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Movies About Type 1 Diabetes

“sugar Does Not Cause Diabetes”: Did The Film What The Health Get It Right?

“sugar Does Not Cause Diabetes”: Did The Film What The Health Get It Right?

The documentary What the Health is receiving a huge amount of attention and most of it is positive. Many reports of people attempting to eat better are filling social media. I discussed the film on a local TV station in Detroit after two reporters indicated that the movie had made a big impact on their diets. There have even been reports that restaurants serving healthier fare have seen an uptick in customers attributing the change to the film. I have seen this in my own plant-based restaurant and have a What The Health Happy Hour that has been very popular. Naturally, there have been critics of the movie defending their viewpoint that meat based diets are healthy, but most have rallied around a statement in the film by Neal Barnard, MD that “sugar does not cause diabetes”. As the answer to this question may be important to you, I have done some research and share it here but this is in NO way an endorsement to add back soda and candy bars to your diet. In a world stressed by growing obesity and its medical consequences, limiting sugar is a universal recommendation from all health experts. 1) Type 1 diabetes is not caused by sugar. All agree on this as type 1 diabetes is considered an autoimmune disease leading to destruction of the insulin producing cells in the pancreas. However, patients with type 1 diabetes can develop and reverse insulin resistance (IR) in their muscles and liver so understanding the origin of IR is important. 2) Who is Neal Barnard, MD? Dr. Barnard is a graduate of the George Washington University School of Medicine and an adjunct associate professor of medicine there. He has published over 70 scientific publications (including long term studies on diet and diabetes) and 18 books including several New York Times bestsellers on health and diabe Continue reading >>

Carb Wars: Going To The Movies With Type 1 Diabetes

Carb Wars: Going To The Movies With Type 1 Diabetes

Star Wars: The Force Awakens is breaking records at the box office in it's opening weekend. The film made 57 million dollars on Thursday and another 100 million on Friday and those numbers tell me that many of you will be in a theater something soon. Trying to bolus for food that is carb heavy, nutrition light... So there I was this morning sitting in a theater waiting for Star Wars to begin (it was amazing by the way) when I began to think about all of you and I decided to compile carb counts for popular movie theaters and include them in this post. That however turned out to be more difficult than I originally envisioned. Of the big five theater chains, the two largest, Regal and AMC don't not provide nutritional information for their concession stands. Cineplex has a fact sheet online that I'd call "better than nothing", Carmike has a simple webpage that lists the values of their popcorn and Cinemark includes a partial list on their website. The thing is... there is no consistency between the theater companies and no good way to estimate based on the limited information that is available. Blog post interruptus... I wanted to provide at least a guideline to follow but from what I am seeing the variables between theater chains, package sizes, how full some theaters fill their bags and some significantly incomplete data; we're going to have to roll over guidelines and talk about strategy. You're going to have to make some educated guesses. We could theorize that one nacho is between 2 and 2.5 carbs. I'd guess a pretzel bite to be about 4 carbs but that popcorn is just too wonky. How do you measure it? How many carbs, how much will they eat... ug. So here's what I'm going to do when we head back to the theater tomorrow afternoon so the family can see Star Wars, yea I wen Continue reading >>

Movies & Media Misrepresent 'the Sugar Sickness'

Movies & Media Misrepresent 'the Sugar Sickness'

Is there something in the water? Seriously... it's like there's a contagion out there at the moment spreading misinformation about diabetes. Sadly, movies and media missing the point is nothing new for the Diabetes Community. It happens all too often. But some recent high-profile examples demonstrate the continuing battle we face combatting myths and misconceptions around our disease. First, there's a new NBC show ironically titled Do No Harm (a reference to the Hippocratic oath that all physicians take) which premiered in January, featuring a brilliant neurosurgeon who suffers from Dissociative Identity Disorder (DID), a Dr. Jekyll/Mr. Hyde syndrome causing his alter ego to come out and wreak havoc between 8:25 p.m. and 8:25 a.m. every night. The neurosurgeon happens to be living with diabetes (no type distinguished, but it appears to be type 1) and so before being cleared for surgery he must check his blood sugar by sticking his finger into some futuristic hospital-version meter the size of a table top (was this FDA approved, we wondered?!). He apparently uses his diabetes as an excuse for why he can't work nights but must restrict his doctoral duties to the daytime hours. At one point, his alter ego gets into the hospital one night and thanks to being hopped up on adrenaline, tests at 325 mg/dL -- so the hospital collegues freak out, demanding emergency insulin because he's hyperglycemic and going into "diabetic shock." WTF? At just over 300? So, there's that. Fellow D-Blogger Cara Richardson wrote a great post recently with her thoughts on the show, too. Then we've got the latest nonfiction snafu: a news story circulating in which a Chicago reporter got it wrong when reporting about a 7-year-old girl who took the hero role when her mom was having a low blood sugar w Continue reading >>

10 Memorable Diabetic Movie Characters – In Honor Of World Diabetes Day

10 Memorable Diabetic Movie Characters – In Honor Of World Diabetes Day

20 years ago, World Diabetes Day was introduced by the International Diabetes Federation and the World Health Organization “in response to growing concerns about the escalating health threat that diabetes now poses.” It is held every November 14, the birthday of Sir Frederick Banting, one of the men credited with discovering insulin. 8.3% of the U.S. population has diabetes, and it’s the seventh leading cause of death here, with more than 200,000 people dying from complications of the disease each year. Many famous people suffer from some form of diabetes, including George Lucas, Halle Berry, Mary Tyler Moore and Wilford Brimley. And many others have died as a result, usually through its effects, such as James Cagney, Mae West, Johnny Cash, Syd Barrett and Thomas Edison. Even though this is a very serious matter and I primarily want us to remember those who’ve lost their life to diabetes, I also want to recognize some movie characters who suffered because they were diabetic, mostly those who succumbed to the disease. Films often get us to think about things we ignore in real life, so you might be more familiar with the following people, some fiction and some nonfiction, than any diabetics actually around you on a daily basis. The following list is just for fun, but don’t let that take away from the gravity of the cause or my greater sincerity towards it. Mario Puzo, who wrote the original “Godfather” novel and co-wrote the screenplays to all three of the films, was himself a diabetic. Perhaps this was the reason he had Michael Corleone (Al Pacino) suffer from the disease in the final installment. While he seems to ultimately die of natural causes, throughout this film he is seen with diabetic symptoms. He needs to have juice and cookies at one point, claim Continue reading >>

Diabetes In Film: Steel Magnolias

Diabetes In Film: Steel Magnolias

The other evening while taking refuge from the early-November snowstorm in NYC, I watched Steel Magnolias (the 1989 Julia Roberts version, available on Netflix). I had heard the name of the play and film(s) in a usually positive context, but never heard the plot details of the story. I was shocked, then, when it was revealed that Roberts’ character, Shelby, has type 1 diabetes. Quickly, my shock changed into confusion and diasspointment (and maybe a little anger, too). Shelby’s experience with Type 1 diabetes was not only completely different from my own, but completely different from the average woman’s experience with Type 1 diabetes. [SPOILER ALERT] For those unfamiliar with the film, Shelby is a type 1 diabetic who, due in part to her disease, has very weak kidney function. She has been advised by her doctor not to have children, but wants a child so decides to have one anyway. The strain of pregnancy and childbirth puts her into kidney failure. Her mother donates a kidney, however, Shelby unfortunately rejects the donated kidney and dies at the end of the film. The film is adopted from a play that the playwright based on the experience his sister faced, who died from a similar series of events. While I do not mean to discredit the authenticity of his personal tragedy, I found this depiction of Type 1 diabetes extremely frustrating. Like the few other movies that feature diabetes prominently, Steel Magnolias leaves “the impression that diabetes draws the people who suffer from it into an uncontrollable tailspin toward death.” It is important to note that death resulting from kidney failure is not by any means a likely outcome for a diabetic (even less so now than in 1989). It is also important to note that while all diabetic pregnancies are considered “h Continue reading >>

Injecting Movies With Type 1 Diabetes

Injecting Movies With Type 1 Diabetes

What if Hollywood blockbusters included more characters with diabetes? Frozen…Insulin Diagnosed with diabetes at a young age, Princess Elsa of Arendelle was taught by her crass father, the king, to keep her hands covered with gloves so nobody would see the small scars from repeated blood glucose tests. Elsa also can make snow come out of her fingertips, but no one really cares about that. Hearing rumor across the land of a possible cure for diabetes, the king and queen set sail. Months go by, yet the royal parents never return. (Truth to tell, Elsa might be better off without them.) Eventually crowned queen of Arendelle, Elsa still struggles with displaying her diabetes in public. At the coronation party, a small drop of blood spreads on the fingertip of Elsa’s white glove and guests take notice. Frightened of what they’ll think, Elsa flees, leaving her sister behind, and escapes to the snowy mountains. Free for the first time, Elsa tosses her gloves to the wind, but forgets that her insulin would be unusable if it freezes. It is up to her sister, Anna, to bring Elsa insulin in an insulated pack and try to convince her to return to the kingdom and educate others about Type 1. E.T.T1 After an extraterrestrial is stranded on Earth, he must survive new horrors like child-Drew Barrymore’s cuteness long enough for his alien brethren to rescue him. However, unbeknownst to his newfound human friends, this alien is suffering from diabetes. He attempts to communicate with them, but “E.T. phone home” apparently does not translate to, “Please prick my finger and test my blood sugar, I think I might be running high.” Will his new friends figure out how to work his meter in time? Titanic Bolus Young and aristocratic Rose boards the RMS Titanic and falls in love with Continue reading >>

32 Famous People With Type 1 Diabetes

32 Famous People With Type 1 Diabetes

Test strips, blood sugar monitors, and insulin pumps are all part of a day in the life of someone living with Diabetes. Several famous actors, musicians, and athletes have Type I Diabetes. Some of these celebrities were diagnosed with diabetes when they were children, while others developed the disease later on in life. Who is the most famous person with Type I Diabetes? Sharon Stone tops our list. The "Basic Instinct" star was diagnosed with Type I diabetes. Mary Tyler Moore was diagnosed with Type I diabetes around the time she was filming "The Mary Tyler Moore Show." She is now an outspoken advocate who brings awareness to the disease. "American Idol" alum Crystal Bowersox has been hospitalized due to complications with Type I diabetes. Several famous men also have Type I diabetes. Chicago Bears quarterback Jay Cutler was diagnosed with Type I diabetes in 2008. Poison front man Bret Michaels was diagnosed with Type I diabetes when he was 6 years old. Pop star Nick Jonas was diagnosed with Type I diabetes in 2005. In 1957, Jackie Robinson was diagnosed as a type 1 diabetic. Are you surprised that so many celebrities have Type I diabetes? Share your thoughts in the comments section. Continue reading >>

What Is Type 1 Diabetes?

What Is Type 1 Diabetes?

Type 1 diabetes is a condition in which the pancreas produces little or no insulin. Insulin is a hormone that helps your body use blood sugar - known as glucose - for energy. Your body takes the food you eat and breaks down fat, protein, and carbohydrates for energy. While your body is digesting the food, the carbohydrates are broken down into glucose. The glucose is then absorbed into the bloodstream, where it is carried to cells throughout your body. Insulin helps your cells absorb the glucose in your blood, allowing it to be used as energy. A healthy pancreas releases a regular supply of insulin into your bloodstream. After you eat, your blood glucose levels rise, and your pancreas responds by releasing more insulin to move the glucose into your cells. Insulin acts as a key, opening up the cell so it can accept the glucose. In a person with Type 1 diabetes, the pancreas produces little or no insulin. Without insulin, blood glucose levels rise. Without insulin, glucose cannot enter the cells and be used for energy, and as a result, it remains in the bloodstream. As a person with Type 1 diabetes, it is important to monitor and maintain healthy blood glucose levels. High blood glucose levels over a long period of time can lead to health complications. If you blood glucose level drops too low, even for a short amount of time, you may feel dizzy, or too hot or cold. If your blood glucose level drops extremely low, you may lose consciousness. By taking insulin as prescribed by your doctor and maintaining a healthy diet, you can keep your blood glucose levels within a healthy range. Continue reading >>

The Story

The Story

The Human Trial is a feature-length documentary with unprecedented, real-time access to one of America’s top labs — ViaCyte in San Diego. This groundbreaking film follows the team’s triumphs and failures in the lab as they attempt to make medical history at a landmark clinical trial in 2015. More than 90 years after the discovery of insulin, ViaCyte has received FDA approval to launch the first ever-human trial of a stem-cell derived treatment that might cure type 1 diabetes. ViaCyte’s trial is only the third ever in the US, and the sixth ever in the world to use embryonic stem cell therapy to cure a disease. Only a decade ago America was torn apart by a political and religious debate about the ethics of using human embryos for stem cell research. Now, The Human Trial is filming the first six months of the first phase of the trial, to document every step of this remarkable moment in medical science. One donated human embryo might be the cure for millions of people suffering from diabetes. But, more than that, the film provides context for what it took to get here: the years of research, by scores of scientists working in other facilities around the world; and the extraordinary costs of getting a new drug to market — on average, $2.9 billion, according to Forbes magazine. Already four years in production, The Human Trial brings to life the human realities of diabetes, which causes a death every seven seconds and will be the leading cause of death in the US by 2030. With exclusive access to the patients who are the subjects of Phase I/II of the trial, the film illuminates the emotional, physical and financial costs of diabetes that is a $612 billion health expenditure worldwide. It’s a rare opportunity to capture how science, commerce and politics intersect, a Continue reading >>

Big Screen Diabetics: Movies That Features Diabetic Characters

Big Screen Diabetics: Movies That Features Diabetic Characters

Moviemakers love incorporating illnesses in their films, and diabetes is among their favorite choices. In fact, a lot of their fictional characters deal with it. There are even times when the entire plot revolve around the disease itself, and there we get to see the main protagonists suffer its symptoms, take medicines for diabetes in an attempt to keep it at bay, and ultimately succumb to it (although not all the time). And although you may not like it, you have to admit that diabetes as a plot device does add to a flick’s appeal. So just in case you want to watch these films, then start with these: Panic Room (2002) Before she became a global phenomenon as that poker-faced chick who’d rather die than live without her vampire boyfriend in Twilight, Kristen Stuart once starred alongside Jodie Foster in the thriller Panic Room. There, she portrayed Sarah Altman, the diabetic daughter of Meg Altman, and we’ll see her struggle with the disease even as a group of thieves had mother and daughter trapped inside their home’s panic room. The Godfather III (1990) In the third installment of this very iconic mafia movie, the diabetic character is none other than Don Michael Corleone himself! The Godfather III showcases an older and weaker Don Corleone who, aside from having to deal with business troubles, has to suffer a diabetic stroke at some point in the movie. Steel Magnolias (1989) Steel Magnolias is one of the most tear-jerker and best classic drama films of all time. Who can forget the funny and inaccurate interpretation of diabetics as portrayed by Julia Roberts? From being healthy to gradually becoming severely hypoglycaemic, you’ll be crying yourself silly before the end credits role. That’s a promise! Derailed (2005) The main character of this film, Amy (pl Continue reading >>

“frozen,” And Other Stories: Relatable Characters For Kids With Diabetes

“frozen,” And Other Stories: Relatable Characters For Kids With Diabetes

Many people identify with fictional characters in books, television, and film, often looking to them for an emotional connection. How many people have felt a bond with Elizabeth Bennet or felt the struggle of George Bailey? But for those living with diabetes, especially children and young adults, finding a character who shares their disease is easier said than done. Now the diabetes community can add one more to their list. This September, Disney’s creative director John Lasseter revealed the movie Frozen’s main character Elsa from Frozen was directly inspired by those with type 1 diabetes. ray ban 2132 In the ABC special The Story of Frozen: Making a Disney Animated Classic, Lasseter explained that Elsa was originally conceived as a villainous queen complete with blue skin, spiky hair, and the ability to freeze hearts. But over the course of production, Lasseter started seeing Elsa in a different light. Elsa’s frosty curse reminded Lasseter of his son Sam, diagnosed with type 1 diabetes at age 10. “This little guy was being poked with needle after needle after needle and he asked ‘why me?’” said Lasseter. “And I thought of Sam as I was thinking of Elsa. She was born with this. Why is she a villain?” Inspired, Lasster asked songwriting team Robert Lopez and Kristen Anderson-Lopez to write a sympathetic song for Elsa about her isolation. The song Let it Go was born and the entire story was rewritten. Diabetes is not a visible disease, but it can have serious complications. It may not be apparent to others, except when doing certain self-care tasks like checking blood glucose, taking insulin or during an emergency like a severe hypoglycemic event. Fear of being different can affect how someone acts and what someone will share about their disease with oth Continue reading >>

Movie Fundraiser Aims To Help Kids Dealing With Diabetes

Movie Fundraiser Aims To Help Kids Dealing With Diabetes

BRIGHTON’S Ariya McDonald wants to ultimately find a cure for Type 1 diabetes but for now will settle for a movie fundraiser on Sunday, November 19. The 10-year-old is hosting an advance screening of Paddington Bear 2 to raise money for the Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation and Camp Diabetes. Ariya said kids should bring their teddy bears to the movie night. “People like going to the movies and getting a famous movie a month early is really good,” she said. “Millions of people have Type 1 diabetes and I know how they feel. “I want to help all those people, because it sucks so I wanna get rid of it.” Teddy bears are a special theme for the St Kieran’s Primary School student, who has hosted many teddy bear picnic fundraisers in the past. This is because children diagnosed with the auto-immune condition are given a teddy to show where they can inject insulin, to regulate their blood glucose levels. “Ruby is a diabetes bear, and when you get diagnosed you get a Ruby or Rufus bear which is a teddy you can practise your injections on, or cuddle if you feel like it,” Ariya said. Ariya’s mother Sarah McDonald said each night at midnight and 2am they have to do blood glucose tests because if it gets too low it can be life threatening. “We haven’t slept properly in four and a half years and it would be great to not have to worry about Ariya every time she goes to sleep,” she said. “Ariya’s amazing, she’s the bravest person I know.” Ariya’s Type 1 Diabetes Fundraiser will be held at Hoyts Redcliffe - Peninsula Fair Shopping Centre on Anzac Ave, Kippa-Ring at 2pm for a 2.30pm movie on Sunday, November 19. For tickets go to eventbrite.com.au and search for JDRF Movie Fundraiser. Continue reading >>

Diabetes In The Movies

Diabetes In The Movies

The only movie I’ve ever seen in which diabetes plays a prominent role is Christopher Nolan’s 2000 thriller Memento. The protagonist of this film, Leonard, looses his short-term memory, but his diabetic wife thinks he’s faking. To force him to stop “pretending,” she asks him to give her an injection of insulin. He does so. A few minutes later, she tells him again: “It’s time for my insulin.” Leonard repeatedly injects her with insulin until she goes into a coma and dies. When I saw this movie for a high school assignment, I hadn’t yet been diagnosed with diabetes, but my brother had. My mom made a reassuring assessment of the movie’s plotholes (Once Leonard has given his wife several injection, wouldn’t she finally realize he’s not faking his condition and drink some orange juice? If Leonard saw his wife going into a coma, wouldn’t he call an ambulance?) Still, I found the movie very disturbing. It reminded me that diabetics are constantly vulnerable, despite every attempt to manage their condition as well as possible. After watching Memento, I’ve never felt the desire to watch another movie about a diabetic. This is partly just my taste; while some people find it comforting to watch movies that address their health issues, I’m usually more of an escapist–I’m not sure I’d seek out a movie about a diabetic character even if the portrayal wasn’t depressing. Still, watching Memento made me curious. Were there any other movies about diabetics? My google search of “diabetics” and “movies” yielded a list from dLife.com of several movies with diabetic characters. From the accompanying short description of each, I found out that there are films with diabetic characters in all different genres. You can see the full list here. In most Continue reading >>

Student Films About Type 1 Diabetes In School

Student Films About Type 1 Diabetes In School

Created by 11-17 year olds as part of the2015 Diabetes in School Short Film Competition, these three-minute films show what life with Type 1 diabetes is really like for children and young people, and what care parents and teachers should expect at school. You could use these videos by: sending them to other families living with diabetes showing one in a school assembly sending them to people you know showing at any diabetes or education events to help inform teachers, school staff and volunteers. Get in touch and let us know which videos you’re showing, we can provide downloads or DVD copies and let us know anything you’d like to see in future videos by emailing us [email protected] Myths about Type 1 diabetes Rasing awareness Inspirational Living with diabetes / Day in the life Continue reading >>

12 Hours To Live (2006 Tv Movie)

12 Hours To Live (2006 Tv Movie)

Yes, the script for "12 Hours to Live" is patched together Frankenstein-style from some of the oldest thriller tropes in history, but if you can get past that and some hideously over-directed flashbacks, the main part of this film is quite good. The plotting is coherent and believable, the human drama genuinely touching and the characters are multidimensional. Even the villain evokes pity and pathos instead of just being a stick-figure menace. The acting is also excellent, with Ione Skye as the heroine (an FBI agent with a personal as well as a professional interest in catching the bad guy) and Kevin Durand as the villain (a psychopathic criminal specializing in bank robberies and not sure himself, as he tells us in the film, why he does what he does) standing out. This one is well worth watching and several cuts above the Lifetime TV-movie norm for this genre. In Belgarde County, in Illinois, the wanted criminal John Carl Lowman (Kevin Durand) runs out gas in an isolated area; he carjacks a car with a couple and kidnaps the diabetic teenager Amy Kennedy (Brittney Wilson). The FBI Agent Megan Saunders (Ione Skye), whose partner and lover was killed by Lowman a couple of years ago in a bank heist, assumes the investigation and finds that Amy needs insulin injection in less than 12 hours, otherwise she will die. However, when her superior arrives in the location, he dismisses Megan since she is haunted by her fail in the past. But she seeks out her absent father to ask for some advice to help her to find Amy while the time is ticking. "12 Hours to Live" has a promising beginning with an intriguing situation. However, the unrealistic and commercial resolution of the plot is weak and full of clichés. The flawed and annoying screenplay has a repetitive flashback with the sh Continue reading >>

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