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National Diabetes Month 2018

National Diabetes Month 2017

National Diabetes Month 2017

Each November communities across the country observe National Diabetes Month to bring attention to diabetes and its impact on millions of Americans. Living with diabetes can be challenging to manage every day. You are the most important member of your diabetes care team, but you don’t have to manage your diabetes alone. Seek support from health care professionals, your family, friends, and community to manage your diabetes. Watch the video below, and when you’re ready learn more about managing your diabetes. Help Promote National Diabetes Month! We encourage partners, organizations, and health care professionals to use our resources and share our 2017 theme in their communities. Continue reading >>

Healthcare Awareness Calendar: Key Months, Weeks And Days From January To December

Healthcare Awareness Calendar: Key Months, Weeks And Days From January To December

Here are the days, weeks and months set aside to raise awareness or recognize healthcare conditions and workers. January • National Blood Donor Month • National Glaucoma Awareness Month • National Volunteer Blood Donor Month • Cervical Health Awareness Month • Thyroid Awareness Month • National Birth Defects Prevention Month Days to note: • Jan. 25: National Intravenous Nurse Day February • American Heart Month • AMD/Low Vision Awareness Month • National Cancer Prevention Month • International Prenatal Infection Prevention Month Weeks to note: • Feb. 1 to Feb. 7: Patient Recognition Week • Feb. 7 to Feb. 14: Congenital Heart Defect Awareness Week • Feb. 12 to Feb. 18: National Cardiac Rehabilitation Week • Feb. 14 to Feb. 21: Alzheimer's and Dementia Staff Education Week Days to note: • Feb. 3: National Wear Red Day for women's heart health • Feb. 4: World Cancer Day • Feb. 14: National Donor Day • Feb. 22: National Heart Valve Disease Awareness Day March • National Colorectal Cancer Awareness Month • Brain Injury Awareness Month • National Developmental Disabilities Awareness Month • Save Your Vision Month • National Nutrition Month • Bleeding Disorders Awareness Month • National Kidney Month • National Endometriosis Awareness Month Weeks to note: • March 12 to March 18: Patient Safety Awareness Week • March 12 to March 18: Long Term Care Administrators Week • March 12 to March 18: National Pulmonary Rehabilitation Week Days to note: • March 8: Registered Dietitian Nutritionist Day • March 20: World Oral Health Day • March 22: The American Diabetes Association Alert Day • March 24: World TB Day • March 30: National Doctor's Day April • National Occupational Therapy Month • National Parkinson's Aw Continue reading >>

Diabetes Awareness Week 2018

Diabetes Awareness Week 2018

While a lot of people have a good understanding of diabetes and how to manage it, many others aren’t getting the right help and support to look after their diabetes. Today, 65 people will die early from the condition and hundreds more will face life-changing complications that could have been avoided or delayed if they’d had the right knowledge and support to manage their diabetes. Some of you have that, and are already doing everything you can to manage your diabetes well. But this isn’t true for everyone and it’s our job to change that. Our vision is a world where diabetes can do no harm. Together, we can make that a reality. Download PDF To View PDF, Download Here DocToPDF Learn more We are encouraging the diabetes community to share their experiences and knowledge. We’d love to hear your stories of how you know more about diabetes because this shared knowledge could help someone else with the condition. We know that the right knowledge has the power to transform lives. Knowledge gained from the experience of people living with diabetes, knowledge gained from research discoveries, knowledge from the people working with diabetes every day. This Diabetes Week, we want to hear how you learned more about your condition, to inspire others to do the same, using our hashtag #knowdiabetes Fight Diabetes We are fighting every day for people with diabetes. Together, we all need to fight the challenges that diabetes presents – challenges of funding over research, perceptions around Type 1 and Type 2, of better care, rights for people at work and children at school living with diabetes. Together we can fight diabetes. We can fight against the postcode lottery in care, we can fight for a cure and we can fight on behalf of those who can’t. This Diabetes Week, tell us Continue reading >>

Promote National Diabetes Month

Promote National Diabetes Month

Partners, organizations, and health care professionals can get involved in National Diabetes Month too! Use the resources below to share our 2017 theme – You Are the Center of Your Diabetes Care Team – in your communities. Share our Resources For People with Diabetes Remind people with diabetes that they are the most important member of their diabetes care team, and that they should seek support from health care professionals, family, friends, and their community to successfully manage their diabetes. For Community Organizations Create or improve existing programs on diabetes prevention and management. For Health Care Professionals Refer to 10 clinically useful principles that identify and synthesize areas of general agreement among existing diabetes management and prevention guidelines. Guiding Principles for the Care of People With or at Risk for Diabetes Share through Social Media Facebook November is National Diabetes Month! Living with diabetes can be challenging to manage every day. You are the most important member of your diabetes care team, and you don’t have to manage your diabetes alone. Seek support from health professionals, your family, friends, and community to help you manage your diabetes. You are the center of your diabetes care team. This National Diabetes Month, remember to seek help from your diabetes care team, including friends and loved ones. Learn more in the video below! Twitter It’s National #DiabetesMonth & YOU are the center of your #diabetes care team! Tips for your next doc visit This National #DiabetesMonth, remember to seek out help from your #diabetes care team. Learn more in this video: Read and Follow our Diabetes Discoveries & Practice Blog Host or Participate in an Event Continue reading >>

National Defeat Diabetes Month

National Defeat Diabetes Month

This month, Right At Home is here to help YOU defeat Diabetes! Since this is National Defeat Diabetes Month we thought wed help you find ways to defeat Diabetes.Tips to Help You Defeat Diabetes. According to the CDCs Diabetes Pamphlet , diabetes is a condition in which the body doesnt properly process food to produce energy for the body. More commonly seen as a problem with the bodys inability to produce insulin properly and/or use the insulin to get the energy we need into the cells of our body. The result of diabetes is an overabundance of sugars in our blood. The Superhero team at Right At Home is here to help you defeat Diabetes! These are a few ways that we can take action to make a difference in the life of our clients who are diabetic: Diet Our caregivers can aide in cooking nutritional breakfasts, lunches, dinners and snacks during their shifts. Proper diet plays a huge role in defeating diabetes and keeping your sugar levels inline. US News offers this list of the top 10 best diets for managing diabetes. Check out our blog article about their #1 Choice for Diabetes Diets (The Mediterranean Diet). Exercise Our caregivers can assist in a variety of ways to get you up and moving; increasing your amount of daily exercising. Exercise helps promote a healthy heart; diabetes increases your risk for cardiovascular disease (CVD). Exercise also helps defeat diabetes by helping to reach and maintain healthy weight levels. Assisting You When Walking Our caregivers can offer assistance in safely moving; walking around the house, inside and outside. Taking You to Exercise We can assist you in transportation to and from physical therapy, occupational therapy, group exercising at local senior centers and other ways to participate in guided exercise. At Home Therapy Compliance Continue reading >>

November Is National Diabetes Awareness Month

November Is National Diabetes Awareness Month

November is National Diabetes Awareness Month The JDRF community will be raising awareness about type 1 diabetes (T1D) throughout the month of November. Well kick things off on T1Day, November 1, 2017, by telling our stories to the world. Every minute of every day, people with T1D persevere in the face of adversity. JDRF is committed to making day-to-day life with the disease easier, safer and healthier while working toward ways to cure and prevent T1D once and for all. This November, we are continuing our T1D Looks Like Me campaign to spread awareness about life with T1D. Visit our website or follow us on social media to Get Quizzed by a Whiz Kid and test your knowledge against that of a nine-year-old with T1D. You can also create a custom T1D Looks Like Me profile photo for social media or generate your unique T1D Footprint. You can post your footprint image to Facebook, Instagram or Twitter to shed light on the cumulative burden of finger pricks, injections and other disruptions that come with living with T1D. JDRF will also continue our important advocacy efforts throughout the month. We are asking Congress to continue funding critical research through the Special Diabetes Program and pressuring insurers to guarantee that everyone has the Coverage 2 Control their T1D. Check back with us on World Diabetes Day, November 14, 2017, and throughout the month for more blogs, stories and ways to share what it means to be affected by T1D. Continue reading >>

Diabetes Awareness Month: When Is It And What Happens?

Diabetes Awareness Month: When Is It And What Happens?

Diabetes Awareness Month: When is it and what happens? Reviewed by Natalie Olsen, RD, LD, ACSM EP-C Every November, people with diabetes, health care professionals, and patient organizations across the United States take part in National Diabetes Month. The event is to raise awareness of diabetes, and the impact it has on millions of Americans. National Diabetes Month is important as more than 29 million Americans have diabetes , yet 1 in 4 of these people are unaware that they have the condition. What is the theme for National Diabetes Month 2017? In 2017, the theme for National Diabetes Month is Managing Diabetes - It's Not Easy, But It's Worth It . The theme for 2017 serves to remind people with diabetes that although managing the condition is difficult, they're not alone. The National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive Kidney Diseases (NIDDK) explain that 2017's theme highlights the importance of managing diabetes to prevent diabetes-related health problems. For example, people with diabetes are twice as likely to have a stroke or get heart disease compared with people who do not have diabetes. They are also more likely to develop these conditions at an earlier age than people without diabetes. People with diabetes are at increased risk of kidney problems because high blood sugar levels can damage the kidneys over time. This damage can occur long before a person starts to experience any obvious symptoms. Diabetes can cause damage to the nerves and blood vessels, leading to serious, difficult-to-treat infections, particularly in the feet. In some cases, amputation may be needed to stop the infection spreading to other parts of the body. Damage that diabetes causes to blood vessels in the retina can also lead to vision problems and even blindness. The NIDDK say that Continue reading >>

American Diabetes Month

American Diabetes Month

Diabetes is one of the leading causes of disability and death in the United States. It can cause blindness, nerve damage, kidney disease, and other health problems if it’s not controlled. One in 10 Americans have diabetes — that’s more than 30 million people. And another 84 million adults in the United States are at high risk of developing type 2 diabetes. The good news? People who are at high risk for type 2 diabetes can lower their risk by more than half if they make healthy changes. These changes include: eating healthy, getting more physical activity, and losing weight. How can American Diabetes Month make a difference? We can use this month to raise awareness about diabetes risk factors and encourage people to make healthy changes. Here are just a few ideas: Encourage people to make small changes, like taking the stairs instead of the elevator. Talk to people in your community about getting regular checkups. They can get their blood pressure and cholesterol checked, and ask the doctor about their diabetes risk. Ask doctors and nurses to be leaders in their communities by speaking about the importance of healthy eating and physical activity. How can I help spread the word? We’ve made it easier for you to make a difference. This toolkit is full of ideas to help you take action today. For example: Continue reading >>

Stop Diabetes – National Diabetes Awareness Month

Stop Diabetes – National Diabetes Awareness Month

Did you know that 29.1 million people in the United States have diabetes? On top of that, an additional 8.1 million may be undiagnosed and unaware of their condition. About 1.4 million new cases of diabetes are diagnosed in United States every year. These number have grown a staggering amount within the past 20 years, making diabetes an extremely important National Health Concern. That is why November is designated as National Diabetes Awareness month by the federal government. Diabetes can strike anyone, from any walk of life, and it often does. Worldwide, it afflicts more than 380 million people. And the World Health Organization estimates that by 2030, that number of people living with diabetes will more than double. To attempt to roll back this increasing numbers, we must actively try to stay away from diabetes prone activities. But before analyzing how to combat diabetes, we must fully understand what diabetes is. To answer that, you first need to understand the role of insulin in your body. When you eat, your body turns food into sugars, or glucose. At that point, your pancreas is supposed to release insulin. Insulin serves as a “key” to open your cells, to allow the glucose to enter — and allow you to use the glucose for energy. But with diabetes, this system does not work. Several major problems can occur that causes the onset of diabetes. The two most common forms of diabetes are Type 1 and Type 2. There are also other, less common, forms, such as gestational diabetes, which occurs during pregnancy. Type 1 is the more severe form of diabetes, known as insulin-dependent diabetes. It is also sometimes referred to as “juvenile” diabetes, because it usually develops in children and teenagers, though it can develop at any age. The most common form of diabe Continue reading >>

National Diabetes Month

National Diabetes Month

National Diabetes Month is an annual designation observed in November. OBSERVE Use #NationalDiabetesMonth to post on social media. HISTORY To Be Researched Continue reading >>

Toolkit: American Diabetes Month

Toolkit: American Diabetes Month

Diabetes is one of the leading causes of disability and death in the United States. Diabetes can cause blindness, nerve damage, kidney disease, and other health problems if it’s not controlled. People who are at high risk for type 2 diabetes can lower their risk by more than half if they make healthy changes like getting more physical activity, losing weight, and eating healthy. American Diabetes Month is a chance to raise awareness about diabetes risk factors and encourage people to make healthy changes. With this and other National Health Observance toolkits offered on healthfinder.gov, we’ve made it easier for you to make a difference. The toolkits provide resources for organizations like schools, healthcare providers, health departments, and more to raise awareness about critical public health issues, like the importance of preventing diabetes. This toolkit is full of ideas to help you take action today. For example: Health professionals: Check out this free training that teaches health care providers how to reduce hypoglycemic adverse drug events (ADEs) in patients with diabetes — and earn continuing education. By raising awareness about diabetes, we can all work together to help people make healthy changes and reduce their diabetes risk factors. Continue reading >>

National Diabetes Education Week

National Diabetes Education Week

NDEW 2017 takes place November 5-11. Celebrate with resources that expand the message of diabetes education and highlight all you do for the diabetes community. Check back every day during the week of November 5-11as we celebrate all that diabetes educators do to help those with or affected by diabetes. Stories of People with Diabetes Who Found Success with the Help of a Diabetes Educator When first diagnosed, Cindy Betz turned to the web to find help with managing her diabetes. However, because she found so much information online about diabetes, it soon became a frustrating and confusing process... until Cindy met a few diabetes educators who helped her separate fact from fiction. After being diagnosed with type 2 diabetes in July 2015, Joseph turned to a diabetes education program and found educator, Barb McDonald. With Barb's help, Joseph was able to turn his health around and today he shares his success story. Chris Memering began her nursing career in oncology. After seeing a favorite patient for the last time during her maternity leave, Chris started looking for a new career path and found diabetes education. Read about how Chris developed lifelong friendships and career partnerships through her work in diabetes education. Jasmine Gonzalvo struggled through pharmacy school, but after a rotation at a diabetes camp, she discovered her passion for working with people with diabetes. Learn a few nuggets of wisdom she's gained from her experiences. Molly McElwee-Malloy was diagnosed with diabetes at the age of 20. Today, she's a CDE working to make diabetes technology better. Read how she found diabetes education and why it's changed her life. Every Way Possible is a documentary short produced by AADE guest blogger,Katie Doyle, and made possible in part with support f Continue reading >>

November Is National Diabetes Month

November Is National Diabetes Month

Diabetes affects so many areas of a personals health and well-being. If you already have diabetes, regular check-ups with your primary care provider along with routine blood work are critical to helping you and your provider make the best care plan for your particular situation. If you are at risk for developing type 2 diabetes, you can lower that risk with a few easy steps. Maintaining a healthy weight can help you prevent and manage problems like type 2 diabetes, heart disease, high blood pressure, unhealthy cholesterol, and high blood glucose. If you are overweight, even losing 10-15 pounds can make a big difference! Eating healthy food is one of the most important things you can do to lower your risk for type 2 diabetes and heart disease. It can seem hard to make healthy food choices, particularly if you are on a budget and short of time. The American Diabetes Association has some great resources for you, including recipes and healthy eating suggestions Even if you've never exercised before, you can find ways to add physical activity to your day. You'll get benefits, even if your activities aren't strenuous. Once physical activity is a part of your routine, you'll wonder how you did without it! For more information, please visit The American Diabetes Association website at Continue reading >>

November: World Diabetes Day And Diabetes Awareness Month!

November: World Diabetes Day And Diabetes Awareness Month!

With November being National Diabetes Awareness Month in the U.S., you can imagine there’s a slew of awareness campaigns and fundraising events that go on throughout the month. This effort has taken on more international importance in recent years, with the growth of global observances of World Diabetes Day that takes place annually on November 14, the date marking the birthday of insulin co-discoverer Dr. Frederick Banting. Here at DiabetesMine, we’ve covered these November diabetes activities at length over the years. Please browse through this overview of posts we’ve written to get a sense of what happens when diabetes awareness becomes a national and international priority. Diabetes Awareness Month 2017 This year, we believe the need for diabetes awareness month is more important than ever. Many different diabetes organizations have a plethora of activities and initiatives, including the American Diabetes Association and JDRF that are both emphasizing the "invisible illness" aspect of living with diabetes. Our roundup explores all of the happenings within the USA and across the world. Diabetes Months of the Past Don’t miss our coverage of what happened for Diabetes Awareness Month last year, in both the U.S. and across the globe. You’ll read about efforts from the American Diabetes Association (ADA), International Diabetes Federation (IDF), JDRF, Diabetes Hands Foundation, and other groups working to raise public awareness and make a difference for the Diabetes Community. You can also reflect back on the prior year, with our coverage of Diabetes Awareness Month 2015, when both the ADA and IDF focused on the theme of educating people about healthy eating. World Diabetes Day and the Blue Circle World Diabetes Day (WDD) was established by the International Di Continue reading >>

It's Your Life. Treat Your Diabetes Well.

It's Your Life. Treat Your Diabetes Well.

November is National Diabetes Month. Here’s to managing your diabetes for a longer, healthier life. There isn’t a cure yet for diabetes, but a healthy lifestyle can really reduce its impact on your life. What you do every day makes the difference: eating a healthy diet, being physically active, taking medicines if prescribed, and keeping health care appointments to stay on track. The Basics More than 30 million people in the United States have diabetes, but 1 out of 4 of them don’t know they have it. There are three main types of diabetes: type 1, type 2, and gestational diabetes (diabetes while pregnant, which can put the pregnancy and baby at risk and lead to type 2 diabetes later). With type 1 diabetes, your body can’t make insulin (a hormone that acts like a key to let blood sugar into cells for use as energy), so you need to take it every day. Type 1 diabetes is less common than type 2 diabetes; about 5% of the people who have diabetes have type 1. Currently, no one knows how to prevent type 1 diabetes. Most people with diabetes—9 out of 10—have type 2 diabetes. With type 2 diabetes, your body doesn’t use insulin well and is unable to keep blood sugar at normal levels. If you have any of the risk factors below, ask your doctor if you should be tested for diabetes. The sooner you find out, the sooner you can start making healthy changes that will benefit you now and in the future. More than 30 million US adults have diabetes—and 1 out of 4 of them don’t know they have it. At least 1 out of 3 people will develop diabetes in their lifetime. Medical costs for people with diabetes are twice as high as for people without diabetes. Risk of death for adults with diabetes is 50% higher than for adults without diabetes. Type 2 diabetes risk factors include: Continue reading >>

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