diabetestalk.net

My Mom Has Diabetes

Growing Up With A Type 1 Dad

Growing Up With A Type 1 Dad

WRITTEN BY: Genevieve Severyn On a spring day in 2012, everything changed. No, it wasn’t the day of diagnosis. It was the day that I found out my father had been hospitalized after yet another insulin reaction. My dad was diagnosed with Type 1 diabetes at the unusual age of 37. I (his only child) was born 9 years later, so I did not experience his diagnosis first-hand. But I learned about his condition at a very young age when he used to trust my tiny fingers to prick his much larger finger and test his blood. Every morning, for 30 years, he would inject insulin with a syringe to keep his blood glucose levels stable all day. It was an old-fashioned system. There were no pumps or monitors connected to his body, nothing high-tech. He was advised to just eat healthy, use a sugar substitute in his coffee and test his blood glucose level throughout the day. But his daily routine began to slack over time. He would skip meals or not eat anything at all, living off of coffee, full of cream. Consequently, he would suffer from severe hypoglycemia sometimes after taking insulin. I remember these incidents with such clarity. Once when I was 6, then 10, then 13, then twice at 15, and 17, then finally at 20. He took me to Disneyworld for the first time when I was 10. It was our first big trip together without my mom. Sure enough, he had an insulin reaction during the fireworks show at Epcot. My friend’s family was there with us that night, and I sent them to find him something sweet. They came back with an ice cream bar and a park security officer. From previous incidents, I had learned what I was supposed do. I explained that my dad was a diabetic and the officer insisted on taking him to the park infirmary. Later, he was wheeled out in a wheelchair and he gave me a thumb’s up Continue reading >>

Reducing Diabetes Risks For The Whole Family

Reducing Diabetes Risks For The Whole Family

Diabetes is a disease that affects more and more Americans every day: Almost 26 million children and adults in the United States now have diabetes, and another 79 million US residents are living with prediabetes, a condition in which blood tests show a blood glucose level that is higher than normal but not high enough for a diagnosis of diabetes. People with prediabetes have an increased risk of developing Type 2 diabetes. Blood relatives of people with either Type 1 or Type 2 diabetes also have a higher risk of developing the same type of diabetes as their family member. And people who have diabetes run the risk of developing long-term complications associated with diabetes. In some cases, being aware of having a heightened risk for diabetes enables a person to be proactive about reducing the risk. For example, people with prediabetes and blood relatives of people with Type 2 diabetes can reduce their risk of developing Type 2 diabetes by making lifestyle changes, such as increased physical activity, that burn calories, lower blood glucose levels, and encourage weight maintenance or weight loss. Close relatives of people with Type 1 diabetes can have their risk of developing the condition assessed through blood tests. While no one yet knows how to prevent Type 1 diabetes, people determined to be at high risk can be followed closely, so that if they develop diabetes, they can be diagnosed early and be started on treatment as early as possible. People who already have diabetes can lower their risk of developing long-term complications by taking steps to manage their blood glucose, blood pressure, and blood cholesterol levels. Diabetes and genetics The reasons that diabetes runs in families are complex, and they differ between Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes. In both cases, ho Continue reading >>

My Mom Has Type 2 Diabetes, So Does That Mean I'll Get It?

My Mom Has Type 2 Diabetes, So Does That Mean I'll Get It?

A fellow caregiver asked... My mother has had type 2 diabetes for years, and I'm worried that I may get the disease too. What are my chances of getting it, should I get tested, and is there anything I can do to prevent it? Expert Answers Family history is a risk factor for diabetes. If one of your parents has type 2 diabetes, you're at slightly increased risk of developing the disease. If both your parents have the disease, your risk is much greater. You're also at greater risk for the disorder if you're over 45, overweight, inactive, or you smoke or have hypertension. And if you belong to any of the ethnic groups at greater risk of getting the condition, including African Americans, Hispanic/Latin Americans, American Indians, Asian Americans, and Pacific Islanders, you're two to three times more likely to develop the disorder than if you're of Caucasian descent. The only way you'll know for certain whether your blood sugar sits in the recommended range is by getting tested. So go ahead and find out how your numbers look. It may be a wake-up call -- or buy you some peace of mind. Carrying excess weight around your waist rather than your hips also increases your risk of diabetes, so check your body mass index and waist size, too, to find out if your body shape is another risk factor. Remember, too, that even though your mom has this condition, there's a lot you can do to avoid it. Start by making smart choices on the food front. That means lots of vegetables and fruits, whole grains, and lean protein, and go easy on the fats and sweet treats. Get active, if you're not already. Even walking as little as 30 minutes a day can lower your risk of getting type 2 diabetes. Physical activity increases your body's ability to store and use glucose. It also helps keep your heart an Continue reading >>

This Question Is For My Mom, She Has Diabetes

This Question Is For My Mom, She Has Diabetes

Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community Find support, ask questions and share your experiences. Join the community This question is for my mom, she has diabetes She is 67 years old, height 62.2 inches, weight 145.5 lbs with her clothes on. She was diagnosed in March of this year when she ended up in the ER in a coma that followed glucose injections. Her blood sugar was sky high. She had violent tremors in her right hand and couldn't get up out of bed to use the bathroom... The doctor said she's already had diabetes for 2-3 years at that point. She also has hypertension, oxaluria, and ischemic heart disease. Her blood sugar levels were gradually lowered with Mixtard in the morning and Glucovance tablet in the evening. Over time Glucovance was no longer needed, morning blood sugar levels were within target range and these days we only use insulin when necessary. Mom thinks that because her pre-meal blood sugar is normal she doesn't need insulin. However, without it two hours later her blood sugar shoots up to 12.8 - 14.6! Does anyone know how much insulin shall i give her to keep her sugars normal? (under 8.5 two hours after she eats?) Also, at night she can't sleep because of aches and pains in her arms and legs. Is this diabetic neuropathy? Looking for any advice on how to make her better. Thanks in advance to everyone who took their time to read this. Hi. Yes, diet is going to be key to helping your Mum. Her surgery should be providing guidance on insulin. If she is on a mixed insulin it is essential that you discuss changes with the surgery as it needs close monitoring. If it's a single insulin which is injected once or twice daily it becomes easier and NICE recommends aiming for a morning fasting level of 5 - 7 mmol and adjusting as necessary to meet that but y Continue reading >>

Having A Parent With Type 2 Diabetes: What To Know About Your Risk

Having A Parent With Type 2 Diabetes: What To Know About Your Risk

Every year, Allison Jones, age 34, of Champaign, Illinois, gets her blood sugar checked. So far, she has breathed a sigh of relief when her numbers have come back normal each time. Still, she knows that type 2 diabetes is in her blood, or more precisely, her genes. She’s watched her father, diagnosed in his 40s, struggle with the disease, and three of her father’s four siblings also have it. “It’s definitely a worry in my mind,” Jones says. Genetics and Lifestyle Play a Role Jones’s concern is well founded. Research suggests that having a parent with type 2 diabetes increases your risk of developing the disease by as much as fourfold, and even more if both parents are affected. “We know that if both parents have type 2 diabetes, there’s about a 50 percent risk that you and your siblings could have the genes passed on,” says Edward Hess, MD, an endocrinologist who leads the diabetes program at Kaiser Permanente in Fontana, California. It’s clear that there’s a strong genetic component to type 2 diabetes, and that’s why we see greater prevalence in some ethnic groups, like Native Americans and African Americans. But it’s an incredibly complex disease. “There are literally dozens of genes and sites on the DNA that are associated with type 2 diabetes,” Dr. Hess says. It’s hard to tease out how much of our risk comes from genetics and how much comes from lifestyle factors, like eating and exercise patterns. “It's a combination of inheriting that really strong type of diabetes from your parents,” says Hess, “and you can inherit bad habits from your parents, too.” Understand Your Individual Risk Family history is just one of many risk factors for type 2 diabetes, so it’s worth talking with your doctor about your overall risk. If you ha Continue reading >>

Need An Advice. My Mom Has Diabetes

Need An Advice. My Mom Has Diabetes

Hi All. My name is Rona and my 61 years old mom was diagnosed with Diabetes last week. On the past few days I've been following your messages and I have to say that I'm really worried about my Mom. Since she was diagnosed, I feel she is in denial and is refusing to take any of the conventional medicine that the doctor has prescribe. I'm currently looking for anything natural that might be helpful to lower her blood sugar levels (her A1C is 7.8). Can someone please recommend me of such dietary supplement?? Me and my sister are really stressed about it but my really doesn't seem to care. D.D. Family T1 since 1966, pumper since '03, transplant '08 I'm glad you are looking out for your Mom. Welcome. Here's the thing though, nothing works in isolation. Exercise will only help a bit if you are not eating properly. Proper diet will help, but exercise is necessary too. Sometimes meds are necessary (and her sugars should come down as she is in the danger range to develop complications) but again they need to be taken together with diet and exercise. The same is true of supplements. Some folks find them helpful (I'm sure lots of people here can tell you what they have taken) but again they should be taken together with lifestyle change. I wish you and your Mom the best of luck. T1 since 1966, dialysis in 2001, kidney transplant in 02 from my cousin, pumping 03 - 08, pancreas transplant Feb 08 D.D. Family T1 for 54 years - on Pump since 03/2008 Well - it's too bad your Mum won't take her meds. As for any natural medications, I have never heard of that for a diabetic, but I may be wrong and someone may just come along and tell you different! She really should start looking after herself, seeing as she has children, but if you can make sure she eats right - which means not many car Continue reading >>

If I Have Type 1 Diabetes, What Is The Risk My Child Will Develop It?

If I Have Type 1 Diabetes, What Is The Risk My Child Will Develop It?

According to the American Diabetes Association, if you are a man with diabetes, your child has 1 in 17 odds of developing the type 1 diabetes. If you are a woman with diabetes, your child's risk of developing the disease is between 1 in 25 and 1 in 100. Other factors that increase your child's diabetes risk include: both parents having type 1 diabetes, one parent developing diabetes before age 11, and having a disorder called polyglandular autoimmune disorder. Certain blood tests for antibodies and genetic markers can test for and help evaluate risk for diabetes as well. The best way to determine your child's risk is to discuss your family's history and risk factors on an individualized basis with your doctor or a genetics specialist. A child born to a parent who has type 1 diabetes is at slightly greater risk of developing type 1 diabetes than children of parents without diabetes. The risk is slightly higher when the father has type 1 diabetes. Researchers have identified genes that could play a role in type 1 diabetes. However, there is no genetic test for predicting whether your baby will develop type 1 or type 2 diabetes. A baby has a 1% risk of developing diabetes if the baby is born to a mother who is age 25 or older and has type 1 diabetes. A baby has a 4% risk of developing diabetes if the mother is younger than age 25 when the child is born. A baby has a 6% risk of developing diabetes if the father has type 1 diabetes. Each of these risks is doubled if the parent with type 1 diabetes developed it before the age of 11. If both parents have type 1 diabetes, the risk is not known but is probably somewhat higher. A baby born to parents who do not have diabetes has a 0.3% risk of developing the disease. Ask your provider to refer you to a medical geneticist or genet Continue reading >>

My Mom Has Diabetes And I Am Very Concerned About Her

My Mom Has Diabetes And I Am Very Concerned About Her

My mom has diabetes and I am very concerned about her My mom has diabetes and I am very concerned about her? Hi, last day I talked to my mother and she told me after being at the doctor's because having an infect and asking for a blood test they recognize a blood sugar of 300 which was mentioned to be a long term result. Also her blood pressure was a little bit too high and also other results. She got medicals and a blood sugar measuring device. I am actually really concerned about my mom, I dont even know if it is diabetes 2 or diabetes 3. My mom has overweight but she was already going to gym before this blood sugar was recognized and she is not eating really much. So I don t know how she can improve her situation as she is already over 50. What can I do for her, I am already thinking about visiting her and stay a long time with her to be able to help. Thank you so much for your answers. Unfortunatly my mom doesnt speak english, also I think I dont want her to see that I am worried so much. But hearing this kind of information makes me calm down a little. She is already on a good way and the own blood sugar results as well as the blood pressure went down a lot since she take the meds. In 14 days she will visit the doc again to do a check plus she will be send to diabitis education. I study a little bit the last days and read the abdominal fat is a main factor for diabitis 2 and other diseases which is really hard to get rid of it. My own experience getting rid of adominal fat is "not eating 5 hours before going to bed" and "swimming". About the diet she already lost 2kg the last week, hope this will continue and stay on long term. ...plus she will be send to diabitis education. I ...read the abdominal fat is a main factor for diabitis 2 When it comes to food, the thi Continue reading >>

What Losing My Father To Diabetes And Heart Failure Has Taught Me About Life

What Losing My Father To Diabetes And Heart Failure Has Taught Me About Life

Let’s take a look back to our teenage years, when we thought that picking out our high school yearbook quote or the dress we’re going to wear to prom was the most important decisions of our lives. When I was a teenager, I always pictured what life would be like in my twenties. You always hear people say that your twenties are known to be the most fun, exciting and spontaneous years of your life. How could I not love my twenties? I graduated college, got my first real job, moved to the big apple, traveled with friends, and enjoyed many nights eating late night pizza and chicken fingers. But when I was 25 years old my life changed forever. My best friend, life coach and most importantly, my father passed away from diabetes and heart failure. Everyone that knows me knows how special the bond I had with my dad was. It all started when I was a senior in High School back in 2005. My parents took our family away on a vacation to the Bahamas. While we were on that trip, my dad got a cut on the bottom of his foot. Diagnosing himself was one of his favorite things to do; he brushed it off and thought nothing of it. A year later, when I was a freshman in college, I got a call from my mom that she had to rush my dad to the emergency room because the little cut on his foot never healed and it turned into gang-green. Looking back on that night now, one could say it was the beginning of the end. My dad lost 2 toes and half of his foot that night and also became blind in one eye, which steered my family to a road I never thought we’d face. From the day my dad was allowed to work, he worked.. He was always a motivated, diligent and dedicated man and even after many surgeries and losing his vision in one eye, he continued to wake up every morning to commute from New Jersey to NYC. Continue reading >>

All I Needed To Know About T1d I Learned From My Mom And Brother

All I Needed To Know About T1d I Learned From My Mom And Brother

Read Why My Family Doesnt Use Nightscout. My mom was diagnosed in 1981, when she was 38 and I was 4. Photos from that time show how impossibly skinny she was at the time gaunt and bony. In hindsight, there were suspicions that something was wrong months earlier; she might even have had Type 1 since the time I was born. As a four-year-old, I didnt know what was happening, and I was terrified. When my mom returned from the hospital after her diagnosis, I remember standing in our tiny, sunlit kitchen, asking if we could still drink from the same glass. I wondered if I could catch diabetes like a cold. I felt that everything was changing and I just wanted to curl up into her arms. She comforted me with the assurance that life would continue as normally as possible. Read Why Children with Type 1 Might Lie About Their Blood Sugar Levels. For the most part, she was correct; life returned to a modified version of normal. Mom never made diabetes a big deal; It was just another aspect of life. I never heard her complain about it once. Following the exchange diet at that time, she ate what she needed, tested her blood glucose, and took her insulin. She never hid diabetes she was public with her insulin injections and blood sugar testing, yet discreet when necessary. She discussed diabetes with her junior high students and others and we did JDRF walks as a family. In 1987, my older brother was also diagnosed with Type 1 at age 13. I was more scared for him than for what his diagnosis might have meant for me. He had lost a lot of weight, and had looked so small and helpless in the hospital bed when he was diagnosed, and he was in DKA. Afterwards, although he had a tougher transition to life with diabetes, he followed our moms lead. He did what he needed to do to care for his health Continue reading >>

Appreciating My Mom With Diabetes On Mother's Day

Appreciating My Mom With Diabetes On Mother's Day

Belated Appreciation for my Mom with Diabetes on Mother's Day As we head toward Mother's Day this weekend, my mom has been on my mind -- especially in the context of how we've both been living with type 1 diabetes for most of our lives. She was 5 years old when diagnosed back in 1958, and ironically, I was diagnosed at the same young age in 1984. From there, it's been two out of three people with diabetes (PWDs) in our immediate family, since I'm an only child. We are in this together (aren't we all?) and that's created a unique bond. Unfortunately, it didn't dawn on me until my 20s how lucky I was to have a mother living with T1D, just like me. Being diagnosed so young, it didn't seem like that big a deal to me in those early years. Sure, Mom and I both did blood tests on that big meter the size of a brick. We had the meal prep routine down, snacks before bed to prevent lows, and insulin injections, which were mandatory before the days of modern D-tech. But as a kid, I had little appreciation of how special it was that my my was along with me on this diabetes adventure. I was stuck in "I'm so alone" and "My mom doesn't get it" mode, and once my teens set in, I was in full rebellion mode. The constant "Did you check?" questions were just annoyances in those days, and at first I could just make up a number and get away with it. As I grew older, my parents got savvier and I had to prove that I had tested. I remember fudging my blood sugar numbers in the paper logbooks for years, using different ink and writing styles to make it look like I'd actually penned those results over days and weeks. Blood smears were always a nice touch, too. In hindsight, I realize how tough it must have been for my mom. She later told me that my grandma was pretty strict with her on diabetes m Continue reading >>

Letter To My Mother (from The Diabetic Herself)

Letter To My Mother (from The Diabetic Herself)

Letter To My Mother (From The Diabetic Herself) Letter To My Mother (From The Diabetic Herself) The moment I was diagnosed with Type 1 Diabetes I didnt know that my world was going to change. I didnt see the fear or worried look on your face as it must have felt like your world had been turned upside down. You held it together for meyou put a smile on your faceandtold me everything is going to be okay. I didnt witness the nights where you laid awake in bed asking why this had to happen to me? Why your daughteryour babyyour piece to the puzzle had to be given this disease. I didnt realize the pain I put you through throughout the years when I didnt want to take care of myself. When you could have said anything and I would have looked the other way. The sacrificesand the struggles that you dealt with and being a mother is hard regardless. A single mother going through difficult times of not having insurance . Barely being able to afford my insulin and supplies. The times where I dropped a vial of insulin on the kitchen floor by mistakewere cringe worthy moments (Im sure). Not having anyone to talk to that understands or even knows what Type 1 Diabetes is. I know that you would have done anything to take it away from me, even if it meant for you to have it. Having to worry if I actually checked my blood sugar (or if I lied to ignore it). If I took the right amount of insulin (or if I took any at all). Having to save my life countless timesfearing for my life aheadhaving the fear of losing me. Begging for me to wake up to reality and take care of myself or I would end up killing myself. All I wanted to do was bury my head in the sand and escape the reality of it. Feeling sorry for myself and not knowing that Im my own worst enemy. I thought that this was a life sentence. I Continue reading >>

Mysugr Moms And Their Children With Diabetes

Mysugr Moms And Their Children With Diabetes

back to Overview My colleague Clara asked several people in the office to interview their mom about having a child with diabetes. She wanted to hear the story of her mom and of other moms out there. She wanted to give all parents of children with diabetes stories to feel close to, anecdotes to laugh at, and wisdom to look up to. I think she has done that, and more. With a special post, just for Mother's Day, here's Clara... The day you learned your child had diabetes When my mom, Isabelle, and Nicole, Kyle’s mom, heard the diagnosis news, they thought it wasn’t possible. Marlis’ mom, Karin, felt like someone pulled the rug out from under her. Anne’s and Scott’s mom took it a bit more smoothly. Scott’s mom, Patricia, being a nurse, knew more about the illness and could more easily take the hit. After that, all of them got to work. Anne’s mom, Elfrieda, made sure the whole family followed the same diet so she didn’t feel different. Scott’s mom invited his four grandparents to join the diabetes education course, so everyone knew more about it. Nicole got rid of all the sweets in the cupboard before learning she could keep them without creating disaster. My mom came back to being the good student she’s always been and learned all she could about diabetes… Whichever mom you relate to when you read this, know that there is no good or bad way. Learning your child has diabetes is shocking and confusing and can lead you to make radical decisions or just bring you closer. What’s important to know is that you’ll be there for them – no matter what. And that, ladies, is all that matters to us too. And that, ladies, is all that matters to us too. Keeping up During the first year after my diagnosis, I asked my mom every single day: “why me?” and I refus Continue reading >>

Mom & Diabetes - :: Nutrizonia ::

Mom & Diabetes - :: Nutrizonia ::

Ive started a series called Confessions of a Nutritionist . Posts are up on Fridays My mom has diabetes, and Im not helping her as I should Here I said it. Alittle dirty secret. I feel ashamed to say that out loud, but I have to get it out of my system. How can I do this to my mom? Its killing me. Her blood sugar level is under control, but she needs help sometimes. She is taking a blood sugar control drug. And you know what? Im not sure what else she is taking now. She is keep updating me, if she get a higher dose, or change the drug. But I feel ugh mom Im not an expert in diabetes. I dont know if this the right one for you, or not. lets back in time, My mom is living a healthy lifestyle, since I was aware what this is means. She is not a fan of heavy desserts, chocolate, or even refined carbohydrates like white rice, and white bread. She always cooks a meal that has veggies in it, or has a salad for a side. And she does extensive cleaning everyday, walking 20-30 minutes every time she can. So why you diabetes little monster got into my moms body? She hasa familyhistoryof diabetes. A bad one,unfortunately!And the truth is that my two uncles, died of complications of uncontrolled diabetes, is so hard to digest. So she has the heredity factor, the age one, and the weight one. She is not obese,but the thing is, she has the ugly kind of fats, the ones on the waist line. What Ibelieveis that STRESS is got her way.She is too caring, and loving mother. She worries about everything, every family member, a husband, and the house that needs to be cleaned. And as every normal family, mine went under some challenging problems that caused constant stress for my mom for months or even years. It is much better now though! I believe its so important to relief the stress, by any possi Continue reading >>

Genetics & Diabetes : What's Your Risk?

Genetics & Diabetes : What's Your Risk?

A school nurse anxiously wants to know if there is a reason why several children from her small grade school have been diagnosed with type 1 (juvenile onset) diabetes. Is it an epidemic? Will there be more cases? Is a recent chicken pox outbreak to blame? A man in his 50s develops type 2 diabetes. His mother developed diabetes in her 60s. Should this man's brother and sister be concerned, too? What about his children's chances of developing diabetes? A married couple wants to have children, but they are concerned because the husband has type 1 diabetes. They wonder what the risk is that their child would have diabetes. A couple has three young children. One of the children develops type 1 diabetes. There's no history of diabetes anywhere in either parent's families. Is this just a fluke? What are the chances the other children will develop diabetes? Chances are if you or a loved one have diabetes, you may wonder if you inherited it from a family member or you may be concerned that you will pass the disease on to your children. Researchers at Joslin Diabetes Center report that, while much has been learned about what genetic factors make one more susceptible to developing diabetes than another, many questions remain to be answered. While some people are more likely to get diabetes than others, and in some ways type 2 (adult onset diabetes) is simpler to track than type 1 (juvenile onset) diabetes, the pattern is not always clear. For more than 20 years researchers in the Epidemiology and Genetics Section at Joslin in Boston (Section Head Andrzej S. Krolewski, M.D., Ph.D., Senior Investigator James H. Warram, M.D., Sc.D., and colleagues) have been studying diabetes incidence and hereditary factors. They are continuing a scientific journey begun by Elliott P. Joslin, M.D., Continue reading >>

More in diabetes