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Myplate For Diabetes Handout

Healthy Eating Plate Translations

Healthy Eating Plate Translations

Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health The contents of this website are for educational purposes and are not intended to offer personal medical advice. You should seek the advice of your physician or other qualified health provider with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition. Never disregard professional medical advice or delay in seeking it because of something you have read on this website. The Nutrition Source does not recommend or endorse any products. RT @HarvardMagazine : Both over and undernutrition are affected by climate change...When carbon dioxide increasesthat can reduce the amoun RT @HarvardChanSPH : Replacing unhealthy fats with olive oil gives a boost to your cardiovascular #health, says Harvard Chan's Frank Hu. @HS RT @HarvardChanSPH : In Anchorage, AK, more time to eat and play at lunchtime seems to reduce disruptive behavior in young students. https:/ RT @HarvardCCHANGE : Be good to your health and be good to the planet this #NationalNutritionMonth by incorporating a more plant-based diet. RT @HarvardChanSPH : A three-decade study from the Harvard Chan School showed no association between moderate egg consumption and risk of he Continue reading >>

Your Game Plan To Prevent Type 2 Diabetes

Your Game Plan To Prevent Type 2 Diabetes

Type 2 diabetes prevention is proven, possible, and powerful. Taking small steps, such as eating less and moving more to lose weight, can help you prevent or delay type 2 diabetes and related health problems. The information below is based on the NIH-sponsored Diabetes Prevention Program (DPP) research study, which showed that people could prevent or delay type 2 diabetes even if they were at high risk for the disease. Follow these steps to get started on your game plan. If you are overweight, set a weight-loss goal that you can reach. Try to lose at least 5 to 10 percent of your current weight. For example, if you weigh 200 pounds, a 10-percent weight-loss goal means that you will try to lose 20 pounds. Research shows that you can prevent or delay type 2 diabetes by losing weight by following a reduced-calorie eating plan and being more active each day. Find ways to be active every day. Start slowly and add more activity until you get to at least 30 minutes of physical activity, like a brisk walk, 5 days a week. Keep track of your progress to help you reach your goals. Use your phone, a printed log, online tracker, app, or other device to record your weight, what you eat and drink, and how long you are active. Ask your health care team about steps you can take to prevent type 2 diabetes. Learn about other ways to help reach your goal, such as taking the medicine metformin. Also, ask if your health insurance covers services for weight loss or physical activity. It’s not easy to make and stick to lifelong changes in what you eat and how often you are active. Get your friends and family involved by asking them to support your changes. You can also join a diabetes prevention program to meet other people who are making similar changes. Set a weight-loss goal If you are ov Continue reading >>

Diabetes Meal Planning: The Plate Method

Diabetes Meal Planning: The Plate Method

Over the many years in which I’ve been a dietitian, I’ve been asked numerous times, “What should I eat?” In some ways, this is an easy question to answer, but in other ways, it can be complex. People who have had diabetes for many years may remember the days of rather strict, calculated diets. Foods were carefully weighed and measured and people used food lists, which didn’t always offer a whole lot of variety. Times have changed in that there are many different meal-planning approaches for people who have diabetes. No one approach fits all; as I’ve mentioned many times, there is no “diabetic diet.” Fortunately, too, we have scientific evidence to back this up: Newer nutrition recommendations for diabetes confirm that many different types of “eating patterns” can help people effectively manage their conditions while preventing or delaying the complications of diabetes. The Plate Method If you read last week’s posting about exchanges and are thinking that it’s not for you, you might be interested in using the plate method. The plate method is an easy yet effective tool that many people who are “new” to diabetes use to get started with meal planning. My Plate No doubt you’ve seen the USDA’s version of the plate method called “MyPlate.” Several years ago, the Food Pyramid was scratched in favor of a plate. MyPlate divides the plate into four somewhat unequal sections. Each section represents a food group: fruits, vegetables, grains, and protein. Off to the side is the dairy group. The USDA states that these five food groups are the basis for a healthful diet. The website for MyPlate, which is www.choosemyplate.gov, is interactive and provides a number of tools for men, women, pregnant women, older adults, and children to learn about nutr Continue reading >>

Eat Well!

Eat Well!

When you have diabetes, deciding what, when, and how much to eat may seem challenging. So, what can you eat, and how can you fit the foods you love into your meal plan? Eating healthy food at home and choosing healthy food when eating out are important in managing your diabetes. The first step is to work with your doctor or dietitian to make a meal plan just for you. As soon as you find out you have diabetes, ask for a meeting with your doctor or dietitian to discuss how to make and follow a meal plan. During this meeting, you will learn how to choose healthier foods—a variety of vegetables and fruits, whole grains, fat-free or low-fat dairy foods, lean meats, and other proteins. You will also learn to watch your portion sizes and what to drink while staying within your calorie, fat, and carbohydrate (carbs) limits. You can still enjoy food while eating healthy. But how do you do that? Here are a few tips to help you when eating at home and away from home. Eating Healthy Portions An easy way to know portion sizes is to use the “plate method.” Looking at your basic 9-inch dinner plate[PDF – 14 MB], draw an imaginary line down the middle of the plate, and divide one side in half. Fill the largest section with non-starchy vegetables, like salad, green beans, broccoli, cauliflower, cabbage, and carrots. In one of the smaller sections, put a grain or starchy food such as bread, noodles, rice, corn or potatoes. In the other smaller section, put your protein, like fish, chicken, lean beef, tofu, or cooked dried beans. Learn more at Create Your Plate, an interactive resource from the American Diabetes Association (ADA) that shows how a healthy plate should look. This tool allows you to select different foods and see the portion sizes you should use in planning your meal Continue reading >>

Diabetes Patient Education Materials

Diabetes Patient Education Materials

Ethnic Foods and Blood Sugar: Guides for Patients Cambodian Foods That Affect Blood Sugar: A Guide for Cambodian Patients This presentation is intended to be used by clinicians during discussion with patients about carbohydrates and blood glucose. It is culturally tailored to reflect foods commonly consumed by Cambodian Americans. Authored by Julianne Williams. For more information about how it was developed, click here, and select 'view documentation'. The narrated file may take a few moments to load. Scroll-over video for table of contents. How Foods Affect Blood Sugar: A Guide for Ethiopian and Eritrean Patients with Diabetes This presentation is intended to be used by clinicians during discussion with patients about carbohydrates and blood glucose. It is culturally tailored to reflect foods commonly consumed by Ethiopian and Eritrean Americans and includes photos of foods, meal comparisons, portion sizes, and some information about managing diabetes during periods of fasting. Authored by Mei Yook Woo. For more information about how it was developed, click here, and select 'view documentation'. How Foods Affect Blood Sugar: A Guide for Iraqi and Syrian Patients with Diabetes This education is intended to be used by clinicians during discussion with patients about carbohydrates and blood glucose. It is tailored to reflect foods commonly consumed by Iraqi and Syrian Americans and includes photos of foods, meal comparisons, portion sizes, and some information about managing diabetes during periods of fasting. Authored by Toi Sennhauser. For more information about how it was developed, click here, and select 'view documentation'. How Foods Affect Blood Sugar: A Guide for Latino Patients with Diabetes This bilingual presentation is intended to be used by clinicians during Continue reading >>

Nutrition & Disease - Diabetes

Nutrition & Disease - Diabetes

Explains the different types of diabetes, the warning signs, and risk factors. Information on testing, complications resulting from diabetes, and disease management is also included. Flip chart of six double-sided 12" x 17" panels. Laminated.. Age 10 and up.Educate students about Type 2 Diabetes with these models. The included education card illustrates effects associated with Type 2 Diabetes, including stroke, non-inflammatory disease of the retina, hypertensive heart ... Diabetes affects an estimated 12 to 16 million of the people in the United States. This teaching kit explains the different types of diabetes. The 30-page resource book defines diabetes mellitus and provides menu guides, exercise suggestions, and se.. With information about risk factors, symptoms, and complications of diabetes, this display is a valuable resource for health educators. The display explains the different types of diabetes and describes how the diseases can be treated. Display measures .. Teach the facts about diabetes in a fun way. This 15" inflatable ball challenges players with 60 questions about diabetes. Use as an ice breaker for group meetings, health fairs, or small classes. Toss up, the person who catches answers the question.. Easy model to show patients how diabetes affects body systems and organs. Indicates structures and organs with vascular effects due to diabetes. Includes sectioned model of Bowmans capsule (kidney), artery, nerve, and posterior section of eye. In.. From Food & Health Communications.This comprehensive diabetes program offers the most up-to-date and useful information to individuals with diabetes. The 12-lesson program takes everything clients need to know about diabetes... Show patients the common problems people have with their feet and then how those pro Continue reading >>

Better Version Of

Better Version Of "my Plate": Precision Nutrition's Eating Guidelines For Clients. | Precision Nutrition

Precision Nutrition's eating guidelines for clients. The USDA has ditched the Food Pyramid and introduced MyPlate, a new graphic that shows a supposed balanced diet. But are the recommendations on MyPlate designed for the health of the individual or the health of the food industry? Dr. John Berardi discusses the short-comings of MyPlate and offers an alternative: The Precision Nutrition Plates. These simple graphics show our suggestions based on nutritional science, our own research, and the success of thousands of real-world clients. A few months back, the USDA ditched the iconic Food Pyramid in favor of a new design. In a bold and exciting move (please note the sarcasm), they took the food out of the pyramid andplaced it on a plate. Some praise the new design for its relevance after all, most of us do put our food on plates before we eat it and say the plate provides a good teaching tool for building our own plates at mealtime. Of course, not everyone is happy. The biggest opponents are critical of its content, as not much has changed with the food choices since the 1990s. (Well get into some additional criticism in a minute.) But before universally praising or condemning the plate, we should quickly talk about two things: Why was the plate created in the first place? Is MyPlate supposed to represent the ideal eating strategy for everyone? Is it an improvement on the way the US eats now? Is it a strategy for weight loss or a diet for optimal health? To answer these questions, I turned to the official website for the MyPlate campaign, www.ChooseMyPlate.gov. According to their site, the image is designed: to remind Americans to eat healthfully; [not] to change consumer behavior It doesnt seem like theyre not aiming too high with MyPlate. Instead, theyre just reminding Continue reading >>

Patient Education Prevention Messaging

Patient Education Prevention Messaging

FORWARD>FORWARD Action Network for Healthcare Professionals>Patient Education Per Action Step #13 in the Pediatric Obesity Protocol, FORWARD encourages providers to distribute a 5-4-3-2-1 Go! handout and the age-appropriate Ounce of Prevention is Worth a Pound handout to each patient at every well-child visit, regardless of weight. However, FORWARD recognizes that each patient is different. Thus, we are highlighting those two resources in addition to the nationally-recognized patient education materials below. The 5-4-3-2-1 Go!message contains recommendations for children and families to promote a healthy lifestyle:5 servings of fruits and vegetables a day, 4 servings of water a day, 3 servings of low-fat dairy a day, 2 or less hours of screen time a day, and 1 or more hours of physical activity a day. For more information on 5-4-3-2-1 Go!and to download the handouts, click here . The Ounce of Prevention is Worth a Pound's goal is to provide primary care providers with simple tools to educate parents in prevention strategies by making good nutritional and physical activity decisions for their children. Ounce of Prevention has a handout for each well-child visit. The handouts include evidence-based messages as recommended by the Expert Committee within the National Initiative for Children's Healthcare Quality (NICHQ) and the American Academy of Pediatrics. For more information on Ounce of Prevention is Worth a Pound and to download the handouts, click here . Developed by the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA), the MyPlate graphic quickly and easily depicts portion size and meal makeup. To access resources in English, click below: GO, SLOW, and WHOA shows foods that are ok to eat almost anytime and are nutrient dense (GO foods), foods that are ok to eat somet Continue reading >>

Cdapp Sweet Success > Resources > Free Patient Education Material

Cdapp Sweet Success > Resources > Free Patient Education Material

Eating Well to Keep Your Blood Sugar Normal - This pamphlet encourages eating meals low in sugar/carbohydrates and at regular times. It includes cooking tips and examples of high fiber foods. Print in landscape orientation, front to back, clip on the "short edge". Eating Well to Keep Your Blood Sugar Normal/Comiendo Bien Para Mantener Normal el Azcar en la Sangre - Spanish/English Food Guide - This brochure presents a colorful pictorial of the different food groups with a place for writing a personalized meal plan. Drawings of culturally appropriate food items are labeled along with portion sizes. Food groups are color coded for easy reference. Fruits and vegetables rich in vitamin C and A are coded for easy reference. A table of foods which raise blood sugar and should be avoided is also provided Print in portrait orientation, front to back. Food Guide - Vietnamese (Color) **The Vietnamese Food Guide was last updated on 3/05 My Meal Plan - This useful tool assists in providing personalized meal plans for your patient. The chart allows individualized meal and snack examples to be listed in the correct portions for each food group. This is an excellent tool for a wide range of literacy skills. This chart is available in English and Spanish. Print in landscape orientation, front to back, clip on the "short edge". My Meal Plan/Mi Plan de Comidas - Spanish Postpartum Nutrition (My Baby has Been Born...) - This easy to read brochure helps a woman maintain a healthy life style after delivery. Includes information on steps to take to maintain a healthy weight, eating less fat, and how to read a label. Print in landscape orientation, front to back, clip on the "short edge". Post Partum Nutrition/My Baby Has Been Born What do I Eat Now?/ Mi Beb ha nacido, Wue Hago hora Para Pre Continue reading >>

How Do You Use Myplate When You Have Diabetes? - Michelle May Md

How Do You Use Myplate When You Have Diabetes? - Michelle May Md

How do you use MyPlate when you have diabetes? For those already familiar with the concepts of mindful eating and intuitive eating, you understand the challenges of applying these non-restrictive approaches when someone has specific dietary needs or a chronic condition that is impacted by what you eat (as if there are any conditions that arent impacted by what you eat!). In fact, its one of the most common questions I get from audience members and other health professionals when I present on mindful eating: But what do you do when you cant eat what you love because you have diabetes? they ask. My answer: People will eat what they love anyway so you might as well figure out how to balance eating for enjoyment with eating for nourishment and in this case, for optimal blood glucose management. We know (as you do) that rigidity just doesnt work long term so we simply arent interested in giving people a bunch of unsustainable rules to follow. Instead, like many other health professionals, we fully embrace the all foods can fit philosophy using the principles of balance, variety, and moderation. Mindful eating is perfect for learning how to eat what you love in moderation while eating a varied and balanced diet. (Our recent series of posts on the debate about butter vs. margarine is a good example of how mindful eating is applied to complex nutrition questions.) As you can imagine, while we were writing Eat What You Love, Love What You Eat with Diabetes , we had many long conversations about how to balance our non-restrictive approach with the goal of achieving target blood glucose levels. We were nearly finished with the first draft of the manuscript when the launch of MyPlate was announced. First it was Argggghhhh! then it was Aha! We quickly agreed that this simple visual Continue reading >>

Diabetes

Diabetes

Click on the English or Spanish version of the topics listed below to view or download the diabetes-care programs you want in either color or black & white. Note: The programs on this page are not for use by organizations or health care professionals. Click here for more information. About Diabetes Click on program title to see cover image. Type 1 Diabetes Click on program title to see cover image. Healthy Eating Click on program title to see cover image. Saving Money Click on program title to see cover image. Blood Sugar Click on program title to see cover image. Be Active! Click on program title to see cover image. Caring for Diabetes Click on program title to see cover image. Medicine Click on program title to see cover image. Preventing Problems Click on program title to see cover image. Stressbusters This program by cartoonist Steve Yurko is designed to help you relax. Steve’s cartoons offer a funny and sometimes off-beat look at some of the many things you can do to cope with the stress of living with diabetes. REMINDER: The diabetes-care programs on this page are not for use by health care professionals or organizations. Continue reading >>

Free Diabetes Handouts

Free Diabetes Handouts

Here is one of our most popular handouts to help patients with type 2 diabetes eat right. Tips are given by Victoria Shanta Retelny, RD, to eat regular, high fiber meals plus directions are given to prepare a healthy plate. This handout features a beautiful color photo that shows that a healthy diabetes plate is very appetizing and beautiful! This handout has a suggestion for every high-calorie treat so persons with diabetes can make a healthy swap that reminds them of their favorite food. PLUS we have a recipe for carrot cake salad that will help every patient want to eat more vegetables. Our long time subscriber, Mary, writes, "Judy, thank you very much for all the cooking instruction sheets! They are wonderful handouts that I plan to discuss, copy and handout at any group presentations that may do, as well as to the teachers/staff at my daughters school during National Nutrition Month. I have picked up some great ideas for my own family meals, too" --Mary Therese Maslanka, RD, LDN, Mount Prospect, IL We will not share your email address with anyone. You will receive the diabetes handout plus weekly updates once your delivery is complete. You can unsubscribe at any time. Or reply to any email and request more items!! We love your feedback! Become a premium member today and get access to hundreds of articles and handouts plus our premium tools! Continue reading >>

Understanding Food

Understanding Food

All food is not equal in calories. Fat, for example, has more than twice the calories, gram for gram, as equal amounts of carbohydrates or protein. This page is an overview, and you will learn general information about: The subsequent sections provide more detailed information: Main sources of calories in food To begin with, let’s talk about food in general. We obtain nutrition through the various foods we eat. Foods supply critical vitamins and minerals essential for health. Foods also supply us with energy, or calories. To keep your body running, you need three types of food: However, all food is not equal in calories. Fat, for example, has more than twice the calories, gram for gram, as equal amounts of carbohydrates or protein. There is not and ideal mix of carbohydrate, protein and fat that is right for everyone. Targets depend on your calorie goals, body weight, lipid profile, blood glucose control, activity levels, and personal preferences. A registered dietitian can help design a meal plan that is right for you. The 2015-2020 Dietary Guidelines for Americans suggest: Carbohydrates – 45 to 65% of your daily calories * Protein – 10 to 35% of your daily calories Fat- 20 to 35% of your daily calories * The Dietary Reference Intake (DRI) for carbohydrates is 130 grams per day. This is the “minimum” suggested intake for most people. The following is an example fuel mix. Your targets may vary. Carbohydrates If you have diabetes, it is essential to learn about carbohydrates. Why? Because among all the foods, carbohydrates have the largest effect on your blood sugar. Carbohydrates include starches and sugars. During digestion, both forms of carbohydrate break down in your body to single units of sugar, called glucose. Carbohydrate is an important part of your d Continue reading >>

Plate Method Meal Ideas

Plate Method Meal Ideas

Diabetic Living / Food to Eat / Nutrition You can combine simple, healthy foods to make a variety of quick and easy meals that are appropriate for anyone, especially people with diabetes. To create balanced meals that stay within your carb and calorie allowances, let a 9-inch plate be your guide. Using the plate method, a meal complete with a side of fruit and a cup of fat-free milk provides about 425 calories, 55-60 grams of carbohydrate, 35 grams of protein, and 10 grams of fat. Save the dairy or fruit serving for a snack if you're targeting 45 grams of carbohydrate per meal (typical for many women) and limit high-calorie condiments. -- Fill 1/2 of the plate with 2 servings of nonstarchy vegetables. -- Fill 1/4 of the plate with lean meat (3 ounces cooked) or other high-protein food. -- Fill 1/4 of the plate with a starchy vegetable or whole grain serving (amount varies depending on food selected). -- Include a serving of fruit and/or dairy. We show you 14 meal ideas, but take what you find on the following slides and mix and match to create your own meal ideas! Diabetic Meals in Minutes Mini Cookbook , Easy Baking Recipes That Start with a Mix , Cook Once, Eat for a Week Nonstarchy vegetable: 1 cup mixed salad greens with 1/2 cup cherry tomatoes, halved Protein: 3 ounces flaked tuna (canned in water) Starch or whole grain: 4 pieces melba toast To transform this into a tuna salad sandwich, add 1 tablespoon fat-free mayo and chopped celery to the tuna and place mixture between two slices of melba toast. In general, the serving size for nonstarchy vegetables is 1 cup raw or 1/2 cup cooked or juiced. Plate Method Menus Mini Cookbook , 23 Easy Plate Method Dinners , MyPlate-Inspired: Healthy & Delicious Recipes Nonstarchy vegetable: 5 to 6 spears of cooked asparagus and Continue reading >>

Decreasing Risk For Gestational Diabetes Toolkit

Decreasing Risk For Gestational Diabetes Toolkit

"Are you at risk for developing Gestational diabetes?" poster ( English and Spanish ) Risk Assessment Chart assists the WIC nutritionist in becoming familiar with GDM risk factors. GDM Assessment Card ( English and Spanish ) explains the risk factors for developing GDM and an action plan for decreasing some of these risks. This card is used at the client's initial visit and given to the client as a handout. Choose MyPlate demonstrates a balanced meal with smaller portion sizes and emphasizing high fiber Walk to Success ( English and Spanish ) handout provides general guidelines for exercise during pregnancy. Hemoglobin A1c in Pregnancy ( English and Spanish ) handout defines what a Hemoglobin A1 is and how an elevated HbA1c may relate to complications during pregnancy. Referral Letter to Provider is given to the client with an HbA1c 5.7% "It's never too early to prevent diabetes" Postpartum Handout ( English and Spanish ) - For all pregnant clients regardless of risk level for developing GDM - Handout: How Can I Decrease my risk for Gestational Diabetes ( English and Spanish ) - Handout: Walk to Success ( English and Spanish ) - Handout: The Plate Method ( English and Spanish ) Continue reading >>

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