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National Diabetes Education Program Cdc

Kirkman To Chair National Diabetes Education Program

Kirkman To Chair National Diabetes Education Program

Conversations with Innovators: UNC hematologist on promising drug trials for treating painful crises in sickle cell patients Kirkman to chair National Diabetes Education Program M. Sue Kirkman, MD, Professor of Medicine and Medical Director of the UNC Diabetes Care Center's Clinical Trials Unit, has been appointed Chair of the National Diabetes Education Program. Kirkman's term as Chair begins on Jan. 1, 2018. M. Sue Kirkman, MD , Professor of Medicine and Medical Director of the UNC Diabetes Care Center's Clinical Trials Unit, has been appointed Chair of the National Diabetes Education Program (NDEP) . Congratulations, Dr. Kirkman! Her term as Chair begins on January 1, 2018. The National Diabetes and Education Program (NDEP) works collaboratively with its partners at the federal, state, and local levels to improve the treatment and outcomes for people with diabetes, promote early diagnosis, and prevent or delay the onset of type 2 diabetes. NDEP is jointly sponsored by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services National Institutes of Health (NIH) and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). John Buse, MD, PhD, Chief of the Division of Endocrinology and Metabolism, previously served a term as Chair of the NDEP. Continue reading >>

Diabetes - Oklahoma State Department Of Health

Diabetes - Oklahoma State Department Of Health

Adults (Click on "Adults" to see complete Fact Sheet.) In 2014, about 351,880 Oklahomans 18 years and older were diagnosed with diabetes. American Indians and African American adults have the highest percentage of diabetes In 2014 nearly one in every four seniors was diagnosed with diabetes The percent of the adult population with diabetes is higher than in the US The death rate for diabetes is higher than in the US The Center for the Advancement of Wellness is funded through the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Funding mandates require a population based, public health approach.This includes public health prevention and control strategies.These strategies include designing, implementing, and evaluating access to and quality of care. Accredited/Certified Diabetes Self-Management Education Programs Registry of Recognized Programs (CDC): The national registry of recognized diabetes prevention programs lists contact information for programs that offer type 2 diabetes prevention programs in communities across the United States. New Beginnings: A Discussion Guide for Living Well with Diabetes : New Beginnings: A Discussion Guide for Living Well with Diabetes is an on-line resource that uses stories about African Americans with diabetes to help group leaders lead discussions about the emotional side of living with diabetes, and help people with diabetes identify family and social support needs and develop goal setting, positive coping and problem solving skills. New Beginnings can be used to supplement diabetes self-management education sessions and in diabetes support groups. Continue reading >>

Diabetes At Work E-news

Diabetes At Work E-news

Having trouble viewing this email? View it as a Web page . The companion newsletter to www.diabetesatwork.org . Read about how CDC is partnering withthe health care community and businesses to help improve employee health andcontrol health care costs. In this issue of BusinessPulse , a newsletterfrom the CDC Foundation, you can find information about strategies to reducehealth care costs and improve productivity along with other CDC resources that can helpemployers spend smarter. New Cardiovascular Disease Resource for Businesses Many people with diabetes do not realize that having diabetes increases their chances of having a heart attack or stroke. Learn the Business Logic of Combating Cardiovascular Diseasefrom the National Business Coalition on Healths Action Brief According to this brief the cost of an employee suffering acardiovascular event can be catastrophic to employer health plan costs. Between2010 and 2030, total direct medical costs of cardiovascular diseases areprojected to triple, from$273billion to $818 billion. Indirect costs (due to lost productivity) areestimated to increase from $172 billion to $276 billionan increase of 61%.This brief includes action steps for employers to help prevent cardiovascularevents. Learn more aboutthe connection between diabetes and heart disease. Answerstodiabetes in the workplace questions Howcan I raise awareness in my workplace about diabetes and eye disease? Inaddition to being National Diabetes Month, November also is Diabetic EyeDisease Month. The disease often has no early symptoms, so early detection andregular follow-up with your health care team are key to preventing vision lossand blindness. Pass on resources about diabetes and eye disease from the NationalEye Health Education Program and the NationalDiabetes Ed Continue reading >>

National Diabetes Prevention Program

National Diabetes Prevention Program

According to the Centers for Disease Control, one out of three American adults has prediabetes meaning their blood glucose (sugar) levels are higher than normal, putting them at high risk for diabetes. You could be at high risk for developing type 2 diabetes if you: are physically active fewer than three times per week ever gave birth to a baby that weighed more than 9 pounds ever had diabetes while pregnant (gestational diabetes), or Take this assessment on the CDC's website to find out if you are at risk for developing diabetes. Mon Health Medical Centers National Diabetes Prevention Program can help reduce your risk for diabetes. Research has shown that making small changes including making better food choices, increasing physical activity, and reducing stress can significantly reduce your risk for developing diabetes. This program will educate and support you in making those important lifestyle changes. To participate in the program, you must be at high risk for developing diabetes, have been diagnosed by a physician as having prediabetes, or had gestational diabetes in a pregnancy. The National Diabetes Prevention Program is a year-long program and is free of charge, but space is limited and pre-registration is required. It is not necessary to have a physician referral to participate, provided you meet the prediabetes requirements. Continue reading >>

Diabetes Resources Arkansas Department Of Health

Diabetes Resources Arkansas Department Of Health

Diabetes Self-Management Education Programs (DSME) Outpatient Diabetes Self-Management Education Programs (DSME/S) recognized by the American Diabetes Association or accredited by the American Association of Diabetes Educators meet National Standards for DSME/S. The programs assure patients and payers that the practice offers quality, comprehensive diabetes education and care, and meet criteria for Medicare Reimbursement. For more information onapplying or receiving technical assistance with the DSME application process contact the Arkansas Department of Health,Chronic Disease Prevention and Control Branch at 501-661-2942. The American Medical Association (AMA) and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) joined forces to take urgent action to Prevent Diabetes STAT and are urging others to join in this critical effort. Prevent Diabetes STAT: Screen, Test, Act - Today, is a multi-year initiative to reach more Americans with prediabetes and stop the progression to type 2 diabetes. The AMA and CDC have co-developed a toolkit to serve as a guide for physicians and other health care providers on the best methods to screen and refer high-risk patients to diabetes prevention programs in their communities. There is also an online screening tool for patients at www.preventdiabetesstat.org to help them determine their risk for type 2 diabetes. The National Diabetes Education Program (NDEP) has created the Small Steps. Big Rewards. Prevent type 2 Diabetes campaign. The NDEP has created campaign messages and materials for people at risk for diabetes, including those at high risk: African Americans, Hispanic and Latino Americans, Native Americans and Alaska Natives, Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders, women with a history of gestational diabetes and older adults. In Continue reading >>

Applying National Survey Results For Strategic Planning And Program Improvement: The National Diabetes Education Program

Applying National Survey Results For Strategic Planning And Program Improvement: The National Diabetes Education Program

Applying national survey results for strategic planning and program improvement: The National Diabetes Education Program Author links open overlay panel SusanGriffeya Only a few national health education programs have published evaluation results. The National Diabetes Education Program conducts population-based diabetes surveys. The results are used for strategic planning and program improvement. NDEP's evaluation framework can be an evaluation model for similar programs. Since the 1970s, the federal government has spearheaded major national education programs to reduce the burden of chronic diseases in the United States. These prevention and disease management programs communicate critical information to the public, those affected by the disease, and health care providers. The National Diabetes Education Program (NDEP), the leading federal program on diabetes sponsored by the National Institutes of Health (NIH) and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), uses primary and secondary quantitative data and qualitative audience research to guide program planning and evaluation. Since 2006, the NDEP has filled the gaps in existing quantitative data sources by conducting its own population-based survey, the NDEP National Diabetes Survey (NNDS). The NNDS is conducted every 23 years and tracks changes in knowledge, attitudes and practice indicators in key target audiences. This article describes how the NDEP has used the NNDS as a key component of its evaluation framework and how it applies the survey results for strategic planning and program improvement. The NDEP's use of the NNDS illustrates how a program evaluation framework that includes periodic population-based surveys can serve as an evaluation model for similar national health education programs. Center Continue reading >>

Lone Star Family Health Center Launches Cdcs National Diabetes Prevention Program

Lone Star Family Health Center Launches Cdcs National Diabetes Prevention Program

Lone Star Family Health Center Launches CDCs National Diabetes Prevention Program Registered Dietitian Nutritionist to lead program in both English and Spanish Conroe, Texas, January 3, 2018 Lone Star Family Health Center (LSFHC) will launch a National Diabetes Prevention Program (National DPP) in February, led by its new Registered Dietitian Nutritionist. In the United States, diabetes is becoming an epidemic. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), one in ten Americans, or about 30 million people, have diabetes. The CDC estimates that over 35,500 people in Montgomery County have diabetes, and just over 2,500 patients treated at LSFHC over the past year had diabetes. Additionally, 84.1 million adults in America have prediabetes, and 9 in 10 of prediabetics are unaware that they have it. The risk of developing type 2 diabetes can be reduced by half in people with prediabetes who make lifestyle changes, says LSFHC Pharm D, Valerie Powell, But making those changes takes support. That support is what this program will let us provide our patients. Powell has been leading LSFHCs diabetes nutrition education efforts and spearheaded the initiative for the organization to start a CDC National DPP effort in-house at its Conroe location. The hope is that through this one year program, patients diagnosed with prediabetes will be able to effect a lifestyle change that will lead away from the full onset of diabetes, and to a healthier lifestyle overall. And the biggest asset of this program is that at LSFHC, it will be free of charge. Preventing the full onset of diabetes is the best way to save the lives, and the quality of life, of people with the disease, says Powell, The program will require some commitment on the part of the patients, but it will pro Continue reading >>

Diabetes Prevention General Information And Resources

Diabetes Prevention General Information And Resources

Nearly 30.3 million Americans have diabetes, and another 84 million America adults are at risk for developing Type 2 diabetes, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). To find out more information on preventing diabetes, see the CDC website which gives risk factors, when you should be tested, a fact sheet and frequently asked questions (FAQ’s): Healthy lifestyle choices can help prevent type 2 diabetes, even if diabetes runs in a family, diet and exercise can help prevent the disease. If you already have been diagnosed with diabetes, the same healthy lifestyle choices can help prevent potentially serious complications from occurring. If you have pre-diabetes, lifestyle changes can slow or halt the progression from pre-diabetes to diabetes. Excerpted from the Mayo Clinic website, and the following tips & additional information on preventing diabetes, can also be found on the site: Eat healthy foods. Choose foods low in fat and calories. Focus on fruits, vegetables and whole grains. For every 1,000 calories you consume, try to have at least 14 grams of fiber, because fiber helps control blood sugar levels. Get physical. Aim for 30 minutes of moderate physical activity a day. Take a brisk daily walk. Ride a bike. Swim laps, or if you cannot fit in a longer workout, spread out 10-minute or longer sessions throughout the day. Lose excess pounds. If you’re overweight, losing 5 to 10 percent of your body weight can reduce the risk of diabetes. To keep your weight in a healthy range, focus on permanent changes to your eating and exercise habits. Motivate yourself as the benefits of losing weight, such as having a healthier heart, having more energy and improved self-esteem are so important to your well-being. The Connecticut Department of Public He Continue reading >>

Living Well | Diabetes Education Program | Division Of Public Health Services | New Hampshire Department Of Health And Human Services

Living Well | Diabetes Education Program | Division Of Public Health Services | New Hampshire Department Of Health And Human Services

If you or a loved one are among the 29 million Americans living with diabetes, take time this month to join forces and prioritize preventive care. Living well with diabetes includes long-term management and maintaining a healthy lifestyle! Managing your diabetes may not be easy, but it is worth it! The day-to-day activities needed to manage diabetes can be hard. But if you keep your blood glucose as close to normal as is safe for you what is called your target range you can reduce your chance of serious health problems. It is worth the effort. Ask your health care team for a referral for diabetes education. See your health care team for regular diabetes check-ups. The A1C Test shows you what your blood glucose has been over the last three months. The A1C goal for many people is below 7%. High blood glucose levels can harm your heart and blood vessels, kidneys, feet, and eyes. The new goal for most people is less than 140/80. High blood pressure makes your heart work too hard. It may cause heart attack , stroke , and kidney disease. The LDL goal for most people is less than 100. The HDL goal for most people is above 40. LDL or "bad" cholesterol can build up and clog your blood vessels. It can cause a heart attack or a stroke. HDL or good cholesterol helps remove cholesterol from your blood vessels. Information provided by the National Diabetes Education Program (NDEP), a joint program of the NIH and CDC. New Hampshire Programs for People with Diabetes Diabetes Self-Management Education Programs Continue reading >>

Diabetes Prevention And Management Resources

Diabetes Prevention And Management Resources

General Public, Health Care Providers and Other Health Professionals The American Association of Diabetes Educators (AADE) The AADE is a multi-disciplinary professional membership organization dedicated to improving diabetes care through innovative education, management and support. Practice and patient resources, research, news and publications, and other materials are available at the AADE website. American Association of Diabetes Educators American Diabetes Association (ADA) This organization funds research and delivers services to help prevent diabetes and help those who have diabetes live healthier lives. The ADA website includes basic information about diabetes, diabetes risk tests, information about living with diabetes, among other services. American Diabetes Association American Medical Association (AMA) and Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC): Preventing Type 2 Diabetes: A Guide This guide provides information to help health care providers refer patients with prediabetes to an evidence-based diabetes prevention program. American Medical Association (AMA) and Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC): Preventing Type 2 Diabetes: A Guide Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) – Diabetes Page The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Diabetes page includes basic information about diabetes prevention and control, diabetes programs and initiatives, and data and statistics relating to diabetes in the United States. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Diabetes Centers for Disease Control (CDC) National Diabetes Prevention Program (NDPP) On the CDC NDPP page, people can learn about prediabetes and type 2 diabetes, how to join a CDC-recognized diabetes prevention lifestyle change program to help prevent or delay type 2 diabet Continue reading >>

New Chair Named For National Diabetes Education Program

New Chair Named For National Diabetes Education Program

New chair named for National Diabetes Education Program The National Diabetes Education Program , a joint program of NIH and CDC, has named Linda Siminerio, RN, PhD, as its chair, according to a release from the organization. The [National Diabetes Education Program (NDEP)] plays a unique role in bringing together diverse stakeholders to foster cooperation and collaboration to improve diabetes outcomes, Siminerio said in the release. Im thrilled to have the opportunity to advance the NDEPs work to create awareness, educate and provide support and behavioral strategies to improve care for the prevention and management of diabetes. According to the release, Siminerio will help in efforts to facilitate the adoption of proven approaches to prevent or delay diabetes onset and complications. Dr. Siminerio is a pioneer in the field of diabetes education, a nationally recognized advocate for diabetes education and care, Judith Fradkin, MD, director of the division of diabetes, endocrinology and metabolic diseases for the NIHs National Institute for Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases. Dr. Siminerio has developed strategies that have translated successfully into programs to help all people with diabetes, and specifically those in underserved populations. The National Diabetes Education Program , a joint program of NIH and CDC, has named Linda Siminerio, RN, PhD, as its chair, according to a release from the organization. The [National Diabetes Education Program (NDEP)] plays a unique role in bringing together diverse stakeholders to foster cooperation and collaboration to improve diabetes outcomes, Siminerio said in the release. Im thrilled to have the opportunity to advance the NDEPs work to create awareness, educate and provide support and behavioral strategies to impr Continue reading >>

Existing Dsme Network Could Create Foundation To Scale National Diabetes Prevention Program Across 50 States

Existing Dsme Network Could Create Foundation To Scale National Diabetes Prevention Program Across 50 States

Existing DSME Network Could Create Foundation to Scale National Diabetes Prevention Program Across 50 States Evidence-Based Diabetes Management > December 2016 Published on: December 12, 2016 Existing DSME Network Could Create Foundation to Scale National Diabetes Prevention Program Across 50 States The American Association of Diabetes Educators has offered extensive comments to CMS on how Medicare reimbursement of the Diabetes Prevention Program should occur, so that community groups offering the program financially thrive. An existing network of 3500 sites that offer diabetes self-monitoring education (DSME) and support could form a foundation to deliver the National Diabetes Prevention Program (National DPP) nationwide, once Medicare starts funding it in 2018,1 according to officials with the American Association of Diabetes Educators (AADE). AADEs director of prevention, Joanna Craver DiBenedetto, outlined the benefits of tapping this network during AADE16, the associations 2016 annual conference, which was held in San Diego in August.2 In an interview with Evidence-Based Diabetes Management, DiBenedetto and vice president of science and practice, Leslie E. Kolb, MBA, BSN, RN, discussed how AADEs support for its 14,000 members and the existing sites could be pivotal in scaling the National DPP across the diverse population at risk for diabetes. Although CMS finalized eligibility criteria for the Medicare DPP on November 2, 2016, it left several details to be resolved in 2017. These include: The reimbursement schedule, which will likely be included in the 2018 Medicare Physician Fee Schedule Details for how CMS will measure and reimburse digital programs, which are expected to play a significant role in Medicare DPP How programs that lack full CDC recognition will p Continue reading >>

For People With Diabetes

For People With Diabetes

To receive email updates about Diabetes Education enter your email address: If you are living with diabetes or have a loved one with the disease, its important to work together to manage diabetes. Use these resources to learn how to make healthy lifestyle choices to help manage diabetes, prevent complications, and improve your quality of life. Diabetes means that your blood sugar (glucose) level is too high. Learn about the different types of diabetes and which groups are more likely to develop diabetes. Emotional issuessuch as depressionoften go along with diabetes. Learn how to cope with emotional struggles while managing your diabetes. Type 2 diabetes is becoming more common in young people. Learn about the differences between type 1 and type 2 diabetes, and find out how to lower your childs risk for getting type 2 diabetes. Take control of your health by working with your health care team and adopting healthy behaviors to avoid complications and enjoy a healthier life. Physical activity is a great way to help manage diabetes and stay at a healthy weight. Use these resources to learn how to incorporate exercise into your daily life. Type 2 diabetes occurs in people of all ages, but its more common in older adults. NDEP offers resources that can help older adults learn how to better manage their diabetes. People with diabetes are at risk for complications that may affect their hearts, eyes, feet, kidneys, and other parts of the body. Read about how to prevent these complications. Healthy eating is an important part of diabetes management, but it can be hard to know where to start. Use these resources to help you eat healthier at home, at work, and when dining out. Emergencies and natural disasters can seriously affect people with diabetes. Find out how to be prepared Continue reading >>

Tennessee Pharmacists Association | Cdc Highlights Tennessee Pharmacists' Diabetes Education Program - Tennessee Pharmacists Association

Tennessee Pharmacists Association | Cdc Highlights Tennessee Pharmacists' Diabetes Education Program - Tennessee Pharmacists Association

CDC Highlights Tennessee Pharmacists Diabetes Education Program In a recent report , the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) highlights the success of the Tennessee Pharmacists Association (TPA) via its Tennessee Pharmacists Research and Education Foundation (TPREF) and the Tennessee Department of Health (TDH) in increasing access to and participation in diabetes self-management education (DSME). CDC attributes the success of Tennessees program to targeted outreach, partnership, technical assistance, grant opportunities, and reimbursement initiatives. This important TPA/TPREF effort is funded by a grant of $850,000 from CDC and TDH to explore the role of pharmacists as providers of care and to expand the integration of pharmacists into collaborative, team-based models of care as non-physician practitioners.The initiative is facilitated by partnerships with the National Community Pharmacists Association (NCPA) and the American Association of Diabetes Educators (AADE) . TPA/TPREF recently received additional funds to involve Tennessees six schools and colleges of pharmacy in helping to create tools and resources specific to hypertension and diabetes prevention, care, and management. These tools and resources will focus on engaging patients, the general public, and health care providers, to increase patients access to education and further promote the goals of the grant to improve the health of Tennesseans with diabetes and hypertension. If you have questions about this initiative, please contact TPA/TPREF at 615-256-3023 or [email protected] . Continue reading >>

National Diabetes Education Program Www.yourdiabetesinfo.org 1-888-693-ndep A Joint Program Of Nih And Cdc The Power To Control Diabetes Is In Your Hands.

National Diabetes Education Program Www.yourdiabetesinfo.org 1-888-693-ndep A Joint Program Of Nih And Cdc The Power To Control Diabetes Is In Your Hands.

Presentation on theme: "National Diabetes Education Program www.YourDiabetesInfo.org 1-888-693-NDEP A joint program of NIH and CDC The Power to Control Diabetes Is in Your Hands." Presentation transcript: 1 National Diabetes Education Program www.YourDiabetesInfo.org 1-888-693-NDEP A joint program of NIH and CDC The Power to Control Diabetes Is in Your Hands 2 National Diabetes Education Program www.YourDiabetesInfo.org 1-888-693-NDEP A joint program of NIH and CDC What is Diabetes? Diabetes means that blood glucose (sugar) is too high too much glucose in a persons blood isnt healthy Diabetes can lead to serious health problems and premature death About 24 million Americans have diabetes NIDDK, National Diabetes Statistics fact sheet. HHS, NIH, 2007. 3 National Diabetes Education Program www.YourDiabetesInfo.org 1-888-693-NDEP A joint program of NIH and CDC Diabetes Complications 2 in 3 people with diabetes die of heart disease or stroke Diabetes is the #1 cause of adult blindness Diabetes is the #1 cause of kidney failure Diabetes causes more than 60% of non-traumatic lower-limb amputations each year NIDDK, National Diabetes Statistics fact sheet. HHS, NIH, 2007. 4 National Diabetes Education Program www.YourDiabetesInfo.org 1-888-693-NDEP A joint program of NIH and CDC Types of Diabetes Type 1 Diabetes 5-10% of diagnosed cases of diabetes Type 2 Diabetes 90-95% diagnosed cases of diabetes Gestational Diabetes 7% of all U.S. pregnancies NIDDK, National Diabetes Statistics fact sheet. HHS, NIH, 2005. 5 National Diabetes Education Program www.YourDiabetesInfo.org 1-888-693-NDEP A joint program of NIH and CDC Preventing Diabetes Complications Blood glucose (sugar) control Blood pressure control Blood lipid (fat) control Preventive care practices for eyes, kidneys, feet, Continue reading >>

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