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My Husband Is Type 2 Diabetic Can I Get Pregnant

Pregnancy With Type 1 Diabetes

Pregnancy With Type 1 Diabetes

Forty five years ago when I was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes I was clearly told I couldn’t have children. I didn’t. Today, thankfully that advice is no longer given. And while a woman with Type 1 diabetes needs to take precautions, she can absolutely, and safely, have a healthy baby. I sat down for an interview with Ginger Vieira, co-author,with Jennifer Smith, of the recent book, Pregnancy with Type 1 Diabetes: Your Month-to-Month Guide to Blood Sugar Management. What will people find in the book? As much information as you possibly need to understand why your blood sugars fluctuate during pregnancy and how to adjust your insulin management to keep your blood sugars as close to non-diabetic levels as possible. Also the book covers preparing for pregnancy, months one through nine of your pregnancy, delivery, and postpartum, including the challenges of breastfeeding for a woman with type 1 diabetes. My co-author Jenny is also my diabetes pregnancy coach. As a certified diabetes educator, woman with type 1 diabetes and mother, she knows this journey inside and out. What makes pregnancy for a woman with type 1 diabetes challenging? Let’s face it, a normal day with type 1 diabetes is challenging, balancing an autonomic system your body ought to balance on its own. And we’re only given insulin to do the job, while a non-diabetic body uses several different hormones to balance blood sugar. Add pregnancy to that mix and you add the insane pressure of, “Every decision you make impacts the human life growing inside of you!!!” And now you have to balance your blood sugars with constantly shifting pregnancy hormones. Plus those hormones impact your insulin needs in ways that are constantly changing and evolving. Also, there is never a break. Even when you’re sleepi Continue reading >>

Can My Husband's Diabetes Cause A Miscarriage?

Can My Husband's Diabetes Cause A Miscarriage?

Can my husband's diabetes cause a miscarriage? I had a miscarriage 2 months ago. I'm completely healthy and my OB/Gyne has no clue why it would have happened. She explained that there are millions of chromosomes and if 1 goes wrong, that is it. Ok, I get that but I won't accept it as my answer because I don't want it to happen again. So I researched more. The father is responsible for 50% of the chromosomes, so miscarriages actually could be from their end and not necessarily the mother's. My husband has Type 2 diabetes but has been taking care of it since he found out in December. It can cause fertility problems in men and can effect the DNA of the sperm. In my husband's case, we just found out the diabetes caused nerve damage in his groin area and a hernia in a testicle and will need surgery this month. I want to try again before surgery, but I'm scared. Has anyone experienced issues with pregnancy because of the fathers health? Is there a way we can protect ourselves from problems when we start trying again? Continue reading >>

How To Get Pregnant If My Husband Has Diabetes?

How To Get Pregnant If My Husband Has Diabetes?

Diabetes is such a common disease, it affects many people of all ages. When a woman is trying to get pregnant, she may wonder how her husband’s diabetes will affect her fertility. Diabetes is such a common disease, it affects many people of all ages. When a woman is trying to get pregnant, she may wonder how her husband’s diabetes will affect her fertility. The most important thing for couples who want to get pregnant with diabetes is going to be constant contact with their doctor or health care provider every step of the way. Claim Your 20 Free Pregnancy Tests – Click Here It is also important to remember that if you do get pregnant and your partner has diabetes, your baby will be at risk for diabetes as well. This does not mean that your baby will automatically have diabetes, just that he or she will be at a greater risk of developing the disease. When it comes to getting pregnant with diabetes, communication with your doctor is key. There are several studies that show that diabetes can affect a man’s fertility, including his sperm count and motility. Sometimes, when a man has diabetes, assisted reproductive techniques like in vitro fertilization are the best route, especially if he has issues related to sperm. Remember that getting pregnant when you have a partner with diabetes is not impossible, but it might be a little more difficult, and take a little more time or creativity to do so. ConceiveEasy® TTC Kit™ is the most complete fertility system available over the counter. Clinically proven to dramatically increase your chances of conception and help you get pregnant fast from the very first use. And now for a limited time, Try a FREE starter pack today & receive 20 FREE pregnancy tests and a FREE Digital BBT Thermometer! Male fertility Continue reading >>

Partners Of Diabetic Men 'more Likely To Miscarry'

Partners Of Diabetic Men 'more Likely To Miscarry'

Wives and girlfriends of diabetic men may be more likely to miscarry, research suggests. A study has shown that diabetics' sperm is of poorer quality than that of other men. It is feared this could make it harder for their partners to get pregnant and make the more likely to miscarry. With rates of both forms of diabetes rising sharply, more and more young men may be denied the chance of fatherhood. Researcher Dr Con Mallidis said: 'What is particularly alarming is that the people who are being diagnosed with type 1 and type 2 diabetes are younger and younger. 'As a consequence, we have a much larger population of people who are diabetic during their reproductive years.' The study of young men with type 1, or childhood diabetes, picked up DNA damage in sperm that looked otherwise normal, the European Society of Human Reproduction and Embryology's annual conference in Barcelona heard. It is known that such damage can make it harder for women to become pregnant and increase the risk of miscarriage. The researchers, from Queen's University, Belfast, said it was likely men with type 2 diabetes, which tends to develop in middle-age and is linked to obesity, would be similarly affected. Fellow researcher Professor Neil McClure said it was clear that a man's health affected his fertility. 'For too long the role of general health in male fertility has been ignored,' he said. 'Very few centres take a detailed history from the man, concentrating instead on the female. 'This basic mistake is understandable but, now, those working in this area must give greater consideration to the male and to ensuring that he is in peak physique and health to maximise the couple’s chances of successful conception.' More than 2.3 million Britons have the diabetes, with type 2 accounting for up to Continue reading >>

The Shock Of Gestational Diabetes

The Shock Of Gestational Diabetes

About the author View all posts by TheLongPointGirl Some people are not surprised when they are diagnosed with type 2 diabetes. They know they are at risk. They have family members with type 2 diabetes. They have had conversations about diabetes with others who live with it. They have learned by observing others what it would be like to live with it whether its true diabetes or diabetes related to pregnancy . But for some of us, it was the shock of our lives. We have no family history of any type of diabetes that we are aware of. Oh, we have heard of diabetes but like most people, we dont always pay attention to what it is because it hasnt directly affected us. With the diagnosis of gestational diabetes you learn very quickly that diabetes has entered your life. Questions then come calling. A: The pregnancy has caused my body to have difficulty using the sugars the way it should be. A: Yes, the baby will be fine but there are things I will have to do to try to control the sugar load so the baby doesnt grow too big for a safe delivery. Although I jest, it isnt funny when it happens to you. The last thing any pregnant woman wants to find out is that part of her body isnt working the way it should when shes growing a baby. Or that she may have type 2 diabetes later in life. My diabetes journey started with my second pregnancy. Not my first, my second. Want to talk about shock? Looking back, I think my doctor had been monitoring me for this for a while before it actually surfaced or he said anything. Throughout the pregnancy, I had the usual blood work taken with no issues I was aware of. The routine blood glucose testing during pregnancy was done around 30 weeks at that time so I had it done. (Today the testing is done much earlier in the pregnancy). I didnt think twice a Continue reading >>

Does Diabetes Affect Fertility?

Does Diabetes Affect Fertility?

There was a time when women who had diabetes were strongly advised to avoid getting pregnant. Attempting to produce a biologically-related family was just too dangerous [source: Brucker]. Fortunately, diabetic women are no longer given that heartbreaking direction from caregivers. Diabetics can, and routinely do, get pregnant and give birth to healthy children. Type 1 or Type 2 diabetes, however, can still be a major factor in fertility for men or women. There are challenges diabetics face in getting a partner pregnant, becoming pregnant, maintaining a pregnancy and ensuring they give birth to a healthy, full-term baby. Diabetes (Type 1 or Type 2) can harm sperm [source: Paddock]. Type 2 diabetes can make it far more difficult to become pregnant. There's an increased rate of miscarriage among diabetics in general, and women with Type 1 diabetes are somewhat more likely to have a baby with a birth defect or a child born prematurely [source: MyDr]. However, all of these challenges can largely be managed by being attentive to and responding to signals from the body. In order to understand why diabetes affects reproduction, it helps to have a general understanding of the disease in both of its forms. A healthy human body digests food and -- with the help of a hormone called insulin -- transports a form of sugar known as glucose through the bloodstream to cells for energy. Diabetics have flaws in their metabolism. A Type 1 diabetic's body doesn't make insulin. The body of a Type 2 diabetic either fails to create enough insulin, the person's cells don't react properly to the insulin or both malfunctions occur [source: Nordqvist]. Click ahead to learn the specifics of how Type 1 diabetes influences reproduction and how it can be managed. You've undoubtedly heard a pregnant wom Continue reading >>

Pregnancy Was Hard But Worth Every Moment

Pregnancy Was Hard But Worth Every Moment

Save for later My pregnancy was without doubt the hardest thing I've ever done, but worth every minute to have baby James safe in my arms. My control wasn't as good as it should have been when we started trying for a baby, and I hadn't seen a diabetes consultant for years. Instead I just attended check ups at my GP surgery. To be honest I didn't fully realise the risks involved with having a baby as a diabetic, although I did know that diabetics have a tendency to have larger babies. It was during one of these check ups that I mentioned that my husband and I wanted to start a family, and the practice nurse told me I should see a diabetes consultant urgently. At that point I was already a few days' pregnant - although I didn't know it yet. I was worried about miscarriage Thankfully we found that I was pregnant very early on, and I was seen by a consultant the following week. I'd read up on what effects diabetes can have on pregnancy and I felt quite stupid and irresponsible for not having taken better care of my sugar levels before. I wanted this baby so much but was really worried that I would have a miscarriage, or that the baby would have some kind of abnormality. I was determined to get my blood sugar levels to the lowest levels I could, and started testing at least 10 times a day. I was really struggling to get the balance right, giving myself corrective injections to bring the levels down, and having hypos every single day. Hormones during pregnancy interfere with blood sugar levels. That coupled with losing hypo awareness meant I had a lot of severe hypos and we had to call an ambulance out on a couple of occasions. Ten weeks into my pregnancy I had a hypo at work where I ended up fitting at my desk. I hadn't wanted to tell my colleagues that I was pregnant until Continue reading >>

Pregnancy And Type 1 Diabetes

Pregnancy And Type 1 Diabetes

When you are pregnant, your ideal scenario is to not gain too much weight, pass each milestone without worry, and have a safe, fast delivery that results in a healthy baby. When you have Type 1 diabetes, however, the ideal pregnancy may seem unattainable. Lisa Pink, a new mother, was able to manage her pregnancy along with her diabetes to have a healthy baby girl. She summed up her experience: “It’s a lot of work. However, it’s also worth it when you hold your healthy, perfect baby!” Before conception Lisa learned she had Type 1 diabetes when she was 25 years old. She didn’t think about pregnancy and starting a family until she reached her mid-30s. Lisa didn’t know any mothers with Type 1 diabetes, but two of her friends knew of women who had managed their diabetes throughout successful pregnancies. Encouraged, Lisa went to her doctor a year before she and her husband began trying to become pregnant, which is highly recommended. A woman with Type 1 diabetes should attain healthy blood glucose levels before conception. This is important for the baby’s health during pregnancy but also before conception. The National Institutes of Health recommends that a woman with Type 1 diabetes have blood glucose levels in the target range of 80 to 110 mg/dl before eating and 100 to 155 mg/dl one to two hours after eating for three to six months before becoming pregnant. During pregnancy, the recommended target blood glucose range is 60 to 99 mg/dl before eating and 100 to 129 mg/dl one to two hours after eating. Safe sugar Meeting these target ranges will help decrease the chance of too much sugar being passed to your baby. Too much sugar may cause a fetus to grow too quickly or possibly harm the early development of organs. Having a large baby was one of Lisa’s concer Continue reading >>

Women’s Top Diabetes Concerns

Women’s Top Diabetes Concerns

Managing type 2 diabetes means being good to yourself. “Diabetes requires self-care to do it well,” says Robin Goland, MD, diabetes research director at New York-Presbyterian Hospital. “While many women are comfortable at taking care of others, it can be hard for them to take care of themselves.” Your first line of defense is a healthy diet and exercise plan, so talk to your doctor about creating one that will likely include: Getting at least 30 minutes of physical activity on most days. Anything that gets your heart rate up and causes you to sweat a little is beneficial, even if it’s gardening, walking, or cleaning your house. Eating foods that will keep your blood sugar levels in check. That means choosing high-fiber foods, swapping out white starchy foods for whole grains, putting lots of vegetables on your plate, and steering clear of sweetened beverages, including fruit juice. Ask your doctor who else can help you, like a nutritionist or a diabetes specialist. Having diabetes makes heart disease more likely. That's all the more reason to follow your doctor's guidelines about diet and exercise. Also, track your blood pressure, says OB/GYN and diabetes educator Cassandra Henderson, MD, of New York’s Lincoln Hospital and Albert Einstein College of Medicine. Keeping your cholesterol levels in check will also help protect your heart. Continue reading >>

Trying To Conceive With Type 1

Trying To Conceive With Type 1

Hi there. I'm 31 years old T1 and we've been TTC for 4 or 5 months now. It's felt much longer because it took me 6 months to get my a1c down from 7. My last two a1cs were 6.3 and 6.4, but my BG can still be variable (highs in 200+) sometimes. Anyway, I'm worried about the impact of diabetes on my ability to get pregnant and would love to hear from anyone with experience. - How long did it take you to get pregnant? - How tight were you around fertile window and weeks after to have a healthy baby? - Did you have any symptoms early in your pregnancy (between your ovulation day and before you tested positive for pregnancy? I get so sad and also worried every time I get my period now. I'm happy for all my friends, but it also makes me sad when I feel like everyone else can get pregnant except me. I'm sure this negative attitude and stress doesn't help things, but perhaps being more educated might help. Great job with your A1c! Are you on an insulin pump? If not I would highly recommend it! Better control is most important. The pump will help stabilize your blood sugar more. If you are getting your cycle each month regularly and your blood sugars are stable consistently then your on your way to making a baby! I am a lucky one with my pregnancy I had no morning sickness at all expect feeling tired all the time and this came after the positive pregnancy test. I use a cycle tracker app to record when I should be getting my cycle and it tracks my estimated day I would be ovulating. Its spot on every month. We tried a couple days before ovulating, on my ovulating day and the day after and we were pregnant. We were very lucky! Keep your head up it will happen The book "Balancing pregnancy with pre-existing diabetes" by Cheryl Alkon has a whole section with this and many women face Continue reading >>

"i Am Pregnant And My Husband Has Diabetes. Is There A Risk For My Child?" A Qualitative Study Of Questions Asked By Email About The Role Of Genetic Susceptibility To Diabetes

Go to: Abstract Diabetes Mellitus is a global health problem. Scientific knowledge on the genetics of diabetes is expanding and is more and more utilised in clinical practice and primary prevention strategies. Health consumers have become increasingly interested in genetic information. In the Netherlands, the National Genetic Research and Information Center provides online information about the genetics of diabetes and thereby offers website visitors the opportunity to ask a question per email. The current study aims at exploring people's need of (additional) information about the role of inheritance in diabetes. Results may help to tailor existing clinical and public (online) genetic information to the needs of an increasing population at risk for diabetes. A data base with emailed questions about diabetes and inheritance (n = 172) is used in a secondary content analysis. Questions are posted in 2005-2009 via a website providing information about more than 600 inheritable disorders, including all diabetes subtypes. Queries submitted were classified by contents as well as persons' demographic profiles. Questions were received by diabetes patients (49%), relatives (30%), and partners (21%). Questioners were relatively young (54.8% ≤ 30 years) and predominantly female (83%). Most queries related to type 1 diabetes and concerned topics related to (future) pregnancy and family planning. Questioners mainly asked for risk estimation, but also clarifying information (about genetics of diabetes in general) and advice (mostly related to family planning) was requested. Preventive advice to reduce own diabetes risk was hardly sought. Genetic information on diabetes provided by professionals or public health initiatives should address patients, as well as relatives and partners. Continue reading >>

Diabetes Mellitus: The Infertility Triple Threat

Diabetes Mellitus: The Infertility Triple Threat

Based on the feedback received from doctors reading the blog, we are introducing a new feature: Case of the Month. This Case of the Month is an actual patient from The Turek Clinic. It is presented to recognize American Diabetes Association Alert Day. The Case of Male Infertility He is a 31-year old who has been trying to conceive with his 28-year old wife for 2 years. During this time, he has noticed a lower sex drive and has had trouble ejaculating. His medical history is negative except for a 6-year history of diabetes mellitus that is well controlled with insulin injections. Exacerbated, he states “I really don’t know what’s happening to me!” Upon further questioning, the sex drive issue started even before they were trying to conceive. Regarding ejaculation, the patient states that his erections are not very strong and, although he has the sensation of climax, nothing comes out of the penis with ejaculation. In fact, he is concerned that things might be “backing up” in his body with these symptoms. A Short Review of Diabetes First identified as a disease of “sweet urine” in ancient times, diabetes mellitus a metabolic disease characterized by high blood sugar (glucose) levels. It is one of the most common medical diseases in the U.S., affecting 26 million adults and children or about 8% of the population. Among those affected, about 15 million are people of reproductive age. Normally, blood glucose levels are tightly controlled by insulin, a hormone produced by the pancreas. When the blood glucose rises, say after eating food, insulin is released to decrease the glucose level. In patients with diabetes, there is low or no production of insulin and therefore blood sugar levels are elevated. The sugars spill into the urine, hence the term “sweet uri Continue reading >>

Preparing For A Baby: From A Dad-to-be With Type 1 Diabetes

Preparing For A Baby: From A Dad-to-be With Type 1 Diabetes

The Life of a Diabetic, who has lived with type 1 diabetes since the age of 19. Originally from Pennsylvania, Chris resides in South Florida with his wife, Amanda. Managing his own search engine optimization (SEO) company, CSI Marketing Solutions, in Delray Beach, he spends most of his time working, learning about search marketing, and advocating for diabetes. We’re thrilled to have him blogging for us, kicking us off with sharing his perspective on preparing for his first child. Please welcome Chris! July 2013 was an amazing time in my life because I married the love of my life, Amanda. Fast forward to July 2014, my wife and I were not only celebrating our one year anniversary, but also celebrating the news of having our first child. After all the initial excited reactions between my wife and me, I could not help but think, “what if our child is diagnosed with type 1 diabetes?” It is a question that has popped into my head at least once a day for the last six to seven months. I usually tell myself there is nothing I can do about it if that day does come, so I cannot live every day in fear of it happening. But as a first time father-to-be with type 1 diabetes, I cannot help but think about it. Preparing for a baby from my perspective has included many more decisions other than what brand of diapers or bottles we want to put on our registry. We have had to discuss and research different items such as cord blood banking, to breastfeed or to not, a special diet for mommy while breastfeeding, what can we do during the early months of child to try and help prevent a diabetes diagnoses, etc. Preparing for Baby Stocker also made me realize how much more important it was for me to pay attention to my own health. This led me to pay more attention to my continuous glucose m Continue reading >>

Diabetes May Affect Men's Fertility

Diabetes May Affect Men's Fertility

May 2, 2007 -- Men with type 1 diabetes may have more DNA damage in their sperm, possibly hampering fertility, a preliminary study shows. The study was small and doesn't prove that type 1 diabetes causes male infertility. But the findings deserve further research, write the researchers, who are based in Belfast, Northern Ireland. They included Ishola Agbaje, MD, of the Reproductive Medicine Research Group at Queen's University of Belfast. Agbaje and colleagues studied semen and blood samples from 27 men with type 1 diabetes. Those men weren't necessarily infertile; they were invited to participate in the study while getting routine diabetes checkups. For comparison, the researchers also studied semen and blood samples from 29 men without diabetes who were undergoing infertility tests. Both groups of men were in their early to mid-30s, on average. The men with diabetes had lower semen volume than the men without diabetes. But the diabetes patients' semen volume was still within the normal range set by the World Health Organization (WHO). Sperm count, shape, and motion (motility) were similar in both groups of men. But when the researchers analyzed the sperms' DNA, they found more DNA damage in the diabetes patients' sperm. Sperm damage may increase infertility, note the researchers. Many factors can cause DNA damage. It's not clear whether diabetes was responsible for the DNA damage seen in the study. The study didn't include any men without diabetes who weren't undergoing infertility tests. Such men might have even less DNA damage in their sperm than the study groups, the researchers note. Agbaje's team calls for further studies on DNA sperm damage -- and its possible fertility consequences -- in men with type 1 diabetes. The study appears online in the journal Human Re Continue reading >>

How To Get Pregnant With Type 1 Diabetes (all The Lifestyle Tips)

How To Get Pregnant With Type 1 Diabetes (all The Lifestyle Tips)

Who recognizes the name Lyrehca from the blog Managing the Sweetness Within, chronicling one woman's efforts to get and stay pregnant while dealing with her lifelong type 1 diabetes? Yes, you guessed it: Lyrehca is coming out of the closet as herself, Cheryl Alkon, now-author of the forthcoming book Balancing Pregnancy With Pre-Existing Diabetes: Healthy Mom, Healthy Baby. Today, Lyrehca (er, Cheryl) shares a brief version of her story, and some don't-miss tips on diabetes and pregnancy. A Guest Post by Cheryl Alkon, D-blogger and Author When I first thought about trying to get pregnant, almost five years ago, I did everything I was supposed to do: I stepped up visits to my endocrinologist for pre-pregnancy consults I worked to get my blood sugar numbers into the tight ranges recommended for pregnancy I saw my eye doctor to check my eyes for any longterm damage from diabetes and learned how pregnancy might affect them I ate better and took prenatal vitamins I also looked everywhere for books and websites about the subject and I soon met with the maternal-fetal medicine specialist who worked with my endocrinologist at my hospital's diabetes and pregnancy program. Despite excellent blood sugars, an overall good bill of health, and extensive knowledge about the topic, I left the specialist's office in tears. Why? The doc, also known as a high-risk obstetrician, spent our appointment telling me all the terrible things that could happen in a pregnancy complicated by diabetes. Yes, tight blood sugars were necessary. Without them, the chances of having a pregnancy colored by complications, both for me and for the unborn baby, were high. The visit was a long list of all the potential things that could go wrong, from the pregnancy itself, to actually giving birth, to the health Continue reading >>

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