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Mustard Oil For Diabetes

6 Best Cooking Oils For People With Diabetes

6 Best Cooking Oils For People With Diabetes

There’s a lot of confusion when it comes to the type of cooking oil that you should use for daily use and especially if you are suffering from a lifestyle disease like heart trouble or diabetes where your diet plays a major role in managing the ailment. There are so many varieties and blends available in the supermarket that it is natural to feel overwhelmed. Here’s a way out. Wellness Expert Dr. Shikha Sharma tells us, “To ensure optimal fat quality the use of a combination of vegetable oils is important. You could juggle between butter, ghee, olive oil, mustard oil, soyabean, sesame or even groundnut oil for different meals. Depend more on unrefined (Kachi Ghani) or cold pressed oils versus refined oils.” When it comes to diabetes, it is very important to keep a check on your diet as your blood sugar levels are directly affected by what you eat. It helps to know that, in this case, a particular cooking oil may be better off than the other. Here are the healthiest cooking oils for diabetics as suggested by Dr. Sunali Sharma, Dietician & Nutritionist, Amandeep Hospitals. 1. Canola Oil: Canola oil is a plant-based oil derived from the rapeseed plant. It is rich in alpha-linolenic acid which is a type of omega-3 fatty acid that you will also find in walnuts. It also contains healthy monounsaturated fatty acids found in avocados and olives. “A study conducted by Dr. David Jenkins from the University of Toronto showed that canola oil helps in lowering blood sugar levels and bad cholesterol in people with type 2 diabetes.” Canola oil is a plant-based oil derived from the rapeseed plant​. Photo Credit: Istock 2. Olive Oil: Olive oil is a heart-friendly oil that is good for diabetics too. It contains an antioxidant called tyrosol that can act as a therapeutic age Continue reading >>

19 Health Benefits Of Using Mustard Oil In Cooking

19 Health Benefits Of Using Mustard Oil In Cooking

19 Health Benefits of Using Mustard Oil In Cooking Home Herbal Herbal Oil 19 Health Benefits of Using Mustard Oil In Cooking 19 Health Benefits of Using Mustard Oil In Cooking So far, people only know the Mustard as a vegetable. We often call it a Caisim for Meatball noodles, or as Cha Caisim. Though Mustard-seed is processed into Mustard oil and condiment such as seasoning or sauce. In India, Mustard oil is known as quite important oil for cooking Additionally Mustard oil is also an ingredient of pharmaceutical industry and a mixture of alcohol, especially wine. In Russia, Mustard oil is even used for the substitution of Olive oil. Currently, India is also currently designing an agro-industrial Mustard oil for biodiesel feedstock. Although Mustard productivity is only 1,300 liters oil/hectare a year. If we eat the Europeans food in a hotel, we would have met with a bunch of yellow paste or sauce. Usually, this yellow sauce is used for greasing bread, boiled potatoes, salad and steak. Yellow sauce is called Mustard condiment, and is used together with the mayonnaise, ketchup, tomato sauce and sambal (chili sauce). Spicy flavor of mustard condiment or mustard sauce is very typical. Spiciness really stung in the nasal cavity and make the eyes very spicy. That is the differences between Mustard sauce and spicy chili, pepper and ginger. Those who tasted the spicy mustard sauce for the first time will be surprised and yelling about its spiciness. But they were already a couple of times to eat it, they are hooked. Then there any health benefits for added mustard oil in the diet? The nutrients content in 100 grams of mustard oil and condiment are: energy 70 kcal (280 kJ); carbohydrates 8 grams; sugar 3 grams; fiber 3 grams; fat 3 grams; protein 4 grams; Saturated Fat 11.6 g; Continue reading >>

Don't Miss: The Oil That Fights Cholesterol And Diabetes

Don't Miss: The Oil That Fights Cholesterol And Diabetes

DON'T MISS: The oil that FIGHTS cholesterol and diabetes Dr Meena Mehta of Dr BM Nanavati College of Home Science in Mumbai tells us just why we should consider switching to rice bran oil. A recent survey reveals that health complaints are due to overcrowding population, unhygienic conditions, polluted environment and nutritionally imbalanced diets and habits. Lot of us seem to believe that all fatty foods are bad. Truth is that fat is an essential nutrient for everybody to stay healthy. A food high in fat can be part of a healthy diet as long as it is balanced with other lower-fat food choices. Vegetable oil is a common source of different fatty acids. In addition, many vegetable edible oils are the proven rich sources of super nutrients like phytochemicals. Certain phytochemicals that aid the body in maintaining health and combating disease resources of micronutrients and phytochemicals are the challenges for researchers to identify bioavailability from natural food. Rice bran oil has over the years been seen as a good supplement to traditional groundnut or mustard oils that are commonly used in India. Here are some of the reasons why you should consider switching to rice bran oil. DON'T MISS: The oil that FIGHTS cholesterol and diabetes Rice bran oil is used for cooking oil or blending of vegetable oil. This oil is the only cooking medium which besides having an ideal SFA/ MUFA/ PUFA ratio has EFA ratio closer to the recommended levels by WHO. DON'T MISS: The oil that FIGHTS cholesterol and diabetes Rice bran supplements could lower blood pressure. Squalene, an anti-oxidant present in Rice Bran improves skin tone and delays wrinkle formation. It also acts as an anti-dandruff and anti-itching agent. DON'T MISS: The oil that FIGHTS cholesterol and diabetes Rice bran o Continue reading >>

Cooking Oils

Cooking Oils

Fat plays many important roles in a healthful diet. It provides energy and essential fatty acids, which are necessary for good health. It helps to maintain healthy skin and to regulate cholesterol metabolism, and it contributes to substances in the body called prostaglandins, which regulate other body processes. Dietary fat aids in the absorption of the fat-soluble vitamins A, D, E, and K, and it helps to satisfy the appetite by making you feel full after eating. Despite all the important functions of fat, there is clear evidence that a diet that is too high in fat can contribute to many health problems, including some types of cancer, heart disease, diabetes, and obesity. High intakes of saturated fat, trans fat, and cholesterol increase the risk of unhealthy blood fat levels. In general, a healthy amount of fat in the diet ranges between 20% and 35% of total calories. Consuming more than 35% of total calories as fat can lead to a high intake of saturated fat and can also make it difficult to keep calorie intake at a desirable level. Types of dietary fat Being selective about the types of fat you eat is important for your heart health. Saturated fat and trans fat raise low-density lipoprotein (LDL, or “bad”) cholesterol levels in the blood, which raises the risk of developing heart disease. Trans fat additionally decreases high-density lipoprotein (HDL, or “good”) cholesterol levels. The American Diabetes Association’s (ADA) latest nutrition recommendations advise getting less than 7% of calories from saturated fat and minimizing intake of trans fat. For a person who consumes 1500 calories per day, 7% of calories from saturated fat is less than 12 grams of saturated fat per day. (When converting grams of fat into calories, remember that each gram of fat conta Continue reading >>

Effects Of Edible Oils In Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

Effects Of Edible Oils In Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

The prevalence of Type 2 diabetes along with dyslipidaemia is increasing alarmingly in India and in some parts of South-East Asia. The causes of this malady are yet to be known though urban life-style and diet are considered to be the two most important factors. Indians are mostly lacto-vegetarians. The intake of fats and oils are less in the Indian diet. Edible oils act as important dietary sources of fats and oils. Some oilseeds are cultivated in India, while a portion is imported to satisfy the need of the population. Indians have a predilection towards fried items and a large portion of fat requirements are fulfilled through this habit. Oils have different biological effects in different conditions, especially in patients suffering from Type 2 Diabetes with dyslipidaemia. Hence, there is a need to have a comprehensive study of all these edible fats and oils in human beings, both in normal and in disease conditions. Our study highlighted the effect of different edible oils such as Sunflower oil, soyabean oil, sesame oil, groundnut oil, mustard oil, coconut oil, ghee and palm oil on humans and the results indicated that sesame oil has the most benefit, followed by mustard oil. Continue reading >>

World Diabetes Day Special Prevention

World Diabetes Day Special Prevention

An old adage says Prevention is better than cure. Our nutrition expert has devised ways for one to be able to prevent the onset of diabetes Our experts tell us how one can prevent diabetes with 10 easy steps Diabetes mellitus (DM) is one of the most common non-communicable diseases (NCDs) globally. Over the past 30 years, the status of diabetes has changed from being known as a mild disorder of the elderly to one of the major causes of morbidity and mortality affecting the youth and middle-aged people. It is the fourth or fifth leading cause of death in most high-income countries and there is substantial evidence that it is epidemic in many economically developing and newly industrialised countries. Diabetes and its complications have a significant economic impact on individuals, families, health systems and countries. With the prevalence projected to increase over the years, the impact will also escalate. The most disturbing trend is the shift in age of onset of diabetes to a younger age in the recent years. It is therefore important to prevent it through appropriate lifestyle changes. Globally, 366 million people had diabetes in 2011; by 2030 this will have risen to 552 million. At present it is estimated that approximately 371 million people across the globe are living with diabetes. 80% of people with diabetes live in low and middle-income countries. The greatest number of people with diabetes is between 40 - 59 years of age. 183 million people (i.e. nearly 50%) with diabetes remain undiagnosed. Many people remain undiagnosed largely because there are few symptoms during the early years of type 2 diabetes or symptoms may not be recognized as being related to diabetes. 4.8 million people died due to diabetes in 2011. In 2011, nearly 61.3 million people were sufferin Continue reading >>

Mustard (sarson) Powder, A Wonder Spice That Helps Prevent Diabetes & 6 Other Diseases

Mustard (sarson) Powder, A Wonder Spice That Helps Prevent Diabetes & 6 Other Diseases

Mustard (Sarson) Powder, A Wonder Spice That Helps Prevent Diabetes & 6 Other Diseases Mustard (Sarson) Powder, A Wonder Spice That Helps Prevent Diabetes & 6 Other Diseases Published: Wednesday, June 28, 2017, 12:00 [IST] Next time you make a sandwich or prepare a salad dressing, reach out for some mustard powder from your spice rack. It is just not about the pungent taste, but also about the medicinal properties that it is believed to have. Mustard powder is grounded dried mustard seeds-yellow (Brassica hirta), brown (Brassica juncea) and black (Brassica nigra). A rich source of nutrients including iron, phosphorous, magnesium, zinc and calcium, its magic also lies in possessing a phytonutrient called glucosinolate. It also contains an amino acid, cysteine, which has anti oxidant properties. It is now grown in over 21 countries, with Nepal, India, Pakistan, Canada and Ukraine being the major growers. In cooking, the powder can be added to curries and dals or used to marinate red meat. Its therapeutic use has been popular among Greeks and Romans since ancient times. From soothing aches and pains to helping asthmatic patients and easing dermatological conditions, the uses of mustard powder are too many. Read some of them here. Mustard seeds are an essential part of home remedies for treating cold and sinus related problems. It can act as a decongestant and expectorant. In Ayurveda, it is believed to soothe vata and kapha. A mustard plaster was a popular form of dressing used for chronic pains and aches. A chemical called allyl isothiocyanate that is produced by wet mustard powder helps in curing sore muscles and rheumatism. Research done on mice has proved that mustard can combat the development of stomach, colon, cervical and uterine cancer. Elements like glucosinates Continue reading >>

Add Some Flavor To Your Diabetes Meal Plan

Add Some Flavor To Your Diabetes Meal Plan

1 / 11 Use Portion Control Enhancing your food's flavors through condiments and spices is key to enjoying a healthy type 2 diabetes diet. But before you reach for the ketchup and mayo, know that some choices are a lot better for you than others. You'll also benefit from learning how to read nutrition labels and measuring servings carefully. "Most important is portion control," says Constance Brown-Riggs, RD, CDN, author of The African American Guide to Living Well With Diabetes. "Condiments should be used to enhance the flavor of food and not serve as the main course." Here are the facts on the most popular condiments and spices to help you choose. Continue reading >>

Mustard Oil Or Refined Oil: Which Is Better?

Mustard Oil Or Refined Oil: Which Is Better?

Mustard Oil Or Refined Oil: Which Is Better? Updated: Tuesday, January 13, 2015, 9:39 [IST] Mustard oil ( ) | Health benefit | | Boldsky We are bombarded with different kind of advertisements regarding edible oils. The various messages from these ads can really confuse us. What are the benefits of refined oil? Is it really good for our health? Or it is the traditional mustard oil used by our grandmas that is better? Mustard oil or refined oil: which is better? Today, Boldsky shares with you numerous health benefits of mustard oil. We also share harmful effects of refined oil that will help you decide whether mustard oil or refined oil is the better option. Mustard oil is a vegetable oil obtained from mustard seeds. It is dark yellow in colour and slightly pungent. It is an edible oil and is widely used in India. Mustard oil contains good fats as they don't get deposited in the blood vessels. It contains omega 3 and omega 6 fatty acids that reduce the cholesterol level. Mustard oil also contains Glucosinolate, which has antimicrobial properties to give protection against infections. Refined oil, on the other hand, is a product obtained after treating natural oils with various chemicals to meet buyer's expectations. Refined oil is the processed form of oil. It is harmful for the digestive and respiratory system. It also causes various diseases such as cancer, diabetes, heart and kidney ailments, among others. Mustard oil or refined oil: which is better? Let's take a look at the benefits of mustard oil and harmful effects of refined oil. The reason behind this is that it reduces the cholesterol level in our body as it contains unsaturated fats. This is one of the important health benefits of mustard oil. Mustard oil aids in digestion by increasing the production and secre Continue reading >>

Diabetes India - Site Consensus Diabetes

Diabetes India - Site Consensus Diabetes

Presently, no specific drugs are available to manage the metabolic syndrome. Lifestyle changes are the best options to prevent the metabolic syndrome or to manage a person diagnosed as having the metabolic syndrome. Thus, lifestyle changes not only offer the best universal beneficial options for the metabolic syndrome, but they also go a long way in managing and /or reducing the long term consequences of the presence of major risk factors which predispose a person to ASCVD. Although the presence of some of these risk factors may need additional specific drug therapies, lifestyle changes still continue to be central to their treatment. In order to ensure compliance, the prescribed diet should be individualised. It must be realistic, flexible, and take into consideration the patient's likes and dislikes, to as large an extent as possible, and must suit the patient's life style. It is important to educate the patient about the basic requirements of the diet and judge compliance at regular intervals. The aim is to attain acceptable body weight with a special emphasis on attaining the desired waist measurement. Other specific changes would be necessary depending on the presence of associated risk factors such as impaired glycemia or diabetes, hypertension, dyslipidemias etc. Aim initially at slow reduction of 7% to 10% from baseline weight over one year of management. Even small amounts of weight loss are associated with significant health benefits. Continue weight loss thereafter to extent possible with goal to ultimately achieve desirable weight Effective weight loss requires a combination of caloric restriction, physical activity, and motivation; effective lifelong maintenance of weight loss essentially requires a balance between caloric intake and physical activity and Continue reading >>

Avoid Diabetes, Eat Ghee!r, The Milli Gazette, Vol. 2 No.23

Avoid Diabetes, Eat Ghee!r, The Milli Gazette, Vol. 2 No.23

The so-called `healthy cooking oils' may actually be doing more harm than good. Take ghee for a change, latest studies reveal, reports Poorvi Go back to the old traditional cooking fats namely ghee, coconut oil or mustard oil, is the advise you're likely to receive if you meet Dr. B S. Raheja, director, All India Institute of Diabetes and honorary physician S L Raheja Hospital, Mumbai. Ghee? Is it not fattening? ``We have used these in India for centuries and we have had no problem. I firmly believe that the present epidemics of diabetes, heart disease and some cancers are possibly the result of the present high intake of these undesirable oils,'' writes Dr Raheja in the Journal of Diabetic Association of India (July-Sept 1997). Dr Raheja and his team at AIID investigating nutritional disorders in diabetes have found that the normal Indian diet -cereals, pulses and vegetables - without oil provides the full requirement of polyunsaturated fat (PUFA) 6, while being deficient in PUFA 3. The desired ratio is four of PUFA-6 to one of PUFA-3. With the use of present-day oils, this ratio goes well, beyond 30. Any ratio above ten is unhealthy. PUFA-3 fats are essential for growth and development in children and during pregnancy, for eyes, brain immune function and normal testicular function in males. Their deficiency increases the risk of cancer, heart disease, high blood pressure, diabetes, eye problems, some skin conditions and immune disorders. Cooking mediums, according to Dr. Raheja, namely derived from safflower, sunflower, corn, trill, soybean or groundnut are undesirable oils. Groundnut oil has often been promoted as mono-unsaturated fat due to its ability to reduce the risk of heart disease. However, in experiments on monkeys, its use increased blocking of blood vesse Continue reading >>

Oils Well With Mustard

Oils Well With Mustard

Ishi Khosla , Ishi Khosla : Sat May 05 2007, 14:30 hrs Maharashtra minister builds bungalow on land meant for fire brigade Once considered the poor man's oil, mustard oil is back in the good graces of the rich and, hence, on the grocery shelves. Native to north and north-east India, the oil was discarded for fear of being adulterated and causing heart disease, and was glossed over in favour of refined oils. But now that scientific research has rediscovered its goodness, mustard oil is back in business. What makes the oil special is its fatty acid profile and the method of extraction. Like olive oil, mustard oil is 70 per cent mono-unsaturated fat. It has the lowest level of saturation and a highly desirable poly-unsaturated fatty acid balance rich in omega-3 fats, the kind found in fish. These are closest to the National Cholesterol Education Programme (NCEP) recommendations for edible oils. Owing to its favourable fatty acid profile, mustard oil protects against cardiovascular ailments by reducing LDL (bad cholesterol) and increasing HDL (good cholesterol). It also helps control blood sugar levels in diabetics. According to the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, mustard oil reduces heart attacks by 70 per cent, a finding confirmed by another study by the All India Institute of Medical Sciences (AIIMS), Delhi, and St Johns Medical College, Bangalore, which says that it reduces the risk of coronary heart diseases by almost 70 per cent. Other benefits of mustard oil include reduction in blood fat (triglycerides), ability to decrease blood clotting, treatment of inflammatory conditions like asthma and arthritis, and lowering of blood pressure in hypertensive people. The fats in mustard oil help treat depression and are known to boost brain function. Mustard oil is al Continue reading >>

Health Benefits Of Mustard Oil

Health Benefits Of Mustard Oil

Health Benefits of Mustard Oil | Mustard Oil for Healthy Heart Written by Vandita Jain |Article Reviewed by Dietitian julia samuel on Oct 11, 2016 We need enormous varieties of food items to sustain us and help maintain good health and quality of life. Requirements in terms of amounts may vary, but everything has its own importance. Fats, oilseeds and nuts play an important role in our diets. Mustard oil is a type of fat, which is extracted from mustard seeds through pressing of seeds and is filtered using the distillation process. Mustard oil has got a typical pungent and sharp flavour that is because of the presence of a compound called Allyl Isothiocyanate. This oil has about 60% monounsaturated fatty acids (MUFA), 21% polyunsaturated fats (PUFA) and about 12% saturated fats. A higher amount of MUFA and PUFA distinguishes it from other types of fats . These fatty acids are also called good fats as they do not get deposited on arterial walls. Mustard oil contains Glucosinolate, which basically works against microbes and adds on to the oils health benefits. Some of the featured benefits are as follows- Reduces Risk of Cardiovascular Disease: A recent comparative study done on varieties of edible oils revealed that mustard oil reduced the risk of Cardio vascular diseases by 70 percent, so mustard oil cuts down the risk of heart diseases if used in moderation by lowering cholesterol levels within the body. Stimulates Digestion: This oil is known as a stimulant and helps the intestine to produce digestive juices, which increase the peristaltic movement of the food, and hence the digestion process. Also the same process helps in increasing appetite by increasing production of gastric juices in our system. Reduces Risk of Cancer: Some studies have shown that mustard oil ha Continue reading >>

Here's Why Mustard Oil May Be Healthy For Your Heart

Here's Why Mustard Oil May Be Healthy For Your Heart

Here's why mustard oil may be healthy for your heart Mustard oil consists of 2 essential fatty acids - in ideal ratio, a huge benefit for the heart DSM & Evonik to jointly set up $200-mn omega-3 fatty acids plant in US GM Mustard: Let the Dhara flow as this tech is pro-farmer and pro-science Provide incentivise for increasing agricultural biotechnology research Coronary stents get cheaper by up to 85% Halfway into 2017's oil supply cut, Asia remains awash with fuel Mustard oil, with its ideal ratio of essential fatty acids and natural antioxidants, may be one of the healthiest edible oils, with huge benefits for the heart, experts suggest. Mustard oil, which has a pungent taste, contains about 60 per cent monounsaturated fatty acids (MUFA), 21 per cent polyunsaturated fats (PUFA) and about 12 per cent saturated fats. "High levels of MUFA and PUFA -- also called good fats -- maintain heart health and lower bad cholesterol, while improving good cholesterol," Reeti Kapoor, Venkateshwar Hospital, Dwarka, told IANS. Further, it also consists of six per cent of the omega-3 fatty acids (N-3) and 15 per cent of the omega-6 (n-6) -- the two essential fatty acids -- in the ideal ratio of 1:2, which is a huge benefit for the heart, as it balances cholesterol levels. This, in turn, reduces triglycerides or blood fat levels, and helps in keeping the heart healthy, experts said. "A heart-friendly oil should be cholesterol- and trans-fat free, low in saturated fat and high in monounsaturated fat and polyunsaturated fat, and should have an ideal N6 to N3 acids ratio as well as a high smoking point. Mustard oil meets all these criteria," Parmeet Kaur, Nutritionist, Columbia Asia Hospital Gurgaon, told IANS. According to a study published recently in the Journal of Preventive Cardiology Continue reading >>

Mustard Oil Recommended For Diabetics

Mustard Oil Recommended For Diabetics

Over a decade and half ago, a handful of Diabetologists including this columnist launched a countrywide determined campaign against widespread use of refined oils which were being misguidedly promoted across the length and breadth of the Indian peninsula by self-seeking trio of profit-mongering manufacturers, mutually vying media channels and gullible medical practitioners. There was, then, quite a formidable opposition from protagonists advocating use of these socalled refined oils. Nevertheless, the clock has turned a full circle. And, today, the vindication comes from some of the worlds highest medical authorities which outrightly endorse the concept favouring the use of Indian ethnic edible oils, notably the mustard oil. In general and more so for Diabetics, mustard oil and not the socalled refined oil is the right choice for maintaining an optimum ratio of different fats in the diet. Unfortunately, however, inspite of its Indian ethnic connection, mustard oil is not so widely used for cooking in India and much less so in South India. In the realms of Modern Malnutrition, the term Fat Toxicity has been coined to describe faulty dietary intake of fats and the consequent hazards. It is to be noted that no drug therapy or medication can fully correct the ill-effects of high fat and refined cereal diets. This has inspired researchers in the fields of Nutrition and Diabetology to reevaluate concepts relating to dietary fats. The earlier concepts were based mostly on the information available way back in the 1960s when a lot many things were not fully understood. For example, at that time, there was hardly any information available regarding qualitative aspects of fats. Refined oils which were popularised since 1968 and during the decades that followed ended up causing m Continue reading >>

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