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Myths About Diabetes

Diabetes Myths Vs Facts

Diabetes Myths Vs Facts

Not everything you hear about diabetes is true. That’s why it is important to get the facts, so you can make good decisions to better manage your diabetes. Myth: "Diabetes is not that big of a deal." Fact: Diabetes is a big deal, but if you manage it right, you may be able to help delay or even avoid some diabetes-related health complications down the road. Myth: "People who are overweight eventually get diabetes." Fact: Being overweight is just one risk factor for developing diabetes. There are other factors, such as family history, race or ethnicity, and age. By knowing all of the risk factors, you may better understand your overall risk and what you can do to improve your health. Myth: "Eating too much sugar can cause type 2 diabetes." Fact: As mentioned above, weight gain is one risk factor for getting diabetes. Taking in too many calories causes an increase in weight. Drinking sugary drinks is one way to take in extra calories. The American Diabetes Association recommends not drinking a lot of sugary drinks. Sugar-sweetened drinks include: Regular (non-diet) sodas Fruit drinks including fruit punch Energy drinks Sports drinks Sweetened tea Instead, choose from zero or low-calorie drinks like water, unsweetened tea, coffee, or diet soda. A splash of lemon can also make your drink light and refreshing without the added calories. One 12-ounce can of regular (non-diet) soda contains approximately 150 calories and 40 grams of carbohydrates. Did you know that this is the same amount of carbohydrates in 10 teaspoons of sugar? Myth: "Having diabetes always leads to bad health problems." Fact: If you follow your diabetes care plan, you may be able to delay or prevent diabetes-related health problems. Myth: "It’s your own fault that you have diabetes." Fact: Diabetes isn Continue reading >>

9 Common Diabetic Diet Myths Busted!

9 Common Diabetic Diet Myths Busted!

According to the 2014 Diabetes Statistics Report from the Center for Disease Control (CDC), 29.1 million Americans are diabetic. That could explain the ton of information out there about what diabetics can and cannot eat, how many times they should eat, and so on. There are many theories of what causes diabetes. We believe that Type 2 Diabetes is a dietary disorder, born of too much insulin and resistance to this excess supply. If the cause is dietary, it seems logical that diet should play a huge role in curing it too. We take a look at some popular myths and explain why they’re not true. We will keep adding to this section, so your questions and suggestions are very welcome. 1. Rice Is Bad for Diabetics: Not True All rice is not bad rice. In a 2010 study, high brown rice intake was associated with a lower risk of type 2 diabetes while higher intake of white rice was associated with a higher risk of type 2 diabetes. The wheat that we eat today has far more gluten content than its ancient counterpart and is far more hybridized than rice. A double-blind study conducted in 2014 published in the British Journal of Nutrition compared ancient wheat products and modern wheat products in participants who had Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS). During the course of the study, participants who consumed the ancient wheat products showed significant improvements in both IBS symptoms and the inflammatory profile while participants who consumed modern wheat products showed worse symptoms in IBS and inflammation in their body. Dr. William Davis in his book “Wheat Belly” explains that modern wheat is a mixture of a grain called einkorn and wild grasses and is the result of human hybridization which in 50 years produced 25,000 varieties of wheat. Modern wheat is responsible for a num Continue reading >>

Biggest Myths About Type 2 Diabetes Treatment

Biggest Myths About Type 2 Diabetes Treatment

Biggest Myths About Type 2 Diabetes Treatment Are myths about diabetes keeping you from getting the most out of your treatment? Spice up your diabetes meal plan with recipes from the Americas to Asia and Europe. You may have heard that statement after you've aired your complaints about the challenges of managing type 2 diabetes . While it's usually meant well, this type of response is misleading, since it promotes the unfounded idea the myth that diabetes isn't as serious as other chronic conditions. But type 2 diabetes raises your risk of dying prematurely by 50 percent, and according to the CDC it's a leading cause of death in the United States. The good news is that diabetes "is absolutely manageable with proper diet, exercise , and medication," says Jenny Champion , a registered dietitian, diabetes educator, and personal trainer in New York City. As you manage the various aspects of your medical care the healthy lifestyle habits , the self-monitoring of blood glucose, and any medication regimen don't be waylaid by these nine other diabetes myths, any or all of which might be keeping you from getting the most out of your treatment. Myth: You can feel when blood sugar is high or low, so you don't have to check it often. Waiting to feel physical effects of blood sugar (glucose) that is too high or too low is dangerous: According to the American Diabetes Association (ADA), this can lead to accidents, injuries, coma, and even death. "Many good studies have been conducted on the ability of people to sense blood sugar levels, and most people are woefully inaccurate," says Amber Taylor, MD, an endocrinologist and the director of the Diabetes Center at Mercy Medical Center, in Baltimore. Says Champion, "By the time you end up feeling the telltale signs of low blood sugar, o Continue reading >>

Diabetes Statistics, Facts And Myths

Diabetes Statistics, Facts And Myths

Statistics from the 2014 USA national diabetes fact sheet from the CDC's National Diabetes Report . 29.1 million US children and adults (9.3% of the population) have diabetes. This is a rise from 25.8 million (8.5%) in 2011. Researchers from the Jefferson School of Population Health (Philadelphia, PA) published a study which estimates that by 2025 there could be 53.1 million people with diabetes . 21 million people have been diagnosed with diabetes (a rise from 18.8 million in 2011). About 8.1 million people with diabetes have not been diagnosed (a rise from 7 million in 2011). This equates to 27.8% of people with diabetes currently being undiagnosed. Diagnosed and undiagnosed diabetes among people aged 20 years or older, US, 2012 About 86 million Americans aged 20 years or olderhave prediabetes. 1.7 million people aged 20 years or more were newly diagnosed with diabetes in 2012. 208,000 (0.25%) people younger than 20 years have diabetes. Approximately 1 in every 400 kids and teenagers has diabetes. 12.3% of people aged 20+ years have diabetes; a total of 28.9 million individuals. 25.9% of people aged 65+ years have diabetes; a total of 11.2 million people. 13.6% of men have diabetes; a total of 15.5 million people (a rise from 11.8% in 2010). 11.2% of women have diabetes; a total of 13.4 million people (a rise from 10.8 in 2010). In the United Kingdom there are about 3.8 million people with diabetes, according to the National Health Service. Diabetes UK, a charity, believes this number will jump to 6.2 million by 2035, and the National Health Service will be spending as much as 17% of its health care budget on diabetes by then. Diabetes is rapidly spreading in Southeast Asia as people embrace American fast foods, such as hamburgers, hot dogs, French fries and pizza. M Continue reading >>

Top 10 Myths About Type 1 Diabetes

Top 10 Myths About Type 1 Diabetes

(Photo Credit: Josie Nicole) Top 10 Myths About Type 1 Diabetes Type 1 Diabetes is one of the most misunderstood diseases, and it accounts for 5-10% of all diabetes cases. Not many people understand the complexity or severity unless personally affected by it. Much of the stigma surrounding diabetes is brought on by myths and misconceptions. But as the prevalence is increasing worldwide, it’s important to debunk many of these myths and share the facts about Type 1 Diabetes. MYTH: Type 1 Diabetes is caused by eating too much sugar – FACT: Type 1 Diabetes occurs when the immune system attacks and destroys the insulin producing cells in the pancreas. There is no known cause but it’s believed that genes and environmental factors play a role. MYTH: People with Type 1 Diabetes can be cured with diet and exercise – FACT: There is no cure for Type 1 Diabetes (YET). Yes, diet and exercise is beneficial for anyone including those managing diabetes, but it can not treat nor reverse it. MYTH: Sugar is off limits with Type 1 Diabetes – FACT: People with Type 1 Diabetes are not limited to what they can eat. Insulin is administered to cover the carbs or sugar they eat. Too much sugar is bad for everyone, but moderation is key. Sugar is also needed and life-saving for diabetics with low blood sugar. MYTH: If it’s sugar-free then it’s okay for Type 1 Diabetics to go ahead and consume – FACT: Actually, many sugar-free foods are loaded with carbohydrates. In many cases where they have more carbohydrates than a product just made with pure sugar. It’s always important to check nutrition labels because product packaging can be deceiving. MYTH: You won’t get Type 1 Diabetes if you live a healthy and active lifestyle – FACT: Type 1 Diabetes is not caused by ones’ lifesty Continue reading >>

12 Common Diabetes Myths Debunked

12 Common Diabetes Myths Debunked

Myth #1: People with diabetes can't eat anything sweet. Relax -- despite what you may have heard, a piece of cake or a couple of cookies won't cause a health crisis. In fact, sweets can be eaten in moderation by people with type 2 diabetes, if eaten as part of a healthy meal plan and combined with exercise, according to the American Diabetes Association. Still, while avoiding sweet treats isn't mandatory, limiting them is. Sweets often contain not only empty calories but a lot of sugar, a carbohydrate that raises glucose levels considerably. For better glucose control, diabetics should have dessert only after a low-carb meal. It's important to eat that chicken breast, broccoli, and salad before dishing into some ice cream. Myth #2: Eating too much sugar causes diabetes. No, chocaholics aren't destined to develop diabetes. The disease is thought to be caused by a combination of genetic and lifestyle factors. And the high level of sugar in someone's bloodstream is not the same thing as the refined stuff you buy in bags from the supermarket. That said, being overweight can increase the risk for developing type 2 diabetes, and eating a lot of sugar can pack on the pounds. If your family has a history of diabetes, eating healthfully and exercising regularly is recommended to keep everyone's weight in check. For those who already have diabetes, those same things will help them manage the disease. Myth #3: People with diabetes must eat a special diet. A healthy diet for someone with diabetes is the same as a healthy diet for an yone else. How does that look? A wholesome meal plan is based on whole-grain foods, lean protein, vegetables, and fruit. Such a diet is low in fat (particularly saturated and trans fat), salt, and simple sugars. So-called diabetic foods offer no special Continue reading >>

7 Diabetes Myths Put To Rest Once And For All

7 Diabetes Myths Put To Rest Once And For All

Even if you don't have diabetes, you can probably imagine how challenging it must be to live with a disease that requires such constant vigilance of your physical health. You might not immediately pick up on how mentally taxing diabetes can be, though. In fact, it's "considered to be one of the most psychologically demanding of the chronic medical illnesses and is often associated with several psychiatric disorders," Miami VA Medical Center experts write in the journal Clinical Diabetes. It might not be your first thought, but considering how much diabetes tends to be viewed through a lens of shame and blame, it doesn't seem so far-fetched after all. We don't blame you, either, for not totally getting it if you don't have diabetes. Whether you have it, know someone who does, worry about your risk of developing it, or hardly give it any thought, you've likely come across confusing diabetes misinformation. To help make it all a little less complicated, here are some of the most common myths about diabetes, debunked. Fact: Sorry, but no. There's a big physiological difference, actually. Type 1 diabetes means your body doesn't produce insulin. Everyone needs insulin; the hormone, produced by the pancreas, helps get energy in the form of glucose into our cells. Type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune disease that causes the body to mistakenly attack itself, in this case destroying insulin-producing cells. Type 2 diabetes, on the other hand, occurs when your body doesn't effectively use the insulin it does make, typically called insulin resistance. You may need a little extra dose to get the job done: While everyone with type 1 diabetes needs insulin injections, only about 30% of people with type 2 require the same treatment. (Here's more info on the differences between Type 1 and T Continue reading >>

Myths And Facts About Diabetes

Myths And Facts About Diabetes

1. You get diabetes from eating too much sugar. Not exactly. First off, it's important to distinguish between different types of diabetes. In people with type 1, the body doesn't produce enough insulin - a hormone that allows your body to use sugar - because of a genetic disorder. With type 2, the body can't process the insulin correctly. Type 2 is the "acquired form" of the illness, which roughly 90 percent of diabetics suffer from. The causes of type 2 include inertia and being overweight, a consequence of a diet too full of fats, carbohydrates and sugar. Type 1 diabetes, by comparison, is an autoimmune disease. Sugar is not a cause at all. 2. Only people who are overweight can get diabetes. False. Yes, the risk of contracting type 2 diabetes is twice as high for overweight people compared to people with a "regular" weight - and even three times as high for severely overweight people. But in more than a quarter of overweight people, their metabolism remains healthy. That means that other risks play a role as well, like family disposition or age. 3. Diabetes is a "lifestyle disease." False. Cases of diabetes are increasing the world over, and in relative terms, type 1 is gaining ground on type 2. The reasons for this spike are unclear. The International Diabetes Federation and WHO count roughly 400 million cases worldwide. Eighty percent of them are in developing countries and emerging economies. False. Diabetes does occur among old people more often, but all age groups are affected. A 2014 study by the International Diabetes Federation determined that roughly half a million children have type 1 diabetes. Those who are afflicted by type 2 diabetes are getting younger and younger, too. The number of type 2 diabetes cases in children have multiplied by five over the last Continue reading >>

Common Myths About Type 2 Diabetes

Common Myths About Type 2 Diabetes

Doctors Wish Youd Ignore These 4 Myths About Diabetes Type 2 You probably believe these myths about type 2 diabetes. Dont. Nearly 30 million Americans are living with diabetesand about 7 million of those people dont even know they have it. It could be because the signs and symptoms of type 2 diabetes are often subtle, and they usually develop slowly over time. It may also be because many people arent aware of their risk, what really causes diabetes, or even how serious diabetes complications can be. Here, we separate fact from fiction and debunk common misconceptions about type 2 diabetes. Myth: Eating too much sugar causes diabetes While diet plays a critical role in controlling blood sugars, its usually much more complicated than that, says Minisha Sood, MD, an endocrinologist in New York City. Type 2 diabetes occurs when your body doesn't make enough insulin or use insulin well. Type 2 diabetes occurs as a result of several factors, including lifestyle (poor diet, physical inactivity, and being overweight), insulin resistance, and genes. Myth: Type 2 is a milder form of diabetes You might have heard your grandma describe her diabetes as just a touch of sugar, or that its not as serious type 1 diabetes, which is treated with insulin from the get-go. The truth is that every case of diabetes should be considered serious. Type 2 diabetes is a major risk factor heart disease and other conditions like kidney disease, foot problems, and nerve damage. Patients often dont think this is the case, because they dont feel unwell; they dont feel the high blood sugar, says Sonal Chaudhry, MD, an endocrinologist at NYU Langone Health. Myth: Insulin is only for type 1 diabetes, not for type 2 Not everyone with type 2 diabetes will need insulin, but many people will, and thats just t Continue reading >>

Diabetes Awareness Month 2013: Facts And Myths About Diabetes

Diabetes Awareness Month 2013: Facts And Myths About Diabetes

Up to Date Medical News and Views from The University of Medicine and Health Sciences, St. Kitts Diabetes Awareness Month 2013: Facts and Myths About Diabetes TYPE 2 DIABETES: People with Type 2 have to check blood-sugar levels several times daily. Photo: FreeDigitalPhotos.net November is Diabetes Awareness Month. Although there are so many awareness months for diseases and conditions, the UMHS Pulse wants to bring attention to diabetes because, according to the American Diabetes Association, diabetes kills more Americans each year than AIDS and breast cancer combined, and there are far too many misconceptions. To understand the scale of how serious diabetes is, heres what the Mayo Clinics website ( ) says about the different types of diabetes and the differences. Authors Nancy Klobassa Davidson, R.N., and Peggy Moreland, R.N. write on the Mayo Clinics Living with Diabetes blog that even if you dont have diabetes, healthy eating and exercise is good for you and may even prevent or delay the onset of type 2 diabetes. Type 1 Diabetes: Type 1 diabetes was formerly called juvenile diabetes or insulin-dependent diabetes, because 70 percent of diagnoses occur before a person reaches the age of 30. However, it can be diagnosed at any age. Only 5 percent to 10 percent of those diagnosed with diabetes have this type. With type 1 diabetes, the pancreas produces little to no insulin. The onset of type 1 diabetes is usually sudden (acute) and clear-cut, when a person goes to their health care provider or the emergency room with symptoms of high blood sugar. Sometimes, a person with new-onset type 1 diabetes needs to be treated in an intensive care unit. Symptoms include increased urination, thirst or dry mouth, hunger, weight loss despite normal or increased eating, blurred vision Continue reading >>

Does Sugar Cause Diabetes?

Does Sugar Cause Diabetes?

The recent film What the Health raised the question as to whether sugar or other carbohydrates cause diabetes. The notion is understandable. Blood sugar levels are high in diabetes, so a common idea has held that eating sugar somehow triggers the disease process. However, the major diabetes organizations take a different view. The American Diabetes Association1 and Diabetes UK2 have labelled this notion a “myth,” as has the Joslin Diabetes Center,3 which wrote, “Diabetes is not caused by eating too much sugar.” These and other organizations have worked to educate people about the causes of diabetes and the role that foods play in the disease process. Type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune disease. Type 2 diabetes—the most common form of the disease—is caused by insulin resistance and pancreatic failure. Here is what you need to know: Sugar Is the Body’s Fuel The human body runs on glucose, a simple sugar. Just as gasoline powers your car, glucose powers your muscles, your brain, and the rest of your body. Glucose comes from fruit and from starchy foods, such as grains, beans, and potatoes, and your body can also produce it when needed. Without it you would die. Diabetes means having higher-than-normal blood glucose values. It comes in three common forms: Type 1 diabetes is caused by the destruction of the insulin-producing cells of the pancreas, usually through an autoimmune process. The triggers for this process are under investigation and may include dairy proteins, viruses, or other factors. Type 2 diabetes typically starts with insulin resistance. That is, the cells of the body resist insulin’s efforts to escort glucose into the cells. What causes insulin resistance? It appears to be caused by an accumulation of microscopic fat particles within muscle and Continue reading >>

Diabetes Facts And Myths

Diabetes Facts And Myths

en espaolLa diabetes: mitos y realidades You want to educate yourself about diabetes so you can help your child manage it. This means having the right information. There's so much online content about diabetes, but it's not always accurate. Even well-meaning family members and friends can give bad information. And this can hurt your child. Here's the truth about some of the common things you might hear. Does eating too much sugar cause diabetes? No, it doesn't. Type 1 diabetes happens when cells in the pancreas that make insulin are destroyed. This happens because something goes wrong with the body's immune system . It has nothing to do with how much sugar a person eats. Sugar doesn't cause diabetes. But sugar can play a role in type 2 diabetes . Eating too much sugar (or sugary foods and drinks) can make people put on weight. Gaining too much weight can lead to type 2 diabetes in some people. Of course, eating too much sugar isn't the only reason why people gain weight. Weight gain from eating too much of any food can make a person's chances of developing type 2 diabetes greater. Yes! People with diabetes can still enjoy sweets sometimes. But like everyone, they should put the brakes on eating too many. Kids with type 1 diabetes don't grow out of it. With type 1 diabetes, the pancreas stops making insulin and won't make it again. People with type 1 diabetes will always need to take insulin , at least until scientists find a cure for diabetes. Kids with type 2 will always have a tendency to get high blood sugar levels. But sometimes taking steps to live a healthier life can lower their blood sugar. If people eat healthy foods and exercise enough to get their blood sugar levels back on track, doctors might say they can stop taking insulin or other medicines . Can you ca Continue reading >>

5 (un)common Myths About Diabetes

5 (un)common Myths About Diabetes

Did you know insulin cures type 1 diabetes? You may have thought so, but you're wrong. Let's clear up other misconceptions there may be about diabetes. Diabetes is a complex disease that millions of Canadians struggle with. In Alberta alone, there are 1 million people suffering from diabetes and prediabetes. With so many people affected, it is easy to create generalizations about what a group of people go through, even though everyone manages their diabetes in different ways. Because of this, we want to do debunk some common and not so common myths about diabetes. Currently, there is no cure for diabetes . Insulin is only a maintenance tool that helps regulate and control diabetes. Insulin injections—which keep blood glucose levels in check—act as a substitute for individuals who cannot produce insulin on their own or are insulin intolerant. You are at an increased risk for type 1 diabetes [CJ1] if you have a parent or sibling who has diabetes because type 1 is genetic—a predisposition pattern is passed down through families, although the inheritance pattern is unknown. Weight and age factors do contribute to your risk of getting type 2 diabetes. However, you are also at risk of type 2 diabetes with any of the following factors: a family member has diabetes, you are part of a high risk group (Hispanic, Native American, South Asian, Asian, or of African descent), or if you have high blood pressure, to name a few. Many people don’t realize that type 1 diabetes is a chronic disease that occurs when the immune system attacks cells in the pancreas; it isn’t caused by poor diet or lack of exercise. Type 1 diabetes is believed to be genetic or brought about through exposure to certain viruses. Type 2 diabetes occurs when the body can’t properly use the insulin that Continue reading >>

14 Myths About Diabetes Treatment

14 Myths About Diabetes Treatment

Will you have to give up carb-laden pizza? It’s a question that many people ask—whether they’re looking to lose 10 pounds or they’ve recently been diagnosed with diabetes. You see, although nearly 30 million Americans—about 1 in 11 people—have diabetes, and 86 million people—more than 1 in 3 adults—have prediabetes, many myths and misconceptions continue to swirl around the metabolic disease. According to research in the Zero Sugar Diet, diabetics are up to four times more likely than people without diabetes to die of heart disease or experience a life-threatening stroke. Currently, diabetes is the seventh leading cause of death in the United States. And for those who don’t properly control their condition, the odds of health issues—which range from cardiovascular issues to nerve damage and kidney failure—increases exponentially. Besides those who are unaware they have prediabetes or diabetes, even those who receive a diagnosis are often left scratching their heads when it comes to improving their health. But rather than looking at self-management as an unfortunate burden of your diagnosis, Lori Zanini, RD, CDE and author of the recently published Eat What You Love Diabetes Cookbook, says the fact that diabetes is a condition that is largely self-managed can be empowering; It allows you to play a key role in your treatment. In honor of National Diabetes Awareness Month, we tapped Elizabeth Snyder, a registered dietician and certified diabetes educator at The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center for her expert advice to dispel the top myths surrounding treating diabetes. Pick up some knowledge and then continue to improve your life by ditching these harmful habits: the 50 Little Things Making You Fatter and Fatter. As we mentioned earlier, 9 Continue reading >>

The 10 Worst Myths About Diabetes

The 10 Worst Myths About Diabetes

There are several myths surrounding diabetes—from silly misconceptions to some that are downright dangerous. At worst, they can give people false optimism or false pessimism and can lead to such disillusionment and despair that they may even stop caring about their health. The notion that your diabetes will get worse the longer you live is one of the most dangerous myths. It’s only progressive when you follow the same outdated advice: “Just get your A1C down to 7.0; eat a high carb, high glycemic diet; exercise when you feel like it for 20 minutes a day; lose 10 percent of your body weight.” While it’s easy to do, it’s not enough to prevent worsening of the disease. When well-managed, diabetes-related complications can largely be avoided. Only poor management of your diabetes can lead to complications. If you have Type 2 diabetes, no “miracle cure” will bring back the beta cells of your pancreas. When your body is resistant to the insulin made by these cells, the pancreas compensates by making more insulin. Eventually, however, your body works so hard it can’t keep up, and the cells begin to die. Learn more at “Diabetes Scams and How to Foil Them.” People with diabetes are longing for a cure and diabetes organizations are playing into the hype that one is just around the corner. The Tour de Cure” is perhaps our biggest annual event and the message we keep hearing is that “with enough funding and support, diabetes will be cured within 10 years.” Sadly, this false sense of optimism can lead to people easing up rather than carefully managing their diabetes. While some think that insulin is considered a last resort to manage their diabetes, the fact is that doctors often start with insulin shots to quickly bring blood glucose levels down to norma Continue reading >>

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