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National Diabetes Month

November Is National Diabetes Month

November Is National Diabetes Month

JACKSON, Miss. – During November, the Diabetes Foundation of Mississippi conducts an educational campaign targeting those with diabetes (approximately 373.000 in Mississippi). Materials developed by the DFM provide important guidelines to improve health and glycemic control. All hospitals, physicians’ clinics, retail pharmacies and home-health agencies receive packets of information from the DFM. National Diabetes Month may only last 30 days, but healthy living and diabetes control should be on everyone’s mind 365 days a year! For more about the Diabetes Foundation of Mississippi and what you should know about diabetes visit www.msdiabetes.org. Continue reading >>

November Is National Diabetes Month

November Is National Diabetes Month

November is National Diabetes Month and health officials say that should serve as a wake-up call to Alabama especially. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention says Alabama has one of the highest rates of diabetes in the country at over twelve percent. The National Diabetes Education Program is promoting a campaign to encourage diabetics to take control of their condition through education and awareness. Dr. Griffin Rodgers is an expert on diabetes at the National Institutes of Health. He says a lack of awareness about the disease can be especially dangerous. "One in four people, on average, are unaware that they have diabetes, and of course, if you aren't diagnosed, you aren't being treated, and there are serious health problems associated with having untreated diabetes for some prolonged period of time. Heart disease, stroke, blindness, kidney disease, amputations, and even death." Several Alabama hospitals are also coordinating a new program to collect and share data on the disease. Continue reading >>

Top Ways To Get Involved In National Diabetes Month

Top Ways To Get Involved In National Diabetes Month

Diabetes is one of the top reasons for annual deaths in America. In fact, one in every ten Americans suffers from this disease. That’s about 30 million people in the country suffering from diabetes every day.The greater problem lies in those who do not control their health habits and make better choices. Diabetes can lead to other serious health problems, such as kidney and nerve damage. But the good news is that diabetes can be controlled. When people decide to make healthier choices, keep their diet and weight in mind, watch their sugar intake and make an effort to exercise, many of the symptoms may subside. Instead of developing more health problems, you can form better health habits and raise awareness of the plight of those living with diabetes. Diabetes can be treated, and the symptoms can be lessened. If more people talk about the risks and consciously try to lead healthier lives, perhaps the statistics of diabetes in the country can be lessened. Participating in National Diabetes Month November is American Diabetes Month. This is a good time to talk about the risk factors, educate others and encourage healthier habits. Some simple and easy things you can do to participate in the National Diabetes Month are: Organizing community walks in your area to raise awareness Inviting speakers to talk with kids in schools about healthy food and health habits Doing more personally to be active, such as encouraging your officemates to take the stairs instead of company elevators Focusing on switching to healthier meals at home Speaking with your doctor or getting a physical check-up to keep your own health I check Tweeting about National Diabetes Month or spreading the word on your social media platforms Visiting a friend who may be suffering diabetes and helping them for Continue reading >>

Get Involved In Wdd!

Get Involved In Wdd!

Taking part in World Diabetes Day can be exciting! World Diabetes Day is an excellent occasion for people with diabetes, health professionals, diabetes advocates, media, the general public and governments to unite for diabetes awareness and action. Your participation is key to the success of the campaign. Here are some ideas on how you can get involved: Promote the blue circle as the global symbol of diabetes Wear blue for diabetes Wear the blue circle pin Form a human blue circle Promote the blue circle selfie app Pin a high-profile individual in your community Advocate Advocate at regional, national and international level to make diabetes a priority on health and development agendas Call on decision-makers in your region to promote early detection and help prevent type 2 diabetes and diabetes complications Hold a roundtable, bringing together key stakeholders from diabetes and NCD organisations, governmental agencies, academic institutions and industry to exchange knowledge and share good example in tackling the diabetes epidemic Share with decision-makers results of successful diabetes interventions Organize an activity You can submit your activity(ies) on the WDD events map. Organize an activity around the 2017 theme ‘Women and Diabetes’ and raise awareness of how important access to care and education is to better manage diabetes Organize a diabetes fair offering screenings and information on how to prevent type 2 diabetes and diabetes complications Organize activities for women promoting healthy living for women and their families to prevent diabetes Organize activities around the importance of GDM screening Organize a diabetes screening at your National Parliament or City Hall to raise awareness among your national or local authorities Request local authorit Continue reading >>

National Diabetes Month And Foot Health

National Diabetes Month And Foot Health

November is National Diabetes Month, which means it’s time to promote awareness of this disease caused by elevated glucose (sugar) levels in the blood stream. If you are diabetic—and a sizeable number of Americans are (currently over 29 million, with another 84 million who can be categorized as “prediabetic”)—you have a lot of health concerns. The disease has wide-ranging effects on the entire body. As such, it’s easy to lose sight of how diabetes affect foot health. The truth of the matter, though, is that there are serious medical complications that can happen to diabetic feet! As we explore diabetes and foot health, there are a couple of key areas of concern. You will see that these include neuropathy (nerve damage), peripheral vascular disease, and impaired immune function. Nerve health is important for living a full life and being able to appreciate everything this world has to offer. They allow you to: Take in the natural beauty while hiking at any of our local parks; Catch inspiring performances at the Dr. Phillips Center for Performing Arts in Orlando; Or savor the delicious tastes and smells at Kres Chophouse, The Capital Grille, Emeril’s Orland, or any of the other fine dining restaurants in our local communities. Of course, your nerves do much more than contribute to the experience of living – they actually allow you to live in the first place. As such, it’s concerning when elevated sugar levels from diabetes cause damage to nerve tissues throughout the body, especially sensory nerves. The sensation of touch can certainly contribute to enjoyable experiences, but it also lets you know when a problem exists. For this reason, pain can actually be a good thing (as strange as that might be to think about). It’s certainly concerning to lose the Continue reading >>

Lethargy. Excessive Thirst. Frequent Urination.

Lethargy. Excessive Thirst. Frequent Urination.

If your pet is displaying any of these common signs, he or she may have diabetes. If you didn’t know your dog or cat could develop diabetes, you’re not alone. Many owners don’t realize diabetes can affect pets too, so learning that your dog or cat has the condition can leave you with many questions. While there’s no cure for diabetes, proper care can help your pet live a happy, healthy, active life. The more you know about diabetes, the better you’ll be able to work with your veterinarian to successfully manage your pet’s health. Your veterinarian is an essential partner in your pet’s diabetes care. Only your veterinarian can diagnose diabetes and provide appropriate preventive and management programs. Continue reading >>

November Is National Diabetes Awareness Month

November Is National Diabetes Awareness Month

The JDRF community will be raising awareness about type 1 diabetes (T1D) throughout the month of November. We’ll kick things off on T1Day, November 1, 2017, by telling our stories to the world. Every minute of every day, people with T1D persevere in the face of adversity. JDRF is committed to making day-to-day life with the disease easier, safer and healthier while working toward ways to cure and prevent T1D once and for all. This November, we are continuing our T1D Looks Like Me campaign to spread awareness about life with T1D. Visit our website or follow us on social media to “Get Quizzed by a Whiz Kid” and test your knowledge against that of a nine-year-old with T1D. You can also create a custom “T1D Looks Like Me” profile photo for social media or generate your unique “T1D Footprint.” You can post your footprint image to Facebook, Instagram or Twitter to shed light on the cumulative burden of finger pricks, injections and other disruptions that come with living with T1D. JDRF will also continue our important advocacy efforts throughout the month. We are asking Congress to continue funding critical research through the Special Diabetes Program and pressuring insurers to guarantee that everyone has the Coverage 2 Control their T1D. Check back with us on World Diabetes Day, November 14, 2017, and throughout the month for more blogs, stories and ways to share what it means to be affected by T1D. Continue reading >>

National Diabetes Month Events To Focus On Disease Prevention And Treatment

National Diabetes Month Events To Focus On Disease Prevention And Treatment

In recognition of National Diabetes Month, several November events aim to educate and help prevent diabetes in the north country. According to data collected by the Fort Drum Regional Health Planning Organization, 10 percent of the population in Jefferson, Lewis and St. Lawrence counties combined — or 25,560 people — have been diagnosed with diabetes. In Jefferson and St. Lawrence counties, the rate of death due to diabetes is on the rise. The Diabetes Coalition of Jefferson County announced it will host “Unwrapping the Mystery of Diabetes,” an evening of community education on prevention and treatment of the disease on Nov. 13. Local agencies and businesses providing diabetes services and products will be on site. “In Jefferson County over 11 percent of adults have been diagnosed with diabetes,” Jefferson County Public Health officials wrote in a press release. “Many more of us have pre-diabetes and even more of us have risk factors to develop diabetes in our lifetime.” The evening will also feature a cooking presentation by Maureen Larkins of Cornell Cooperative Extension, and the first 50 guests will receive a bag of food to make the dish at home. Two doctors will also speak. Dr. James V. Stillerman, Samaritan Wound Care Center medical director, will present “Prevention and Care in Diabetic Wounds,” followed by endocrinologist Dr. Claudia Fish with “Medical Options for Diabetes Control.” There will be information for those with Type 2, Type 1 and Gestational Diabetes along with prevention tips and free healthy tips provided by sponsor MVP Healthcare. On Nov. 15, Carthage Area Hospital will provide a free, public luncheon to discuss the prevention and management of the disease. The educational luncheon hopes to empower attendees with “informa Continue reading >>

National Diabetes Month

National Diabetes Month

The Highlands Hospital Diabetes Center is an American Diabetes Association (ADA approved program, a member of the Pittsburgh Regional Initiative for Diabetes Education (PRIDE.) The center is located at 1064 Morrell Avenue in Connellsville and is open Mon-Fri from 8-4. Call 724-628-8008 for more information or to schedule your appointment. Continue reading >>

National Diabetes Month

National Diabetes Month

National Diabetes Month is an annual designation observed in November. OBSERVE Use #NationalDiabetesMonth to post on social media. HISTORY To Be Researched Continue reading >>

November Is National Diabetes Month

November Is National Diabetes Month

Diabetes can be a devastating illness. It’s the seventh-leading cause of death in the United States, causing more than 76,000 deaths annually, and even when the disease isn’t fatal, it can have serious consequences: every year nearly 12 million people have to report to the ER due to complications caused by the disease. One of the worst facts about diabetes, however, is that many people who have the illness are unaware. Experts estimate that as many as one-quarter of those with diabetes have yet to be diagnosed, leaving them vulnerable to the gradual destruction of their health caused by high blood sugar. Because diabetes is dangerous and sometimes overlooked, the National Diabetes Education Program (NDEP) has named November National Diabetes Month. This event, which has continued uninterrupted since 1975, aims to promote awareness of the disease among the general public and recognize the daily struggle of millions of Americans to stay healthy in the face of this potentially devastating illness. Spreading Awareness The main goal of National Diabetes Month is to give physicians, public health officials, and those with diabetes a time to gain the attention of their community. To that end, the NDEP holds events and provides resources to those working to educate their friends and neighbors about the illness. The NDEP has set up a website to promote National Diabetes Month, and this website hosts several useful tools, including posts to publicize National Diabetes Month on social media (including free web posters and Facebook and Twitter cover images), pre-designed wall posters and flyers, and pre-written public service announcements suitable for local radio and television stations. In addition, the website offers a pre-recorded webinar and videos about National Diabetes Continue reading >>

It's Your Life. Treat Your Diabetes Well.

It's Your Life. Treat Your Diabetes Well.

November is National Diabetes Month. Here’s to managing your diabetes for a longer, healthier life. There isn’t a cure yet for diabetes, but a healthy lifestyle can really reduce its impact on your life. What you do every day makes the difference: eating a healthy diet, being physically active, taking medicines if prescribed, and keeping health care appointments to stay on track. The Basics More than 30 million people in the United States have diabetes, but 1 out of 4 of them don’t know they have it. There are three main types of diabetes: type 1, type 2, and gestational diabetes (diabetes while pregnant, which can put the pregnancy and baby at risk and lead to type 2 diabetes later). With type 1 diabetes, your body can’t make insulin (a hormone that acts like a key to let blood sugar into cells for use as energy), so you need to take it every day. Type 1 diabetes is less common than type 2 diabetes; about 5% of the people who have diabetes have type 1. Currently, no one knows how to prevent type 1 diabetes. Most people with diabetes—9 out of 10—have type 2 diabetes. With type 2 diabetes, your body doesn’t use insulin well and is unable to keep blood sugar at normal levels. If you have any of the risk factors below, ask your doctor if you should be tested for diabetes. The sooner you find out, the sooner you can start making healthy changes that will benefit you now and in the future. More than 30 million US adults have diabetes—and 1 out of 4 of them don’t know they have it. At least 1 out of 3 people will develop diabetes in their lifetime. Medical costs for people with diabetes are twice as high as for people without diabetes. Risk of death for adults with diabetes is 50% higher than for adults without diabetes. Type 2 diabetes risk factors include: Continue reading >>

National Diabetes Month 2017

National Diabetes Month 2017

November is National Diabetes Month, and the theme for 2017 is Managing Diabetes – It’s Not Easy, But It’s Worth It. This year’s theme was chosen to emphasize how diabetes affects more than just your blood sugar, it also affects your heart and body, and how important managing diabetes can be for maintaining your overall health. Diabetes occurs when your body doesn’t produce enough insulin to absorb sugar into body. Blood sugar can rise to dangerous levels. Diabetics control their blood sugar levels by taking insulin, medication, and through diet. It’s a balancing act between what they eat, how much insulin they take, and how physically active they are. Sometimes one side of this balance goes too high or too low, and this when we can have a diabetic emergency. The most common emergency for diabetics is low blood sugar. This is the person who can become sleepy or confused, feel thirsty or hunger, or become nauseous. They may become pale, sweaty, and complain of a headache. We treat this by giving them something with sugar to eat or drink. Juice, soda, jelly beans, or candy that contain real sugar. They should start to feel better and remind them to check their blood sugar. If someone has become so sleepy or confused that you think they could choke if they drink or eat call 911. Risks of mismanaging diabetes include an increased risk for a heart attack or stroke. This can be caused by increased levels of blood sugar damaging blood vessels and nerves over time. The damage leads to increased risk of developing heart disease or having a stroke. Not taking care of your diabetes can also cause problems with vision, blindness, nerve damage, kidney damage, and problems with your teeth or gums. Keeping track of diabetes can help you minimize these risks, as well as giv Continue reading >>

November: World Diabetes Day And Diabetes Awareness Month!

November: World Diabetes Day And Diabetes Awareness Month!

With November being National Diabetes Awareness Month in the U.S., you can imagine there’s a slew of awareness campaigns and fundraising events that go on throughout the month. This effort has taken on more international importance in recent years, with the growth of global observances of World Diabetes Day that takes place annually on November 14, the date marking the birthday of insulin co-discoverer Dr. Frederick Banting. Here at DiabetesMine, we’ve covered these November diabetes activities at length over the years. Please browse through this overview of posts we’ve written to get a sense of what happens when diabetes awareness becomes a national and international priority. Diabetes Awareness Month 2017 This year, we believe the need for diabetes awareness month is more important than ever. Many different diabetes organizations have a plethora of activities and initiatives, including the American Diabetes Association and JDRF that are both emphasizing the "invisible illness" aspect of living with diabetes. Our roundup explores all of the happenings within the USA and across the world. Diabetes Months of the Past Don’t miss our coverage of what happened for Diabetes Awareness Month last year, in both the U.S. and across the globe. You’ll read about efforts from the American Diabetes Association (ADA), International Diabetes Federation (IDF), JDRF, Diabetes Hands Foundation, and other groups working to raise public awareness and make a difference for the Diabetes Community. You can also reflect back on the prior year, with our coverage of Diabetes Awareness Month 2015, when both the ADA and IDF focused on the theme of educating people about healthy eating. World Diabetes Day and the Blue Circle World Diabetes Day (WDD) was established by the International Di Continue reading >>

November Is National Diabetes Month

November Is National Diabetes Month

National Diabetes Month is recognized the month of November. To create awareness for this disease the American Diabetes Association posted the following statistics on diabetes: • Nearly 30 million children and adults in the United States have diabetes. • Another 86 million Americans have pre-diabetes and are at risk for developing type 2 diabetes. • The American Diabetes Association estimates that the total national cost of diagnosed diabetes in the United States is $245 billion. Diabetes is a group of diseases marked by high levels of blood glucose resulting from defects in insulin production, insulin action or both. It is a chronic disease that can lead to serious complications and premature death. While there is currently no cure for diabetes, it can be controlled through early detection, proper diet and education. Pre-diabetes, on the other hand, is when blood glucose levels are higher than normal, but not yet high enough to be diagnosed as diabetes. The progression of pre-diabetes to diabetes may be reduced by lifestyle interventions (changes) and by some medication strategies. In fact, according to the American Diabetes Association early treatment and education of pre-diabetes can actually return blood glucose level to the normal range. Butler County Health Care Center offers both a Diabetes Self-Management Education Program and a Diabetes Prevention Class (pre-diabetes course). The Diabetes Self-Management Education program is certified by the American Diabetes Association and is directed by Connie Schmit, RN, Certified Diabetes Educator (CDE) in conjunction with Joan Plummer, RD, CDE. The program is designed with the American Association of Diabetes Educators seven self-care behaviors in mind: healthy eating, being active, monitoring, taking medication, pr Continue reading >>

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