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Nail Polish For Diabetics

[nail Susceptibility To Fungal Infection In Patients With Type 1 And 2 Diabetes Under Long Term Poor Glycaemia Control].

[nail Susceptibility To Fungal Infection In Patients With Type 1 And 2 Diabetes Under Long Term Poor Glycaemia Control].

Abstract Onychomycosis is a common disorder in adults. Its prevalence increases also in diabetics. The objective of the study was: 1) evaluation of finger and toe nail susceptibility to Candida albicans and Trichophyton mentagrophytes infection in patients with type 1 and type 2 diabetes with long term glycaemia under poor control as compared with healthy persons, and 2) checking whether or not various aetiology of type 1 and type 2 diabetes may influence the intensity of fungal nail infection. The materials comprised finger and toe nails sampled from 26 patients with type 1 diabetes (20 females and 6 males at average age 51 +/- 10 years), 25 patients with type 2 diabetes (17 females and 8 males at average age 58 +/- 4 years). Twenty two healthy volunteers (18 females and 4 males at average age 47 +/- 14 years) served as controls. All of the diabetics (except one with type 1 diabetes and four with type 2 diabetes) had increased fasting glycaemia; moreover, all of them had poor controlled long term glycaemia because the concentration of glycated haemoglobin HbAlc exceeded 7.5%. The patients with type 1 diabetes were treated with insulin while those with type 2 diabetes with diet only (one person), with gliclazide (sixteen persons), with glimepirid (five persons), and with metformin (four persons). Enhanced fingernail susceptibility to Candida albicans infection was detected in 38.5% of the patients with type 1 diabetes, in 28% of those with type 2 diabetes, and in 22.7% of the controls. Intensive toenail infection was found in 34.6%, 20%, and 22.7% respectively. Enhanced fingernail susceptibility to Trichophyton mentagrophytes infection was found in 30.8% of the patients with type 1 diabetes, in 48% of those with type 2 diabetes, and in 4.54% of the controls while intens Continue reading >>

Chemicals In Nail Polish, Hair Spray May Increase Diabetes Risk

Chemicals In Nail Polish, Hair Spray May Increase Diabetes Risk

Chemicals in nail polish, hair spray may increase diabetes risk A group of chemicals found in personal care products may raise the risk of diabetes, a new study suggests. Women in the study with highest concentrations of these chemicals, called phthalates , in their bodies were more likely to have diabetes than women with lowest concentrations, the researchers said. Phthalates are found in a variety of products, including nail polish, hair sprays, soaps and shampoos. There was also a link between high concentrations of phthalates and insulin resistance among women who did not have diabetes. (Insulin resistance is often a precursor to Type 2 diabetes ). The findings suggest that phthalates could disrupt blood sugar metabolism, said study researcher Tamarra James-Todd, of Brigham and Women's Hospital's Division of Women's Health. Chemical that regulates biological clock could foster new diabetes treatments However, the researchers cautioned the study surveyed participants at only one point in time, and more research is needed that follows women over years to confirm the results. Phthalates are present in certain medications and medical devices, and its possible women with diabetes have higher phthalate concentrations in their bodies due to the use of these medications or devices, James-Todd said. James-Todd and colleagues analyzed information from 2,350 women ages 20 to 80 who took part in the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, conducted by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, between 2001 and 2008. As part of the survey, participants underwent physical exams and provided urine samples. Of the participants, 217 reported having diabetes. Women who had the highest levels of two chemicals mono-benzyl phthalate and mono-isobutyl phthalate in their u Continue reading >>

Nailing Down Nail Infections

Nailing Down Nail Infections

The condition of your nails may point directly toward the condition of your health. If you are in good health, your fingernails and toenails tend to be smooth, somewhat curved and slightly pink. Abnormalities in the color, shape or condition of your nails, however, may indicate medical problems of varying severity. Novartis Pharmaceuticals Corporation recently commissioned a survey of 1,017 adults, conducted by Roper Starch Audits and Surveys Worldwide. The survey revealed that only 48 percent of Americans know that unexpected physical changes in their nails can signal a significant medical problem including infection, anemia andin extreme circumstanceseven cancer or kidney problems. Furthermore, of those who noticed unexpected changes in the appearance of their nails, a mere 40 percent had them examined by a physician. The fungal infection known as onychomycosis is the most common nail infection, accounting for approximately 50 percent of all nail problems. Onychomycosis results in thick, brittle nails that can be sharp and pointed, causing injury to the surrounding skin. An estimated 30 million individuals in the United States suffer from onychomycosis. According to the November 2000 issue of the Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology, onychomycosis is also the most common nail disorder among people with diabetes, representing about 30 percent of cutaneous fungal infections. One study published in the October 1998 issue of the British Journal of Dermatology, involving 550 people with diabetes, found that 26 percent of patients had onychomycosis and 46 percent had abnormalities in their nails. Individuals with type 1 or type 2 diabetes who have sensory neuropathy and impaired circulation of the lower extremities are at additional risk for onychomycosis. A pers Continue reading >>

Why Does My Breath Smell Like Acetone?

Why Does My Breath Smell Like Acetone?

People often associate strong smelling breath with the food someone has eaten or poor dental hygiene. But it may reveal much more than that. If a person's breath smells like acetone or nail polish remover, it could indicate health conditions, including diabetes. The way a person's breath smells can be an indicator of their overall health. This article explores why a person's breath might smell like acetone and what this might mean about their health. Contents of this article: How diabetes can affect breath Diabetes can affect the way a person's breath smells and can cause bad breath, or halitosis. In a 2009 study, researchers found that analyzing a person's breath helped to identify prediabetes when diabetes is in its early stages. There are two conditions associated with diabetes that can cause bad breath: gum disease and a high ketone level. The proper name for gum diseases in periodontal disease, and its forms include: Diabetes can be associated with an increased risk of gum disease, which may cause a person's breath to smell bad. However, gum disease does not cause a person's breath to smell like acetone. If a person has diabetes and their breath smells like acetone, this is usually caused by high levels of ketones in the blood. Diabetes and acetone breath When diabetes is not managed well, the body does not make enough insulin to break down glucose in the blood. This means that the body's cells do not receive enough glucose to use as energy. When the body cannot get its energy from sugar, it switches to burning fat for fuel instead. The process of breaking down fat to use as energy releases by-products called ketones. Ketone bodies include acetone. Acetone is the same substance that is used in nail varnish remover and is distinguished by its fruity smell. When a pe Continue reading >>

Diabetes Foot Care

Diabetes Foot Care

You're more likely to have foot problems with diabetes because it can damage your nerves and lessen blood flow to your feet. The American Diabetes Association estimates that it's the reason why 1 in 5 people with diabetes who seek hospital care do so. You have to take care of your feet when you have diabetes. Poor foot care may lead to amputation of a foot or leg. Your doctor will check yours each year for problems. If you take good care of your feet, you can prevent most serious problems related to diabetes. Use mild soaps and warm water. Pat your skin dry; do not rub. Thoroughly dry your feet. After washing, put lotion on them to prevent cracking. But not between your toes! Look carefully at the tops and bottoms of your feet. Have someone else do it if you can't see them. Check for dry, cracked skin. Look for blisters, cuts, scratches, or other sores. Check for redness, increased warmth, or tenderness when you touch an area. Watch for ingrown toenails, corns, and calluses. If you get a blister or sore from your shoes, don't "pop" it. Put a bandage over it, and wear a different pair of shoes. Cut toenails after bathing, when they are soft. Trim them straight across, then smooth with a nail file. Avoid cutting into the corners of toes. You may want a podiatrist (foot doctor) to do it for you. Don't cut cuticles. Walk and work out in comfortable shoes. Don't exercise when you have open sores on your feet. Continue reading >>

Number One Podiatrist Recommended Nail Polish - Dr.'s Remedy Enriched Nail Care

Number One Podiatrist Recommended Nail Polish - Dr.'s Remedy Enriched Nail Care

Dr.'s REMEDY is a line of podiatrist formulated nail care created by board certified podiatrists, Dr. Adam Cirlincione and Dr. William Spielfogel. Our collection of products includes over 40 luxurious nail colors and as well as nail care solutions, which can minimize the appearance of dry brittle nails, hydrate nail cuticles and improve the wear-time of your nail color. To set up your account and qualify for special physician pricing, please call 877-323-NAIL (9:30-5:30 EST). By creating an account with our store, you will be able to move through the checkout process faster, store multiple shipping addresses, view and track your orders in your account...and more. Click here for order forms, seasonal promotions and marketing material. Each product is infused with a special blend of ingredients selected by Dr. Cirlincione and Dr. Spielfogel. This blend includes: wheat protein, tea tree oil, garlic bulb extract and lavender. Dr.'s Remedy is the best alternative nail care line for anyone who wants beautiful looking nails and wants to avoid formaldehyde, formaldehyde resin, toluene and DBP. Dr.'s Remedy is vegan friendly and utilizes a range of organic ingredients. Already sold at more than 1,000 podiatry offices nationwide, Dr.'s REMEDY appeals to a wide range of patients which may include: Pregnant women looking to avoid harsh chemicals Children who wish to limit exposure to formaldehyde Patients with strong healthy nails who want to keep them that way We encourage you to contact us with any questions or concerns related to our enriched nail care line. We look forward to working together with all of our professional partners to grow their business. Dr. Adam Cirlincione and Dr. William Spielfogel Continue reading >>

Gel Nails | Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community

Gel Nails | Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community

Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community Find support, ask questions and share your experiences. Join the community This is such a superficial question with so many people here suffering major problems, but I wanted to ask - I have Type 2 diabetes, Victoza and insulin controlled. Can I have gel nails attached to my own nails, or is this discouraged in diabetics? Thank you. I don't understand why you would even ask that? Surely if you want then you'd get them done? I've had tattoos and I didn't ask anyone it's my business! I am asking because diabetics have so many issues that relate to a lack of circulation and getting infections much easier than others. Sorry, but I would have thought that was obvious. Because your diabetic surely you don't ask about every single thing you do? If you have reasonably ok controlled bg levels then you should be ok. I haven't had tattoos done but had my ears pierced a few times. I also went on sunbeds when I was younger, but always made sure that I tested before and had a packet of fruit pastels with me so that I could eat one if I felt I needed to. I also wore contact lens as well. Can we show a little respect for each other please. Hi Claire. My question was genuine, and I was looking for some help. Nanno if you feel like asking then ask away, no questions are unimportant if they relate to you or you are unsure about anything I'm type 1 and have had Gel nails in the past on a few occasions . I used to have acrylics too permanently for a year or so ,never had any problems but I can understand why you would wonder with circulation problems which are associated with Diabetes. Give them a go if you feel they are bothering you you will be able to get them removed by the nail tech. Hi Claire. My question was genuine, and I was looking for Continue reading >>

Pedicures And Diabetes: Can You? Should You?

Pedicures And Diabetes: Can You? Should You?

Before she does anything more to a client than shake her hand, Jill Tinetti carefully checks the health history section on her new client card. With pedicure clients in particular, she carefully evaluates the client’s skin and nails and asks a few seemingly casual questions aimed at unearthing any signs or symptoms of diabetes. As a registered nurse, Tinetti knows what to look for. And as a diabetic herself, she knows all too well what’s at stake. Years ago, long before she herself became a licensed nail tech, an accidental nick incurred in the course of a pedicure landed her in the emergency room. Diagnosed with cellulitis, she required 10 days of intravenous antibiotics to heal. “I’m extremely careful,” declares Tinetti, who’s worked at Tall Grass Spa in Evergreen, Colo., ever since getting her license two years ago. “I never nip cuticles on a diabetic.” With the growing popularity of pedicures and the rising number of diabetics in the United States, nail techs increasingly are faced with the issue. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, more than 15.7 million Americans had diabetes in 1998. According to Douglas Albreski, D.P.M., a podiatrist who specializes in the skin disease and an assistant professor at the University of Connecticut Health Center in Farmington, Conn., that number continues to grow at a fast clip in what specialists are tagging a “diabetic epidemic.” “Diabetes is a very serious disease,” adds Lee Sanders, D.P.M., the immediate past president of health care and education for the American Diabetes Association (ADA) and chief of podiatry at the Veterans Administration Medical Center in Lebanon, Pa. “It’s the leading cause of new cases of blindness, kidney failure, and nontraumatic amputation.” The Di Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Yellow Nails: Is There A Connection?

Diabetes And Yellow Nails: Is There A Connection?

Why do nails turn yellow? Whether they’re short or long, thick or thin, your nails can reveal a lot of secrets about your health. Changes to the texture, thickness, or color can signal that you’re sick before other symptoms appear. When you have a chronic disease such as diabetes, it’s even more important to pay attention to the health of your nails. Changes in nail color and thickness could warn of a more serious health problem. If your nails have turned yellow and you haven’t painted them that color or injured them, most often it’s because you’ve picked up an infection. Usually the culprit is a fungus. In rare cases, the color change can stem from a condition called yellow nail syndrome. People with this disorder also have lymphedema, or swelling in their body. Yellow nail syndrome also causes fluid in the lungs. Other possible reasons why your nails can turn yellow include: bronchiectasis, or damaged airways overusing nail polish without giving your nails a break certain medications, such as quinacrine (Atabrine) carotenoids, especially beta carotene In some people with diabetes, the nails take on a yellowish hue. Often this coloring has to do with the breakdown of sugar and its effect on the collagen in nails. This kind of yellowing isn’t harmful. It doesn’t need to be treated. But in certain cases, yellowing can be a sign of a nail infection. People with diabetes are more likely than those without diabetes to get a fungal infection called onychomycosis. This infection usually affects the toenails. The nails will turn yellow and become brittle. The thickening that comes along with yellow nails can make it harder and more painful for you to walk. Thickened nails are also sharper than usual. They can dig into the skin of your foot. If you do get a cut Continue reading >>

Your Annual Comprehensive Foot Exam

Your Annual Comprehensive Foot Exam

People with diabetes face the possibility of developing a variety of diabetic complications, with the risk of each dependent on a number of factors including, first and foremost, blood glucose control. One area in which complications can occur is the feet. It is estimated that as many as 25% of people with diabetes develop a foot ulcer at some point in their lives, and ulcer risk tends to increase with age. The major contributing factor to this risk is loss of sensation in the feet, usually caused by peripheral neuropathy, or nerve damage in the feet and legs. This common complication can change or reduce the sensation of pain, heat, and cold in the feet. For example, if someone with neuropathy were to walk on hot pavement, he might not be able to feel the heat, so there would be an increased likelihood of burns or blisters — which, in turn, could easily go unnoticed and untreated due to the lack of sensation. Add to the mix another common diabetic complication: reduced blood circulation in the limbs, or peripheral arterial disease. Blood is the main source of oxygen and other nutrients essential to healing, as well as immune defense, so when circulation is impaired, wounds tend to take longer to heal and are more likely to become infected. Thus, for feet, the combination of reduced sensation and poor circulation can spell major trouble. While these two factors tend to play the largest role in the development of foot complications, other factors can also increase the level of risk, including foot deformities, loss of eyesight, kidney disease, chronic or frequent high blood glucose, previous ulcers or amputation, and cigarette smoking. There is good news, however. Through early identification, diagnosis, and treatment of potential problems, the vast majority of foot-re Continue reading >>

Best Nail Polish For Diabetes #3

Best Nail Polish For Diabetes #3

Home Beauty-Fashion-Style Uncategorized Best Nail Polish for Diabetes #3 Mr. Divabetic 02/22/2017 Beauty-Fashion-Style , Uncategorized No Comments I know that coping with diabetes on a daily basis can not only be stressful but it can also be more time consuming especially in the morning.Sometimes you need a little pick me up to get you through the day. Self-pampering is a great way to reward yourself for being proactive about managing your diabetes and theres no better way to treat yourself than by giving yourselfa safe manicure! I want to help you Makeover Your Diabetes by sharing the best products in beauty/fashion, diabetes self-care and exercise to help you GLAM MORE, FEAR LESS with less stress this year! For people with diabetes, it is vitally important that they learn to care for their nails. Your nails protect your fingers and toes from injury and trauma. Did you know people with diabetesare prone to developing a fungal infection known as onychomycosis ? This fungal infection accounts for approximately 50% of all nail infections. To avoid infections go natural and dont use artificial nails. Artificial nails trap water under the nails and this moisture will promote fungus growth. The good news is there are still plenty of safe, fun and colorful ways to flex your attitude with natural nails! Our nails are an expression of who you are, you should have the ability to have nail art that accentuates your personality, saysJennifer Dye, a licensed nail technician at Studio 26 inSanta Cruz, CA. If you wear nail polish, you might be applying more than glossy color to your fingertips. A study led by Duke University and the public health advocacy organization Environmental Working Group suggests that we absorb at least one potentially hormone-disrupting chemical every time Continue reading >>

Important Tips In Taking Care Of Your Hands And Feet If You Are Diabetic

Important Tips In Taking Care Of Your Hands And Feet If You Are Diabetic

Important Tips in Taking Care of Your Hands and Feet If You Are Diabetic A big part of foot health depends on the shoes you wear. It is important to buy comfortable shoes that fit appropriately, when you are a type 2 diabetic. Because you may have decreased sensation in your feet, you may not feel an injury to your feet caused by ill-fitting shoes. It is important to choose shoes that do not have internal stitching in areas that can rub against your feet. You should choose shoes that will fit your feet without causing pressure against any of the bony prominences, because this could cause blistering and ulceration. If you have malformed toes, as in hammertoes, you should wear shoes that are deep enough and wide enough that do not cause pressure on them. You may not feel pain, which would tell you that your shoes are not fitting you correctly. Shoes should fit correctly from the first day you put them on. Diabetic neuropathy is a common condition among type 2 diabetics. The feet are often the first place where type 2 diabetics lose feeling, which is why it is important to check the feet daily. Most people check their feet before going to bed; it is important to take a good look at your toes, your toenails, the tops and bottoms of your feet. Make note of any differences in the feel and appearance of your feet, ankles and lower legs. Since your sensation may be impaired, it is important to examine your feet with your hands and your eyes. Spread your toes apart and look between your toes, and check the underside of your toes also. When you bathe, it is important to pay special attention to your feet. Wash them gently, and dry your feet well. If any moisture is left between your toes, this can cause a fungal infection to set up between the toes. You may not feel the itching Continue reading >>

Cat Diabetes – Symptoms, Diagnosis And Treatment

Cat Diabetes – Symptoms, Diagnosis And Treatment

Like their human owners, cats can be diabetic. Luckily, just as humans are able to medically control their diabetes, it can be controlled in our pets, too. Amazingly, in some cases, after a while, a cat’s pancreas may even heal or regenerate and start producing insulin again. The vital thing is to get your cat to the vet the minute you notice any potential symptoms. Feline diabetes can be treated, but if your cat doesn’t get care quickly, the disease will kill him. Symptoms When cats aren’t feeling well, their instinct is to try to hide it, which means cat owners have to be vigilant. One of the major early signs of feline diabetes is drinking excessive amounts of water. Because it can no longer process glucose, your cat’s body just expels it, along with water – which leads to another sign of feline diabetes: excessive urination. Other early symptoms of feline diabetes are increasingly lethargic behavior, a dull coat, dandruff, extreme changes in appetite, and extreme changes in weight. Even if your cat is only experiencing one of these symptoms, take him to the vet. If feline diabetes is left untreated, you’ll start seeing more symptoms, including impaired movement of back legs, vomiting, and breath that smells fruity or like nail polish remover. Without treatment, a cat will fall into a diabetic coma, and soon die. How do cats get diabetes? There’s no definite answer to this question. We know that some cats are at higher risk than others: the disease tends to attack older, neutered male cats who live indoors and are overweight. Burmese cats also show a higher rate of diabetes. But diabetes can affect any cat, regardless of age, weight, gender, or breed. If you have the slightest suspicion that your cat is diabetic, don’t think it’s impossible just bec Continue reading >>

9 Pedicure Safety Tips For People With Diabetes

9 Pedicure Safety Tips For People With Diabetes

9 Pedicure Safety Tips for People With Diabetes Sign Up for Our Living with Diabetes Newsletter Sign up for more FREE Everyday Health newsletters . By Athena Philis-Tsimikas, MD, Special to Everyday Health Summertime is beach and sandal weather, whichmeans your feet and toes are more frequently on display. Professional pedicures can help your toes look their best and pamper your feet, but too often poor sanitation practices, shared tools, and the work of overzealous nail technicians can result in skin injuries or infections . Pedicure problems can happen to anyone, but if you have type 2diabetes , you need to be especially careful about protecting your feet . An infection can raise your blood sugar levels, which, in turn, can interfere with proper healing and increase your risk of serious complications likeulcers or even amputation. Before you schedule a pedicure, check with your physician to make sure its okay to have one. Once you getthe green light, do your feet a favor and learn what to look for and what to avoid at nail salons. Taking a few basic precautions can significantly reduce infection risks and lead to a safer, more pleasant experience. Know when to postpone a pedicure. If you currently have any infections, cuts, or open sores on your legs, feet, or toenails, skip the salon since these will make you even more vulnerable to problems. Instead, contact your physician for a referral to a podiatrist or other professional who is medically trained to care for feet. Avoid shaving your legs for a day or two before your pedicure. Shaving can leave tiny nicks in your skin (even if you cant see them) and increase the chance of infection. Its fine to shave afterward. Stick with a salon that is clean and practices impeccable sanitation. Tell the manager you have diabete Continue reading >>

What Diabetes Can Do To Your Nails

What Diabetes Can Do To Your Nails

Is There a Link Between Sleep Deprivation and Insulin Resistance? This is the ultimate no-nonsense, MD approved guide to get to the root of your blood sugar problem and change the way you live with diabetes. Today were GIVING it away 100% FREE! This ebook, valued at $36.95 is 100% FREE. No credit card required. Your Information is 100% Secure and Will Never Be Shared With Anyone. Copyright 2017 and Beyond. - Privacy Policy Where should we send your FREE Diabetes Recovery Guides? These books, valued at $47 are 100% FREE. No credit card required. Your Information is 100% Secure and Will Never Be Shared With Anyone. Keep an eye out for any changes in nail color, shape, or growth! Everyone likes having a nicely manicured set of pretty nails, even guys! But, this may not always be possible with the symptoms that diabetes can cause. It can affect the fingernails and toe nails in a number of different ways. Sometimes, problems with the breakdown of blood sugars can have an effect on collagen, which is a substance found in the skin and nails. This results in the nail turning yellowish. Thankfully, this color change isnt dangerous when caused by diabetes alone. You can easily hide it with a coat of nail polish. However, a color change along with thickening and peeling of the nails could be a sign of a fungal infection. It is difficult for most people to treat a fungal infection with over-the-counter products but downright impossible for someone with an impaired immune system. Youll need to speak with your doctor about an appropriate and safe regimen for curing the fungus. Its possible that the doctor will prescribe an oral medication that works from inside the body. This is often more effective than creams, as nail infections start underneath the nail and in the cuticle. This c Continue reading >>

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