standards of care. They are also a significant financial contributor to diabetes research and National Diabetes Week is an important event in their fundraising calendar. What happens during National Diabetes Week? National Diabetes Week is held in July each year and is an opportunity for Diabetes Australia to increase awareness of the dangers of diabetes and to raise funds for research into diabetes treatments and the search for a cure. The date for 2017 is yet Continue reading >>

National Diabetes Week 2017

National Diabetes Week 2017

National Diabetes Week (9 – 15 July) aims to raise the awareness of diabetes in the community. Diabetes is Australia's fastest growing chronic condition and there are more than 103,000 South Australians diagnosed with diabetes. Importance of the annual cycle of care for optimal diabetes management As part of National Diabetes Week 2017, Diabetes SA will be focusing on increasing the awareness of the importance of the annual cycle of care for optimal diabetes management. As part of the awareness campaign, Diabetes SA has some resources available for all health professionals to download and order. The National Diabetes Week Resource Pack this year will include an A4 and A3 promotional poster, 'AusDrisk Tool,' 'Goals of Management' flyer and NDSS factsheets on 'Diabetes-Related Complications' and 'Diabetes Distress'. AusDrisk Tool Are you at risk of type 2 diabetes? The Australian Type 2 Diabetes Risk Assessment (AusDrisk) Tool is a quick test for people to assess their own risk of type 2 diabetes. The AusDrisk Tool can be used to test your family and friends to see if they are at risk as there are quite a few people walking around with diabetes and may not realise. Click here to download the AusDrisk Tool and assess your risk for type 2 diabetes. Click here to assess your risk online. Goals of Management This information sheet is a guide to assist in the management of diabetes. It is important to have regular checks with your healthcare team to ensure you understand what your numbers signify and how they relate to your specific diabetes management. Click here to download your copy of the Goals of Management information sheet. Diabetes-Related Complications High blood glucose levels over a long period of time can cause damage of the body's organs, blood vessels and nerve Continue reading >>

National Diabetes Week 2017

National Diabetes Week 2017

In the lead up to National Diabetes Week (9-15 July), a new diabetes awareness survey conducted by Diabetes Victoria highlights the urgent need for Victorians to learn more about this Invisible Condition. While every second respondent (56.4%) could not identify the correct number of Victorians developing diabetes every day, one in five respondents (19.8%) actually believed they were not at risk of developing this relentless condition. "Diabetes does not discriminate. People from all walks of life can develop diabetes – they come in all shapes, sizes, ages, gender identities and ethnicities," says Diabetes Victoria CEO: Craig Bennett, who points out that every day more than 80 Victorians develop diabetes. Latest figures show that 314,000 Victorians have been diagnosed with one of the three main types of diabetes. In addition, Diabetes Victoria estimates that a further 125,000 Victorians don’t know that they have type 2 diabetes. A further 500,000 Victorians are at risk of developing type 2 diabetes. "This is why our new digital awareness campaign for this year's National Diabetes Week highlights that diabetes is an Invisible Condition," Mr Bennett says. "You cannot see if somebody is at risk of developing diabetes. Many people at risk do not have 'warning signs', helping them to understand that something is amiss. Likewise, you cannot see if somebody already has diabetes, nor can you tell which type of diabetes they have. Diabetes is truly an Invisible Condition." Diabetes Victoria has launched a new campaign website: invisiblecondition.org.au where Victorians can learn more about diabetes. A 30-second video visualises the growing number of people affected by this Invisible Condition – which flies under the radar of the general public. "We need to continue to stres Continue reading >>

Australia Diabetes Awareness: More Than The “4ts”

Australia Diabetes Awareness: More Than The “4ts”

From July 9 through 15, 2017, Australia celebrated National Diabetes Awareness Week #NDW2017 and I couldn’t resist posting this vlog because it seems some things are still missing in how Diabetes Australia chooses to spread awareness through their campaign #itsabouttime. Yes, it’s important to know the 4Ts, the warning signs of both type 1 and type 2 diabetes, but my big question is…what if you don’t have those symptoms? And why don’t we share more about the people who live well with diabetes? What is Type 2 Diabetes? The Basics Life with Type 2 Diabetes: Emotions & Mental Health: Family, Friends & Relationships Holidays Continue reading >>

Catching Diabetes Early, Down Under

Catching Diabetes Early, Down Under

One of our diabetes friends from Melbourne, Australia, is Renza Scibilia, a type 1 since 1998 whom we've had the honor of knowing in the Diabetes Online Community for years now. You may recognize Renza as the prolific writer of the blog Diabetogenic. Given that this week is Australia's National Diabetes Week (July 9-15), we thought it a perfect time to invite Renza to share a bit about the big messages in her country... and how their work applies to all of us. Early Diabetes Detection in Australia, by Renza Scibilia Do you remember your, or your child’s, diabetes diagnosis? Did you know the symptoms of diabetes before the diagnosis? Somehow, I did. I was 24 years old, and after I noticed the typical symptoms of thirst, weight loss, frequently going to the toilet and exhaustion, I saw my GP and asked to be tested for diabetes. I was sent off for a blood test and was diagnosed a few days later. From the first symptom to ‘Renza, you have type 1 diabetes,’ was 10 days. That was 19 years ago and, thankfully, it was all very boring. But for a lot of people, diagnosis story is far more convoluted and traumatic. I have many friends with diabetes who tell their story in hushed tones as they explain the number of times they visited their family doctor only to be sent home with nothing more than a prescription for antibiotics, or orders to stay in bed and rest. Parents tell of how their kids were told it was nothing more than growing pains and that the symptoms would disappear. The diabetes diagnosis eventually comes. But often it takes months, or even years. Despite being quick for me, the diagnosis was a lot to deal with. Learning the language of diabetes, trying to grasp the concept of administering insulin by injecting my skin, stabbing my fingers throughout the day, bei Continue reading >>

More in diabetes