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My Husband Is Diabetic And I Can T Get Pregnant

How To Get Pregnant With Type 1 Diabetes (all The Lifestyle Tips)

How To Get Pregnant With Type 1 Diabetes (all The Lifestyle Tips)

Who recognizes the name Lyrehca from the blog Managing the Sweetness Within, chronicling one woman's efforts to get and stay pregnant while dealing with her lifelong type 1 diabetes? Yes, you guessed it: Lyrehca is coming out of the closet as herself, Cheryl Alkon, now-author of the forthcoming book Balancing Pregnancy With Pre-Existing Diabetes: Healthy Mom, Healthy Baby. Today, Lyrehca (er, Cheryl) shares a brief version of her story, and some don't-miss tips on diabetes and pregnancy. A Guest Post by Cheryl Alkon, D-blogger and Author When I first thought about trying to get pregnant, almost five years ago, I did everything I was supposed to do: I stepped up visits to my endocrinologist for pre-pregnancy consults I worked to get my blood sugar numbers into the tight ranges recommended for pregnancy I saw my eye doctor to check my eyes for any longterm damage from diabetes and learned how pregnancy might affect them I ate better and took prenatal vitamins I also looked everywhere for books and websites about the subject and I soon met with the maternal-fetal medicine specialist who worked with my endocrinologist at my hospital's diabetes and pregnancy program. Despite excellent blood sugars, an overall good bill of health, and extensive knowledge about the topic, I left the specialist's office in tears. Why? The doc, also known as a high-risk obstetrician, spent our appointment telling me all the terrible things that could happen in a pregnancy complicated by diabetes. Yes, tight blood sugars were necessary. Without them, the chances of having a pregnancy colored by complications, both for me and for the unborn baby, were high. The visit was a long list of all the potential things that could go wrong, from the pregnancy itself, to actually giving birth, to the health Continue reading >>

Diabetes Mellitus: The Infertility Triple Threat

Diabetes Mellitus: The Infertility Triple Threat

Based on the feedback received from doctors reading the blog, we are introducing a new feature: Case of the Month. This Case of the Month is an actual patient from The Turek Clinic. It is presented to recognize American Diabetes Association Alert Day. The Case of Male Infertility He is a 31-year old who has been trying to conceive with his 28-year old wife for 2 years. During this time, he has noticed a lower sex drive and has had trouble ejaculating. His medical history is negative except for a 6-year history of diabetes mellitus that is well controlled with insulin injections. Exacerbated, he states “I really don’t know what’s happening to me!” Upon further questioning, the sex drive issue started even before they were trying to conceive. Regarding ejaculation, the patient states that his erections are not very strong and, although he has the sensation of climax, nothing comes out of the penis with ejaculation. In fact, he is concerned that things might be “backing up” in his body with these symptoms. A Short Review of Diabetes First identified as a disease of “sweet urine” in ancient times, diabetes mellitus a metabolic disease characterized by high blood sugar (glucose) levels. It is one of the most common medical diseases in the U.S., affecting 26 million adults and children or about 8% of the population. Among those affected, about 15 million are people of reproductive age. Normally, blood glucose levels are tightly controlled by insulin, a hormone produced by the pancreas. When the blood glucose rises, say after eating food, insulin is released to decrease the glucose level. In patients with diabetes, there is low or no production of insulin and therefore blood sugar levels are elevated. The sugars spill into the urine, hence the term “sweet uri Continue reading >>

I Have Diabetes. What Should I Know Before I Get Pregnant?

I Have Diabetes. What Should I Know Before I Get Pregnant?

If you have type 1 or type 2 diabetes there are steps you can take to prepare yourself for pregnancy. Rest assured that these steps can make a big difference to how healthy you and your baby are throughout the pregnancy you're hoping for. You will need to be very careful to monitor your blood sugar (glucose) levels, though. That's because, once you're pregnant, you and your unborn baby will have a higher risk of complications. Rarely, these complications caused by diabetes can result in a baby being born with a life-long condition. Sadly, mums-to-be with diabetes are more likely to have a miscarriage, or even experience the loss of a baby at birth. Babies born to mums with diabetes are also more likely to develop diabetes in later life. Most heart defects, kidney problems and nerve and brain defects happen in the first eight weeks of pregnancy. These potential risks are probably due, in part, to the way blood glucose levels can rapidly go up and down beyond the normal range. So controlling your diabetes starting now is key to preventing complications or, in the worst of cases, the loss of a longed-for pregnancy. The good news is that with careful planning and the support of your GP and diabetes specialist, this is very achievable. There may be a preconception diabetes clinic in your area where you can get help too. Taking the following steps will help you to be in the best of health, ready for conception: Aim to control your blood sugar. Your diabetes counsellor will recommend a glycosolated haemoglobin level (HbA1c) for you to maintain. If you don't already have one, you should be offered a kit for testing your own blood sugar levels often. Manage your diet carefully and take regular exercise. Don't drink alcohol, as it can make your blood sugar levels rise and fall ra Continue reading >>

Pregnancy With Type 1 Diabetes

Pregnancy With Type 1 Diabetes

Forty five years ago when I was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes I was clearly told I couldn’t have children. I didn’t. Today, thankfully that advice is no longer given. And while a woman with Type 1 diabetes needs to take precautions, she can absolutely, and safely, have a healthy baby. I sat down for an interview with Ginger Vieira, co-author,with Jennifer Smith, of the recent book, Pregnancy with Type 1 Diabetes: Your Month-to-Month Guide to Blood Sugar Management. What will people find in the book? As much information as you possibly need to understand why your blood sugars fluctuate during pregnancy and how to adjust your insulin management to keep your blood sugars as close to non-diabetic levels as possible. Also the book covers preparing for pregnancy, months one through nine of your pregnancy, delivery, and postpartum, including the challenges of breastfeeding for a woman with type 1 diabetes. My co-author Jenny is also my diabetes pregnancy coach. As a certified diabetes educator, woman with type 1 diabetes and mother, she knows this journey inside and out. What makes pregnancy for a woman with type 1 diabetes challenging? Let’s face it, a normal day with type 1 diabetes is challenging, balancing an autonomic system your body ought to balance on its own. And we’re only given insulin to do the job, while a non-diabetic body uses several different hormones to balance blood sugar. Add pregnancy to that mix and you add the insane pressure of, “Every decision you make impacts the human life growing inside of you!!!” And now you have to balance your blood sugars with constantly shifting pregnancy hormones. Plus those hormones impact your insulin needs in ways that are constantly changing and evolving. Also, there is never a break. Even when you’re sleepi Continue reading >>

Diabetes, Men, And Sex

Diabetes, Men, And Sex

Sexual dysfunction. You've seen the ads on television, you've heard the jokes, and, if you're like most men, you've tried your best to block it from your mind. But if you have diabetes, this is one touchy subject you shouldn't ignore. A full 75 percent of diabetic men have some trouble achieving or maintaining an erection long enough to have intercourse. But diabetes doesn't have to be a deathblow to your sex life. You can protect your sexual functioning by keeping your diabetes under control. And if the condition has already started to derail your physical relationships, your doctor can help you get back on track. How does diabetes cause sexual dysfunction? Erections take teamwork from several parts of the body: Your brain makes you aroused, your nerves sense pleasurable feelings, and your arteries carry a flood of blood to the penis. Unfortunately, poorly controlled diabetes can ruin that teamwork. Blood sugar that stays too high for too long can both deaden your nerves and damage the arteries that feed your penis. You can still get aroused, but you'll have trouble turning those feelings into action. The breakdown doesn't happen overnight. Most men have diabetes for many years before they notice a problem with erections. Diabetic men rarely have any erectile dysfunction before they reach 30. The key is controlling your diabetes. But when it comes to blood sugar, how high is too high? There's a national movement to describe sugar levels in terms of A1C (also known as glycosylated hemoglobin or HbA1c)), a lab test that reports average blood glucose over a period of two to three months. If your A1C is below 7 percent, your blood sugar is under control. But as A1C gets higher than 7 percent your long-term risk of damage to nerves and arteries increases, and that can also Continue reading >>

Preparing For A Baby: From A Dad-to-be With Type 1 Diabetes

Preparing For A Baby: From A Dad-to-be With Type 1 Diabetes

The Life of a Diabetic, who has lived with type 1 diabetes since the age of 19. Originally from Pennsylvania, Chris resides in South Florida with his wife, Amanda. Managing his own search engine optimization (SEO) company, CSI Marketing Solutions, in Delray Beach, he spends most of his time working, learning about search marketing, and advocating for diabetes. We’re thrilled to have him blogging for us, kicking us off with sharing his perspective on preparing for his first child. Please welcome Chris! July 2013 was an amazing time in my life because I married the love of my life, Amanda. Fast forward to July 2014, my wife and I were not only celebrating our one year anniversary, but also celebrating the news of having our first child. After all the initial excited reactions between my wife and me, I could not help but think, “what if our child is diagnosed with type 1 diabetes?” It is a question that has popped into my head at least once a day for the last six to seven months. I usually tell myself there is nothing I can do about it if that day does come, so I cannot live every day in fear of it happening. But as a first time father-to-be with type 1 diabetes, I cannot help but think about it. Preparing for a baby from my perspective has included many more decisions other than what brand of diapers or bottles we want to put on our registry. We have had to discuss and research different items such as cord blood banking, to breastfeed or to not, a special diet for mommy while breastfeeding, what can we do during the early months of child to try and help prevent a diabetes diagnoses, etc. Preparing for Baby Stocker also made me realize how much more important it was for me to pay attention to my own health. This led me to pay more attention to my continuous glucose m Continue reading >>

Can Women With Diabetes Get Pregnant?

Can Women With Diabetes Get Pregnant?

Can Women with Diabetes Get Pregnant? Can women with diabetes get pregnant? Diabetes can affect a person without warning and sometimes may even occur without any family history. For a woman of child bearing age, this is stressful as the desire to become a mother and the thought of bringing harm to the child. Although the risks associated with pregnancy in a diabetic woman can’t be ignored, the number of misconceptions is huge and adds to the stress. However, the situation is not as bad as it is made out. Diabetic woman can get pregnant and deliver healthy babies. You just need to take certain precautions to become a mother. The short answer is “Yes”. Since diabetes is a chronic condition, a person is required to take care of their health. Monitoring the sugar levels and keeping them in check is essential. This becomes all the more necessary and important during pregnancy, when your body is undergoing a lot of changes. You should interact more often with your doctor and other healthcare professionals during your pregnancy and try to manage your diabetes as best as you can. This way you can have a successful pregnancy and a healthy baby. How Will Diabetes Affect My Pregnancy? The most commonly seen complications of diabetes are those that affect the kidney, eyes and the nervous system. These are also known as diabetic-nephropathy, retinopathy and neuropathy respectively. After delivery the symptoms might disappear; however, treatment may be required. Ensure that you inform your doctor about any changes in your body as they can be symptoms of a condition. Common conditions seen among mothers are: urinary tract infection leading to fever. high blood pressure leading to fluid build up. swelling in limbs and face. protein excretion in urine. carpal tunnel syndrome leadi Continue reading >>

Pregnancy And Type 1 Diabetes-getting Pregnant

Pregnancy And Type 1 Diabetes-getting Pregnant

If you saw my post from last week, you will know that I am pregnant! My hubby and I are expecting our bundle of joy November 15th (although the doc said he/she would most likely be a week or two early). I am 16 weeks along now. It hasn’t been easy to get to this point, though. In fact, it’s been a pretty emotional journey. My husband and I got married three years ago. We were never in a rush to get pregnant but after a year, I started thinking that pregnancy should be coming on our minds soon. My A1C was OK. It was under eight but it wasn’t under seven, the magic number I had read about. At that point in my life, I didn’t really know any other Type 1 diabetics, besides my mother-in-law, who was diagnosed later in life, but we never talked about our diabetes. Around this same time, my husband and I moved from Northern Virginia to Richmond and I didn’t have an endocrinology team yet. I was very scared about the thought of getting pregnant with T1D, which is when I randomly googled pregnancy and Type 1 Diabetes and landed on Jacquie’s page at Typical Type 1. She is a T1D who also happened to have a baby and reading her blog was comforting to me. She had a blog roll on her page so I started getting exposed to other blogs. I can’t recall the timing of it all but after reading her blog and the others I found, I decided I would create a diabetes blog as well. It seemed like such a great way to connect with others. I still hadn’t discovered the Twitterverse with diabetes so the blog was my first foray into the DOC (Diabetes Online Community). From reading the blogs, I learned a little bit about pregnancy with Type 1 diabetes and I realized I needed to get my A1C Below Seven before I could think about conceiving. Hence, that became my blog name (also an A1C below Continue reading >>

How To Get Pregnant If My Husband Has Diabetes?

How To Get Pregnant If My Husband Has Diabetes?

Diabetes is such a common disease, it affects many people of all ages. When a woman is trying to get pregnant, she may wonder how her husband’s diabetes will affect her fertility. Diabetes is such a common disease, it affects many people of all ages. When a woman is trying to get pregnant, she may wonder how her husband’s diabetes will affect her fertility. The most important thing for couples who want to get pregnant with diabetes is going to be constant contact with their doctor or health care provider every step of the way. Claim Your 20 Free Pregnancy Tests – Click Here It is also important to remember that if you do get pregnant and your partner has diabetes, your baby will be at risk for diabetes as well. This does not mean that your baby will automatically have diabetes, just that he or she will be at a greater risk of developing the disease. When it comes to getting pregnant with diabetes, communication with your doctor is key. There are several studies that show that diabetes can affect a man’s fertility, including his sperm count and motility. Sometimes, when a man has diabetes, assisted reproductive techniques like in vitro fertilization are the best route, especially if he has issues related to sperm. Remember that getting pregnant when you have a partner with diabetes is not impossible, but it might be a little more difficult, and take a little more time or creativity to do so. ConceiveEasy® TTC Kit™ is the most complete fertility system available over the counter. Clinically proven to dramatically increase your chances of conception and help you get pregnant fast from the very first use. And now for a limited time, Try a FREE starter pack today & receive 20 FREE pregnancy tests and a FREE Digital BBT Thermometer! Male fertility Continue reading >>

Trying To Conceive With Type 1

Trying To Conceive With Type 1

Hi there. I'm 31 years old T1 and we've been TTC for 4 or 5 months now. It's felt much longer because it took me 6 months to get my a1c down from 7. My last two a1cs were 6.3 and 6.4, but my BG can still be variable (highs in 200+) sometimes. Anyway, I'm worried about the impact of diabetes on my ability to get pregnant and would love to hear from anyone with experience. - How long did it take you to get pregnant? - How tight were you around fertile window and weeks after to have a healthy baby? - Did you have any symptoms early in your pregnancy (between your ovulation day and before you tested positive for pregnancy? I get so sad and also worried every time I get my period now. I'm happy for all my friends, but it also makes me sad when I feel like everyone else can get pregnant except me. I'm sure this negative attitude and stress doesn't help things, but perhaps being more educated might help. Great job with your A1c! Are you on an insulin pump? If not I would highly recommend it! Better control is most important. The pump will help stabilize your blood sugar more. If you are getting your cycle each month regularly and your blood sugars are stable consistently then your on your way to making a baby! I am a lucky one with my pregnancy I had no morning sickness at all expect feeling tired all the time and this came after the positive pregnancy test. I use a cycle tracker app to record when I should be getting my cycle and it tracks my estimated day I would be ovulating. Its spot on every month. We tried a couple days before ovulating, on my ovulating day and the day after and we were pregnant. We were very lucky! Keep your head up it will happen The book "Balancing pregnancy with pre-existing diabetes" by Cheryl Alkon has a whole section with this and many women face Continue reading >>

"i Am Pregnant And My Husband Has Diabetes. Is There A Risk For My Child?" A Qualitative Study Of Questions Asked By Email About The Role Of Genetic Susceptibility To Diabetes

Go to: Abstract Diabetes Mellitus is a global health problem. Scientific knowledge on the genetics of diabetes is expanding and is more and more utilised in clinical practice and primary prevention strategies. Health consumers have become increasingly interested in genetic information. In the Netherlands, the National Genetic Research and Information Center provides online information about the genetics of diabetes and thereby offers website visitors the opportunity to ask a question per email. The current study aims at exploring people's need of (additional) information about the role of inheritance in diabetes. Results may help to tailor existing clinical and public (online) genetic information to the needs of an increasing population at risk for diabetes. A data base with emailed questions about diabetes and inheritance (n = 172) is used in a secondary content analysis. Questions are posted in 2005-2009 via a website providing information about more than 600 inheritable disorders, including all diabetes subtypes. Queries submitted were classified by contents as well as persons' demographic profiles. Questions were received by diabetes patients (49%), relatives (30%), and partners (21%). Questioners were relatively young (54.8% ≤ 30 years) and predominantly female (83%). Most queries related to type 1 diabetes and concerned topics related to (future) pregnancy and family planning. Questioners mainly asked for risk estimation, but also clarifying information (about genetics of diabetes in general) and advice (mostly related to family planning) was requested. Preventive advice to reduce own diabetes risk was hardly sought. Genetic information on diabetes provided by professionals or public health initiatives should address patients, as well as relatives and partners. Continue reading >>

Can My Husband's Diabetes Cause A Miscarriage?

Can My Husband's Diabetes Cause A Miscarriage?

Can my husband's diabetes cause a miscarriage? I had a miscarriage 2 months ago. I'm completely healthy and my OB/Gyne has no clue why it would have happened. She explained that there are millions of chromosomes and if 1 goes wrong, that is it. Ok, I get that but I won't accept it as my answer because I don't want it to happen again. So I researched more. The father is responsible for 50% of the chromosomes, so miscarriages actually could be from their end and not necessarily the mother's. My husband has Type 2 diabetes but has been taking care of it since he found out in December. It can cause fertility problems in men and can effect the DNA of the sperm. In my husband's case, we just found out the diabetes caused nerve damage in his groin area and a hernia in a testicle and will need surgery this month. I want to try again before surgery, but I'm scared. Has anyone experienced issues with pregnancy because of the fathers health? Is there a way we can protect ourselves from problems when we start trying again? Continue reading >>

Does Diabetes Affect Fertility?

Does Diabetes Affect Fertility?

There was a time when women who had diabetes were strongly advised to avoid getting pregnant. Attempting to produce a biologically-related family was just too dangerous [source: Brucker]. Fortunately, diabetic women are no longer given that heartbreaking direction from caregivers. Diabetics can, and routinely do, get pregnant and give birth to healthy children. Type 1 or Type 2 diabetes, however, can still be a major factor in fertility for men or women. There are challenges diabetics face in getting a partner pregnant, becoming pregnant, maintaining a pregnancy and ensuring they give birth to a healthy, full-term baby. Diabetes (Type 1 or Type 2) can harm sperm [source: Paddock]. Type 2 diabetes can make it far more difficult to become pregnant. There's an increased rate of miscarriage among diabetics in general, and women with Type 1 diabetes are somewhat more likely to have a baby with a birth defect or a child born prematurely [source: MyDr]. However, all of these challenges can largely be managed by being attentive to and responding to signals from the body. In order to understand why diabetes affects reproduction, it helps to have a general understanding of the disease in both of its forms. A healthy human body digests food and -- with the help of a hormone called insulin -- transports a form of sugar known as glucose through the bloodstream to cells for energy. Diabetics have flaws in their metabolism. A Type 1 diabetic's body doesn't make insulin. The body of a Type 2 diabetic either fails to create enough insulin, the person's cells don't react properly to the insulin or both malfunctions occur [source: Nordqvist]. Click ahead to learn the specifics of how Type 1 diabetes influences reproduction and how it can be managed. You've undoubtedly heard a pregnant wom Continue reading >>

Trying To Get (my Wife) Pregnant

Trying To Get (my Wife) Pregnant

Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community Find support, ask questions and share your experiences. Join the community My name's Dan, I'm 29 years old and I live in the south-east UK, quite near to Reading. I was diagnosed as being Type I Diabetic when I was 16 and currently have to inject 4 times a day. Over the 13 years that I've been living with my Diabetes I think I've gradually developed rather a relaxed attitude to it and as a consequence I haven't always looked after my blood sugar nearly as carefully as I should have done. The reason for my post is to ask whether anyone here knows anything much about how Diabetes can affect fertility. My wife and I did manage to get pregnant back in June but we lost the baby at the beginning of August and have now started trying again. I've read several things online though, saying that there's an increased chance of miscarriage if the father suffers from Diabetes and also that sperm can be damaged by poor blood-sugar regulation. I've also read articles saying that being Diabetic has no bearing on male fertility whatsoever so this has left me a little confused. At the moment I'm feeling rather angry and frustrated at myself for potentially jeopardising our chances of falling pregnant again by my complete absence of will-power. Obviously I'm working hard to rectify this now but I would love to hear from anyone who has been in the same situation who is now a parent! I am sorry to hear of the recent miscarriage suffered by your wife. I do not know if diabetes is linked to male infertility. It sounds like doctors do not know that much on the subject either. I do know though, from personal experience, that there is a lot that the medical profession can do to assist couples with fertility problems, irrespective of what the cause of Continue reading >>

Guys, Diabetes Could Be Affecting Your Fertility!

Guys, Diabetes Could Be Affecting Your Fertility!

The surge in diabetes cases in Singapore may well be getting in the way of a man’s ability to have kids. Listing risk factors most diabetic men have that can impact their fertility, Dr Colin Teo, the head of urology at Khoo Teck Puat Hospital, says, “These individuals often suffer from other related health issues dealing with blood vessels, nerve damage, metabolic issues and obesity.” In 2014, some 440,000 Singaporeans 18 years and older had diabetes. And that number is set to grow to one million by 2050, according to Health Minister Gan Kim Yong. This condition increases one’s risk of blindness, nerve damage, kidney failure and heart disease. In severe cases of diabetes, permanent damage may even result ― more than 1,500 diabetes-related amputations are carried out in Singapore hospitals every year. We take a look at the most common infertility issues faced by men with diabetes (both type I & II): 1) Low testosterone levels (Hypogonadism) Low levels of testosterone — the male sex hormone — are common among diabetic men, which can result in a low sex drive. Points out Dr Simon Chong, a consultant urologist at Mount Elizabeth Medical Centre, “One common cause of infertility is the low frequency of sex rather than the quality of the sperm or eggs.” Pregnancy is the result when sperm fertilises an egg and for this to happen, there must be intercourse. The good news, Dr Chong notes, is that there are medications such as injections and oral medication to treat low testosterone levels. Low levels of the male sex hormone can also give rise to weight gain and general lethargy. 2) Poor sperm health Sperm that is healthy a normal shape with move well. Healthy sperm also have a high sperm count in the semen. The higher the count, the better the chances a woman ha Continue reading >>

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