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Most Accurate Diabetes Meter

Bg Meter Accuracy: 10 Meters Put To The Test!

Bg Meter Accuracy: 10 Meters Put To The Test!

These 10 meters varied in age and wear.Some were old, some were new one wasmy own personalmeter that I used to calibrate my CGM and make mission-criticaldecisions each day.All of them passed their respective control solution tests, so its safe to assume that they werein good working order. I tried to match the testing method employed by Chris (author of the original post ) as closely as possible. Eightrounds of testing were performed over the course of 24 hours according to the following procedure: Order of meters was randomized for each round. Tests were performed only when CGM readings were stable (i.e. no insulin on board and CGM showing a slope of ~0 mg/dL/min). I didnt do anything special to stabilize my blood glucose just tested as I went about a normal day. The test strips used for each meter all came from their own unique vials. Before and after completing the eight testing rounds, the meters were checked using their respective control solutions. They all passed the control solution tests. Unlike Chris, I didnt have an alarming spread in my results for any round. The overallbetween-meter variability (% Error, or %CV for you stats folks) was only 6%. In plain English:My treatment decisions wouldnt have varied much at all, regardless of the meter I was using. One unit of rapid-acting insulin brings my BG down by ~80 mg/dL, and I correct whenever Im over 100 mg/dL. Ill usually correct down to 70-110 mg/dL, depending on my plans for the next couplehours (big meal = correct to 70; workout = correct to 110). Iwasrelieved to see that even if I tooka correction bolus for the maximum BG of each round, I still would have been brought down to a desirableblood glucose level. For example, take Round 1. The highest reading I saw was 182 md/dL, and Id take 1 unit for that. Ev Continue reading >>

Comparative Accuracy Of 17 Point-of-care Glucose Meters

Comparative Accuracy Of 17 Point-of-care Glucose Meters

Comparative Accuracy of 17 Point-of-Care Glucose Meters 1Massachusetts General Hospital Diabetes Research Center, Boston, MA, USA Steven J. Russell, MD, PhD, Massachusetts General Hospital Diabetes Research Center, 50 Staniford St, Ste 301, Boston, MA 02114, USA. Email: [email protected] Copyright 2016 Diabetes Technology Society The accuracy of point-of-care blood glucose (BG) meters is important for the detection of dysglycemia, calculation of insulin doses, and the calibration of continuous glucose monitors. The objective of this study was to compare the accuracy of commercially available glucose meters in a challenging laboratory study using samples with a wide range of reference BG and hemoglobin values. Fresh, discarded blood samples from a hospital STAT laboratory were either used without modification, spiked with a glucose solution, or incubated at 37C to produce 347 samples with an even distribution across reference BG levels from 20 to 440 mg/dl and hemoglobin values from 9 to 16 g/dl. We measured the BG of each sample with 17 different commercially available glucose meters and the reference method (YSI 2300) at the same time. We determined the mean absolute relative difference (MARD) for each glucose meter, overall and stratified by reference BG and by hemoglobin level. The accuracy of different meters widely, exhibiting a range of MARDs from 5.6% to 20.8%. Accuracy was lower in the hypoglycemic range, but was not consistently lower in samples with anemic blood hemoglobin levels. The accuracy of commercially available glucose meters varies widely. Although the sample mix in this study was much more challenging than those that would be collected under most use conditions, some meters were robust to these challenges and exhibited high accuracy in this Continue reading >>

How To Get The Most Accurate Reading From A Blood Glucose Meter

How To Get The Most Accurate Reading From A Blood Glucose Meter

Q. What’s the best way to get the most accurate reading from my blood glucose meter? A. Start with clean hands, but try to avoid using alcohol wipes, says CR's chief medical adviser Marvin M. Lipman, M.D. "That can diffuse the blood drop, and possibly make the reading artificially low." Instead, simply use soap and warm water, and dry thoroughly; the warm temperature helps the finger capillaries to dilate. Also, don’t milk your fingertip for blood because that can dilute the blood drop with tissue fluid and may cause a low reading. To get enough blood for the strip, brace the tip of your finger against a stationary surface, then prick it with the lancet. For related information, check our blood glucose meter buying guide. Editor's Note: This article also appeared in the January 2018 issue of Consumer Reports magazine. Continue reading >>

Blood Sugar Meters: Most Accurate

Blood Sugar Meters: Most Accurate

A laboratory tested 18 of the most commercially available blood sugar meters available in the US. My personal testing of some of the included meters matches the study’s… that’s a good sign. top meters tested worst meters tested The top-rated blood sugar meter is Contour Next. The only meter to have 100% accuracy, according to this study. Impressive. I have not used this particular meter, but I have used and love Contour Next EZ (it wasn’t tested). Meter accuracy can (and will) vary even among identical models. Additionally, the second component of every blood sugar test, the strips — can vary in accuracy as well. If you ever receive an unexpected blood sugar test, it’s always wise to re-test, especially if the result requires you to adjust insulin or diabetes drugs. Blood Sugar Meter Test You can read the full study “here‘. The group doing the testing, “Diabetes Technology Society”, has Big Pharma companies as sponsors… so be aware of that. However at least in ‘design’, it appears to be a well-controlled study. “This study was triple blinded. None of the people involved in conducting this study (i.e. neither investigators, laboratory staff, statistician, nor sponsor) had all the information to break the BGMS code until all results were calculated and posted. “ Over 1,000 subjects provided blood samples, and each of the 18 meters were put through three separate tests. Sadly, only 6 of the 18 passed each of the three tests, and are recommended. Links below are Amazon Affiliate links. Passed the Test: Recommended Accu-Check Aviva Plus 98% Walmart ReliOn Confirm (Micro) 97% CVS Advanced 97% FreeStyle Lite 96% Failed the Test: Not Recommended Listed in order of accuracy, from highest to lowest. Walmart ReliOn Prime 92% One Touch Verio 92% Prodig Continue reading >>

Checking Blood Sugar: Blood Glucose Meter Accuracy

Checking Blood Sugar: Blood Glucose Meter Accuracy

If handheld blood glucose meters were always as accurate checking blood sugar levels as the much bigger (25 pounds), much more expensive ($10,000) analyzers that hospitals and labs use, then hospitals and labs would use the small, personal blood sugar meters. Find out more about how meters get to market, what to look for when choosing your next meter, and how to calculate the performance results of the meter you have now. How meters get to market To get clearance to market a new meter, a manufacturer needs to submit data to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) that shows the new blood glucose monitoring system (meter plus test strips) is as safe to use and effective as other devices on the market that have FDA clearance. Many meter companies cite criteria published by the International Organization for Standardization (ISO), a network of the national standards institutes of 162 countries, based in Switzerland. The standard for blood glucose meters is ISO 15197, published in 2003. It is an FDA-recognized standard. It includes instructions for manufacturers on how tests of accuracy are to be run and what counts as a passing grade. Companies don't have to go by the ISO standard. According to the FDA, "Conformance with recognized consensus standards is strictly voluntary for a medical device manufacturer. A manufacturer may choose to conform to applicable recognized standards or may choose to address relevant issues in another manner." So if a manufacturer isn't using the ISO standard, it still has to make a case to the FDA that the device and strips are as safe to use and effective as others on the market. How is accuracy tested? Accuracy means how close the meter's results are to the results from a big, expensive, carefully calibrated lab analyzer. ISO requires man Continue reading >>

Are Blood Glucose Meters Accurate? New Data On 18 Meters

Are Blood Glucose Meters Accurate? New Data On 18 Meters

Results from the Diabetes Technology Society’s Blood Glucose Meter Surveillance Program identifies only six out of 18 meters that passed. Did yours make the cut? The Diabetes Technology Society (DTS) recently revealed long-awaited results from its Blood Glucose Monitor System (BGMS) Surveillance Program. The rigorous study tested the accuracy of 18 popular blood glucose meters (BGM) used in the US. These FDA-cleared meters were purchased through retail outlets and tested rigorously at three study sites in over 1,000 people (including 840 people with diabetes). The results were troubling: only six out of the 18 devices met the DTS passing standard for meter accuracy – within 15% or 15 mg/dl of the laboratory value in over 95% of trials. The devices that passed were: Contour Next from Ascensia (formerly Bayer) – 100% Accu-Chek Aviva Plus from Roche – 98% Walmart ReliOn Confirm (Micro) from Arkray – 97% CVS Advanced from Agamatrix – 97% FreeStyle Lite from Abbott – 96% Accu-Chek SmartView from Roche – 95% The devices that failed were: Walmart ReliOn Prime from Arkray – 92% OneTouch Verio from LifeScan – 92% OneTouch Ultra 2 from LifeScan – 90% Walmart ReliOn Ultima from Abbott – 89% Embrace from Omnis Health – 88% True Result from HDI/Nipro (Trividia) – 88% True Track from HDI/Nipro (Trividia) – 81% Solus V2 from BioSense Medical – 76% Advocate Redi-Code+ from Diabetic Supply of Suncoast – 76% Gmate Smart from Philosys – 71% Get the full data and all the accuracy information here. While all of these meters received FDA clearance at some point, this study shows that not all are equivalent in terms of accuracy. The FDA looks at company-reported trials when it reviews new meters; this study took an independent look, purchasing the meters di Continue reading >>

How Accurate Are Blood Glucose Meters?

How Accurate Are Blood Glucose Meters?

If you have Type 1 or Type 2 diabetes, then you know how important it is to check your blood sugar, whether that’s with a CGM (continuous glucose meter) or the manual BGM (blood glucose meter). And when you are on one end of the spectrum, or just not convinced by your CGM number, you test with a blood glucose meter, right? But what if your BGM were inaccurate as well? Just how accurate is the quintessential diabetes management tool? An independent study by the Diabetes Technology Society of 18 popular FDA-approved blood glucose monitoring systems released last month found that only six tested meters recorded BGLs as consistently and dependably as laboratory tests. The six highest-functioning monitors reported results within 15 percent of laboratory tests taken for comparison 95 percent of the time. The other 12 meters were only on the mark between 71 and 92 percent of the time. While the deviation on the meters was sometimes minor, minor mistakes can eventually lead to big complications. The study used BGMs bought in retail locations and tested 1,035 people in three different laboratory locations. It was conducted by a team of researchers led by David C. Klonoff, MD, of the Diabetes Research Institute at San Mateo, Calif.-based Mills-Peninsula Medical Center and funded by Abbott Laboratories. The study was not isolated to people with T1D. Among those who participated in testing the BGMs, 370 people had T1D, while the others had T2D, pre-diabetes, or did not have diabetes at all. The meters tested were developed by Bayer, Roche, Arkray, Agametrix, Abbott, LifeScan, Prodigy, Omnis Health, HDI/Nipro, BioSense Medical, Diabetic Supply of Suncoast and Philsys, and they represented 90 percent of the meters available on the market from 2013 to 2015. The six meters that were Continue reading >>

Top 10 Popular Blood Glucose Meters Put To The Test

Top 10 Popular Blood Glucose Meters Put To The Test

With countless blood glucose meters on the market, how do you know which one to choose? Do you choose the most expensive one; it must work the best if it costs the most, right? Or are you a techie looking for a Bluetooth meter that syncs to your smartphone? Perhaps, you’re concerned with the cost and you’re looking for the most affordable meter. Top 10 Glucose Meters We’ve taken the time to test the ten most popular blood glucose meters. Take a look to find the meter that’s the best fit for you. Winner and our favorite meter is One Touch Ultra 2. OneTouch Ultra 2 Accu-Chek Aviva Connect Walmart ReliON Confirm OneTouch Verio Abbott FreeStyle Lite Walgreens True2Go Contour Next EZ Livongo Health In Touch Meter Nova Max Plus Sanofi iBGStar Our Pick After a careful review of the top glucose meters on the market, our #1 recommendation is the One Touch Ultra 2. It’s simply one of the best in terms of functionality and price. Click here to learn more. (Helpful Tip: Although you can get one from your local pharmacy, you’ll find it cheaper on Amazon. Click here to get yours.) Accu-Chek Aviva Connect The Accu-Chek Aviva Connect gets its name from the Bluetooth connection that syncs to the user’s smartphone. The Connect utilizes an app to keep track of both short-term and long-term readings on a person’s smartphone. The user can also view their trends via bar graphs and maps on the app. The Accu-Chek Aviva Connect will cost you $29.99 and $1.75 for a single test strip. One con to this meter is that the test strips are one of the highest priced strips on the market. However, they are readily available in almost all drug stores and pharmacies. Accu-Chek also offers a supplemental program called Preferred Savings which can reduce most test-strip co-pays to $15-$45. Ot Continue reading >>

Best Blood Glucose Meter

Best Blood Glucose Meter

We spent over 50 hours researching and testing 16 different types of blood glucose meters and found that accuracy, ease of use, and cost were most important. The active1st Complete Diabetes Testing Kit scored high marks in all categories and is our top pick. We loved that everything we needed to monitor of blood glucose levels were included in this kit. It has test strips, lancets, solution, instructions, and a convenient case to name a few items. This all inclusive kit made blood glucose monitoring less complicated and having all the components in one case made it easy to keep up with when it came time to test. Navigation Introduction to the Blood Glucose Meter The blood glucose meters that are available are much smaller than they used to be and come with much more in the way of features. Accuracy is much better with these newer models as well. There are approximately 29 million Americans that have diabetes. One of the most important things that someone with diabetes can do is monitor their blood glucose. These glucose meters allow them to keep tabs on their levels so there are no complications. These top rated blood glucose meters are popular with consumers because of their quality of performance and reliability. Getting accurate test results means they can safely make any needed adjustments to their exercise and diet plans. Being able to do this lowers their risk of complications that can include kidney disease, blindness, nerve damage and even seizures. active1st Bayer Contour NEXT Complete Diabetes Testing Kit You’ll have everything you need to test your blood glucose levels with the active1st Bayer Contour NEXT Complete Diabetes Testing Kit. Bayer Contour is well known as the #1 rated test strip in the world and tops the charts in fast results and accuracy. Keep Continue reading >>

Comparing Glucose Meter Accuracy

Comparing Glucose Meter Accuracy

One of the most frequent questions we get from our customers who purchase the iHealth Align Portable Glucometer or the iHealth Smart Wireless Glucometer is: How accurate are iHealths meters compared to other glucose meters on the market? Unfortunately, there is not a straightforward answer to this question, as no two meters will give you the same readings and a difference of even 20-30 points may be in the range of error. iHealth glucometers meet the most up-to-date FDA regulations and ISO standards, which state that over-the-counter home-use meters must be accurate within +/-15% compared to a formal lab measurement. This means that a person with a glucose level of 100 can read as low as 85 or as high as 115 and still be within the range of accuracy. According to the FDA and several clinical studies, many factors can determine the accuracy of your meter, including: interfering substances (Vitamin C, Tylenol, etc.) how well you perform the test. For example, you should wash and dry your hands before testing and closely follow the instructions for operating your meter. altitude, temperature, and humidity (High altitude, low and high temperatures, and humidity can cause unpredictable effects on glucose results). Check the meter manual and test strip package insert for more information. store and handle the meter and strips according to manufacturers instructions. It is important to store test strip vials closed and to make sure that you are not using expired strips to check your blood sugar. Rather than comparing meters to other meters to gauge accuracy, the FDA recommends using the three ways below to ensure that your meter is working properly: Continue reading >>

11 Best Glucose Meters

11 Best Glucose Meters

by Jessica Hegg April 02, 2018 0 Comments Stay on top of your diabetes with the best glucose meter. These essential devices allow you to monitor your blood sugar numbers, discover the effects that food and activity have on your glucose levels, and help you make changes accordingly. Below, we list the best glucometers on the market and provide you with some top tips on their selection and use. Containing everything you need to measure your blood sugar levels, this Bayer product earns the top spot on our list of the best blood glucose meters. The kit includes the superior and highly accurate Bayer Contour NEXT Meter, test strips, a lancing device, lancets, a control solution for testing, and a detailed instruction manual. Includes everything you need to test your blood sugar Easy Touchs bestselling testing kit is CLIA certified for accuracy. Each kit contains a glucose meter, 100 test strips, 100 lancets, a log book, instructions, and a carry case. The meter takes a reading in just five seconds and requires a tiny blood sample for quick and painless results. There are four alarm settings, and you can save your previous readings for weekly or monthly averaging. Bayers USA-made Contour meter allows users to choose basic or advanced feature levels depending on their requirements and preferences. With no-coding technology, it is easy to use, accurate, and fast. Choose to test from your palm, finger, or forearm. The devices most notable features include its ability to remember 480 test results and to provide a fourteen-day average. This True Metrix blood glucose meter comes free when you purchase these test strips. The device can take a measurement from just half a microliter of blood, while it also takes into account the sample environment and temperature. A sophisticated al Continue reading >>

The Most Accurate Blood Glucose Meter

The Most Accurate Blood Glucose Meter

Credit: Accu-chek.com The Accu-Chek Aviva was first in an evaluation of a dozen meters conducted by a team of testing experts at Germany’s University of Ulm led by Guido Freckmann, M.D. It led the field in accuracy and precision. Few studies of meter accuracy have appeared in the more than 20 years that I have been writing about diabetes. Dr. Freckmann and his team of researchers have been the most relevant, reliable, and prolific in testing our meters. But some of the meters that they evaluated aren’t available in the United States. The leading diabetes journal that evaluates our meters just released the full text of this meter accuracy study. The editors tell me that the study will be free online only until March 31. Most Relevant Info So don’t wait too long if you want to review the whole thing. Meanwhile, I summarize below what I think is the most relevant information. The journal is Diabetes Technology & Therapeutics, and the study is “Evaluation of 12 Blood Glucose Monitoring Systems for Self-Testing: System Accuracy and Measurement Reproducibility.” The journal published it two years ago, but until now only the abstract has been freely available to us. Dr. Freckmann and his colleagues rated the meters against both the current and proposed standards. The current standard can be met more easily. It requires that at least 95 percent of the results fall within plus or minus 15 mg/dl at blood glucose levels below 75 mg/dl and within plus or minus 20 mg/dl at levels greater than or equal to 75 mg/dl. The International Organization for Standardization (ISO) set this level back in 2003, and it is the standard not only in Europe but also in the United States because the U.S. Food and Drug Administration uses it. The Tighter Standard ISO’s 2013 standard is tigh Continue reading >>

Comparing The Accuracy Of My Blood Glucose Meters

Comparing The Accuracy Of My Blood Glucose Meters

Comparing the Accuracy of My Blood Glucose Meters I was first introduced to the One Touch Verio IQ when I began using an Animas insulin pump in May 2016. The sales rep gave me a rave review of this blood glucose meter, telling me that it was one of the most accurate on the market. This meter had also been recommended for calibrating readings on a Dexcom system, which is often considered the golden child of continuous glucose monitoring in the diabetes community. At the time, I was quite happy with my FreeStyle Insulinx and had no intention of switching. However, the Verio was quite a good looking meter and certainly more modern than any of the other devices I was using. So, I ended up placing it in my travel case and decided that I would use it as my spare. As wonderful as the encasing, color screen, and rechargeable batteries were, my biggest deal breaker in using this meter was its accuracy. I have consistently found that the One Touch Verio reads at least 0.5mmol/L (9mg/dL), if not 1mmol/L (18mg/dL) higher than each of my other blood glucose meters. There have been times where Ive felt lows coming on, only to check my blood sugar using the Verio and still see a reading within range. From my personal experience, this is not a meter that I can trust. To be fair, all blood glucose meters will only be accurate to the nearest 1mmol/L (9mg/dL) of a laboratory result. Which explains why two simultaneous blood glucose checks will likely produce two different results. Most blood glucose meters must have a Mean Absolute Relative Distance (MARD) within 15 to 20 per cent of laboratory results. This standard deems these devices a reliable indicator of blood glucose levels and safe to dose insulin from. Which blood glucose meter can I trust? I conducted my own experiment of sorts Continue reading >>

2016 Blood Glucose Meter Comparisons

2016 Blood Glucose Meter Comparisons

Choose Your Blood Glucose Meter Wisely! These days, there is lots of emphasis on accuracy, particularly when it comes to continuous glucose monitors (and their ability to match blood glucose values) and insulin pumps (and their ability to deliver doses with extreme precision). But let’s not forget about that trusty, dusty blood glucose meter that has been a staple of diabetes management. Why is meter accuracy so important? For those who take rapid-acting insulin to cover meals and “correct” out-of-range blood sugar readings, accurate readings are necessary for determining the right dose. Inaccurate readings can lead to over- or under-dosing, which can produce dangerously high or low blood sugar results. An inaccurate meter can also cause a person to treat hypoglycemia inappropriately (if the meter reads too low) or miss the need for treatment (if the meter reads too high). And finally, with so many people using CGM systems, proper calibration is a must. The more accurate the fingerstick readings, the better the CGM will perform. Of course, no meter will provide accurate results if the user fails to use proper technique. That means: Making sure the finger (or other test area) is clean Using the test strips prior to their expiration date Keep the strips sealed in their bottle to prevent exposure to light and humidity Applying enough blood to fill the test strip completely. Never exposing the strips to extreme hot or cold temperatures. Coding the meter (if required) Our team believes that meters should be within 10% of lab values to be considered accurate. One of the more important things you can do to ensure accurate results is to choose the right meter. Blood glucose meters vary widely in terms of accuracy. Accuracy is determined by comparing measurements obtained Continue reading >>

Accuracy Evaluation Of Five Blood Glucose Monitoring Systems Obtained From The Pharmacy: A European Multicenter Study With 453 Subjects

Accuracy Evaluation Of Five Blood Glucose Monitoring Systems Obtained From The Pharmacy: A European Multicenter Study With 453 Subjects

Go to: Abstract This multicenter study was conducted to evaluate the performance of five recently introduced blood glucose (BG) monitoring (BGM) devices under daily routine conditions in comparison with the YSI (Yellow Springs, OH) 2300 Stat Plus glucose analyzer. Five hundred one diabetes patients with experience in self-monitoring of BG were randomized to use three of five different BGM devices (FreeStyle Lite® [Abbott Diabetes Care Inc., Alameda, CA], FreeStyle Freedom Lite [Abbott Diabetes Care], OneTouch® UltraEasy® [LifeScan Inc., Milpitas, CA], Accu-Chek® Aviva [Roche Diagnostics, Mannheim, Germany], and Contour® [Bayer Vital GmbH, Leverkusen, Germany]) in a daily routine setting. All devices and strips were purchased from local regular distribution sources (pharmacies, four strip lots per device). The patients performed the finger prick and the glucose measurement on their own. In parallel, a healthcare professional performed the glucose assessment with the reference method (YSI 2300 Stat Plus). The primary objective was the comparison of the mean absolute relative differences (MARD). Secondary objectives were compliance with the International Organization for Standardization (ISO) accuracy criteria under these routine conditions and Clarke and Parkes Error Grid analyses. MARD ranged from 4.9% (FreeStyle Lite) to 9.7% (OneTouch UltraEasy). The ISO 15197:2003 requirements were fulfilled by the FreeStyle Lite (98.8%), FreeStyle Freedom Lite (97.5%), and Accu-Chek Aviva (97.0%), but not by the Contour (92.4%) and OneTouch UltraEasy (91.1%). The number of values in Zone A of the Clarke Error Grid analysis was highest for the FreeStyle Lite (98.8%) and lowest for the OneTouch Ultra Easy (90.4%). FreeStyle Lite, FreeStyle Freedom Lite, and Accu-Chek Aviva perform Continue reading >>

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