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National Diabetes Month 2017

November Is National Diabetes Awareness Month

November Is National Diabetes Awareness Month

Diabetes is a disease that occurs when your blood glucose, also called blood sugar, is too high. The combined efforts of clinicians and the Special Diabetes Program for Indians grantees across the country have produced remarkable improvements in clinical outcomes for American Indian and Alaska Native people with diabetes over the last 20 years. Although diabetes has no cure, you can take steps to manage your diabetes and stay healthy. Links: Continue reading >>

National Diabetes Awareness Month

National Diabetes Awareness Month

November is recognized as National Diabetes Month. Highlighting the disease helps bring awareness and education about what it is, and how it can be managed. It is important to know that while diabetes has no cure, we can help to fight the onset and minimize the symptoms that can occur. What is Diabetes? Diabetes is a condition where the sugar in the blood, or blood glucose elevates and become difficult to manage. Either a person has Type 1 diabetes, where they make little to no insulin, or, Type 2 where the body has difficulty utilizing insulin effectively. Although the onset of the two types does differ, it is important to know that both are managed similarity. Exercise- Daily exercise at least 30 mins a day. Try for more! Meal Planning/Diet- Eat a well balanced diet limited salts, sugars,and low calories. Remember to keep foods whole! Blood sugar testing No Smoking- Smoking can increase risk of heart problems and poor circulation. Your risk While the risk for diabetes has greatly increased over the years, it’s important that you take the preventative measures that you can to lessen your own risk. The Mayo Clinic gives a few tips to take steps in lessening your chance of developing diabetes. Getting moderate exercise daily, eating whole grains and fiber, managing your weight, and not dieting! When developing a routine with consist and habits, this is very much achievable. You are able to take control on your health and body! As we spread Awareness this month in dealing with diabetes, let us learn information that may help the lives of others improve. Let us educate ourselves to the disease for our own health as well. And if we are the one personally dealing with the disease let us remain the healthiest version of ourself that we can do alongside the communal support Continue reading >>

Ten Ways To Observe National Diabetes Month

Ten Ways To Observe National Diabetes Month

November is National Diabetes Month, and much government and media attention is focused on the need to slow the growing “epidemic” of diabetes and prediabetes in the United States. Efforts to this end include the American Diabetes Association’s Stop Diabetes campaign, which encourages people to take an online risk test to assess their personal risk of developing prediabetes or Type 2 diabetes and to see a doctor if their test results suggest a high risk. But what if you already have diabetes? Is there anything in National Diabetes Month for you? Of course there is! For people who already have diabetes, it’s as good a time as any to take a look at your diabetes management and ask yourself how things are going. Are there areas that need improvement? Are you interested in connecting with other people who have diabetes? Would you like to participate in a diabetes fundraiser? Would you like to learn something new? Here are some suggestions for making the most of a month devoted to diabetes. 1. Commit to a new healthy habit for one month. Many lifestyle habits — not just eating and exercising — can affect your general health and your diabetes management. Some may affect your blood glucose levels directly, and others may have a more indirect effect, enabling or preventing you from carrying out your daily routines, for example. Rather than choose something you feel you “should” do, pick something you feel able and willing to do. Here are some ideas: Get more sleep. Not getting enough sleep can increase insulin resistance, meaning your body requires more insulin to get glucose into your cells. This can lead to higher blood glucose levels and is believed to have other negative health effects. Inadequate sleep also tends to leave you feeling fatigued during the day Continue reading >>

National Diabetes Month — November 2017

National Diabetes Month — November 2017

November is National Diabetes Month. Approximately 114 million U.S. persons are living with diabetes (30 million) or prediabetes (84 million) (1). Persons with prediabetes are at increased risk for developing type 2 diabetes, heart disease, and stroke (1). Type 2 diabetes can be prevented through lifestyle changes (e.g., weight loss, healthy eating, and increased physical activity) (1,2). Persons with diabetes can take steps to control the disease and prevent complications (1,3). This issue of MMWR includes a report on diabetes-related kidney failure. Working with partners, CDC plays an important role in preventing or delaying the onset of type 2 diabetes, preventing complications of diabetes, and improving health and quality of life for persons with diabetes. The National Diabetes Statistics Report, 2017 (1) provides the latest statistics about diabetes. With the Ad Council, the American Diabetes Association, and the American Medical Association, CDC has developed public service announcements to encourage persons to take the prediabetes risk test (CDC also joined forces with CBS Television Stations in a television and digital miniseries, “Your Health with Joan Lunden and CDC,” to provide information about diabetes prevention and control (More information is available at Continue reading >>

It's Your Life. Treat Your Diabetes Well.

It's Your Life. Treat Your Diabetes Well.

November is National Diabetes Month. Here’s to managing your diabetes for a longer, healthier life. There isn’t a cure yet for diabetes, but a healthy lifestyle can really reduce its impact on your life. What you do every day makes the difference: eating a healthy diet, being physically active, taking medicines if prescribed, and keeping health care appointments to stay on track. The Basics More than 30 million people in the United States have diabetes, but 1 out of 4 of them don’t know they have it. There are three main types of diabetes: type 1, type 2, and gestational diabetes (diabetes while pregnant, which can put the pregnancy and baby at risk and lead to type 2 diabetes later). With type 1 diabetes, your body can’t make insulin (a hormone that acts like a key to let blood sugar into cells for use as energy), so you need to take it every day. Type 1 diabetes is less common than type 2 diabetes; about 5% of the people who have diabetes have type 1. Currently, no one knows how to prevent type 1 diabetes. Most people with diabetes—9 out of 10—have type 2 diabetes. With type 2 diabetes, your body doesn’t use insulin well and is unable to keep blood sugar at normal levels. If you have any of the risk factors below, ask your doctor if you should be tested for diabetes. The sooner you find out, the sooner you can start making healthy changes that will benefit you now and in the future. More than 30 million US adults have diabetes—and 1 out of 4 of them don’t know they have it. At least 1 out of 3 people will develop diabetes in their lifetime. Medical costs for people with diabetes are twice as high as for people without diabetes. Risk of death for adults with diabetes is 50% higher than for adults without diabetes. Type 2 diabetes risk factors include: Continue reading >>

National Diabetes Month – November, 2017

National Diabetes Month – November, 2017

November is National Diabetes Month. Help your students and their families learn about healthy behaviors. Download posters from the Discover Health/Descrube Salud project. See how the Great Lakes Science Center is introducing students to research related to diabetes, obesity and cardiovascular disease. Explore the web-based resources available from the Genetic Science Learning Center. Continue reading >>

National Diabetes Month: An Overview Of The Disease

National Diabetes Month: An Overview Of The Disease

November is National Diabetes Month and throughout the month, DHEC’s Diabetes, Heart Disease, Obesity and School Health Division is highlighting the impact diabetes has on the citizens in South Carolina (SC) and millions of Americans across the country. According to the 2014 Behavior Risk Factor Surveillance Survey, SC ranks seventh highest in the nation in the percent of the adult population with diabetes. The prevalence of diabetes increases with age – a dramatic increase can be seen among those 45 and older. In 2014, three people died each day from diabetes – that is one death from diabetes every eight hours. Research has shown that improving food choices, a modest weight loss (5-7 percent of body weight) and getting at least 150 minutes of physical activity weekly helps to prevent or delay the onset of type 2 diabetes. What are the different types of diabetes? Prediabetes – a wake-up call that you are on the path to diabetes. Prediabetes means your blood glucose level is higher than normal, but not high enough yet to be diagnosed with type 2 diabetes. Prediabetes often can be reversed through lifestyle changes such as increased physical activity and weight loss. The earlier the diagnosis, the more likely it can be reversed or prevented. When you have prediabetes, it puts you at risk for heart disease and stroke. But you can take action to lower those risks by enrolling in a local National Diabetes Prevention Program. Type 1 diabetes – usually diagnosed in children and young adults, and was previously known as juvenile diabetes. Only 5% – 10% of people with diabetes have this form of the disease. In type 1 diabetes, the body does not produce insulin. The body breaks down the sugars and starches you eat into a simple sugar called glucose, which it uses for Continue reading >>

Toolkit: American Diabetes Month

Toolkit: American Diabetes Month

Diabetes is one of the leading causes of disability and death in the United States. Diabetes can cause blindness, nerve damage, kidney disease, and other health problems if it’s not controlled. People who are at high risk for type 2 diabetes can lower their risk by more than half if they make healthy changes like getting more physical activity, losing weight, and eating healthy. American Diabetes Month is a chance to raise awareness about diabetes risk factors and encourage people to make healthy changes. With this and other National Health Observance toolkits offered on healthfinder.gov, we’ve made it easier for you to make a difference. The toolkits provide resources for organizations like schools, healthcare providers, health departments, and more to raise awareness about critical public health issues, like the importance of preventing diabetes. This toolkit is full of ideas to help you take action today. For example: Health professionals: Check out this free training that teaches health care providers how to reduce hypoglycemic adverse drug events (ADEs) in patients with diabetes — and earn continuing education. By raising awareness about diabetes, we can all work together to help people make healthy changes and reduce their diabetes risk factors. Continue reading >>

Organizations Seek To Raise Awareness For Diabetes During National Diabetes Month 2017

Organizations Seek To Raise Awareness For Diabetes During National Diabetes Month 2017

November marks National Diabetes Month, a national health observance recognized every year to bring attention to diabetes and its effect on millions of Americans. Organizations including the National Diabetes Education Program (NDEP), the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and the American Diabetes Association (ADA) observe the month of awareness. The NDEP’s 2017 theme is “You Are the Center of Your Diabetes Care Team.” The theme seeks to remind people with diabetes that they are the most important member of their diabetes care team, and that they should seek support from health care professionals, family, friends and their community to successfully manage their diabetes. The ADA recognizes November as American Diabetes Month®. Both the ADA and the NDEP have promotional materials available on their websites. Continue reading >>

Toolkit: American Diabetes Month

Toolkit: American Diabetes Month

Diabetes is one of the leading causes of disability and death in the United States. It can cause blindness, nerve damage, kidney disease, and other health problems if it’s not controlled. People who are at high risk for type 2 diabetes can lower their risk by more than half if they make healthy changes like increasing physical activity, losing weight, and eating healthy. We can use American Diabetes Month to raise awareness about diabetes risk factors and encourage people to make healthy changes. healthfinder.gov provides toolkits for several National Health Observances including American Diabetes Month in November. The toolkits provide resources for organizations like schools, healthcare providers, health departments, and more to raise awareness about critical public health issues, like the importance of preventing diabetes. Visit healthfinder.gov for resources to help you raise awareness about American Diabetes Month. Health professionals: Check out this free training that teaches health care providers how to reduce hypoglycemic adverse drug events (ADEs) in patients with diabetes and earn continuing education. Continue reading >>

Stop Diabetes – National Diabetes Awareness Month

Stop Diabetes – National Diabetes Awareness Month

Did you know that 29.1 million people in the United States have diabetes? On top of that, an additional 8.1 million may be undiagnosed and unaware of their condition. About 1.4 million new cases of diabetes are diagnosed in United States every year. These number have grown a staggering amount within the past 20 years, making diabetes an extremely important National Health Concern. That is why November is designated as National Diabetes Awareness month by the federal government. Diabetes can strike anyone, from any walk of life, and it often does. Worldwide, it afflicts more than 380 million people. And the World Health Organization estimates that by 2030, that number of people living with diabetes will more than double. To attempt to roll back this increasing numbers, we must actively try to stay away from diabetes prone activities. But before analyzing how to combat diabetes, we must fully understand what diabetes is. To answer that, you first need to understand the role of insulin in your body. When you eat, your body turns food into sugars, or glucose. At that point, your pancreas is supposed to release insulin. Insulin serves as a “key” to open your cells, to allow the glucose to enter — and allow you to use the glucose for energy. But with diabetes, this system does not work. Several major problems can occur that causes the onset of diabetes. The two most common forms of diabetes are Type 1 and Type 2. There are also other, less common, forms, such as gestational diabetes, which occurs during pregnancy. Type 1 is the more severe form of diabetes, known as insulin-dependent diabetes. It is also sometimes referred to as “juvenile” diabetes, because it usually develops in children and teenagers, though it can develop at any age. The most common form of diabe Continue reading >>

Every November Is National Diabetes (awareness) Month

Every November Is National Diabetes (awareness) Month

This month is National Diabetes Month. During this month, along with the Centers for Disease Control, the National Institutes of Health, the American Academy of Ophthalmology, the American Optometric Association, and many other organizations, we will be posting articles to help raise the awareness of diabetes. As board certified eye doctors, we will focus on how best to prevent vision loss from diabetic retinopathy. It is estimated that about 10% of Americans will have diabetes by 2040. Unfortunately, most with the disease know little about diabetic retinopathy and how vision loss can be prevented. Presently, diabetes is the leading cause of blindness in the world. By increasing awareness, we hope to better educate everyone so that diabetes is no longer a leading cause of blindness. What is Diabetes? We derive energy from the food we eat. Glucose, a sugar found in food, is used by our cells as a source of energy. The hormone insulin is required to help our cells utilize the glucose (sugar) in our blood. Insulin helps keep our cells healthy and alive. Patients with diabetes have difficulty maintaining and controlling normal blood sugar levels. In general, diabetes is characterized by having higher sugar levels in the blood compared to normal. Insulin is normally produced by the pancreas. There are two types of diabetes: Type 1 Diabetes (T1D) Type 2 Diabetes (T2D) Classification of the types of diabetes has changed over the years as our understanding of the disease has changed. Patients with Type 1 Diabetes (T1D) have lost the ability for the pancreas to produce insulin. Patients with Type 1 Diabetes must take insulin on a daily basis to maintain sugar control. Patients with Type 2 Diabetes (T2D) still have the ability to produce insulin, but the body does not use the ins Continue reading >>

American Diabetes Month

American Diabetes Month

Diabetes is one of the leading causes of disability and death in the United States. It can cause blindness, nerve damage, kidney disease, and other health problems if it’s not controlled. One in 10 Americans have diabetes — that’s more than 30 million people. And another 84 million adults in the United States are at high risk of developing type 2 diabetes. The good news? People who are at high risk for type 2 diabetes can lower their risk by more than half if they make healthy changes. These changes include: eating healthy, getting more physical activity, and losing weight. How can American Diabetes Month make a difference? We can use this month to raise awareness about diabetes risk factors and encourage people to make healthy changes. Here are just a few ideas: Encourage people to make small changes, like taking the stairs instead of the elevator. Talk to people in your community about getting regular checkups. They can get their blood pressure and cholesterol checked, and ask the doctor about their diabetes risk. Ask doctors and nurses to be leaders in their communities by speaking about the importance of healthy eating and physical activity. How can I help spread the word? We’ve made it easier for you to make a difference. This toolkit is full of ideas to help you take action today. For example: Continue reading >>

National Diabetes Month

National Diabetes Month

Did you know more than 30 million Americans are living with Diabetes? That’s 1 in 11 people! And a staggering 86 million adults are prediabetic which means they are at risk for developing Type 2 Diabetes. Talk to your Pharmacist or Provider at The Little Clinic for more information about the Diabetes. For more information about pricing and services, just send an email to [email protected] And be sure to follow them on Instagram. Continue reading >>

November Is National Diabetes Month

November Is National Diabetes Month

November is National Diabetes Month, and all kinds of events are planned on the local and national levels to bring attention to the burgeoning epidemic. Hospitals and health systems are working with their communities to sponsor screenings, informational sessions, fund-raising walks and healthy-living demonstrations. Of course, programs aimed at managing and preventing diabetes are year-round activities for hospitals and health systems. They invest in wellness and prevention services for those with chronic diseases, like diabetes, because keeping people healthy and at home is better for patients and communities – and better for controlling health care costs. Consider that diabetes affects nearly 30 million children and adults in the U.S. today, according to the American Diabetes Association. Another 86 million people have prediabetes and are at risk for developing the disease. Health complications associated with diabetes include heart disease and vision loss. The average medical expenditures for people with diabetes are about $13,700 a year – with $7,900 relating to diabetes alone. With all the health complications involved with diabetes – not to mention the health care costs for people living with the disease – November is a sobering reminder of the value of diabetes awareness. Recent estimates project that as many as 1 in 3 American adults will have diabetes by 2050 unless preventative measures are taken. Everyone is at risk. But the good news is that just about everyone also has the ability to avoid diabetes. Eating a balanced diet with limited carbohydrates, maintaining a normal weight, and daily exercise for the vast majority will prevent it. Hospitals and health systems want the people they serve to know that a little bit of change can go a long way – an Continue reading >>

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