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Mortality Rate Of Type 2 Diabetes Australia

Mortality Trends Among People With Type 1 And Type 2 Diabetes In Australia: 1997–2010

Mortality Trends Among People With Type 1 And Type 2 Diabetes In Australia: 1997–2010

OBJECTIVE With improvements in cardiovascular disease (CVD) rates among people with diabetes, mortality rates may also be changing. However, these trends may be influenced by coding practices of CVD-related deaths on death certificates. We analyzed trends of mortality over 13 years in people with diabetes and quantified the potential misclassification of CVD mortality according to current coding methods. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS A total of 1,136,617 Australians with diabetes registered on the National Diabetes Services Scheme between 1997 and 2010 were linked to the National Death Index. Excess mortality relative to the Australian population was reported as standardized mortality ratios (SMRs). Potential misclassification of CVD mortality was determined by coding CVD according to underlying cause of death (COD) and then after consideration of both the underlying and other causes listed in part I of the death certificate. RESULTS For type 1 diabetes, the SMR decreased in males from 4.20 in 1997 to 3.08 in 2010 (Ptrend < 0.001) and from 3.92 to 3.46 in females (Ptrend < 0.01). For type 2 diabetes, the SMR decreased in males from 1.40 to 1.21 (Ptrend < 0.001) and from 1.56 to 1.22 in females (Ptrend < 0.001). CVD deaths decreased from 35.6 to 31.2% and from 31.5 to 27.2% in males and females with type 1 diabetes, respectively (Ptrend < 0.001 for both sexes). For type 2 diabetes, CVD decreased from 44.5 to 29.2% in males and from 45.5 to 31.6% in females (Ptrend < 0.001 for both sexes). Using traditional coding methods, ∼38 and 26% of CVD deaths are underestimated in type 1 diabetes and type 2 diabetes, respectively. CONCLUSIONS All-cause and CVD mortality has decreased in diabetes. However, the total CVD mortality burden is underestimated when only underlying COD is c Continue reading >>

Deaths Among People With Diabetes In Australia, 20092014

Deaths Among People With Diabetes In Australia, 20092014

Enter the email address where you would like the PDF sent. This address will not be used for any other purpose. This report uses linked data to provide a more complete understanding of deaths among people with diagnosed diabetes. It highlights that death rates for people with diabetes are almost double those of other Australians and that people with diabetes are more likely to die prematurely. Between 2009 and 2014, death rates fell by 20% for people with type 1 diabetes but rose by 10% for those with type 2 diabetes. Death rates among people with diabetes increased with increasing socioeconomic disadvantage Age-adjusted death rates for people with diabetes are almost double those of other Australians Among people with type 2 diabetes, the highest death rates were in Remote and very remote areas Death rates fell by 20% for those with type 1 diabetes but rose by 10% for those with type 2 diabetes from 2009 to 2014 3.7 Cause-specific mortality by age group 4.7 Cause-specific mortality for those aged 85 and over Continue reading >>

3303.0 - Causes Of Death, Australia, 2013

3303.0 - Causes Of Death, Australia, 2013

+ Leading Causes of Death Diabetes mellitus is a chronic metabolic condition where glucose levels are too high within the bloodstream. This is due to insulin, a hormone that controls blood glucose levels, no longer being produced or not being produced in sufficient amounts by the body (Diabetes Australia). According to the Australian Health Survey 2011-12, 4.6% of persons aged 2 years and over (999,000 people) had some type of diabetes (excluding persons with gestational diabetes). This included 0.6% of persons with Type 1 diabetes and 3.9% of persons with Type 2 diabetes. Diabetes mellitus (E10-E14) was the sixth leading underlying cause of death of Australians in 2013, accounting for 4,328 or 2.9% of all deaths. The sex ratio for deaths due to diabetes was 113 male deaths per 100 female deaths. Type 1 and Type 2 Diabetes are the two main types of diabetes mellitus. Type 2 Diabetes has links to both genetic and lifestyle factors, whereas Type 1 Diabetes is not a lifestyle disease (Diabetes Australia). Over a 10 year time frame Type 2 Diabetes has increased by 37.5% as an underlying cause of death, rising from 1,428 deaths in 2004 to 1,964 in 2013. This is in contrast to Type 1 Diabetes which showed an 11.3% decrease in the same period, declining from 364 deaths in 2004 to 323 deaths in 2013. Table 2.3 shows the breakdown of deaths due to Type 1 Diabetes, Type 2 Diabetes, and Diabetes mellitus in total over a ten year time frame. (c) Type 1 Diabetes: E10 Insulin dependent diabetes mellitus. (d) Type 2 Diabetes: E11 Non-insulin dependent diabetes mellitus. (e) Total Diabetes: E10, E11; E12: Malnutrition related diabetes mellitus; E13: Other specified diabetes mellitus; E14: Unspecified diabetes mellitus. In 2013, for all deaths assigned an underlying cause of Type 2 Diab Continue reading >>

Healthstats Nsw Diabetes Deaths By Type Of Cause Of Death

Healthstats Nsw Diabetes Deaths By Type Of Cause Of Death

The term 'diabetes-related death' is used in HealthStats NSW to refer to deaths where diabetes was recorded as the underlying cause of death, or where diabetes was recorded as an associated cause of death and the underlying cause of death was one of the commonly recognised diabetes complications. An underlying cause of death is often called a 'principal' cause and an associated cause 'contributing'. The common complications of diabetes included in the definition of diabetes-related deaths are: myocardial infarction, ischaemic heart disease, stroke or sequelae of stroke, heart failure, sudden death (cardiac arrest), peripheral vascular disease, kidney disease, hyperglycaemia and hypoglycaemia (Dixon et al. 2005). The reason for defining diabetes deaths in this way is that, more than other disorders, diabetes often causes death indirectly as it is an important risk factor for common causes of death such as heart, kidney disease and stroke. These diseases are likely to appear as the underlying cause of death which is the basis for official mortality statistics. The inclusion of deaths from diabetes as the underlying cause only would lead to a considerable underestimation of the overall mortality burden caused by diabetes (Dixon et al. 2005). This concept of 'diabetes-related deaths' is based on the definition of 'death related to diabetes' used in the United Kingdom Prospective Diabetes Study (UKPDS) since 1998. The UKPDS definition has been modified by diabetes specialists of the National Diabetes Data Working Group, associated with the Australian Institute of Health and Welfare (AIHW). The Group included additional conditions in the Australian definition. These conditions are: ischaemic heart disease, stroke or sequelae of stroke and heart failure (Dixon et al. 2005). R Continue reading >>

3303.0 - Causes Of Death, Australia, 2016

3303.0 - Causes Of Death, Australia, 2016

Footnote(s): (a) Standardised death rate. Deaths per 100,000 of estimated mid-year population. See Glossary for further information. (b) All causes of death data from 2006 onward are subject to a revisions process - once data for a reference year are 'final', they are no longer revised. Affected data in this table are: 2007-2013 (final), 2014 (revised), 2015-2016 (preliminary). See Explanatory Notes 55-58. See also Causes of Death Revisions, 2012 and 2013 (Technical Note) in Causes of Death, Australia, 2014 (cat. no. 3303.0). (c) The age-standardised death rates for 2012-2015 presented in this table have been recalculated using 2016-census-based population estimates. As a result, these rates may differ from those previously published. (d) Deaths registered on Norfolk Island from 1 July 2016 are included in this publication for the first time, see Explanatory Notes 12-15. Source(s): Standardised death rates for Diabetes (E10-E14) in Australia, per 100,000, 2007-2016 (a)(b)(c)(d)-Standardised death rates for Diabetes Mellitus (E10-E14) in Australia, per 100,000, 2007-2016 Footnote(s): a) This graph presents deaths for which Diabetes (E10-E14) is the underlying cause of death. The underlying cause of death refers to the disease or injury which initiated the train of morbid events leading directly to death. (b) Associated causes of death are all causes listed on the death certificate other than the underlying cause of death. (c) The associated causes listed are based on the WHO tabulation of leading causes. See Explanatory Notes 35-37 for further information. Groupings of deaths coded to Chapter XVIII: Symptoms, signs and abnormal clinical laboratory findings, not elsewhere classified (R00-R99) are not included in analysis, due to the unspecific nature of these causes. (d) Continue reading >>

Diabetes In Australia

Diabetes In Australia

Diabetes is the epidemic of the 21st century and the biggest challenge confronting Australia’s health system. 280 Australians develop diabetes every day. That’s one person every five minutes Around 1.7 million Australians have diabetes. This includes all types of diagnosed diabetes (1.2 million known and registered) as well as silent, undiagnosed type 2 diabetes (up to 500,000 estimated) More than 100,000 Australians have developed diabetes in the past year For every person diagnosed with diabetes there is usually a family member or carer who also ‘lives with diabetes’ every day in a support role. This means that an estimated 2.4 million Australians are affected by diabetes every day Total annual cost impact of diabetes in Australia estimated at $14.6 billion Blindness Diabetes is the leading cause of preventable blindness in Australia. (Source) There are currently around 72,000 people in Australia with diabetic retinopathy, with approximately 3 in 5 experiencing poor sight. (Source) Diabetic retinopathy occurs in over 15 per cent of Australians with diabetes. (Source) The total indirect cost of vision loss associated with diabetic macular oedema in Australia is estimated to be $2.07 billion per annum. This is more than $28,000 per person with diabetic macular oedema. (Source) Amputations There are more than 4,400 amputations every year in Australia as a result of diabetes. (Source) In 2005, more than 1000 people with diabetes died as a direct result of foot ulcers and lower limb wounds – around 8% of all diabetes related deaths. (Source) Every year there are 10,000 hospital admissions in Australia for diabetes-related foot ulcers in Australia – many of these end with people having a limb, or part of a limb, amputated. (Source) Experts estimate diabetic foot Continue reading >>

Age At Type 2 Diabetes Diagnosis Influences Mortality Risk

Age At Type 2 Diabetes Diagnosis Influences Mortality Risk

Age at Type 2 Diabetes Diagnosis Influences Mortality Risk Being younger when diagnosed with type 2 diabetes is associated with an increased risk of all-cause and cardiovascular disease (CVD) mortality compared with being diagnosed at a later stage in life, a large Australian cohort study has shown. "Evidence is accumulating to suggest that earlier onset of type 2 diabetes is associated with an increased risk of complications and comorbidities compared with later onset, and that the development and progression of complications might be more aggressive in those with earlier onset," say the authors, led by Lili Huo, MD, of the Baker Heart and Diabetes Institute in Melbourne, Australia. "Early and aggressive risk factor management is warranted for individuals with young-onset type 2 diabetes," they conclude. The research was published online February 22 in Diabetologia by Huo and colleagues. Greater Risk of Noncancer Death With Younger Age at Diagnosis Type 2 diabetes was considered a disease largely confined to older people, but the global epidemic of obesity and overweight in almost all countries has seen diagnoses rocket in young adults, adolescents, and even younger children. Diabetes rates are increasing substantially in younger adults aged 20 to 45 years, which means there is a steadily growing pool of patients with type 2 diabetes exposed to the disease for a longer period in their lives. The researchers analyzed data on 743 709 Australians diagnosed with type 2 diabetes between 1997 and 2011 from the National Diabetes Services Scheme. The sample represented approximately 90% of all Australians diagnosed with type 2 diabetes over the study interval. Mortality was determined using data from the National Death Index. The median age at diagnosis was 59 years and 115 3 Continue reading >>

Mortality Trends Among People With Type 1 And Type 2 Diabetes In Australia: 1997-2010.

Mortality Trends Among People With Type 1 And Type 2 Diabetes In Australia: 1997-2010.

Abstract OBJECTIVE: With improvements in cardiovascular disease (CVD) rates among people with diabetes, mortality rates may also be changing. However, these trends may be influenced by coding practices of CVD-related deaths on death certificates. We analyzed trends of mortality over 13 years in people with diabetes and quantified the potential misclassification of CVD mortality according to current coding methods. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: A total of 1,136,617 Australians with diabetes registered on the National Diabetes Services Scheme between 1997 and 2010 were linked to the National Death Index. Excess mortality relative to the Australian population was reported as standardized mortality ratios (SMRs). Potential misclassification of CVD mortality was determined by coding CVD according to underlying cause of death (COD) and then after consideration of both the underlying and other causes listed in part I of the death certificate. RESULTS: For type 1 diabetes, the SMR decreased in males from 4.20 in 1997 to 3.08 in 2010 (Ptrend < 0.001) and from 3.92 to 3.46 in females (Ptrend < 0.01). For type 2 diabetes, the SMR decreased in males from 1.40 to 1.21 (Ptrend < 0.001) and from 1.56 to 1.22 in females (Ptrend < 0.001). CVD deaths decreased from 35.6 to 31.2% and from 31.5 to 27.2% in males and females with type 1 diabetes, respectively (Ptrend < 0.001 for both sexes). For type 2 diabetes, CVD decreased from 44.5 to 29.2% in males and from 45.5 to 31.6% in females (Ptrend < 0.001 for both sexes). Using traditional coding methods, ∼38 and 26% of CVD deaths are underestimated in type 1 diabetes and type 2 diabetes, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: All-cause and CVD mortality has decreased in diabetes. However, the total CVD mortality burden is underestimated when only underl Continue reading >>

Deaths From Diabetes

Deaths From Diabetes

Diabetes contributed to 10% of all deaths in 2015 (that is over 16,400 deaths), according to the AIHW National Mortality Database. Diabetes was the underlying cause of death in around 4,700 deaths (28% of diabetes deaths). It was an associated cause of death in a further 11,800 deaths (72% of diabetes deaths). Diabetes is far more likely to be listed as an associated cause of death. This is because it is often not diabetes itself that leads directly to death but one of its complications that will be listed as the underlying cause of death on the death certificate. When diabetes was examined as an associated cause of death, the conditions most commonly listed as the underlying cause of death were cancer, coronary heart disease and stroke. Where diabetes was listed as the underlying and/or associated cause of death: 5% were due to type 1 diabetes (800 deaths) 55% were due to type 2 diabetes (9,000 deaths) 41% were due to other diabetes (6,700 deaths). Diabetes death rates have remained relatively stable over the last two to three decades, both where diabetes is the underlying cause of death and where it is the underlying and/or associated cause of death: On average, diabetes was the underlying cause of death in around 3,200 deaths per year between 1985 and 2015, equating to death rates of 17–22 deaths per 100,000 population for males and 13–15 per 100,000 for females (see data). On average, diabetes was the underlying and/or associated cause of death in around 12,700 deaths per year between 1997 and 2015, equating to death rates of 67–78 per 100,000 for males and 41–49 per 100,000 for females (Figure 1). Figure 1: Trends in diabetes deaths (underlying and/or associated cause), by sex, 1997–2015 Note: Age-standardised to the 2001 Australian Standard Population. A Continue reading >>

Department Of Health | 4.4 Diabetes

Department Of Health | 4.4 Diabetes

National physical activity recommendations for older Australians: Discussion Document The National Ageing Research Institute was commissioned by The Department of Health and Ageing to review the evidence and develop physical activity recommendations for older people. The prevalence of Type 2 diabetes rises with age (Figure 4.3), with prevalence rates being highest among 65-74 year old men and women aged 75 years and over (Australian Institute of Health and Welfare 2002). In 2004-05, almost 700,000 people (3.5% of the population, excluding those with gestational diabetes) had medically diagnosed diabetes mellitus), similar to the 2001 NHS age standardised figures (3.0%) (Australian Bureau of Statistics 2006). A further 56,300 people reported high blood or urine sugar levels, but had not been formally diagnosed. As many cases remain undetected, these prevalence rates are likely underestimate the true prevalence of these conditions. The majority of people with diabetes had Type 2 diabetes(83%), whilst 13% reported Type 1 diabetes and 4% reported diabetes but did not know which type. Among those aged 65 years and over with diabetes, 27% also had one or more circulatory problem. Prevalence tends to be higher amongst those from CLDB groups, although data collection methods limits accurate information on rates other than across broad population groups (Thow and Waters 2005) . The latest edition of Australias Health (Australian Institute of Health and Welfare 2004) reports higher mortality rates for migrants (apart from those from the UK and Ireland) and more reporting diabetes (35%), with incidence more common in those from the South Pacific Islands, Southern Europe, the Middle East, North Africa and Southern Asia. Type 2 diabetes prevalence is particularly high amongst Indig Continue reading >>

How Australians Die: Cause #5 – Diabetes

How Australians Die: Cause #5 – Diabetes

This is the final in the How Australians Die series that focuses on the country’s top five causes of death and how we can drive down rates of these illnesses. Previous series articles were on heart diseases and stroke, cancers, dementia and chronic lower respiratory diseases. Diabetes is rapidly emerging as a leading cause of death among Australians. It is also a leading cause of heart attacks, strokes, amputations, kidney failure, depression, dementia and severe infections – all of which themselves contribute to premature death. It never used to be this way. Thirty years ago, around 250,000 Australians had diabetes. Today that figure is around two million. Around the world in 2013, more than five million people between the ages of 20 and 79 died from diabetes, accounting for 8.4% of deaths among people in this age group. This translates to one death due to diabetes every six seconds. Tragically, nearly half of these were in people under 60. These figures likely underestimate the major role of diabetes in death as it frequently goes unreported as a cause of death. One study showed that only 35% to 40% of people with diabetes who died had the disease listed on their death certificate, while only about 10% to 15% had diabetes listed as the underlying cause of death. Which type of diabetes is worst? Diabetes is characterised by higher than normal levels of glucose in the blood, caused by having insufficient insulin production or function to keep glucose levels under control. This can come about if the immune system inadvertently destroys the insulin producing cells of the pancreas. This is called type 1 diabetes. It can occur at any age, but is most common in children and young adults. Ectopic fat – fat that accumulates outside the typical stores underneath your skin Continue reading >>

Impact Of Age At Diagnosis And Duration Of Type 2 Diabetes On Mortality In Australia 19972011

Impact Of Age At Diagnosis And Duration Of Type 2 Diabetes On Mortality In Australia 19972011

, Volume 61, Issue5 , pp 10551063 | Cite as Impact of age at diagnosis and duration of type 2 diabetes on mortality in Australia 19972011 Current evidence suggests that type 2 diabetes may have a greater impact on those with earlier diagnosis (longer duration of disease), but data are limited. We examined the effect of age at diagnosis of type 2 diabetes on the risk of all-cause and cause-specific mortality over 15years. The data of 743,709 Australians with type 2 diabetes who were registered on the National Diabetes Services Scheme (NDSS) between 1997 and 2011 were examined. Mortality data were derived by linking the NDSS to the National Death Index. All-cause mortality and mortality due to cardiovascular disease (CVD), cancer and all other causes were identified. Poisson regression was used to model mortality rates by sex, current age, age at diagnosis, diabetes duration and calendar time. The median age at registration on the NDSS was 60.2years (interquartile range [IQR] 50.969.5) and the median follow-up was 7.2years (IQR 3.411.3). The median age at diagnosis was 58.6years (IQR 49.467.9). A total of 115,363 deaths occurred during 7.20 million person-years of follow-up. During the first 1.8years after diabetes diagnosis, rates of all-cause and cancer mortality declined and CVD mortality was constant. All mortality rates increased exponentially with age. An earlier diagnosis of type 2 diabetes (longer duration of disease) was associated with a higher risk of all-cause mortality, primarily driven by CVD mortality. A 10year earlier diagnosis (equivalent to 10years longer duration of diabetes) was associated with a 1.21.3 times increased risk of all-cause mortality and about 1.6 times increased risk of CVD mortality. The effects were similar in men and women. For mortal Continue reading >>

Diabetes Life Expectancy

Diabetes Life Expectancy

Tweet After diabetes diagnosis, many type 1 and type 2 diabetics worry about their life expectancy. Death is never a pleasant subject but it's human nature to want to know 'how long can I expect to live'. There is no hard and fast answer to the question of ‘how long can I expect to live’ as a number of factors influence one’s life expectancy. How soon diabetes was diagnosed, the progress of diabetic complications and whether one has other existing conditions will all contribute to one’s life expectancy - regardless of whether the person in question has type 1 or type 2 diabetes. How long can people with diabetes expect to live? Diabetes UK estimates in its report, Diabetes in the UK 2010: Key Statistics on Diabetes[5], that the life expectancy of someone with type 2 diabetes is likely to be reduced, as a result of the condition, by up to 10 years. People with type 1 diabetes have traditionally lived shorter lives, with life expectancy having been quoted as being reduced by over 20 years. However, improvement in diabetes care in recent decades indicates that people with type 1 diabetes are now living significantly longer. Results of a 30 year study by the University of Pittsburgh, published in 2012, noted that people with type 1 diabetes born after 1965 had a life expectancy of 69 years.[76] How does diabetic life expectancy compare with people in general? The Office for National Statistics estimates life expectancy amongst new births to be: 77 years for males 81 years for females. Amongst those who are currently 65 years old, the average man can expect to live until 83 years old and the average woman to live until 85 years old. What causes a shorter life expectancy in diabetics? Higher blood sugars over a period of time allow diabetic complications to set in, su Continue reading >>

Understanding Diabetes Mortality In Australia

Understanding Diabetes Mortality In Australia

WHAT IS DIABETES? Diabetes mellitus is a chronic metabolic condition where glucose levels are too high within the bloodstream. This is due to insulin, a hormone that controls blood glucose levels, no longer being produced or not being produced in sufficient amounts by the body (Diabetes Australia). According to the National Health Survey 2014-15, 5.1% of the Australian population (1.2 million people) had some type of diabetes (excluding persons with gestational diabetes). Type I diabetes affects approximately 0.7% of the population and is an autoimmune disease. Type II diabetes affects around 4.4% of the population and has links to both genetic and lifestyle factors (Diabetes Australia). Currently there is no cure for diabetes, but it can be managed successfully. Despite this, diabetes can lead to many complications which cause or contribute to a person's death. It is referenced on many death certificates, and depending on a range of factors can be assigned either as an underlying or associated cause of death. Understanding mortality associated with diabetes is therefore quite complex and can be examined in a number of different ways. This article presents two different ways of tabulating information on diabetes mortality that both give an insight into the impact of this disease. Information is also provided on diabetes deaths of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people. DIABETES AS AN UNDERLYING CAUSE OF DEATH The traditional way of tabulating causes of death is by underlying cause. Underlying causes of death are based on the single disease or condition that starts the morbid train of events leading to death. Tabulating causes of death by underlying cause ensures that each death is assigned a single cause and is counted only once in tabulations. However, it does no Continue reading >>

Deaths Among People With Diabetes In Australia 2009–2014

Deaths Among People With Diabetes In Australia 2009–2014

The Australian Institute of Health and Welfare (AIHW) has released this report which highlights that death rates for people with diabetes are almost double those of other Australians and that people with diabetes are more likely to die prematurely. Between 2009 and 2014, death rates fell by 20 per cent for people with type 1 diabetes but rose by 10 per cent for those with type 2 diabetes. Diabetes and its complications are major causes of illness, disability and death in Australia. People with diabetes are more likely to die prematurely than people without diabetes. This report examines the 156,000 deaths that occurred between 2009 and 2014 among 1.3 million Australians with diagnosed type 1 and type 2 diabetes. Specifically, data from the National Diabetes Services Scheme and the National Death Index were combined to look at causes of death and death rates for people with diabetes compared with the general population. Creating a comprehensive picture of diabetes-related deaths is important for population-based prevention strategies and could help to improve care for all people with diabetes. Death rates for people with diabetes almost double that of other Australians Compared with the Australian population, death rates for people with diabetes were nearly twice as high for those with type 1 diabetes in 2012-2014, and 1.6 times as high for those with type 2 diabetes in 2014. This higher mortality was apparent across sex, age, socioeconomic status and remoteness (for type 2 diabetes only) groups. The disparity in death rates between people with diabetes and the general population was highest at younger ages-death rates were 4.5 times as high for people aged under 45 with type 1 diabetes and almost 6 times as high for those with type 2 diabetes, compared with the Australi Continue reading >>

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