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Mothers Of Type 1 Diabetes Poems

A Short Poem About Type 1 Diabetes

A Short Poem About Type 1 Diabetes

A 13-year old uses verse to express feelings about life with T1D. Cassandra G is 13-year old who has been living with T1D for three years. She wrote this poem about her experiences. Waking up early morning, all you hear is the little girl yawning. She does not get up to train for the Eagles, but instead she takes irritating needles. When the sound of silence slaps her class at school, her mashie goes off and that is not cool. which people thinks it is a phone with a wake-up alarm. it is hard to control her sugar level, when it just cant decide. Waking up in the middle of the night, she wakes up to an open light. Her mum gives her sugary food, at least that puts her in a good mood. She can find her way through the darkest cave. Just because she is different, she is still the same And whoever puts her down, they are the one to blame. Do you have an idea you would like to write about for Insulin Nation? Send your pitch to [email protected] . Thanks for reading this Insulin Nation article. Want more Type 1 news? Subscribe here . Have Type 2 diabetes or know someone who does? Try Type 2 Nation , our sister publication. Continue reading >>

A Night In The Life Of A Type 1 Diabetic

A Night In The Life Of A Type 1 Diabetic

I wrote this poem last night at 3 a.m. Seems like almost every night I am up at that time. Truth be told though I am not alone. Multitudes of others share a similar experience when caring for someone with this disease. If you know someone with Type 1 Diabetes and they are managing it so well know that there is a whole lot of hard work behind it. A Night In The Life of a Type 1 Diabetic By: Mary Williams Now I lay me down to sleep, I pray to God I catch some Zzz’s. The first alarm goes off at 12 Time to make sure all is still well A blood sugar reading of 65. Time to down juice to keep her alive. “Wake up sleepy head, it’s that time of night Wake up so momma can make you alright.” 15 minutes later its time to re-poke A drop of blood reveals its time for some Coke Still too low to go to bed. So we patiently wait to lay our weary heads. 15 minutes go by and the Alarm bell rings Another drop of blood…141 it sings. Set the alarm to wake up at 3. My head hits the pillow and my alarm startles me. Another drop of blood into the machine. 350 is what it now currently screams! Freakity Frack! I want our old lives back. Time for a shot to bring them back down. Set the alarm for 6 this time around. My head hits the pillow its time for a snooze. The alarm interrupts The Rock giving me booze, On a nice sandy beach, enjoying a walk. The alarms jolts me back to type 1 diabetes talk. Another drop of blood says she needs to wake up. 65 again! This royally sucks. Time to down juice, we know the routine I hate this disease, it makes me feel mean. Another drop of blood is what I request From small little hands that are trying their best To be brave when the needles cause so much pain Fingers riddled with scars is what has been gained And now its time to start a brand new day, With Continue reading >>

A Poem For Moms Of Diabetic Kids

A Poem For Moms Of Diabetic Kids

D.D. Family T1 for 72 years, here to help A poem in memory of the author, Gary Hempleman, for all children with diabetes. "She walks down the hallway in silence so deep, Keeping watch over him, as her little one sleeps. Making sure not to wake him as she crosses the floor, She sits on his bedside and brushes his hair, As he dreams of shooting baskets, without a "D" care. She holds his hand softly; his fingers so small, As she watches and wonders why "D" came to call. While she watches him sleeping, so peaceful and warm, The forces inside him fight a constant "D" storm. Will he ever be free of shots and blood testing? She sits and she wonders as she watches him resting. The beep of the meter breaks the silence of the night; A small drop of blood tells if everything's right. The seconds count down to the final display, I hate this **** meter; I want to throw it away. The number is fine, one down, a lifetime to go, As he turns in his sleep, will he ever know? Why does this "D" happen to someone so small? My son is my hero, but my baby most of all. She turns at his doorway, looking back one more time, It's a nightly routine of the very worst kind. She walks down the hallway and time passes by, As she sits in dark silence and quietly cries. I have to stay strong, and for him I will fight, We'll battle this "D" with all of our might. I'll teach him to master and conquer this foe, This "D" will not stop him, I promised him so." Type 1 for 72 years. Using the MM 630g pump, and Dexcom G5. A1c=6.1 Continue reading >>

A Mothers Promise

A Mothers Promise

Happy Mother's Day to all you wonderful moms...You Rock! A poem in memory of the author, Gary Hempleman, for all children with diabetes. She walks down the hallway in silence so deep, Keep watch over him, as her little one sleeps. With meter in hand, she opens his door, Making sure not to wake him as she crosses the floor, She sits on his bedside and brushes his hair, As he dreams of shooting baskets, without a "D" care. She holds his hand softly; his fingers so small, As she watches and wonders why "D" came to call. While she watches him sleeping, so peaceful and warm, The forces inside him fight a constant "D" storm. Will he ever be free of shots and blood testing? She sits and she wonders as she watches him resting. The beep of the meter breaks the silence of the night; A small drop of blood tells if everything's right. The seconds count down to the final display, I hate this damn meter; i want to throw it away. The number is fine, one down, a lifetime to go, As he turns in his sleep, will he ever know? Why does this "D" happen to someone so small? My son is my hero, but my baby most of all. She turns at his doorway, looking back one more time, It's a nightly routine of the very worst kind. She walks down the hallway and time passes by, As she sits in dark silence and quietly cries. I have to stay strong, and for him i will fight, We'll battle this "D" with all of our might. I'll teach him to master and conquer this foe, This "D" will not stop him, i promised him so. Gary 2001 Visit Gary's website and read more of his poetry www.diabetespoetry.com. Happy Mother's Day to all you wonderful moms...You Rock! A poem in memory of the author, Gary Hempleman, for all children with diabetes. She walks down the hallway in silence so deep, Keep watch over him, as her little one Continue reading >>

Helen Steiner Rice Mother Poems

Helen Steiner Rice Mother Poems

If you have diabetes your blood sugar levels may be abnormal and surgery can make these symptoms worse. Helen Steiner Rice Mother Poems we appreciate that endocrinological problems can present in a variety of ways and we strive to provide the best care The government plans to create a diabetes prevention program but the program may well hurt more people than it helps. Exercise is a great way to lower your blood sugar and studies have shown that a walk after meals can improve blood glucose levels. Adult obesity and type 2 diabetes 3 to the risk of both obesity and type 2 diabetes. Medicare billing; Aged Care Funding Instrument; Physiotherapy; Podiatry; Dietitian; Speech Pathology; Diabetes Education Medicare Rebates; Diabetes education products ( If you need assistance with a past purchase you can reach us at [emailprotected] ). Gastroparesis More Common Than You Think. Diabetes symptoms; Newly diagnosed; Diabetes guides; Diabetes tests; Swollen ankles and legs will often be ought on or aggravated by long periods of standing. I wish I would have did it like this on Christmas. GESTATIONAL DIABETES EATING PLAN ] Happy cure diet next year due towards the popularity among the diet common. I was recently diagnosed with type 2 diabetes and read that diabetics should not take aspirin. 1 Medications This is one of the most common causes of dry mouth. Insulin: legal widely used is not sponsored by or affiliated with any of the pharmacies identified in its price comparisons. Natural Home Remedies for Diabetes: Diet for Diabetics. Cystic Fiosis Canada has invested more than relentless energy drink tesco $226 million in leading research and care. Krgel K(1) Wurm A Pannicke T Pancreatic insufficiency is a hallmark of cystic Ang paninigarilyo ng tabako ay lumilitaw na nagpapataas ng Continue reading >>

Diabetes Humour...

Diabetes Humour...

Life with diabetes is stressful but often we can find humour in the most interesting places! Here a few things that have made us all chuckle over the years. Humorous Tidbits, Diabetes Poetry and Diabetes Songs,... But first..... What NOT to say to a parent of a child with diabetes. Test Strip Locations We all know that test strips are actually alive. They move on their own. They can be found in the most unique locations. Here are some of the interesting places that we have heard of. Please feel free to share with us some of the strange places your test strips have been found. Thanks to Michael for sharing!! "Somehow, a One Touch Ultra strip ended up in my coffee cup at work this morning. No idea how it got there, but probably involved a morning blood test of 211 that caused me to cuss and toss my case across my desk. There must have been flailing test strips at hand, also. So, in the spirit, my Blood Meter decided to pose nearby the swimming test strip." In my daughters thick curly hair after she brushed it with a brush that was next to my bed. The strip stayed in there through a full day of school. Teresa I In a school novel. It had been used as a book mark! In the yard Frozen in the ice In a salad In the washer and dryer Fishing tackle box The teacher's sweater pocket On the back of the toilet tank In a make up kit. It needs to be cleaned out on a weekly basis. How do they find there way to these places?? In a clean pair of underwear! On the stove! Strange infusion set locations! We have found them in the tub, by the garbage, in the car but today I found one attached to the bottom of my Swifter vac! Always something new. Poems No more needles, No more pumps no more ouches, no more lumps no more tests, no more fears no more blood, no more tears By Gail aged 4yr The kid Continue reading >>

Inside The World Of Type 1: A Mother’s Poem

Inside The World Of Type 1: A Mother’s Poem

This poem was written by Michele Grima whose daughter, Zoe, was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes two years ago. This is something I wrote at 3 a.m. on a difficult night about a month after we came home from the hospital. I am a world away from the sadness I felt that day, and I know we will overcome any obstacle that comes our way. - - Love is, love is all. It brings you to your knees sometimes. Although you may not fall, your heart feels the break, and there is no greater pain than that of looking into a child's eyes, full of fear, and watching helplessly as they miss their old life – a life with no pricks to their fingers, a life with no needles, a life with no disgusting smell of insulin, a life without looking at their own blood 10 times a day, a life without highs and lows. You know their little bodies are struggling to work, and you want to reach deep inside and fix what has gone wrong, but it's not in your power. A life when they could go on their own and take whatever they want to eat without counting every carb, and there is no way but acceptance and hope for a cure – one that, in this often cruel world, your intelligent brain knows may never come. Money will come before others' pain, and children are just statistics to pharmaceutical companies and the elite of the world, and that doesn't only ring true for diabetes but also for cancer and many other sicknesses these poor kids have to endure – sicknesses that rob them of their childhood. All mothers were put here to protect their babies and fix their problems, and when you can't, you begin to look at yourself in the mirror, and the frustration and heartache leave you feeling totally hollow inside, and you end up feeling like a failure as a protector. What if? What if I hadn't seen the signs, what if I had c Continue reading >>

Poem About Daughter Fighting Diabetes

Poem About Daughter Fighting Diabetes

My daughter was diagnosed with juvenile diabetes at the age of 13. She is now 28. We have been through some rough times with ketoacidosis and I have known what it is like to have a doctor say, "We are doing all we can." On October 5, 2013, she will have gone one year without a hospital visit. She is struggling with some of the complications of diabetes in her digestive system and it is becoming harder for her to control her blood sugars. This poem is about my admiration for her. My life was normal. Then one day I just got sick. My energy levels were low. I didn't want to eat. I was going to the bathroom a lot, and I slept longer than I used to. My mom knew that... Subscribe by Email for your weekly dose of Loving, Healing and Touching poetry! Poem Encouraging You To Look On The Bright Side Has this poem touched you? Share your story! My life was normal. Then one day I just got sick. My energy levels were low. I didn't want to eat. I was going to the bathroom a lot, and I slept longer than I used to. My mom knew that something was wrong, so she finally took me to the doctor. In the E.R. they checked my blood glucose level, and it was way over 900. I was admitted to the hospital for 2 days. The doctors told my mom that I was in DKA (diabetic ketoacidosis). My mom came back into the room after talking to the doctors. She gave me a hug and told me it was going to be okay, but I could see it in her eyes it was bad news. I was hooked up to an insulin drip. I had to go to see an endocrinologist for my diabetes. At first I was scared, but aren't we all. My whole life began to change. My family was my support. They helped me cope with my highs and lows. But now I'm 16, and I couldn't be happier with my life. I play on the varsity soccer team at my school and I run track. I hope Continue reading >>

Lauryn’s Poem About Type 1 Diabetes

Lauryn’s Poem About Type 1 Diabetes

Lauryn is a JDRF advocate who recently met with her local MP Tony Crook. After meeting with Lauryn, he wanted to help support her and all other Australians with type 1 diabetes, and encourage all other parliamentarians to do the same. This morning, he read her poem out in Parliament. To be like Lauryn and help encourage other MPs to support type 1 diabetes, sign up to become a JDRF advocate and participate in Promise to Remember Me 2012. Continue reading >>

We Are The D Mothers

We Are The D Mothers

We are called D Moms. D Mamas. Even Type 3's. Sometimes we get a bad rap. And I only have one thing to say about all of that... You are probably right. I want to tell you that if you are a parent, you can understand. But that is not true. I want to tell you that if you have diabetes yourself, you can understand. But that is not true either...just as I will never fully understand your diabetic life, you will never fully understand mine. The only way you would understand what goes on in the swelly brain of a D Mama, is if you were a D Mama yourself. We are special. Chosen for our story, as you were chosen for yours. We are fighters, and we will fight until our last breath to keep our children safe. New technologies like fast acting insulin and insulin pumps provide keys for better management, but they also provide a clear and present danger at all times. We have to be vigilant. We look into the eyes of our children and we love them with a bright tenderness. We want more than anything for them to live a life free from restrictions, free from prejudice, free from complications, free from emergency rooms and hospitals. We feel a responsibility well beyond any bounds of normalcy. We do not want to live a life of regrets. One day we will need to look into the eyes of our adult Type 1 Children and we want more than anything to say... The mothers of Type 1's spend every day racked with guilt. Every blood sugar number pierces our heart. We feel responsible for every high and every low. An argument can be made that diabetes is responsible for every one of those numbers, but in our eyes...whether a reasonable notion or not, we feel they are a reflection of our efforts. We may not always admit it to you, or to ourselves...but we take those numbers personally. The A1C isn't called th Continue reading >>

Kids With Type 1 Diabetes

Kids With Type 1 Diabetes

She walks down the hallway in silence so deep, Keeping watch over him, as her little one sleeps. With meter in hand, she opens his door, Making sure not to wake him as she crosses the floor. She sits on his bedside and brushes his hair, As he dreams of shooting baskets, without a 'D' care. She holds his hand softly; his fingers so small, As she watches and wonders why 'D' came to call. While she watches him sleeping, so peaceful and warm, The forces inside him fight a constant 'D' storm. Will he ever be free of shots and blood testing? She sits and she wonders as she watches him resting. The beep of the meter breaks the silence of the night, A small drop of blood tells if everything's right. The seconds count down to the final display, I hate this damn meter; I want to throw it away. The number is fine, one down, a lifetime to go, As he turns in his sleep, will he ever know? Why does this 'D' happen to someone so small? My son is my hero, but my baby most of all. She turns at his doorway, looking back one more time, It's a nightly routine of the very worst kind. She walks down the hallway and time passes by, As she sits in dark silence and quietly cries. I have to stay strong, and for him I will fight, We'll battle this 'D' with all of our might. I'll teach him to master and conquer this foe, This 'D' will not stop him, I promised him so. The face of 'D' is a hard one to see, What do we look like? What do you see? The battles we fight are on the inside, Battles from which we can't run or hide. We're all just the same, like everyone else, Not that much different, I keep telling myself. The looks from some people, the fear in their eyes, It makes me feel alone, and I ask myself "Why?" 'D' is not visual; it's hard to explain, But please don't ignore us, or treat us in vain Continue reading >>

Letters To Banting

Letters To Banting

These excerpts Letterthought to Federick Banting are from Rachel Morgans debut poetry collection,Honey & Blood, Blood & Honey. This bookoccupies a tenuous place between illness and wellness, in the moments and years after insulin was discovered, making Type 1 diabetes a survivable disease. The poems in this collection move between direct address to the scientists who first discovered insulin in 1921, to the lyrical reflections of a mother as she laments the burden of chronic disease that comes with her young sons type 1 diabetes. The language of science and parenthood infuse the poems, giving voice to the caregiver, where nothing is entirely gift or grief. Rachel Morgan is the Poetry Editor of the North American Review, the nations oldest magazine, which is published at the University of Northern Iowa, where Morgan also teaches in the Department of Languages & Literatures. Winter Letterthought to Frederick Banting, Discoverer of Insulin This snow is melting before the next snow. How I hated the prairie when I arrived, its naked try-hard crops for miles. Two weeks after moving, we sat on the porch after dark, broken down boxes in the yard, catching our breath from the decade in the city. Holding illusions + hope + opaque. Inside our one-year-old son, asleepalready some invisible hitchhiker traveling the interstate of his immune system. Semis and train whistles sounded like leaving, otherplace, not here, no there, no where, now here. But, I have to tell you, Dr. Banting, theres this moment that breaks and mends my heart. The summer he was two, I corralled plastic riding toys after a day in the sun, a new plastic smell, that next year Id recognize as insulin, like opening a new doll from its package. Heres the funny thing, I dont remember the last doll I was given. Childh Continue reading >>

Living With Type 1 Diabetes: A Poem

Living With Type 1 Diabetes: A Poem

Insulin, shots, meter, blood Emotions are about to flood DKA – Hospital stay I just don’t know what to say So, sugars are a running high And toxins building up, oh my! They put me in a hospital bed And flushed my body with fluid They tell me that I’ve got Type 1 With finger pricks, it is no fun I have to have four shots a day And count food carbs – the only way The honeymoon is at an end No islet cell to call a friend My pancreas no longer makes The insulin for cells it takes Short acting, long acting, pen and pump These are ways to help my slump Lots of tools they have today To manage the disease, my way And for the times when I go low Smarties I will always stow I take with me everything I need and wear my medic alert indeed Needles, doctors, glucose tests logbooks, ketones — all are pests There is so much that I hate But I can think of a much worse fate I’m thankful that I live today For in the past, I’d pass away I’ll count my blessings and take good care The better my number, the better I’ll fair I think that it’s safe to say that none of us were happy when we first found out that we had diabetes. The words “you’re a diabetic” or “you have diabetes” can sound like a death sentence and while we … This time of year, I always like to look back at the previous year and reflect on the people and the events that shaped me; giving thanks for what I have learned and reflecting on what I would like to … Continue reading >>

A Mothers Poem | Children With Diabetes Forums

A Mothers Poem | Children With Diabetes Forums

This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More. I'm not sure who originally wrote this but I found it touching..... I am the mother of a diabetic child. I dont know what its like to go to sleep at night and know for certain my child will wake up in the morning. I dont know what its like to sleep the whole night through without waking up to do blood tests on my sleeping child. I dont know what its like to prepare a meal without a calculator, measuring cups, and a gram scale. I dont know what its like to drop my child off at school and know she will always be in the charge of someone who knows how to take care of her. I do know what its like to force feed sugar in the middle of the night knowing I am sacrificing my childs teeth to save her life. I do know what its like to draw up insulin at 2 am and pray to God Im not too sleepy to make a fatal error in judgment, technique or calculation. I do know what its like to sit underneath the dining room table holding my sobbing child, explaining to her, No, we cant take a break just this one time. while I inject insulin into her already bruised arm. I do know what its like to walk away from the pharmacy counter with an armload of supplies and realize Ive just gone through another box of 200 syringes. I do know what its like to help my child march bravely past the juice and cookies at the school reception that was supposed to be her reward for achieving Student of the Month. I do know what its like to look into my childs eyes and tell her she has an incurable disease and explain to her what that means, And then to be comforted by her when Im the one who cant stop sobbing. I do know what its like to love and cherish my child every minute of every day, To know that I may s Continue reading >>

Sweet To The Soul: How God Chooses The Parents Of Children With Type 1 Diabetes

Sweet To The Soul: How God Chooses The Parents Of Children With Type 1 Diabetes

How God Chooses the Parents of Children with Type 1 Diabetes I found this a while ago on a group I am a part of and just had to share. It made me cry but it's so precious. It's taken from the poem "The Special Mother" by Erma Bombeck Did you ever wonder how parents of children with diabetes are chosen? Somehow I visualize God hovering over Earth selecting his instruments for propagation with great care and deliberation. As He observes, He instructs his Angels to make notes in a giant ledger. Brands, Tim and Heather, a daughter. Patron Saint Audrey Bickleys, Sid and Ellen, a daughter. Patron Saint Caroline Kitchens, David and Laura, a daughter. Patron Saint Lauren Finally, He passes a name to an Angel and smiles. Give them a child with diabetes. The Angel is curious. Why this one, God? They are so happy. Exactly, smiles God. Could I give a child with diabetes to a mother and father who do not know laughter? That would be cruel. The Angel asks, But have they the patience? I dont want them to have too much patience, or they will drown in a sea of self-pity and despair, God replied. Once the shock and resentment wears off, theyll handle it. I watched them today. They have that feeling of self and independence that is so rare and so necessary in a parent. You see, the child I am going to give them has her own world. They have to make it their world and thats not going to be easy. God smiles. This family is perfect. They have just enough selfishness. The Angel gasps. Selfishness? Is that a virtue? God nods. If they cannot separate themselves from the child occasionally, they will never survive. Yes, this is the family I will bless with less than perfect. They do not realize it yet, but they are to be envied. I will permit them to see clearly the things I seeignorance, cruelt Continue reading >>

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