diabetestalk.net

National Diabetes Statistics Report 2017

Type 2 Diabetes Statistics: Facts And Trends

Type 2 Diabetes Statistics: Facts And Trends

Diabetes mellitus, or diabetes, is a disease that causes high blood sugar. It occurs when there is a problem with insulin. Insulin is a hormone that takes sugar from foods and moves it to the body's cells. If the body does not make enough insulin or does not use insulin well, the sugar from food stays in the blood and causes high blood sugar. There are several different types of diabetes, but the most common is type 2. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's (CDC) National Diabetes Report, 2014, 90 to 95 percent of people with diabetes in the United States have type 2. Just 5 percent of people have type 1. Contents of this article: Key facts about diabetes in the U.S. Diabetes is at an all-time high in the U.S. The CDC's Division of Diabetes Translation states that 1 percent of the population, which is about a half of a million people, had diagnosed diabetes in 1958. Today, nearly 10 percent of the population have diabetes, according to the American Diabetes Association (ADA). That's 29.1 million Americans, and more than a quarter of these people do not know they have it. The ADA report that the number of people who have diabetes increased by 382 percent from 1988 to 2014. The risk of developing diabetes increases with age. The CDC report that 4.1 percent of people age 20-44 have diabetes, but the number jumps to 25.9 percent for people over 65 years old. As obesity has become more prevalent over the past few decades, so too has the rate of type 2 diabetes. An article in the Journal of Diabetes Science and Technology states that 25.6 percent of Americans are obese, much higher than the 15.3 percent of obese people in 1995. In that same period, the incidence of diabetes increased by 90 percent. Although the link between obesity and diabetes is well Continue reading >>

Complete Health Indicator Report Of Diabetes Prevalence

Complete Health Indicator Report Of Diabetes Prevalence

Definition Percentage of Utah adults (18+) diagnosed with diabetes. Numerator Number of Utah adults who reported being told by a health care professional that they have diabetes (excludes women who were told they had diabetes only during pregnancy or those who reported they had "borderline" or prediabetes). Denominator Utah adults 18 and over. Data Interpretation Issues The Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS) is the primary source for estimating diabetes prevalence for Utah. The BRFSS is a telephone survey (with interviews using both landline and cell phones) that includes only adults 18 and over. Why Is This Important? Almost 145,000 Utahns have been diagnosed with diabetes. Diabetes is a disease that can have devastating consequences. It is the leading cause of non-traumatic lower-extremity amputation and renal failure. It is also the leading cause of blindness among adults younger than 75. It is one of the leading causes of heart disease. Diabetes places an enormous burden on health care resources, approximately $245 billion is spent annually [in direct medical costs ($176 billion) and in indirect costs ($69 billion) such as disability, work loss, and premature death]. (See Economic costs of diabetes in the U.S. in 2012). In Utah, more than a billion dollars each year are spent on direct and indirect costs of diabetes. A model using simulated data projected that diabetes incidence will increase from the current rate of 8 cases per 1,000 population to about 15 in 2050 nationwide. Prevalence of diabetes (including undiagnosed cases) can be as high as one of three Americans by 2050 (see Currently, about 80 million Americans aged 20 and older have pre-diabetes, a condition that puts them at high risk for developing diabetes. For many individuals, taking sm Continue reading >>

15 Things We Learned From The 2017 National Diabetes Statistics Report

15 Things We Learned From The 2017 National Diabetes Statistics Report

An estimated 10 percent of the United States population has diabetes, according to a recent report by the Centers for Disease Control. Of the 30.3 million people included in that estimate, 23.1 million people have been diagnosed with either type 1 or type 2 diabetes. The remaining 7.2 likely have diabetes without knowing it. (The report did not differentiate between type 1 and type 2 diabetes, but with 90 to 95 percent of diagnosed diabetes being type 2, the statistics presented are more representative of the type 2 population.) Here are some of the highlights from this CDC report. 25.2 percent of people aged 65 years or older have diabetes, compared with 17 percent of people aged 45 to 64 and 4 percent of people aged 18 to 44. 1.5 million new cases of adult diabetes were diagnosed in 2015 (or 6.7 per 1,000 people). More than half of these cases were in people aged between 45 and 64. 84.1 million people had prediabetes in 2015, which is about 33.9 percent of U.S. adults older than 18. “Nearly half (48.3%) of adults aged 65 years or older had prediabetes,” the report said. More men have diabetes than women: 36.3 percent versus 29.3 percent. One area in which the report did differentiate type 1 from type 2 was in reference to rates of diabetes in children. Using data from the SEARCH for Diabetes in Youth Study, they determined that 17,900 people under the age of 20 years old were diagnosed with type 1 diabetes between 2011 and 2012. 5,300 children between the ages of 10 and 19 were diagnosed with type 2 diabetes in the same time frame. “Among children and adolescents younger than age 20 years, non-Hispanic whites had the highest rate of new cases of type 1 diabetes compared to members of other U.S. racial and ethnic groups,” the report stated. “Among children an Continue reading >>

Overview

Overview

The importance of both diabetes and these comorbidities will continue to increase as the population ages. Therapies that have proven to reduce microvascular and macrovascular complications will need to be assessed in light of the newly identified comorbidities. Lifestyle change has been proven effective in preventing or delaying the onset of type 2 diabetes in high-risk individuals. Based on this, new public health approaches are emerging that may deserve monitoring at the national level. For example, the Diabetes Prevention Program research trial demonstrated that lifestyle intervention had its greatest impact in older adults and was effective in all racial and ethnic groups. Translational studies of this work have also shown that delivery of the lifestyle intervention in group settings at the community level are also effective at reducing type 2 diabetes risk. The National Diabetes Prevention Program has now been established to implement the lifestyle intervention nationwide. Another emerging issue is the effect on public health of new laboratory based criteria, such as introducing the use of A1c for diagnosis of type 2 diabetes or for recognizing high risk for type 2 diabetes. These changes may impact the number of individuals with undiagnosed diabetes and facilitate the introduction of type 2 diabetes prevention at a public health level. Several studies have suggested that process indicators such as foot exams, eye exams, and measurement of A1c may not be sensitive enough to capture all aspects of quality of care that ultimately result in reduced morbidity. New diabetes quality-of-care indicators are currently under development and may help determine whether appropriate, timely, evidence-based care is linked to risk factor reduction. In addition, the scientific evid Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes Statistics And Facts

Type 2 Diabetes Statistics And Facts

Type 2 diabetes is the most common form of diabetes. Read on to learn some of the key facts and statistics about the people who have it and how to manage it. Risk factors Many risk factors for type 2 diabetes include lifestyle decisions that can be reduced or even cut out entirely with time and effort. Men are also at slightly higher risk of developing diabetes than women. This may be more associated with lifestyle factors, body weight, and where the weight is located (abdominally versus in the hip area) than with innate gender differences. Significant risk factors include: older age excess weight, particularly around the waist family history certain ethnicities physical inactivity poor diet Prevalence Type 2 diabetes is increasingly prevalent but also largely preventable. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), type 2 diabetes accounts for about 90 to 95 percent of all diagnosed cases of diabetes in adults. The CDC also gives us the following information: In general Research suggests that 1 out of 3 adults has prediabetes. Of this group, 9 out of 10 don't know they have it. 29.1 million people in the United States have diabetes, but 8.1 million may be undiagnosed and unaware of their condition. About 1.4 million new cases of diabetes are diagnosed in United States every year. More than one in every 10 adults who are 20 years or older has diabetes. For seniors (65 years and older), that figure rises to more than one in four. Cases of diagnosed diabetes cost the United States an estimated $245 billion in 2012. This cost is expected to rise with the increasing diagnoses. In pregnancy and parentingAccording to the CDC, 4.6 to 9.2 percent of pregnancies may be affected by gestational diabetes. In up to 10 percent of them, the mother is diagnosed w Continue reading >>

The 2017 National Diabetes Statistics Report Is Here

The 2017 National Diabetes Statistics Report Is Here

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has released the 2017 Diabetes Statistics Report with estimates for “prevalence and incidence of diabetes, prediabetes, risk factors for complications, acute and long-term complications, deaths, and costs.” Where are we now? There are 30.3 million people with diabetes (9.4% of the US population) including 23.1 million people who are diagnosed and 7.2 million people (23.8%) undiagnosed. The numbers for prediabetes indicate that 84.1 million adults (33.9% of the adult U.S. population) have prediabetes, including 23.1 million adults aged 65 years or older (the age group with highest rate). The estimated percentage of individuals with type 1 diabetes remains at 5% among those with diabetes. The statistics are also provided by age, gender, ethnicity, and for each state/territory so you can search for these specifics. The CDC has produced wonderful infographics, “A Snapshot of Diabetes in the U.S.” and “Prediabes: Could it be You?” for everyone to use and reproduce. They illustrate estimates for diabetes, prediabetes, the cost of diabetes (dollars, risk of death, medical costs), specifics about type 1 and type 2 diabetes, risk factors for type 2 diabetes, and a “What You Can Do” section. If we compare the numbers with previous estimates, we see that there has been an increase in those with diabetes and a decrease in those with prediabetes. However, the numbers are all still extremely high, and the costs and health burdens are staggering! What can we do with these statistics? Use them to help focus efforts to prevent and control diabetes in the U.S. Share the positive messages regarding prevention strategies with those at risk of developing or with type 2 diabetes Distribute the information to local media and Continue reading >>

Quick Facts Diabetes In Minnesota

Quick Facts Diabetes In Minnesota

How many adults in Minnesota have diabetes? 2015, 7.6% of Minnesota adults (about 320,000)1 had been diagnosed with diabetes (type 1 or 2). Around 18,000 new cases are diagnosed in Minnesota each year (2010)1 Around 1 in 4 people with diabetes do not know that they have the disease2. For information about diabetes in the US, please read the National Diabetes Statistics Report 2017. Are there disparities in diabetes rates in Minnesota? Disparities happen when the health of a group of people are negatively affected by factors like how much money they earn, their race or ethnicity, or where they live. In Minnesota, we currently collect data specific to two of these factors. Education: In 2015, about 5.4 percent1* of adults who have a college degree report having diabetes compared with 8.5 percent1* of adults who do not. Income: Health survey data from 2013 through 2015 show that self-reported diabetes rates are higher for people living in households that earn lower incomes1*. How is Minnesota monitoring diabetes management? Healthcare providers measure five diabetes goals to monitor how well a patient’s diabetes is controlled. These goals are influenced by a number of different factors: individual factors, community-level factors, and healthcare-related factors. This information is reported as the Optimal Diabetes Care measure. Overall in Minnesota, 53 percent of adults met all five diabetes goals3. There are disparities in the percentage of people who meet all five diabetes goals. We show some of the disparities observed in 2014 below: Race: 31 percent of American Indian or Alaska Native meet the Optimal Diabetes Care measure as compared to 59 percent of Asian adults3. Ethnicity: 46 percent of Hispanic or Latino adults meet the Optimal Diabetes Care measure as compared Continue reading >>

Percentage Of Diabetics In The Global Adult Population In 2017 And 2045

Percentage Of Diabetics In The Global Adult Population In 2017 And 2045

Premium Statistics on "Diabetes" Related Studies: Available to Download in PDF or PPTX Format Everything On "Diabetes" in One Document: Edited and Divided into Handy Chapters. Including Detailed References. Statista for Your Company: The Research and Analysis Tool Further Content: Statistics, Studies, and Topic Pages Our Business Solutions: Save Time and Money * All products require an annual contract. Prices do not include sales tax (New York residents only). Continue reading >>

National Diabetes Audit

National Diabetes Audit

The National Diabetes Audit (NDA) is the one of the largest annual clinical audits in the world, integrating data from both primary and secondary care sources, making it the most comprehensive audit of its kind. To find out more about the NDA Programme check out this short presentation, or view a power point presentation here Latest Reports National Diabetes Audit Report 1 Care Processes and Treatment Targets 2016-17 A short report for the NDA 16-17 collection was published on the 10 November 2017. This is a small national report accompanied by GP, CCG, LHB and specialist service level data. A full report will be published in March 2018, which will contain the full key findings, recommendations, results of analysis for multiple readings, and information for learning disability and severe mental illness. The link to the short report is here. The National Diabetes Audit Insulin Pump Report 2015-16 The Insulin Pump Audit collects information on the number of people with diabetes using an insulin pump, the reason for going on an insulin pump and the outcomes achieved since starting the pump. The report and supporting documentation is available here. National Diabetes Audit Complications and Mortality 2015-2016 Report This report, Report 2a and an accompanying Report 2b, from the National Diabetes Audit (NDA) covers complications of diabetes. The reports and supporting documentation are available here For the audit reports for previous audit years please check out the link on the right hand side "Access the audit reports" including patient friendly versions of the reports. National Diabetes Audit 2017-18 collection The 2017-18 collection for the NDA will incorporate information about people with non-diabetic hyperglycaemia. A pilot was carried out with 22 GP practices in Eng Continue reading >>

Michigan Diabetes Statistics And Reports

Michigan Diabetes Statistics And Reports

A number of data sources are available to and through the Diabetes Prevention and Control Program about: Diabetes burden Diabetes-related indicators Complications Mortality These sources include: Michigan Diabetes Reports Diabetes Data Library Tables are presented in diabetes prevalence and incidence among Michigan adults and children, as well as prediabetes among adults. In addition, the Library provides data about diabetes-related risk factors, preventive care practices, diabetes-related complications, hospitalization data, mortality, and cost data. Hospitalization among Michigan Adults with Diabetes, 2013 Risk Factors in Adults with Diabetes and the General Population, 2011-2013 Diagnosed Diabetes Prevalence and Incidence (New Cases) in Adults, 2011-2013 Preventive Care Practices in Adults with Diabetes, 2011-2012 Diabetes in Pregnancy, 2010-2012 Diabetes Prevalence in Children, 2006 Diabetes Incidence (New Cases) in Children, 2002-2003 Prevalence of Complications in Adults with Diabetes, 2008-2010 Mortality for People with Diabetes, 2009 Prediabetes in Adults, 2005-2006, 2010 Cost of Diabetes in Michigan, 2005-2006 Michigan Diabetes Related Medicaid Data Michigan's Medicaid programs are funded by state and federal dollars and serve socio-economically vulnerable children and adults. Analysis of paid Medicaid claims, encounter, and prescription data provide a unique and powerful perspective on key components of health care. Previously, MDHHS has utilized analysis of Medicaid data to address health care utilization of children with asthma and the disabled population served by Michigan Medicaid programs. Diabetes burden and indicators are presented as briefs, presentations, and downloadable tables, charts, and maps. Briefs and Reports Diabetes-Health Care Utilization By Continue reading >>

Diabetes

Diabetes

Key facts The number of people with diabetes has risen from 108 million in 1980 to 422 million in 2014 (1). The global prevalence of diabetes* among adults over 18 years of age has risen from 4.7% in 1980 to 8.5% in 2014 (1). Diabetes prevalence has been rising more rapidly in middle- and low-income countries. Diabetes is a major cause of blindness, kidney failure, heart attacks, stroke and lower limb amputation. In 2015, an estimated 1.6 million deaths were directly caused by diabetes. Another 2.2 million deaths were attributable to high blood glucose in 2012**. Almost half of all deaths attributable to high blood glucose occur before the age of 70 years. WHO projects that diabetes will be the seventh leading cause of death in 2030 (1). Healthy diet, regular physical activity, maintaining a normal body weight and avoiding tobacco use are ways to prevent or delay the onset of type 2 diabetes. Diabetes can be treated and its consequences avoided or delayed with diet, physical activity, medication and regular screening and treatment for complications. What is diabetes? Diabetes is a chronic disease that occurs either when the pancreas does not produce enough insulin or when the body cannot effectively use the insulin it produces. Insulin is a hormone that regulates blood sugar. Hyperglycaemia, or raised blood sugar, is a common effect of uncontrolled diabetes and over time leads to serious damage to many of the body's systems, especially the nerves and blood vessels. In 2014, 8.5% of adults aged 18 years and older had diabetes. In 2015, diabetes was the direct cause of 1.6 million deaths and in 2012 high blood glucose was the cause of another 2.2 million deaths. Type 1 diabetes Type 1 diabetes (previously known as insulin-dependent, juvenile or childhood-onset) is charact Continue reading >>

Apa Citation Style, 6th Edition: Government Publication

Apa Citation Style, 6th Edition: Government Publication

In-Text Citation (Paraphrase): (Government or Corporation Name, year) In-Text Citation (Direct Quote): (Government or Corporation Name, year, page number) References: Government or corporation name. (Year). Title of publication. Location of publication: Publisher. Retrieved from URL. Examples: In-text Citation (Paraphrase): (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 2014) In-text Citation (Direct Quote): (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 2014, p.8) References: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. (2014). National diabetes statistics report: Estimates of diabetes and its burden in the United States. Atlanta, GA: US Department of Health and Human Services. Retrieved from Continue reading >>

Current Burden Of Diabetes In The U.s.

Current Burden Of Diabetes In The U.s.

Diabetes is one of the most common and costly chronic diseases. An estimated 23.1 million people in the United States are diagnosed with diabetes at a cost of more than $245 billion per year.1,2 The CDC estimates that another 7.2 million people have diabetes but remain undiagnosed, while another 84.1 million adults 18 years and older have prediabetes.1 The highest rates of diabetes are found among minority populations and older Americans; however, across the United States, the overall prevalence continues to increase as overweight and obesity rates rise.3 Individuals with diabetes are at greater risk than other similar adults for many common problems, including coronary heart disease, stroke, hypertension, depression, pain, polypharmacy, and functional disability.4 Diabetes remains the leading cause of new cases of blindness among adults in the United States, and the leading cause of end-stage renal failure. Annual updates on the impact of diabetes on the health of the U.S. population are available from the CDC National Diabetes Statistics Report . Despite significant advances in therapy over the past several years, diabetes remains the seventh leading cause of death in the United States. Intensive treatment of glucose, blood pressure, and lipid levels in individuals with diabetes substantially reduces the risk of developing diabetes-related complications. However, under current models of care, many individuals with diabetes are not achieving the targets for optimal care recommended by clinical experts. In the most recent reports from the National Committee for Quality Assurance on health maintenance organizations (HMOs), 31 percent of patients continue to have an A1C greater than 9 percent, while 35 percent have blood pressure of ≥140/90 mm Hg.5 This gap between curr Continue reading >>

New National Diabetes Statistics Report Released

New National Diabetes Statistics Report Released

Twitter The Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) released the 2014 National Diabetes Statistics Report (formerly referred to as the National Diabetes Fact Sheet), intended to provide up-to-date scientific data and statistics on diabetes and its burden in the United States. The Report shows that the number of cases of diabetes and prediabetes among Americans of all ages and ethnicities continues to increase, underscoring the continuing crisis this disease presents for Americans and the importance of our mission to prevent and cure diabetes and improve the lives of all people affected by diabetes. Below you will find a number of key points from the new report, which can be found in full at The American Diabetes Association website, diabetes.org, is also being updated to reflect this new information. 2014 National Diabetes Statistics Report Overall Numbers, Diabetes and Prediabetes. Prevalence: In 2012, 29.1 million Americans, or 9.3% of the population, had diabetes. In 2010 the figures were 25.8 million and 8.3%. The prevalence rate for adults age 20 and older in 2012 was 12.3%, compared to 11.3% in 2010. Undiagnosed: Of the 29.1 million, 21.0 million were diagnosed, and 8.1 million were undiagnosed. In 2010 the figures were 18.8 million and 7.0 million. Prevalence in Seniors: The percentage of Americans age 65 and older remains high, at 25.9%, or 11.8 million seniors (diagnosed and undiagnosed). Incidence: The incidence of diabetes in 2012 was 1.7 million new diagnoses/year; in 2010 it was 1.9 million. Prediabetes: In 2012, 86 million Americans age 20 and older had prediabetes; this is up from 79 million in 2010. The percentage is up slightly, from 35% in 2010 to 37% in 2012—and is now at 51% among those age 65 and older. Deaths: Diabetes remains the 7th lea Continue reading >>

Cdc Releases New Statistics On Diabetes And Prediabetes

Cdc Releases New Statistics On Diabetes And Prediabetes

More than 100 million adults in the United States are living with diabetes or prediabetes as of 2015, according to a recent report from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). The CDC estimates that 30.3 million U.S. adults have diabetes, which represents 9.4% of the U.S. population. However, about 7.2 million adults living with diabetes are unaware that they have the disease. Another 84.1 million have prediabetes, but just 11.6% are aware that they have this condition. People with untreated prediabetes are at high risk for progression to type 2 diabetes within 5 years. The report also found that diabetes prevalence in the U.S. varies significantly by education. About 12.6% of U.S. adults with less than a high school education has diabetes, while 9.5% of those who completed high school have the disease. An estimated 7.2% of adults with more than a high school education have diabetes. Rates of prediabetes were similar among women and men across racial/ethnic groups or educational levels. Overall, however, more men (36.6%) have prediabetes than women (29.3%). The CDC notes that diabetes is associated with a substantial health burden. The cost of caring for people with diabetes is more than twice the cost of caring for those without diabetes, and the mortality risk is also 50% greater for those with compared to those without diabetes. Click here to read the full report. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). National Diabetes Statistics Report, 2017. Atlanta, GA: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. 2017. Available at: click here. Accessed July 21, 2017. Continue reading >>

More in diabetes